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Lyr Add: Songs of The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare

Jim Dixon 11 Sep 18 - 10:04 PM
Jim Dixon 29 Aug 18 - 08:47 PM
Jim Dixon 29 Aug 18 - 02:52 PM
Jim Dixon 28 Aug 18 - 03:27 PM
Jim Dixon 18 Aug 18 - 06:18 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 18 - 07:33 PM
Jim Dixon 16 Aug 18 - 11:32 AM
Jim Dixon 09 Aug 18 - 08:51 PM
Jim Dixon 07 Aug 18 - 10:14 PM
Jim Dixon 05 Aug 18 - 10:56 AM
Jim Dixon 04 Aug 18 - 06:31 PM
Jim Dixon 03 Aug 18 - 11:37 PM
Jim Dixon 03 Aug 18 - 08:39 PM
Jim Dixon 16 Jul 18 - 03:39 PM
Jim Dixon 16 Jul 18 - 01:17 PM
Jim Dixon 15 Jul 18 - 01:31 PM
JennieG 13 Jul 18 - 09:33 PM
GUEST 17 Oct 15 - 04:03 PM
Jim Dixon 03 Jul 14 - 08:17 AM
Jim Dixon 03 Jul 14 - 07:35 AM
Jim Dixon 03 Jul 14 - 12:38 AM
Jim Dixon 02 Jul 14 - 12:01 AM
Artful Codger 01 Jul 14 - 02:15 AM
Artful Codger 14 Sep 11 - 08:35 PM
Jim Dixon 14 Sep 11 - 06:59 PM
Artful Codger 14 Sep 11 - 03:29 PM
Jim Dixon 14 Sep 11 - 03:11 PM
Jim Dixon 14 Sep 11 - 01:01 PM
Artful Codger 08 Sep 11 - 11:04 PM
Jim Dixon 08 Sep 11 - 11:12 AM
Jim Dixon 08 Sep 11 - 08:47 AM
Jim Dixon 07 Sep 11 - 10:08 PM
Jim Dixon 07 Sep 11 - 06:18 PM
Jim Dixon 07 Sep 11 - 12:49 AM
Jim Dixon 06 Sep 11 - 06:15 PM
Artful Codger 02 Sep 11 - 06:26 PM
Jim Dixon 02 Sep 11 - 09:51 AM
Jim Dixon 01 Sep 11 - 08:04 AM
Artful Codger 01 Sep 11 - 02:36 AM
Artful Codger 01 Sep 11 - 01:37 AM
Jim Dixon 31 Aug 11 - 11:13 PM
Artful Codger 31 Aug 11 - 06:38 PM
Jim Dixon 31 Aug 11 - 03:44 PM
Jim Dixon 31 Aug 11 - 10:49 AM
Jim Dixon 30 Aug 11 - 10:00 PM
Jim Dixon 30 Aug 11 - 07:44 PM
Jim Dixon 30 Aug 11 - 01:59 PM
Jim Dixon 30 Aug 11 - 08:22 AM
Jim Dixon 30 Aug 11 - 07:15 AM
Jim Dixon 29 Aug 11 - 08:18 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: ASK ME ANOTHER (De Sylva/Brown/Henderson)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 11 Sep 18 - 10:04 PM

You can hear this song at the Internet Archive.


ASK ME ANOTHER
Words and music by B.G. De Sylva, Lew Brown and Ray Henderson, ©1927.
As recorded by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys), 1927.

[Spoken dialog:]
—Ernest, I’d like to ask you a question.
—Well, go right ahead, Bill.
—What is the difference between a red onion and a white onion?
—Well, now, I don’t know.
—You don’t know?
—No.
—(laughs) You don’t know your onions! (laughs).
—Ask me another, Bill.
—I will.
—And listen to me. You know...

[Singing dialog:]
There’s a book of questions that’s quite a fad today.
—“Ask Me Another,” Ernie. That’s what you’re going to say.
—I’d like to ask some questions, Bill; it may be quite a task.
—I’ll bet I know the answers, so go ahead and ask.

—Well, who discovered Washington in 1492?
—Why, the Pennsylvania Railroad. Ask me another!
—Well, in the war of 1812, just what did Pershing do?
—Eighteen holes. Now, ask me another!
—What famous song begins with “’Neath the spreading chestnut tree”?
—Why, that was just “The Nut Song” from “Pimento by the Sea.”
—Well, which of us is crazy? Is it you or is it me?
—You. Ask me another, but don’t get personal.

[Spoken dialog:]
—Well, now, I’ll try not, William.
—Yes, please.

[Singing dialog:]
—You know, first the crossword puzzle was driving people mad.
—“Ask Me Another” will soon be just as bad.
—Just get a book of questions; most anyone can play.
—Though no one knows the answers, just ask them anyway.

—Well, what is square and round on top and has another shape?
—That’s easy. My Ford car. Ask me another!
—Well, who invented noodle soup, and how did he escape?
—Macaroni. Now, ask me another!
—Now, why do single fellows always lead a double life?
—Why, after they are married, why, the peas roll off their knife.
—Did Sherman say that war was his(?)?—No, no! That was his wife.
—Yeah?—Ask me another!—All right; I’ll get you yet.

[Singing together, in harmony:]
Who wrote “Madame Butterfly” and did she get his note?
Four out of five. Ask us another!
What barber wrote that ballad: “Cut Yourself a Piece of Throat”?[*]
The Barber of Seville; ask us another!
Now, where was Andrew Volstead born and can you tell me why?
Why, out in the Sahara where the weather’s always dry.
Our answers are all perfect so we lay us down and die.
That’s all there is folks; there isn’t any more.


* a reference to another Jones & Hare song: "Cut Yourself a Piece of Cake."


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Subject: Lyr Add: OPERATIC SYNCOPATION
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Aug 18 - 08:47 PM

This was a hard one to transcribe (note a couple of gaps), and I had only this one recording to go by, at the Internet Archive:


OPERATIC SYNCOPATION
Words and music by [John C?] Egan, [Alfred C?] Harriman
As recorded by Ernest Hare & Billy Jones, 1922.

I was sleeping one night at the opera
And I dreamt that the melodies
That made the old masters famous
Were written in raggy keys,
So now with your kind permission,
We will throw upon the screen
Of your minds a little song
To show you what we mean:

Let’s take a little bit of William Tell,
A pretty thing that’s hard to sing
And it always gets applause if you really do it well.
Just take one bar of that evening song.
I love that melody.
Oh, how it sings to me!
Just listen:

Oh, how I love a big opera band! (Y’ ought to hear it.)
One that plays classical music grand. (Don’t be near it.)
Gives me a feeling I can’t understand.
It goes to my brain; I’m near insane
When I hear that sweet refrain.

Come on and hear the pretty little melodies of all the old composers.
Come on; let’s go it’s only...(?); besides, we’ll see some showses.
So—Oh, I don’t want to go!—Oh, yes!—Oh, no; I said I wouldn’t go!
—But I think you’d better go.—No!

Everybody loves to hear a good song, instead of ragtime.
Everybody loves to hear grand opera ...(?)
Maybe you’ll go
To see that big show.
Oh, don’t say no.
—All right, I’ll go.

Then we’ll forth go
To see that great big opera show,
And you’ll all know
That it is some big swell affair.
Don’t stare(?)
We’ll all be there.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LITTLE PAL OF LONG AGO
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Aug 18 - 02:52 PM

LITTLE PAL OF LONG AGO
Words by Walter Hirsch & Claude Sacre; music by Harold Dixon, ©1922.
Lyrics from the sheet music found at UCLA:

1. When shadows at twilight are falling
And birds to their mates softly coo,
The night winds are whisp’ring: “I’m lonesome,”
And then I am dreaming of you.

CHORUS: For I’ll never find another
Little pal of long ago.
You remind me of my mother.
She’s the dearest pal I know.
I recall ‘twas in September
That you said you loved me so.
You forget, but I remember,
Little pal of long ago.

2. The moonlight and shadows are blending
With bright silver starlight above.
On each gentle breeze I am sending
A token, sweetheart, of my love. CHORUS

* * *
The Internet Archive has recordings by:
Billy Jones and Ernest Hare, 1923.
Henry Burr, 1924.
The Library of Congress has a recording by:
Lewis James, 1923.
Discographies indicate that another recording exists by:
Robert Bruce, 1922.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LALAWANA LULLABY (A White/R Stark)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 28 Aug 18 - 03:27 PM

LALAWANA LULLABY
Words by Allen White, music by Robert Stark, ©1921.
Lyrics from the sheet music found at Baylor University:

VERSE: When the twilight began to fade,
To his maiden an Indian played.
From his lute wild notes ascended to the summer sky.
Soon the maiden beside him came.
Lalawana he called her name.
On the evening breeze he blended soft a lullaby.

CHORUS: The sun is glowing beyond the west.
The day has gone to rest.
Lalawana, close your eyes.
Now the evening star
Sends its beam afar
To the little fire flies.
Dusky shadows come a-falling
And cover us two.
Dreamy slumber land is calling
To me and to you.
We’ll linger here in a leafy nook
Beside the silv’ry brook,
Singing drowsily along
While the whippoorwill
From the distant hill
Sends to us its plaintive song.
Let slumber bring to you
Its happy dream; I’ll watch with loving eye
While I hold you and sing to you
My Lalawana lullaby.


* * *
The Internet Archive has recordings by:
Billy Jones and Ernest Hare, 1921. They perform this “straight” (not for laughs).
Vernon Dalhart and Ernest Hare, 1921.
Charles Hart and Elliott Shaw, 1922.
YouTube has a recording by
(Nathan) Glantz and His Orchestra, 1922.
The Imperial Marimba Band (instrumental only, 1922)
Various discographies say there were also recordings by:
Ferrera and Franchini, 1922.

There is an older song called ON LALAWANA’S SHORE (“South Sea Island Love Song”) (1904).


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Subject: Lyr Add: I LIKE IT (Irving Berlin/Jones & Hare)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 18 Aug 18 - 06:18 PM

You can hear this recording at the Internet Archive:


I LIKE IT
Irving Berlin
As recorded by Billy Jones and Ernest Hare, 1921.

[BJ:] Say, Willie, how's your girl?
[EH:] Who? You mean Pearl?
[BJ:] Yeah. [EH:] Not so good at all.
[BJ:] What's wrong? [EH:] Why, she's buying' things,
Some diamond rings.
[BJ:] Well, she deserves a call.
[EH:] I'll say so, but she don't care.
She's bobbed her hair.
[BJ:] I'll bet you almost cried.
[EH:] Yes. [BJ:] Why don't you ask her please to stop?
[EH:] I did, and she replied.
[BJ:] What did she say?

[EH:] "I'm gonna do it if I like it," [Both:] and she likes it.
She took the eyebrow(?)
But she's a highbrow(?),
Now, that's true.
She wears her skirt terribly short.
[BJ:] Well, you bought her the cloth.
[EH:] I know I did, Ernie, but she didn't use every yard that I bought.
[Both:] And so she does it cause she likes it; she shouldn't like it.
[BJ:] She'll catch a cold. [EH:] It isn't pleasing to hear her sneezing
All day through. Katchoo! Katchoo!
[Both:] I knew a girl that sneezed too just that way.
I told her that, but all she had to say:
"I will do it if I like it, and I do."

[BJ:] You know, uh, you're a scream.
[EH:] Why? [BJ:] Now, what I mean
Is to let a girl command.
[EH:] Well, that may be so,
But you don't know
That love is oh so grand.
[BJ:] Ha-ha! Why, you're just a rube.
[EH:] Who? I'm no boob.
I called her yesterday.
[BJ:] Great! Now that's the stuff.
[EH:] And I threw some bluff.
[BJ:] What did she have to say?

[Both:] "I'm gonna do it if I like it, and I like it."
Why, we'll just tell her
That we'll compel her
To obey.
But she just ... a chance.
[BJ:] She has you in a trance,
And when you're wed, I'll bet that she will be wearing the trousers.
[EH:] But she can do it, Ernest, if she likes it. [BJ:] Ah, but you don't like it.
[EH:] Who said I don't? [Both:] When we're in love how we forgive all ... we trust;
We lap it up. A-ha, a-ha!
We are slaves to girls, and here's the proof:
If they should ask us to jump off the roof,
We're gonna do it if we like it, and we do.

I guess a lot of you who've heard this song
Will say it's awful; you may not be wrong,
But we just sing it 'cause we like it, and we do, do, do, do, doodle-oodle-oo.
Now wouldn't you?


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Subject: Lyr Add: I LIKE IT (Irving Berlin)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 18 - 07:33 PM

Lyrics from the sheet music at Baylor University:


I LIKE IT
Words and music by Irving Berlin, ©1921.

1. Mary Greene, seventeen, Mother's only child—
Mother's cross just because Mary's running wild—
Sits and spoons afternoons with the boy next door.
Mother cries: "You mustn't do it" and Mary starts to roar:

CHORUS: I'm gonna do it if I like it, and I like it.
I'll let him hold me, though you scold me when I'm through.
I hate to make Mother and Dad so terribly mad,
But there are times when it's good to be bad.
I'm gonna hold hands if I like it, and I like it.
A little squeezing is so pleasing when you're blue,
And since the boy next door first realized
I'd let him kiss me, well you'll be surprised.
I'm gonna do it if I like it, and I do.

2. Mary's beau worries so, more and more each day.
Mary flirts, and it hurts more than he can say.
She enjoys vamping boys with her roguish eyes.
When her beau says: "Please don't do it," she looks at him and cries: CHORUS

* * *
The Internet Archive has recordings by:
Marion Harris, 1920—but her recording has the title I'M GONNA DO IT IF I LIKE IT.
Billy Jones and Ernest Hare, 1921—but they sing almost entirely different lyrics than the above. See below.
All Star Trio and Their Orchestra, 1921—an instrumental medley with ALL BY MYSELF.


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Subject: Lyr Add: HAPPY-GO-LUCKY DAYS (Wilson/Brennan)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 16 Aug 18 - 11:32 AM

Lyrics from the sheet music at York University:

HAPPY-GO-LUCKY DAYS
Words and music by Al Wilson and James A. Brennan, ©1925.

VERSE: Sometimes it seems to me
The scheme of things is wrong.
What's the use of growing up and then
Just to wish you were a kid again?
And if I had my way, take this tip from me:
All our troubles would burst like bubbles.
A kid I'd always be.

CHORUS: Back in those happy-go-lucky days,
Down by the old swimmin' pool,
Happy-go-lucky days
When we used to go to school,
Remember how you'd wave your hand.
The teacher'd say "stand".
When she'd ask you to spell
"C-A-T spells dog," you'd stand right up and yell:
"Hey!" Then you'd have reading, too.
You knew ev'ry word
And a lot of other words that the teacher never heard.
Ev'ry question in school that teacher asked, you always knew,
'Cause the smartest kid in school had the desk in front of you.
I'd love to live always
In those happy-go-lucky days.

PATTER: At the birthday parties, gee, the games were rough!
We played "puss in the corner," and "blind man's bluff."
They hit me in the puss, and I'm telling you
That I laid in the corner for an hour or two.
"Chewing the string" was a game I couldn't miss.
Ev'ry boy and girl that played was sure to get a kiss.
When it came my turn to play, I didn't get a thing,
'Cause I got excited and swallowed the string.
Then they said that ev'ry kid in the place
Should see who could make the funniest face.
They gave me the prize and I began to bawl,
Because I hadn't been playing at all.

[To the tune of the last 4 lines of the chorus:]
How they grabbed for the cake! Nobody waited like they should,
But the seven pieces I got all tasted mighty good.
I'd love to live always
In those happy-go-lucky days.

* * *
The Internet Archive has recordings by
1. The Duncan Sisters, whose picture appears on the above sheet music.
2. Jones and Hare—who didn't use the name "Happiness Boys" this time.


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Subject: Lyr Add: EDDIE LEONARD BLUES (V & E Stanton)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 09 Aug 18 - 08:51 PM

From the sheet music at Mississippi State University:


EDDIE LEONARD BLUES
Words and music by Val and Ernie Stanton, ©1922.

1. I am haunted by a tune
Warbled by a ragtime coon.
Ev'ry time I hear it, I am simply wild the whole day long.
In his satins, he's so neat!
Lawdy, how he shakes his feet!
Although I love to see him dance, I'd rather hear him sing a song
Just like that—

CHORUS: Ida, oh, lovin' Ida, won't you sing it again, sing it again?
Ida, please play that haunting refrain, wonderful strain.
When you sing those roly-boly eyes,
That's when you begin to tantalize.
Sweetness, sweetness, oh boy, that's paradise!
Eddie, you are beloved as a minstrel man, best in the land.
You sing those songs like nobody can, for you understand,
I'm tired of hearing songs about the pale moonshine,
Songs of dear old Dixieland and mammy mine,
So sing me Ida, I've got the Eddie Leonard blues.

2. All the songs we learned to play,
Sang them while they had their day,
But like winter, spring and fall, they pass along without regret.
There's one tune that seems to cling,
Enticing folks to dance and sing,
A melody that's come to stay and sway, I'll say the one best bet,
That's dear old— CHORUS


You can hear Jones & Hare sing this song at the The Internet Archive. They sing only the first verse and chorus, and interpolate a bit of "Ida, sweet as apple cider."

Eddie Leonard was a white vaudevillian performer and songwriter who frequently performed in blackface. Some of his songs were:

I Want to Go Back to the Land of Cotton
Ida, Sweet as Apple Cider
Lyna
Mandy
Molasses Candy
Roly Boly Eyes
Sweetness


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Subject: Lyr Add: ALL SHE'D SAY WAS "UMH HUM"
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Aug 18 - 10:14 PM

Lyrics from the sheet music at Mississippi State University:


ALL SHE'D SAY WAS "UMH HUM"
"Van and Shenck's terrific hit in the fourteenth edition of Ziegfeld Follies"
Words and music by King Zany, Mac Emery, [Gus] Van and [Joe] Shenck; ©1920.

1. I never cared for birds or flowers or buzzing of the bees
    Until today, until today.
I never cared for movie stars or lovesick melodies
    Until today, until today.
I met someone who
Thrilled me through and through.
I'll confess I met my Waterloo.

CHORUS 1: Like a sweet cooin' dove,
I'm just bubbling with love,
    Umh-hum, umh-hum.
For my sweet baby girl
Sets my brain in a whirl,
    Umh-hum, umh-hum.
Oh, her beautiful eyes
And her wonderful smile
Have me hypnotized.
Oh, she's driving me wild.
When I patted her hand,
Why, she thought it was grand,
    Umh-hum, umh-hum.
Then I started to sing
'Bout a cute wedding ring,
    Umh-hum, umh-hum.
I told her of my dream about a bungalow.
I felt myself a-slippin' when she said: "Let's go."
I just fainted away
When I heard her say:
    "Umh-hum, umh-hum."

2. I always loved my home and swore that I would never roam,
    Until today, until today.
And ev'ry night at eight o'clock, my mother tucked me in my cot
    To stay, until today.
Mister Cupid's dart
Pierced my lonely heart.
Single life and I just had to part.

CHORUS 2: Oh, I'm all out of breath.
I'm just tickled to death,
    Umh-hum, umh-hum.
For today is the day
That I took her away,
    Umh-hum, umh-hum.
As we walked down the aisle,
It was just like a dream.
She was chuck full of smiles
When I called her my queen.

Oh, the parson was grand
When he joined hand in hand,
    Umh-hum, umh-hum.
Ev'rything that he said,
She just nodded her head:
    "Umh-hum, umh-hum."
We started on our honeymoon just side by side.
I pressed her little hand and then I softly sighed:
"Are you sleepy, my dear?"
Then she cuddled up near:
    "Umh-hum, umh-hum."


You can hear Jones & Hare's recording at the Internet Archive. They stick pretty close to the lyrics given above, but the part in italics is omitted and replaced with a short instrumental break.


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Subject: Lyr Add: OH! HOW I LOVE MY DARLING (Leslie/Woods)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 05 Aug 18 - 10:56 AM

OH! HOW I LOVE MY DARLING
Words, Edgar Leslie; music, Harry Woods. ©1924.

VERSE 1. I heard a crowd at the Cake Eater's Ball
Talk of the high cost of loving.
One fellow said: "My expenses are small.
I never spend money when I'm with my honey."

CHORUS 1: I kiss her once.
I kiss her twice.
Oh, how I love my darling!
I stop and then
I start again.
That satisfies my darling.
We go out dancing and she ruins my feet,
But when she whispers: "Dear, supposin' we eat?"
I'm right on deck.
She pays the check.*
Oh, how I love my darling!

CHORUS 2: I kiss her once.
I kiss her twice.
Oh, how I love my darling!
In her coupé
'Most ev'ry day
I ride beside my darling.
She goes out speeding and I can't make her stop,
But ever since the night she knocked down a cop,
I'm out on bail.
She's still in jail.
Oh, how I love my darling!

VERSE 2. Christmas means presents, and some fellows hide
When girlies hang up their stockings.
I told my sweetie that Santy Claus died.
She cried for two hours, wanted to send flowers.

CHORUS 3: I kiss her once.
I kiss her twice.
Oh, how I love my darling!
I light her pa's
Big fat cigars,
Then blow smoke at my darling.
She's very heavy and she heard her friends state
That horseback riding would reduce her in weight.
She took one ride.
The poor horse died.
Oh, how I love my darling!

CHORUS 4: I kiss her once.
I kiss her twice.
Oh, how I love my darling!
Her money shows
Down in her hose,
That's why I love my darling.
I needed ten and went to her for a touch.
I looked and found she didn't have quite that much.
She gave me four,
Owes me six more.
Oh, how I love my darling!

* * *
SOURCES:

Chorus 1 was recorded by Carl Fenton and His Orchestra. Jones and Hare are said to be among the vocalists on this recording, but the arrangement is not in their characteristic style.

The first 3 lines of each verse can be seen in a sample page of sheet music for sale at eBay.

Chorus 2 can be heard in a recording by The Ambassadors. It also has this couplet which seems to be part of a chorus:
She has a form and figure that's so divine,
Looks like an engine on the B&O Line.

But the most helpful in putting it all together was this video of a piano roll by Pete Wendling. It has lyrics printed along the right margin, although they are hard to read.

* British vocalists substitute this couplet: "I say we will./She pays the bill."


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Subject: Lyr Add: MAMMA LOVES PAPA, PAPA LOVES MAMMA
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 04 Aug 18 - 06:31 PM

From the sheet music at University of Maine:

MAMMA LOVES PAPA; PAPA LOVES MAMMA
Words and music by Cliff Friend and Abel Baer, ©1923.

1. Oh me, oh my, what a life I lead now!
Nothing to do but love.
That's all I'm thinking of.
Ding-dong, sweet song! Glad I took that little vow.
Married? Yes!
I'll confess
It's a "wow" and how!

CHORUS 1: 'Cause Mamma loves Papa; Papa loves Mamma.
Ev'rything's dandy, sweet as can be.
Nothing to hurry, nothing to worry me.
I'm so contented.
There's a good reason, mighty good reason:
Mamma lies squeezin'; Papa does too.
Nothing can break us; nothing can make us blue.
We've got a bungalow and, oh, what a time we have! Such wonderful bliss!
Spooning, crooning, sweet honeymooning, and the secret is this:
People like us, we never do fuss
We've always got something better to do,

'Cause Mamma loves Papa; Papa loves Mamma too.

2. Sunday, Monday, ev'ry day we make love.
That's all we do; what's more,
That's all we're looking for.
Happy, happy, that's the word that made us one.
Rain or shine,
All the time,
Gee, but we have fun!

CHORUS 2: 'Cause Mamma loves Papa; Papa loves Mamma.
Ev'rything's dandy, sweet as can be.
Nothing to hurry, nothing to worry me.
I'm so contented.
There's a good reason, mighty good reason:
Mamma lies squeezin'; Papa does too.
Nothing can break us; nothing can make us blue.
I'm here to say that ev'ry day is a gay one filled with wonderful bliss.
Here's good news: I'm through with the blues. It's true; the secret is this:
Mamma says "yes" and Papa says "yes"
And people who "yes" are happy, I guess,

'Cause Mamma loves Papa, Papa loves Mamma too.

* * *
The Happiness Boys (Jones and Hare) recorded this song, but the sound quality of the recording at YouTube is so poor I would have a tough time transcribing it. It seems they have altered the lyrics quite a bit, compared to the sheet music.


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Subject: Lyr Add: I DON'T WANT TO GET MARRIED (I'M HAVING..
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Aug 18 - 11:37 PM

I DON'T WANT TO GET MARRIED (I'M HAVING TOO MUCH FUN)
Words and music by Myrtle Boland, James A Brennan, & William Jerome, ©1924.

I. Lyrics from the sheet music at Indiana Historical Society:

1. I passed a church today when I heard the strains of Lohengrin,
And so I wandered in
While the wedding bells were ringing,
Choir singing.
Then when all was still I could hear them when they said: "I do."
That happy pair
Standing there
Just thrilled me through and through.

CHORUS 1: But I don't want to get married; I'm having too much fun.
I don't want to be bothered with any certain one.
Why let them get serious? I know how it would end.
I'd only get a husband, but I'd lose a darn good friend.
First he's telling the world you're the light of his young life,
But you know well that light's gone out when he says: "Meet the wife."
Now married men are nice; that's true,
But not the one you're married to.
I don't want to get married; I'm having too much fun.

2. Last night I made a call on a married couple that I know.
They're wed five years or so,
But I've never seen them scrappy.
They seem happy
With their kiddies playing around, it was a real love-nest.
Now surely this
Must be bliss.
I really was impressed.

CHORUS 2: But I don't want to get married; I'm having too much fun.
I don't want to be bothered with any certain one.
What's the use of battling with a husband ev'ry night?
Say, I can join the army any time I want to fight.
I have plenty of boyfriends; I love them all the same.
To marry one and leave the rest would be an awful shame.
So I'll stay single for their sake
And give them all an even break.
I don't want to get married; I'm having too much fun.

II. As recorded by Billy Murray and Ed Smalle, 1925. I have used a dash to indicate a change of speaker.

SPOKEN: Say, Bill: I was thinking of you this morning.
— Yes? Well, what turned your thoughts my way, Eddie?
— Well, I passed a church today when I heard that good old wedding song.
— Another poor sap gone wrong!
That sweet refrain means ball and chain.
— But I got a thrill, and I think, Bill, that's just the life for you.
— I'm not a dunce; I tired it once; I'll tell the world I am through.

CHORUS 1: I don't want to get married; I'm having too much fun.
I don't want to be bothered with any single one.
— Oh, come on, Bill; be serious; 'twould be better in the end.
— No, I'd only get a wife and then I'd lose a darn good friend.
— Now you have plenty of girlfriends; don't you like 'em? – Sure, I do.
— Then why not marry one? — Well, what would the other forty do?
I'll stay single for their sake
And give them all an even break.
— Oh, you don't want to get married? – No, I'm having too much fun.

SPOKEN: — No kidding, Bill: do you really know why people get married?
— Well, most of the time a woman marries a man just to get even,
But if I need a loudspeaker, I'll buy one.
— You know that nine marriages out of ten are only accidents.
— Well, take it from me: I've seen some terrible accidents.
— Yes, but say for instance you get sick. Oh, boy! That's when a wife is wonderful.
Why, half the time you don't need a doctor.
— You're right; no doctor can take the heart out of you like a woman can.
— Well, in spite of your kidding, I still think that marriage is a wonderful thing.
You know, I can't forget that little scene this morning. Just picture, Bill—

Here comes the bride,
The groom by her side.
— Look at the poor sap; it looks as though he were trying to hide.
— Ah, she looks so happy there at the altar rail!
— Of course she's happy; she's landed him; from now on, he's in jail.
Gee, whiz, I'm glad I'm free!
No wedding bells for —

CHORUS 2: I don't want to get married; I'm having too much fun.
— So you hate girls? – No, I like 'em, but I like a lot, not one.
What's the use of battling with friend wifey every night?
Why, I can join the army any time I want to fight.
— You're wrong; some folks get along nicely; why, I know a man and wife
Who've only had one argument in all their married life.
— Yes, that started when they first met,
And gosh! It isn't finished yet.
I don't want to get married; I'm having too much fun.

III. As sung by the Happiness Boys (Jones and Hare)

We don't want to get married; we're having too much fun.
We just couldn't be bothered with any certain one.
What's the use of battling with friend wifey ev'ry night?
Say, we can join the army any time we want to fight.
We have plenty of girlfriends; we love them all it's true,
But if we marry one, what would the other forty do?
So we'll stay single for their sake
And give them all an even break.
We don't want to get married; we're having too much fun.


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Subject: Lyr Add: I WOULD RATHER BE ALONE IN THE SOUTH
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Aug 18 - 08:39 PM

Lyrics below are taken from the sheet music, which can be seen at York University.

You can hear the Happiness Boys (Jones and Hare) sing this song at the Internet Archive. As usual, they make a few small changes in the lyrics so that it works as a dialog, and they add some patter, which I have not notated.


I WOULD RATHER BE ALONE IN THE SOUTH
Words and music by Norman J. Vause, ©1925.

1. I'm Dixie bound
When payday comes around.
Don't try to stop me now.
Straight as a dart
Into Dixie's heart—
I can't be satisfied anywhere else somehow.

CHORUS: I would rather, very much rather, be alone in the south
Than blue and down in the mouth
Where the crowds and lights are all the sights to see;
And I would sooner be a communer with the birds and the bees.
That's why I state, I can hardly wait for that choo-choo train.
I've got a mammy there, a sweetie there, a little Ford runabout;
But if I had no one beneath that southern sun, I would stand up and shout
That I would rather, very much rather, be alone in the south,
For the south is home sweet home to me.

BRIDGE: Southern days, southern ways, southern cotton and corn—
Southern cooks don't need books down where I was born
Southern sighs 'neath southern skies get my brain in a whirl
Southern tunes 'neath southern moons and a kiss from my best girl (that's heaven). CHORUS

2. When shadows fall,
It's then I hear the call.
There is no place like home.
I'm here to say
I'll be here to stay.
Homeland, I'm coming now, never no more to roam.


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHERE'D YOU GET THOSE EYES?
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 16 Jul 18 - 03:39 PM

Lyrics below transcribed from the sheet music, which is viewable at the website of York University. You can compare it with the recording by The Happiness Boys at The Internet Archive.


WHERE'D YOU GET THOSE EYES?
Words and music by Walter Donaldson, ©1926.

VERSE 1. Who's that baby that I see
All dolled up like a Christmas tree?
Who's that, what's that, coming down my way?
What's her name? Bet it's Rose,
'Cause she's sweet as the rose that grows.
I'd like to go right up to her and say:

CHORUS 1: Where'd you get those eyes? Where'd you get those lips?
Where'd you get those dimples, honey?
Where'd you get that smile so sunny?
Those chin, those nose, those rosy cheeks!
I'm gone, been gone, for weeks and weeks.
How'd you grow so sweet? How'd you grow so nice?
Where'd you get that new blue bonnet
With the doo-wack-a-doo-doos on it?
Please make me happy and put me wise:
Where'd you get those great big eyes?

VERSE 2. I've been watching carefully.
You're the one that appeals to me.
Maybe someday I'll appeal to you.
Seems I've lost my appetite.
I just can't sleep a wink at night,
So please don't keep me guessing like you do.

CHORUS 2: Where'd you get those eyes? Where'd you get those lips?
Where'd you get those what's-this, honey,
Makes me feel so, oh, so funny?
Don't eat, can't eat, can't sleep at night.
Those charms, those arms, that hold me tight!
Where'd you learn to hug? Where'd you learn to kiss?
Ev'ry time you kiss me, sister,
On my lips, I find a blister.
You've got me dizzy; I'm hypnotized.
Where'd you get those great big eyes?


[Jones and Hare stick pretty close to the lyrics in the sheet music, but they change a few pronouns: "I/me" changes to "we/us." In some cases, lines that were addressed to the woman turn into a dialog between the two singers about the woman; thus "you" changes to "she" or "her" and "I/me" changes to "you."


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Subject: Lyr Add: SMILE A LITTLE BIT
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 16 Jul 18 - 01:17 PM

My transcription from the recording at The Internet Archive:


SMILE A LITTLE BIT
Words by Moe Schenck; music by Bob Morton & Peggy Shelvin, ©1925.
As recorded by the Happiness Boys (Billy Jones & Ernest Hare)

VERSE 1: —Tell me: why are you feeling blue today, pal?
—Ev'rything I do just seems to go wrong.
Wish you do have something to make me gay, pal.
—Well, I do; just you keep on singing this song:

CHORUS 1: Smile away; don't be blue.
—Well, that's easier to say than do.
—Just smile a little bit; smile a little bit; smile.
—Well, suppose you are blue.
Tell me, Ernie, just what you would do.
—I'd smile a little bit; smile a little bit; smile. (Go ahead and smile.)
—I believe you're sincere when you try to make me smile.
—If a friend doesn't cheer, then he isn't worth your while.
—I've been wrong all the day.
—Greater men than you have been that way,
So smile a little bit; smile a little bit; smile.

SPOKEN: Say, Bill, speaking of smiles, do you remember the other day when we were introduced to the president? Did you notice how he smiled at me?
—Yes, Ernest; when I first saw you, I pretty nearly went into hysterics.

VERSE 2: —Smiling is the best thing for blues and trouble.
—I've been told that smiles would chase them away.
—After rain, the sunshine is always brighter.
—Doctors say a smile makes the heart feel lighter.

CHORUS 2: —Smile away. —Smile away.
—Yes, and all your cares will fade away.
Just smile a little bit; smile a little bit; smile.
You'll lose blues. —Troubles, too.
—Yes, and ev'rything I say is true.
Just smile a little bit; smile a little bit; smile.
—If in doubt, you'll find out that a smile will pull you through.
—Well, you're down but not out; smile and be as good as new.
No delay! —I'll start today.
—Follow my advice and learn to say:
"Smile a little bit; smile a little bit; smile."

CHORUS 3: Smile away like a duck(?).
If your wife is always at the cluck(?),
Just smile a little bit; smile a little bit; smile.
—If she buys clothes from France
While you're wearing patches on your trousers,*
Smile a little bit; smile a little bit; smile.
—If she phones all her friends to come up and have a spread,
And she hands your cigars out to Billy, Jack, and Fred,
And the next day you find you can't even buy a loaf of bread,
Just smile a little bit; smile a little bit; smile.


A catalog entry from a library that holds the sheet music gave these lines:
First Line of Song: Smiling is the best thing to do when lonesome.
First Line of Chorus: Smile away, ev'ry day, and you'll find your cares will fade away.
These lines don't occur in the Happiness Boys' recording, but they do fit the meter, so I assume they simply omitted or changed this verse and chorus.

* Trousers: a joking substitute for the expected word "pants" (rhymes with "France") suggesting "pants" would have been considered vulgar.


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Subject: Lyr Add: OH! EVA (AIN'T YOU COMING OUT TO-NIGHT?)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 15 Jul 18 - 01:31 PM

I started by copying the following lyrics, which are said to come from the sheet music, from a scholarly website called Uncle Tom's Cabin and American Culture, where there is collected all sorts of material referencing "Uncle Tom's Cabin." However, except for the spoken prologue, apparently invented by Jones and Hare, I doubt there is any connection between the Eva of the song and Little Eva, the character in the novel.

Then I compared that text to the singing of Jones and Hare, found at the Internet Archive. I transcribed the spoken part, and described other differences in footnotes. I also followed my own preferences regarding spelling, punctuation and formatting.


OH! EVA (AIN'T YOU COMING OUT TO-NIGHT?)
Words by Grant Clarke & Edgar Leslie, music by Harry Warren, ©1924
As recorded by the Happiness Boys (Billy Jones & Ernest Hare)

SPOKEN PATTER:
—Step right this way, ladies and gentlemen. We are presenting this afternoon the famous Uncle Tom's Cabin Troupe. Step closer and I'll introduce to you the leading characters in the play. First, let me present Simon Legree, the famous villain.
—Throw him a bone!
—This, ladies and gentlemen, is Liza. She crosses the ice.
—She looks like a cold proposition.
—Let me introduce to you now the celebrated Uncle Tom. Who in this intelligent audience does not know Uncle Tom?
—Why, he played cornet in the parade this mornin'!
—Last but not least, ladies and gentlemen, let me draw your attention to Little Eva. Little Eva!
—Yes, she's little, and a little wrinkled, too.
—Get ready now, and while you are buying your tickets, the Happiness Boys will sing the latest popular song, "Oh! Eva."

VERSE 1: Eva was a garden rose,
'Way down where the Swanee flows,
And a half a dozen beaux
Loved this pretty maid.
Eva's uncle would get sore,
Chase the boys from the door,
But when he would sleep and snore,
They would serenade.

CHORUS 1: Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! Ain't yer comin' out tonight?
Better pack your things and flap your wings, a bride all dressed in white.
Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! There's a honeymoon in sight.
In a one-horse shay, we'll drive away from Uncle Tom tonight.
Bow wow! Bow wow! Those bloodhounds want to bite.
If they want meat, they'll have to eat Uncle Tom tonight.

VERSE 2: Chickens know the chorus now.
So does ev'ry village cow.
Farmers while they rake and plow
Croon it soft and low.
Someone heard the kitchen cat
Teaching it to a rat.
It's been heard in ev'ry flat
On the radio.

CHORUS 2: Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! I have loved you all my life,
And I'd call on you each night or two, but I can't dodge my wife.
Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! She is built just like a sack.
Both her teeth are lost, her eyes are crossed, and tears roll down her back.
Ding dong! Ding dong! I hear you married twice,
So take the air 'cause I don't care for shopworn merchandise.

CHORUS 3: Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! If you want to eat tonight,
There's some oats nearby to satisfy your horse's appetite.
Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! I'll be thirsty by and by,
And at twelve o'clock I'll take the rock from Uncle Tommy's rye.
Tee hee! Tee hee! Ain't I the silly chap?
When I tell jokes to lady folks, they roll right off my lap.[1]


CHORUS 4: Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! Won't you slip on something, dear?
If we must elope, slip on some soap and slide down on your ear.
Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! We must steal away in peace.
If you have no bags, just pack your rags in Uncle Tom's valise.[2]

Bing bang! Bing bang! Those shots were meant to kill.
When bullets fly, I run them by just like they're standing still.

CHORUS 5: Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! In a little two-room shack,
You supply the grub; I'll steal a tub so you can wash my back.
Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! Get a few Virginia hams.
When you're leaving there, bring me a pair of Uncle Tom's pajams.
Jingle! Jingle! I'm broke most of the time.
When Tom's at rest, feel in his vest and throw me down a dime.[1]

CHORUS 6: Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! There's a married gal next door,
And the story goes she hung out clothes upon the night before.
Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! Now her husband's grievin' hard,
'Cause today he found his wife's nightgown in Uncle Tom's backyard.
Bip bop! Bip bop! There was an awful fight!
That guy hit him with so much vim that Uncle Tom turned white.[1]



1. Jones and Hare omit choruses 3, 5, and 6.

2. In verse 4, Jones and Hare substitute these lines for lines 3 and 4:
Oh, Eva! Oh, Eva! Won't you let me hold you tight?
I love those eyes, I love those nose, but I hate those appetite.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs of The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: JennieG
Date: 13 Jul 18 - 09:33 PM

Thanks for the lyrics to "On my ukulele", Jim.....I think my ukulele group needs this song, cheesy though it is!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs of The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Oct 15 - 04:03 PM

It's Sunkist kisses the sun, as in the citrus brand.


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Subject: Lyr Add: YOU CAN'T WALK BACK FROM AN AEROPLANE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Jul 14 - 08:17 AM

My transcription from the recording at YouTube:

YOU CAN'T WALK BACK FROM AN AEROPLANE (SO WHAT ARE YOU GIRLS GONNA DO?)
As sung by Billy Jones and Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) on Columbia 1141-D, recorded Sept. 28, 1927.

1. Bill, we've had it mighty tough.
Girls have fooled us long enough,
And we've let 'em go on and deceive us. (They sure have fooled us!)
They want food and then besides,
They want nice long auto rides,
But try and kiss 'em and they up and leave us.
After they get all they want, they walk home; they don't care,
But, girls, we soon will take you out a-riding through the air—

CHORUS 1: And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?
When all those future Lucky Lindys want some squeezin',
A girl who has good sense will have to listen to reason,
For there's air, air ev'rywhere,
And not a drop to walk on; it's true.
Gee, what a time the married men will have, I declare!
Their wives won't have a chance to have them watched way up there,
And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?

2. Girlies, take this good advice.
Think it over once or twice.
Keep it in your mind and don't forget it. (It's good advice, girls.)
Now, start today and just prepare
For your joy-ride through the air.
If you don't, you surely will regret it.
Now, when you're miles high in the sky, the fellows are the kings,
So if you want to be sweet angels, start in growing wings—

CHORUS 2: For you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?
For as you climb up to the sky, you'll have to start in spooning.
Oh, me, oh, my! He'll make you sigh for real honeymooning,
For there's air, air ev'rywhere,
And not a drop to walk on; it's true;
And if a girl should fear that anything might go wrong,
For safety's sake, you'd better take a preacher along,
For you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?

CHORUS 3: And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?
When he begins to loop-the-loop and starts to do a glider,
There's not a single girl who'll have a conscience to guide her,
For there's air (air), air (air) ev'rywhere,
And not a drop to walk on; it's true.
I know some girls will scream: "You stop, or out I will go!"
But if he doesn't stop, she'll stay when she looks below,
And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?


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Subject: Lyr Add: YOU CAN'T WALK BACK FROM AN AEROPLANE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Jul 14 - 07:35 AM

From the sheet music at The National Library of Australia:

YOU CAN'T WALK BACK FROM AN AEROPLANE (SO WHAT ARE YOU GIRLS GONNA DO?)
Words and music by Irving Bibo and William B. Friedlander, ©1927.

1. [GIRL:] When a maiden seeks romance,
There are times she takes a chance,
Even though her boyfriend loves her truly.
I've had my experience,
Therefore as a consequence,
I know boys are bound to get unruly.
Walking back from auto rides, I'll say I've had my share,
But soon the boys will take us out a-riding through the air—

CHORUS: And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are we girls gonna do?
When all these future Lucky Lindys want some squeezin',
A girl who has good sense will have to listen to reason,
For there's air, air ev'rywhere,
And not a drop to walk on; it's true.
Oh, what a time the married men will have, I declare!
Their wives won't have a chance to have them watched way up there,
And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are we girls gonna do?

2. [BOY:] Boys, we've had it mighty tough.
Girls have fooled us long enough,
And we've let them go on and deceive us.
They want food and then besides,
They want nice long auto rides,
But just try and kiss them and they leave us.
After they get all they want, they walk home; they don't care,
But, girls, we soon will take you out a-riding through the air—

CHORUS: And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?
Now just suppose he takes you flying o'er some ocean.
If he suggests a kiss, you'll have to second the motion,
For there's air, air ev'rywhere,
And not a drop to walk on; it's true.
Why, even boys who never in their whole lives were rude
Are bound to be affected by the high altitude,
And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?

A lot of girls will scream: "You stop or out I will go,"
But if he doesn't stop, she'll stay when she looks below,
'Cause you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?


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Subject: Lyr Add: LAST NIGHT ON THE BACK PORCH
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Jul 14 - 12:38 AM

My transcription from the recording at YouTube. This song illustrates how adept Jones & Hare were at turning a song that had been written for one singer into a dialogue-duet.


LAST NIGHT ON THE BACK PORCH (I LOVED HER BEST OF ALL)
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare, (Okeh 4948-B, recorded 8/23/23)

[SPOKEN:][EH:] Hey, Bill, did I ever tell you this?
[BJ:] No. What is it?

[SUNG:][EH:] There's the girl I'm wild about.
[BJ:] Gee, I'm glad I found it out.
[EH:] I'm crazy. [BJ:] You're crazy, without a doubt.
[EH:] I'm just wild about her eyes.
[BJ:] I bet she's wild about your lies.
[EH:] Well she's my honey; she's my pet.
[BJ:] But y'ain't met nothin' yet.

[EH:] I love her in the morning. [BJ:] Do you love her at night?
[EH:] I love her; yes, I love her when the stars are shining bright.
[BJ:] Please tell me: do you love her in the springtime and the fall?
[EH:] Uh-huh, but last night on the back porch I loved her best of all.

[EH:] Ev'ry time that she's alone—
[BJ:] Do you call her on the phone?
[EH:] Uh-huh. I hurry. [BJ:] You worry; you worry so.
[EH:] I'm afraid that I might see
Someone there in place of me.
[BJ:] If you lost her, what woe!
[EH:] I love her, oh, oh, oh!

[EH:] I love her in the morning. [BJ:] Do you love her at night?
[EH:] The first time that I met her, it was true love at first sight.
[BJ:] Please tell me: do you love her in the springtime and the fall?
[EH:] Uh-huh, but last night in the parlor, I loved her best of all.

[SPOKEN][EH:] Ah, Bill, she's a lovely girl.
[BJ:] I should say so, Ernest. Those eyes!
[EH:] Uh-huh!
[BJ:] Those nose!
[EH:] Yes, yes, Bill.
[BJ:] Those lips!
[EH:] Yes, yes.
[BJ:] Those hair!
[EH:] Yes, yes, and those teeth, Bill, they are beautiful.
[BJ:] Yes, the both of them! On the back porch—
[EH:] Nevertheless, Bill—

[SUNG][BOTH:] I love her in the morning and I love her at night.
I love her; yes, I love her when the stars are shining bright.
I love her in the springtime and I love her in the fall,
But last night on the back porch, I loved her best of all.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LAST NIGHT ON THE BACK PORCH
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 02 Jul 14 - 12:01 AM

From the sheet music at the Maine Music Box:


LAST NIGHT ON THE BACK PORCH
Words and music by Lew Brown and Carl Schraubstader, ©1923.

1. There's a girl I'm wild about.
Ev'ry time I take her out,
I hug her; I squeeze her; I tease her so;
And we always can be found
Where there's no one else around.
Do we cuddle? Do we pet?
You ain't heard nothin' yet!

Chorus 1: I love her in the morning and I love her at night.
I love her; yes, I love her when the stars are shining bright.
I love her in the springtime and I love her in the fall,
But last night on the back porch I loved her best of all.

2. Ev'ry time that she's alone,
When I call her on the phone,
I hurry; I scurry; I worry so.
I'm afraid that I might see
Someone there in place of me.
If I lost her, what a blow!
I love her. Oh! Oh! Oh!

Chorus 2a: I love her in the morning and I love her at night.
The first time that I met her it was true love at first sight.
I love her in the springtime and I love her in the fall,
But last night in the parlor I loved her best of all.

Chorus 2b: I loved her in a Packard and a Locomobile.
I loved her in a Buick while she held onto the wheel.
I loved her in a flivver and we ran into a wall,
But last night in a taxi I loved her best of all.

Chorus 3: I loved her in a rainstorm and I loved her in snow.
I loved her in a blizzard when zero was below.
I loved her in the sunshine underneath her parasol,
But last night with some moonshine I loved her best of all.

Chorus 4: From Monday until Sunday, oh, I sure am some sheik.
I love her; yes, I love her ev'ry day that's in the week.
Though seven days of heaven ain't enough, I won't get sore,
'Cause next year when it's leap year, I'll love her one day more.

Chorus 5: I loved her at breakfast and I loved her at tea.
I loved her; yes, I loved her when she took her lunch with me.
I loved her after supper when I paid her folks a call,
But last night in between time, I loved her best of all.

Chorus 6: I loved her in a sailboat and a big birch canoe.
I loved her on a tugboat and an ocean liner too.
I loved her in a schooner and I loved her in a yawl,
But last night in a rowboat I loved her best of all.

Chorus 7: I loved her in the classroom in Latin and Greek.
I loved her in Italian; that's a language she can't speak.
I loved her on the campus and in the dining hall,
But last night at the junior prom I loved her best of all.

Chorus 8: [spoken patter] Oh, I love-a Marianna when she play da grand piana.
She's-a push-a; she's-a pump-a wid her feet.
Got a kiss like taste-a fine-a, joost-a like Italian wine-a.
She's-a nice-a; she's-a fat-a; she's-a sweet.
Oh, she call-a me her papa; when she hug-a, she no stop-a.
Got-a eyes-a so-a big-a, no-a small,
But last night she get-a colic when she eat-a lot of garlic,
[Sung:] And I love her best of all.


YouTube has recordings by these artists (and more):
Alma Cogan (1959)
Andrews Sisters
The Carolinians (vocal by Billy Jones)
Paul Whiteman's Orchestra
Green Bros. Novelty Band
Savoy Havana Band, 1924
University Sextette, 1923
Varsity Eight/California Ramblers
The Happiness Boys
The Shannon Quartet, 1923
Pee Wee King & His Golden West Cowboys
Teresa Brewer, 1960
Carl Fenton's Orchestra, 1923
Pete Wendling (on a piano roll)


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Subject: RE: It Don't Do Nothing But Rain
From: Artful Codger
Date: 01 Jul 14 - 02:15 AM

A catchy down-country rendition of "It Don't Do Nothing But Rain" by Lew Childre:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laGENW6Vobs
This should help fill some gaps in the lyric transcription above.

For comparison, here's the version by Jones & Hare, singing under the names Billy West and Bob Thomas:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8ULFQad1t8

I also see on YouTube a version by Harry Hudson's Melody Men.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs of The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 08:35 PM

My Cutie's Due...
The Clevelanders (1926): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWZwIX-zshk
Piccadilly Revels Band (1928): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvP2WNL2Ilc
And catch this one for some fancy hoofin':
Ondřej Havelka: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bui1NgxEqJQ
How can your feet sit still?


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Subject: Lyr Add: MY CUTEY'S DUE AT TWO-TO-TWO TO-DAY
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 06:59 PM

You can see the sheet music at the Indiana Historical Society web site. (Click for a PDF.) Jones & Hare's recording can be heard on Spotify.


MY CUTEY'S DUE AT TWO-TO-TWO TO-DAY
Words and music by Leo Robin, Albert Von Tilzer, and Irving Bibo.
New York: Bibo, Bloedon, & Lang, ©1926.

I. Lyrics as given in the sheet music:

VERSE 1. Hey there, taxi, do your stuff.
I can't get there fast enough.
Take me to that train from way out west.
I'm just jumping in my shoes
'Cause there ain't no time to lose.
Got a date, one-fifty-eight, with the one that I love best.

CHORUS 1: My cutey's due at two-to-two.
She's coming through on a big choo-choo.
She's been away for months,
But I haven't cheated once.
Stayed home nights, didn't dance,
Wasn't taking any chance,
Didn't flirt, and though it hurt,
I just couldn't do my cutey dirt.
My days were blue, my nights were black,
But I just knew that she'd come back,
For I love her and she loves me and say,
Don't think there ain't no Santa Claus.
I know darn well there is because
My cutey's due at two-to-two today.

VERSE 2. No one knows how glad I am
Since I got that telegram,
Sweeter than a message from above.
Seems just like a century
Since she's been away from me,
But you bet I'm gonna get what I've kept on dreaming of.

CHORUS 2: My cutey's due at two-to-two.
She's coming through on a big choo-choo.
She's been away for months,
But I haven't cheated once.
She's very short, five foot two.
She's got bowlegs, cross-eyed too,
A girl you wouldn't think much of,
But oh, by gosh, how she can love.
My days were blue; my nights were black,
But I just knew that she'd come back,
For I love her and she loves me and say,
And when I feel her lips on mine,
I won't let go 'til half past nine.
My cutey's due at two-to-two today.

Tonight I'll disconnect my phone,
Because I want to be alone.
My cutey's due at two-to-two today.


II. Lyrics as sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys):

VERSE 1: —Listen, Ernie, I feel gay.
—Why, you're excited, I must say.
—I'm gonna meet that train from way out west.
—Way out west? —Uh-huh. —Well, what's the big idea, old boy,
Of this nervous, sniffin' joy?
—I got a date, one fifty-eight, with the one that I love best.

CHORUS 1: —I know; your cutey's due at two-to-two.
—She's comin' through on a big choo-choo.
—She's been away for months,
—And I haven't cheated once.
—You stayed home nights. —I didn't dance.
—You wasn't takin' any chance.
—I didn't flirt. —Well, I bet that hurt.
—I just couldn't do my cutey dirt.
—Your days were blue. —My nights were black.
—But soon you'll have your cutey back.
—'Cause I love her and she loves me, and, say,
—And when you press her lips divine,
—I won't let go till half-past nine.
—My cutey's due at two-to-two today.

VERSE 2: —No one knows how glad I am.
—Well, I saw that telegram.
—And it was like a message from above.
—Well, I bet you never sleep a wink.
Nights you lie awake and think.
—But you bet I'll soon forget, when I meet and greet my love.

CHORUS 2: —Your cutey's due at two-to-two.
—She's comin' through on a big choo-choo.
—You're surely feeling fine.
—You know this gal of mine.
—She's kind o' short, —About five-foot-two.
—She's got bowlegs and cross-eyed too,
A girl I wouldn't think much of.
—But oh, my gosh, how she can love!
—Your days were blue. —My nights were black.
—Don't cry; you soon will have her back.
—I love her and she loves me, and, say,
—Tonight you'll disconnect your phone,
—Because I want to be alone.
—My cutey's due at two-to-two today.

CHORUS 3: —My days were blue; my nights were black,
But I just knew that she'd come back,
For I love her and she loves me, and, say,
—Don't think there ain't no Santa Claus.
—I know darn well there is because
—My cutey's due at two-to-two today.
My cutey's due at two-to-two today.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs of The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 03:29 PM

Chester Gaylord singing "That's My Hap-Hap-Happiness": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcNZcmed7X0


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Subject: Lyr Add: PARDON ME WHILE I LAUGH
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 03:11 PM

Also transcribed from Spotify. Don't take the number of "ha"s too literally.


PARDON ME (WHILE I LAUGH)
Words by Arthur Terker and Jules Von Tilzer; Music by Billy Heagney.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) , 1925.

VERSE 1: We're going to sing a song to you; it's not a song of love.
There's not a word that speaks of mush and none 'bout stars above.
We've had enough of songs like that; I'm sure you will agree.
So here's the thing we're going to sing; it's foolish as can be:

CHORUS 1: A chorus girl hates anyone to ask her out to dine.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
A Scotsman is the first one who will buy a glass of wine.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
The chauffeurs and the traffic cops, they get along so fine,
And all the chauffeurs think the coppers really are divine.
The coppers throw them kisses when they pass before it's time.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon us while we laugh.

CHORUS 2: The alcohol sold nowadays is for external use.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
The fat girls should eat candy; it's the best way to reduce.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
The first child of a married couple brings them great delight,
But when they want to get some sleep, it cries with all its might.
Then hubby says, "You stay in bed; I'll walk with him all night."
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon us while we laugh.

PATTER: It's a silly song, Ernie.
It is crazy, isn't it?

VERSE 2: In ev'ry song you've ever heard, there's been a second verse.
We've tried to write one for this thing, but it got worse and worse.
We worked on it all summer, through the winter, spring, and fall,
And then we said, "We will not write a second verse at all."

CHORUS 3: Today the girls all love to sit at home each night and sew.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
They never ride in taxis and they hate to see a show.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
A fellow and his wife went out to have a dance or two.
He flirted with the flappers, as the fellows often do.
The wifie said, "You dance with her; I'll wait till you get through."
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon us while we laugh.

CHORUS 4: You know, Bill, I wanted to tell you about Phil Ohman.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
Sure! I was gonna tell you about Harry Reser.
Ha-ha-ha!—You know they are?—Ha-ha-ha!—Yes.—Ha-ha-ha!—Twins?
Ha-ha-ha!—They play piano and banjo?—Ha-ha-ha!—Oh yes!
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon us—Ha-ha-ha!—while we laugh.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THAT'S MY HAP-HAP-HAPPINESS
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 01:01 PM

I found this recording with Spotify:


THAT'S MY HAP-HAP-HAPPINESS
Words by Howard Johnson and Charles Tobias, music by Al Sherman.
[New York]: Irving Berlin, 1926.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

PATTER: —I have a little something I want to tell you, Bill.
—Yes?

VERSE: —Talk of happiness, real true happiness; do you know what it means?
—Some people say it's wealth,
While others say it's health.
—But there's happiness, just one happiness, I've been longing to find.
—Will you paint a picture, the kind you have in mind?

CHORUS 1: —Think of just a little town
When the evening sun goes down.
That's my hap-hap-happiness.
—Think of just a bungalow
Where the morning glories grow.
Is that your hap-hap-happiness?
—Yes. —Don't hesitate or wait; just open the gate
—And walk in with me.
Look around and oh what a home-sweet-home you will see.
—Think of someone if you can,
Saying, "Da-da, here I am."
—That's my hap-hap-happiness.

PATTER: There, Bill, that's my idea of happiness. Now, what's yours?
—Well I'll tell you:

CHORUS 2: When Gene Tunney swings his hand
And I hear his old glove land.
—Is that your hap-hap-happiness?
—And when springtime comes around,
For a baseball game I'm bound.
—Is that your hap-hap-happiness?
—The umpire starts to shout "You're safe" and "You're out,"
That thrills me, I find,
Even though the home team is one or two runs behind.
When the bags are full, it's great,
—And then Babe Ruth walks to the plate,
—That's my hap-hap-happiness.

PATTER: —That's very good, Bill, but you see, you're a bachelor, and don't get the real line on happiness. In other words, you don't know anything at all about home ties.
—Well, if that's a home tie your wife gave you for Christmas, I don't want to know anything about 'em.
—Well, listen. I'm going to give you my idea of home ties:

CHORUS 3: Ev'ry meal I sit beside
My sweet baby girl, my pride.
—Is that your hap-hap-happiness?
—Yes, she loves potatoes, the little dear.
—She shoves them in your nose and your ear.
—And that's my hap-hap-happiness.
She's full of joy, and boy,
—She breaks any toy her two eyes can see.
—When we bought a new baby grand, —she broke ev'ry key.
—When she breaks things, I'm not sore.
—You go out and buy her more.
—And that's my hap-hap-happiness.

CHORUS 4: —We two boys without a care
Entertain you folks out there.
That's our hap-hap-happiness.
Just to know the things we do
Make us feel we're pleasing you,
That's our hap-hap-happiness.
—Each one beneath the sun should know that he's done
His share while he's here,
—Spreading all around him a little sunshine and cheer.
—If we failed, at least we've tried,
But if you feel satisfied,
That's our hap-hap-happiness.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 08 Sep 11 - 11:04 PM

A few more YouTube clips for Jones and Hare songs:

With both:
I Don't Want to Get Married: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vovVivYhn8o
Oh, How I Love My Darling: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5v7dZ8RzTQ
Why Did I Kiss That Girl?: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcHhard0a88

Billy Jones solo:
Crosswords Between My Sweetie and Me: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDtXM6ac51A
Honolulu Honey (comp. 1921?) (Charles Hart & Elliott Shaw): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVt6wV4PsHE
(Crazy over) Horses: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8EW3zQJjPs
        (thread: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=140123#3219251)
In the Old Town Hall: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Iu2CfSbdug
        (thread: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=140123#3219345)
Peggy O'Neil (1921): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmk4wMQdj2k
When You and I Were Young Maggie Blues: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AG7xfexBls
[According to Wikipedia, Jones also worked under these stage names: Harry Blake, Billy Clarke, Lester George, Duncan Jones, Reese Jones, John Kelley, Dennis O'Malley, William Rees, Victor Roberts, Billy West, William West, and Carlton Williams.]

Ernest Hare solo:
All By Meself: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFIkBsq-Uc4
Down by the River (1923): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e2dw-p-g9cY
A New Kind of Man With a New Kind of Love, That's Me! (1924?): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjaMl_Lkqzs
No Wonder I'm Blue: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEqzad7TlLg
Old Pal: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEqo5P_LbXA
Satan, I'm Here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZ6jdPk22_0

And I goofed in my first post: The Hare recordings of "Hallelujah, I'm a Bum" and "The Bum Song" are of separate songs--both, I believe, written or at least heavily adapted by Haywire Mac McClintock. Above, my first link was to "The Bum Song", my "ditto" link to "Hallelujah".


To the Mudelf who blickified my first post: Many thanks, but there's a reason I usually include the link targets as visible text in messages: so people can easily copy the URLs to their own files along with the other text. Otherwise, only the target description is copied, hidden URLs all get dropped, and it's a pain for people to try to locate to the active links again. In future, please retain any visible URLs as visible text.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THERE'S NOBODY ELSE BUT YOU (L W Gilbert)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 08 Sep 11 - 11:12 AM

You can see the sheet music at Mississippi State University. (Click for a PDF.)

THERE'S NOBODY ELSE BUT YOU
Words and music by L. Wolfe Gilbert
New York: L. Wolfe Gilbert Music Corp., ©1924

1. You believe that I belong to somebody else.
Teardrops they fill your eyes.
You believe that I deceive; there's somebody else.
You're wasting tears and sighs.
Dearie, I'll always play fair.
I'm telling you on the square:

CHORUS: Honey, don't you worry, 'cause there's nobody else,
Nobody else but you.
Why should you be
Jealous of me?
Now I can see
Why we disagree.
Though we part, I cross my heart, there's nobody else.
Honest, I'm faithful and true.
I like to play
And fool around with others.
That's just my way,
Like sisters do with brothers.
Honey, don't you worry 'cause there's nobody else,
Nobody else but you.

2. Nothing makes the heart grow cold like jealousy, dear.
Won't you believe in me?
We must trust each other whether absent or near.
Then we would happy be.
If I were telling you lies,
You'd find it out in my eyes. CHORUS


YouTube has these recordings:
Bennie Krueger's Orchestra, with vocals by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (uncredited). They sing only the chorus.
The Melodist Four (instrumental)
Vincent Lopez (instrumental)


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Subject: Lyr Add: SO I TOOK THE FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 08 Sep 11 - 08:47 AM

My transcription from the recording at YouTube:


SO I TOOK THE FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS
Words, Jack Meskill. Music, Albert Gumble.
New York: Jerome H. Remick & Co., ©1923.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

VERSE 1: —Fifty thousand dollars surely is quite a lot.
—Yes, I'll say it's a lot.
Fifty more than you've got.
—I told my rich uncle I could use it someday.
—You ...(?) the old guy passed away.

CHORUS 1: —So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought I'd have a good time with the roll.
—So you took the fifty thousand dollars,
And your good time was a dollar Ingersoll.
—I wanted life insurance; the payments were not high.
—Because you looked so healthy, they thought you'd never die.
—So I took the fifty thousand dollars,
And went and bought a cuckoo for the clock.

CHORUS 2: So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought I'd take a trip to Montreal.
—So you took the fifty thousand dollars,
And didn't go to Montreal at all.
—One day I met a lady so ...(?)
—I posed her just one dollar, a kiss with you she'd share.
—So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
Oh, gee! Oh, gosh! Oh, golly! I'm in love!

VERSE 2: There are many diff'rent ways ...(?) spending dough,
—And I guess that you know
Fifty thousand or so.
—No doubt uncle left it just for some rainy day.
—But you got rash with all that cash and let it drain away.

CHORUS 3: —So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought that I'd buy something for my home.
—So you took the fifty thousand dollars,
And bought a brush to have a brush and comb.
—My wife and I went shopping to buy a costly gem.
—You jumped into a taxi, drove to the five and ten.
—So I took the fifty thousand dollars,
Then a hundred million others just like me.

CHORUS 4: So we took the fifty thousand dollars.
We thought that we would like to study Greek.
So we took the fifty thousand dollars,
And learned to sing "Bananas" in a week.
—We told the phonograph company they'd have to raise our pay.
—They admitted we worked better, and raised it right away.
So we took the dollar and a quarter.
We're better men than you are, Gunga Din.

*
I haven't seen the sheet music, but I think it's a safe bet that this recording sticks closer to it than Jones & Hare did. You can hear it at Robert's Old Schmaltz Archives:

SO I TOOK THE FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS
As sung by Robert Denning (M. J. O'Connell) on Edison Record 9262.

VERSE 1: Fifty thousand dollars, gee, it is a whole lot.
Though you've got it or not,
Still it is a whole lot.
I told my rich uncle I would use it someday,
So just to be a pal to me, he went and passed away.

CHORUS 1: So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought I'd make a big splash with that roll.
So I took the fifty thousand dollars
And bought myself a brand-new Ingersoll.
I wanted life insurance; the payments were not high.
Because I looked so healthy, they said I'd never die,
So I took the fifty thousand dollars
And went and bought myself a piece of cake.

VERSE 2: There are many ways for you to spend all your dough,
And I guess that I know
Fifty thousand or so.
No doubt Uncle left it just for some rainy day,
But I got rash with all that cash and let it drain away.

CHORUS 2: So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought I'd take a trip to Montreal.
So I took the fifty thousand dollars,
And didn't go to Montreal at all.
I met a poor gold digger; her feet were almost bare.
She said she needed shoesies; her toesies didn't care.
So I took the fifty thousand dollars
And went and bought a cuckoo for the clock.

VERSE 3: There's a politician down in our neighborhood.
He's done ev'ryone good,
Ev'ryone that he could.
Leads the life of Riley, has his own motorcar,
But he feels bad because he's had to buy his own cigars.

CHORUS 3: I took the fifty thousand dollars.
It was a lot to spend on cigarettes.
Yes, I took the fifty thousand dollars,
But think of all coupons I could get.
He said, "Get me elected; you may spend all your cash,
But after I'm elected, I'll make sure you get hash."
So I took the fifty thousand dollars
And bought the subway just to get a seat.

CHORUS 4: Yes, I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought that I would like to study Greek.
Yes, I took the fifty thousand dollars
And learned to sing "Bananas" in a week.
I went to buy an auto; you know it's quite the fad.
The clerk showed me a pink one; it didn't look so bad,
So I took the fifty thousand dollars
And bought Detroit just to get a Ford.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MAYBE (SHE'LL WRITE ME...SHE'LL PHONE ME)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 10:08 PM

From the sheet music at Mississippi State University. (Click for a PDF.)

MAYBE (SHE'LL WRITE ME, MAYBE SHE'LL 'PHONE ME)
Words, Roy Turk. Music, Ted Snyder & Fred E. Ahlert
New York: Waterson, Berlin & Snyder Co., ©1924.

1. I've got trouble, oh, what trouble!
Something happened to me!
Came home one day and I found
My sweet one wasn't around.
Haven't heard a single word about the cause of it all.
That's why I'm full of the blues,
Just waiting round for some news.

CHORUS: Maybe she'll write me. Maybe she'll phone me. Maybe she'll radio.
Went away Monday, here it is Sunday, just a long week ago.
I don't know where she went or what made her go.
One thing I know: I'm feelin' mighty worried.
Maybe she's lonesome, all by her "ownsome," longin' for who-knows-what.
Maybe she's sighin'. Maybe she's cryin'. Then again, maybe not.
I don't care what she did or where she went or why she left,
As long as she only hurries back home to me.

2. Always lonely, but I'm only
Getting what I deserve.
I should have known at the start
Someday she'd ruin my heart.
But I'm praying she is saying just what I'm saying now,
For then she'll worry and cry,
And change her mind by and by. CHORUS TWICE


YouTube has 2 versions:
Billy Jones & Ernest Hare. They stick pretty close to the sheet music, except that they change the pronouns as necessary to transform the song into a dialogue.
Ian Whitcomb and Janet Klein They sing an additional chorus which I assume is their own composition.


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Subject: Lyr Add: "MAGGIE!" "YES MA'AM!" (Moore / Tucker)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 06:18 PM

From the sheet music at The National Library of Australia:

"MAGGIE!" "YES MA'AM!" ("COME RIGHT UPSTAIRS")
Words, Leslie Moore; Music, Johnny Tucker.
New York: Clarke & Leslie Songs, ©1923

1. There's a fam'ly right next door
Wakes us up at three or four
When the daughter comes home with her beau.
First they stand outside and chin;
After that, they tiptoe in
And begin their spooning down below.
Then when all is quiet in the hall,
Down the stairs you hear her mother call:

CHORUS 1: —Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Who's with you there?
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Stop that affair.
Why does it take you so long to say goodnight?
You know I've told you always,
It ain't safe to stand in hallways.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Give him his hat.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Just leave him flat.
I forgot what Mother taught me.
That's the way your father caught me.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Come right upstairs.

2. Maggie doesn't care a bit
What the neighbors think of it.
She declares that lovin' is no crime.
Even though her sweetheart Dan
Always was a union man,
Maggie has him working overtime.
Now and then they lean against a bell.
Then the whole darn house begins to yell:

CHORUS 2: —Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Who's with you there?
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Stop that affair.
You'll wake the neighbors the way you carry on.
I'm gonna have a copper
Chase that young finale hopper.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Give him his hat.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Just leave him flat.
Give his face a darn good smacking
If he tries to be wisecracking.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Come right upstairs.

*
From the recording at YouTube

"MAGGIE!" "YES MA'AM!" ("COME RIGHT UPSTAIRS")
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) - Vocalion B 14644.

1. —Bill, I got a good idea.
Let us tell the folks right here
All about the girl who lives next door.
—Very well! Ev'ry night she's with her beau,
Spooning in the hall below
While her mother's upstairs getting sore.
Though you won't believe it, it's a fact:
This is just exactly how they act:

CHORUS 1: —Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Who's with you there?
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Stop that affair.
Five minutes more, Ma, and then we'll say goodnight.
—You know I've told you always,
It ain't safe to stand in hallways.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Give him his hat.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Please leave him flat.
—I can't do my entertaining
On the stoop because it's raining.
—Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Come right upstairs.

2. Since her father made a pile,
Now the fam'ly lives in style
In a mansion on Fifth Avenue,
And Maggie now is Marguerite.
In her heart she's just as sweet.
Tell me, what's an avenue or two?
Now her beau is of a social kind,
So her mother's voice is more refined:

CHORUS 2: —Daughter! —Mother! —Time to retire.
Daughter! —Yes, mother! —Sleep you require.
—Larry(?) is talking about the polo game.
—Don't disobey your parents
Tell him you're engaged to Clarence.
Margaret! —Mater! —Bid him adieu.
—Pater! —What, child? —I'm ...(?) you.
Then, with all her million dollars,
Ma forgets herself and hollers:
—Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Come right upstairs.

CHORUS 3: Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Please ...(?) him quick.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —You make me sick.
—Just because you're over fifty,
Don't forget I'm young and nifty.
—Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Come right upstairs.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GET 'EM IN A RUMBLE SEAT
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 12:49 AM

GET 'EM IN A RUMBLE SEAT
Words and music by Jack Marshall, Carl Lampl, and Morey Davidson.
San Francisco: Villa Morét, Inc., ©1927
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

—Ernie!
—What, Willie?

VERSE 1: Romeo met Juliet upon the balcony.
For his love affair,
He had to climb the stair;
And Antony had Cleopatra sitting on his knee,
But his sweet romance
Just put him in a trance.
Buggy ridin' always had its day,
But we've improved it; here's the latest way:
Say—

CHORUS 1: Get 'em in a rumble,
In a little rumble,
Get 'em in a rumble seat.
Girlies always crumble.
Like the bees they bumble,
Getting in a rumble seat.
Now they just cuddle up and, oh, boy, how you feel!
You sure can love 'em when you're not behind the wheel.
There's a great attraction
And lots of satisfaction,
Sitting in a rumble seat.
It's a great invention,
And for close attention,
Positively can't be beat.
Now you can love your sweetie in the corner at night,
Ah, but if you want your lovin' and you want it done right,
Just get 'em in a rumble,
In a little rumble,
Get 'em in a rumble seat.

VERSE 2: Met a boy who had a girl but ... she didn't care.
Why, he was mighty blue,
And wondered what to do.
Told me all about the girl and of his love affair.
Couldn't see at all
Just why she didn't fall.
Then I said, "Why, that is nothing new.
Once I had that very trouble too.
Say—

CHORUS 2: Get her in a rumble,
In a little rumble,
Get her in a rumble seat.
Girlies never grumble,
Even though they stumble,
Getting in a rumble seat.
She can't resist you in your little runabout.
She's got to hug you tight for fear she'll bounce right out.
You won't have to worry
If you only hurry.
Get her in a rumble seat.
Never holler, "No, sir"
When you hold her closer,
'Cause she'll find it mighty sweet.
A horsie knows his oats, but you can take it from me,
A little rumble seat sure knows its upholstery.
So get her in a rumble,
Get her in a rumble,
Get her in a rumble seat.

CHORUS 3: Pick 'em up at random.
You can always land 'em,
Sitting in a rumble seat.
If there's engine trouble,
You'll enjoy it double,
Sitting in a rumble seat.
The chauffeur fools around the motor and you smile,
'Cause you can fool around the old back seat awhile.
If you have a blow-out,
You don't have to go out.
Stay right in the rumble seat.
You can send a wire
For another tire.
Waiting for it is so sweet.
A bus may carry lots of people; that may be right,
But you can carry on much better cuddled up tight.
And ...(?)
You can get familiar
Sitting in a rumble seat.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 06:15 PM

I figured tying clothes in knots was a prank played by some of the boys on some other boys.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 02 Sep 11 - 06:26 PM

The line as I hear it is "Your clothes are full of knots and your belly's short o' beef." You might expect it to explain why the trousers in particular were difficult to pull on, but I think it's just pointing out the kids' impatience to get home to supper, so they couldn't be bothered to fuss with their clothes. (What did they do to "knot" them, tie them to branches with a double sheel bend??)

This song was their first recording release as a performing team, in 1921 on Edison records. They had been paired up the year before to sing accompaniment on a Brunswick recording, "All She'd Say Was 'Umh Hum'" (link to another recording of the song; sheet music available at the Lester S. Levy Collection). Since "Swimming Hole" is now in the public domain, I hope the sheet music has been scanned somewhere online, but I haven't found it. I'd like to find the original lyrics, hopefully written for a single singer rather than a duo.

The team was dubbed "The Happiness Boys" to accord with their sponsor, Happiness Candies. When they changed sponsors, they correspondingly changed their moniker, becoming "The Taystee Loafers" for Taystee Bread and "The Interwoven Pair" for Interwoven Socks.

Wikipedia has an interesting article on them which mentions a few other songs, such as "She's the Sweetheart of Six Other Guys" and "We Ain't Never Been to College" (a response to the hit "Collegiate", which they also recorded). Tim Gracyk wrote a good summary of the team's history.

A couple more songs which Jones recorded solo:
Crosswords Between My Sweetie and Me (1925): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDtXM6ac51A
Honolulu Honey (written in 1921?): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVt6wV4PsHE (Charles Hart & Elliott Shaw)
Peggy O'Neill (1921): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmk4wMQdj2k


Let me also plug a fun Irving Berlin song from 1920 that I ran across:
After You Get What You Want, You Don't Want It (YouTube clip; sheet music available at the Lester S. Levy Collection)
    Somebody e-mailed me the following:
      My daughter found the lyrics to a very old silly song my mother used to sing to us when we were kids. She was born in 1905. There's a phrase missing in the section under The Old Swimming Hole "New Tune" (Message_ID=3217046). It's after "Your clothes are full of knots" and the phrase is "And you have to chew beef." She explained that this meant you had to use your teeth to try to get the knots out of your clothes.

      Thanks for helping us locate my mother's song, and also my father's, The Eastern Train.

      Doris

    -Joe Offer-


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Subject: Lyr Add: DOWN AT THE OLD SWIMMING HOLE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 02 Sep 11 - 09:51 AM

YouTube has 2 versions of this song. The transcription below comes from Edison 50841-L (although I have omitted some of the patter). Emerson 10427 omits verse 2. Note there is one phrase I can't make out near the end.

DOWN AT THE OLD SWIMMING HOLE
Words and music by Al Wilson and Jim Brennan.
New York: Edward B. Marks Music Co., ©1921.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

PATTER: —Say, Ernest.
—Will?
—How do you feel?
—Oh, I don't know. Why do you ask?
—Well, the reason I asked, I thought that, uh,

VERSE 1: You look very tired and weary.
—I am. I'd like to go where I'd leave my troubles behind.
—I know a dandy place. You'll forget care as soon as you get there.
—Well, Willie, where's this place you have in mind?

CHORUS: —Come along with me. —Where to? —Down to the old swimming hole.
—Why sure! I'd like to be a kid again.
—Well, don't forget to bring along your fishin' pole.
—Could I lie beneath a tree?
—Of course! From care you're going to be free.
—Oh, boy! It's great to lie on the bank and look at the sky.
—Hot dog! And let the rest of the world go by.
—But if it gets too warm, —Why then, we'll dive right into the pool.
—I'll bet that feels nice and cool.
—Why you'll forget about home-sweet-home.
You know that bathing suits are out of style.
—Yes, just a coat of tan and a great big smile,
When you go down to the old swimming hole.

VERSE 2: —Someday is a struggle for fortune.
—Will I find that I have forgotten how to smile?
—Yes indeed! So let's hurry and forget about worry,
And we'll find that life's worthwhile.

CHORUS: Come along with me down to the old swimming hole.
Come on and be a kid again,
And don't forget to bring along your fishing pole.
Underneath a tree,
From care we're going to be free.
It's great to lie on the bank and look at the sky,
And let the rest of the world go by,
And if it gets too warm, we'll dive right into the pool.
It feels so nice and cool,
You'll forget about home-sweet-home.
Bathing suits are out of style.
Just a coat of tan and a great big smile,
When you go down to the old swimming hole.

NEW TUNE: First you take your clothes off, feeling pretty bold.
A kid sticks in his toe and hollers, "Gee, the water's cold!"
You stand around and shiver. Someone hollers with a grin,
"The last one in's a sissy," then you all dive in.
See an old bullfrog, catch him by the toe.
When he starts to holler, then you gotta let him go.
Splashing in the water till the sun begins to set.
You're hungry and you wonder if you supper's ready yet.
When you come to dress, that's when you come to grief.
Your clothes are full of knots and ....(?)
You can't get 'em on and you think you'll take a chance,
So you tie your shirt around you where you ought to wear your pants.
[Silly patter here.]
You spend the whole day gettin' a tan on your face.
At home you get a tanning in a diff'rent place,
When you go down to the old swimming hole.
Come on along!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Sep 11 - 08:04 AM

The lyrics to INDIANA LULLABY, as sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare, are posted in a separate thread--the reason being that there happen to be 2 songs with the same title, and I mistakenly transcribed the wrong one (from the sheet music) at first! Both songs are in the same thread.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 01 Sep 11 - 02:36 AM

Grrr, that's Andy Iona--I must've slipped into Iolian mode: all accidentals.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 01 Sep 11 - 01:37 AM

Have to mention a wonderful song which Billy Jones did without Hare:

Hula Lou: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_R_hi5Yydg
Lyrics by Jack Yellen, music by Milton Charles and Wayne King, 1924. I believe it was first recorded by Sophie Tucker in 1924; obviously her version is a tad different from Hare's. Also recorded by the Carolina Tar Heels (1927) and some others around the same time.

It makes an interesting contrast to this dreamy little earworm by Andy Iola:
Naughty Hula Eyes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0fvNb57nm0


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Subject: Lyr Add: OH-MY-YES! (Felix Austead)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 31 Aug 11 - 11:13 PM

You can see the sheet music at The National Library of Australia, or hear the Happiness Boys sing the song at YouTube.


OH-MY-YES! (US GIRLS* MUST HAVE OUR FUN)
Words and music by Felix Austead
Sydney: Chappell & Co., ©1924.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

1. Doctor Green told Missus Luce,
"Ride a horse and you'll reduce."
She rode four weeks, gained ten in weight,
But the poor old horse lost forty-eight.

CHORUS: Oh, my, yes, us girls* must have our fun.
Oh, my, yes, us girls* must have our fun.

2. Have you seen the girls today
As they stroll along Broadway?
The sun shines east, the sun shines west,
And shines so bright they look undressed.

3. Go in and out the windows.
Go in and out the windows.
Go in and out the windows.
We feel fine today.

4. Mister Burns was brought home dead.
"He's still warm," the neighbors said,
But Missus Burns with tears did shout:
"Hot or cold, he goes right out."

5. You should see Miss Nellie Green,
Funniest gal you've ever seen.
She's got a neck like an old smokestack,
Not as long but just as black.

6. This is the way we wash our clothes,
Wash our clothes, wash our clothes.
This is the way we wash our clothes,
Ev'ry rainy Tuesday.

7. There's a lady, eighty-three.
She lives across the street from me.
She laughs and says, "Ain't nature sweet?
I've just two teeth. I'm glad they meet."

8. Have you heard that Mary Grant
Has a job in a powder plant?
Twelve a week is all it pays,
But in powder plants you get a raise.

9. Mrs. Cohen was looking for
Apartments on the second floor.
Her husband said, "There's no bath here."
She said, "We'll only stay a year."

[* "Girls" in the original sheet music. The Happiness Boys changed "girls" to "boys." They also added verses 3 and 6 above.]

[The sheet music actually has 39 verses, but I didn't consider them worth typing.]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 31 Aug 11 - 06:38 PM

Frank Crumit: You're in Kentucky, Sure as You're Born

Thanks for finding "You Don't Like It - Not Much"; what a treat! My first exposure to the Happiness Boys was "Like A Porcupine"--one of those "slated to be learned, but not there yet" songs. Thanks for taking the time to transcribe all of these, and for providing links! Keep 'em coming.

Here are some links to Happiness Boys clips on YouTube. I'm too lazy to make blickies for them all.

Not to worry. A JoeClone has done that for you.

Ain't We Got Fun? (1921)
All By Yourself in the Moonlight (1928)
As a Porcupine Pines for Its Pork
(Down) At the Old Swimming Hole
Barney Google
Collegiate
Crazy Over Horses
Crazy Words, Crazy Tune
Cut Yourself a Piece of Cake
Don't Bring Lulu
Does the Spearmint Lose Its Flavor on the Bedpost Overnight?
ditto
Dream Daddy
The Etiquette Blues
The Farmer Took another Load Away! Hay! Hay! (written 1925) (incomplete)
A Gay Caballero
Get 'Em in a Rumble Seat
Hard-Boiled Rose
Henry's Made a Lady out of Lizzie
I've Never Seen a Straight Banana (1927)
I Miss My Swiss
ditto
I Wish I Was in Peoria
I'm Going to Bring a Watermelon to My Girl Tonight
In the Little Red Schoolhouse
In the Old Town Hall
Indiana Lullaby (1922)
It Ain't Gonna Rain No More
It Won't Be Long Now
Laff It Off
Maggie
Mamma Loves Papa (1923)
Maybe (She'll Write/Phone Me)
Mister Gallagher and Mister Shean (1922)
Oh Ja Ja
Oh-My-Yes (Us Girls Must Have Our Fun)
The Old Grey Mare
Old King Tut
ditto
On My Ukulele (Tra La La...) (1924)
She Knows Her Onions
Singing in the Bathtub
So I Took the 50 Thousand Dollars (1923)
How Do You Do?
Ten Little Fingers & Ten Little Toes (1921)
That Old Gang of Mine
That's a Lot of Bunk
There's Nobody Else but You
Twisting the Dials
The Village Blacksmith Owns the Village Now
Who Cares, Anyhow?
You Tell Her—I Stutter
ditto

-- Billy Jones solo:
Mary Lou
Yes, We Have No Bananas

-- Ernest Hare solo:
Doodle Doo Doo
I Makes Mine Myself
I Ain't Afraid of Nuttin' Dat's Alive
Hallelujah, I'm a Bum (The Bum Song; singing as "Hobo" Jack Turner)
ditto
Mindin' My Business (singing as Bob Thomas)
Silk Hi-Hat and a Gold Tipped Walking Cane (1928; as "Hobo" Jack Turner)
Waitin' for the Evenin' Mail (1923)
Yankee Doodle
[This is just a small sampling! Hare recorded with various orchestras, the California Ramblers and the Cotton Pickers; his pseudonyms include Wallace Daniels, Arthur Grant, Henry Jones, Robert Judson, Walter Lang, Walter Leslie, Roy Roberts, Bob Thomas, Bob Thompson, "Hobo" Jack Turner, and Frank Mann.]

-- Al Bernard & Ernest Hare (pre-Happiness Boys)
Cindy
In 1999 (1923)
See Old Man Moon Smile



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Subject: Lyr Add: ETIQUETTE BLUES (Gayle Grubb)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 31 Aug 11 - 03:44 PM

You can hear this at YouTube:


ETIQUETTE BLUES
Words and music by Gayle Grubb
New York: Stasny Music Corp., ©1926.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

VERSE 1: We're the guys that wrote the book on etiquette.
Yes, we know just how all your vittles should be et. (I'll say we do!)
We have writ this little book about mistakes we've saw.
Now take 'em down and don't forget that what we say is law.

CHORUS 1: Always leave your spoon right in your coffee. (Look out for your eye.)
Starting with your soup, first sound your 'A', then play The Pilgrims' Chorus.
Napkins are to catch the food that bounces off your knife,
And tuck the napkin in so it will stay underneath your double chin.
And always put both elbows on the table.
Many other pointers we could mention.
Now always gesture with your fork.
Keep your mouth full when you talk.
Thank you for your very kind attention.

CHORUS 2: When your tea is hot, just use your saucer.
Pick the punkin pie up in your hand. (Don't squeeze it.)
Never ask for anything that you can safely reach.
Read rule eighty-two; you'll understand.
Wipe your plate with bread when you have finished. (Mop up.)
Many other pointers we could mention.
Grab your glass so it won't drop,
And always finish when you stop.
Thank you for your very kind attention.

PATTER: We have some more to say on this matter.

VERSE 2: You know, we've been watching people eat for many, many years.
Oh, and the way they eat has driven us to tears. (It's simply awful.)
There's no reason you can't eat polite the same as we.
Yeah, read our book on etiquettey; it's simple as can be.

CHORUS 3: Always mix your peas with your potatoes,
And this makes eating with your knife a cinch.
You know, when somebody asks for bread, grab several pieces in your mitt
And deal 'em out like you were dealin' flinch, (bridge, poker, pinochle).
Take two toothpicks; you might sometimes drop one. (Of course!)
And many other pointers we could mention.
Put your gum beneath your plate,
And eat fast so you won't be late.
Thank you for your very kind attention.

CHORUS 4: Never cut spaghetti up in pieces.
Eat it like a chicken eatin' worms.
When you're eating cake, be sure you eat the frosting first.
Watch out for bacteria and germs.
Always laugh when nothing funny happens.
Many other pointers we could mention.
Fingerbowls are set close by,
In the event your glass runs dry.
Thank you for your very kind attention.


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Subject: Lyr Add: YOU DON'T LIKE IT—NOT MUCH
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 31 Aug 11 - 10:49 AM

YOU DON'T LIKE IT—NOT MUCH
Words and music by Ned Miller, Art Kahn and Chester Cohn
New York: Leo. Feist Inc., ©1927.


[First, here are the lyrics as they appear in the sheet music, which can be seen at the State Library of Victoria (Click for a PDF.):]


VERSE 1: Honey baby, you look so happy to me,
And I'm wondering what the reason can be.
Though you hide it somehow,
I can understand now.
What the reason is, it's so easy to see.
You show it—

CHORUS 1: When I hug you and when I squeeze you and when I please you and such,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
When I kiss you and when I tell you your lips are thrilling to touch,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
When I hold you close in my arms awhile, you love it.
You sigh and then you smile, contented.
When I press you and I caress you and you say "I love you" and such,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.

VERSE 2: Honey baby, your eyes just sparkle like dew.
There's a secret in them I wish that I knew.
Though they beg me to guess,
There's no need, I confess.
I can tell it by simply looking at you.
You show it—

CHORUS 2: When I hold you, when I enfold you, and when I scold you and such,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
When I phone you and say I'm lonely to see you only and such,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
When I whisper sweet nothings in your ear, you love it.
You smile and cuddle near, contented.
When I petcha and say, "You betcha, I'm glad I metcha," and such,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.


[And here are the lyrics as sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) at YouTube:]


VERSE 1: —Billy, Billy, you look so happy to me.
—Thank you! Ernie, Ernie, there's nothing diff'rent, you see.
—Well, what's that smile that you wear?
—Oh, that's always been there.
—Well, you can't fool me, 'cause you're as changed as can be.

CHORUS 1: —Well, I'll tell you: I've been huggin' and I've been squeezin' and kind of teasin' and such.
—Yes, and you don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
—I've been kissing and I must tell you, those lips were thrilling to touch.
—Yes, and you don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
—Not much. When I hold her up close in my arms awhile, I love it.
—I know now why you smile, contented.
—When I press her and I caress her and I tell her I love her and such,
—Then she don't like it. —No, she don't like it, not much.

VERSE 2: —Now, Billy, Billy, your eyes they sparkle like dew.
—Ernie, Ernie, that shows what loving can do.
—Well, you have sure got it bad.
—Yes, worse than I ever had.
—I can tell it by simply looking at you.

CHORUS 2: —Don't tell me; I know it. When I hold her and I enfold her, I often scold her and such.
—And she don't like it; no, she don't like it, not much.
—Not very much! When I phone her and say I'm lonely to see her only and such—
—And you don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
—No, and I call around and when lights are low, I love it.
—Her brother hangs around, all evening.
—I buy him candy and say he's dandy, but I could kill him and such.
—And you don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.

CHORUS 3: People write us, think they delight us; they boost our singing and such.
And we don't like it; no, we don't like it, not much.
They befriend us; some gifts they send us and often get us in Dutch.
And we don't like it; no, we don't like it, not much.
—Records that we make they say sell real good, so spend it.
—We hear that you can get offended.
We lose patience with our vacations; we go to Europe and such,
And we don't like it; no, we don't like it, not much.
—Not much!
—Too much!


[The Internet Archive has recordings by:
Golden Gate Orchestra
Paul Ash and His Orchestra
Harry Bidgood, with vocal by Ramon Newton
The Boston Syncopators, with vocal by Arthur Fields
Sol S. Wagner and His Orchestra, with vocal by the Brown Sisters

[YouTube has recordings by:
Jan Garber and His Orchestra
The Rhythmic Eight]


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Subject: Lyr Add: I'VE NEVER SEEN A STRAIGHT BANANA (Waite)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Aug 11 - 10:00 PM

You can hear this at YouTube:


I'VE NEVER SEEN A STRAIGHT BANANA
Words and music by Ted Waite
Melbourne : E.W. Cole, ©1926.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys), 1927.

VERSE 1: –I have seen lots of funny things in my time.
–But there's one thing you've not seen, I'd like to bet.
–What's that? I'd like to know just what I have been missing.
–Well, I'll tell you in the chorus but not yet.
–Why, now you've got me puzzled. Won't you tell me what you mean?
–The thing that's in my mind I must confess I haven't seen.

CHORUS 1: I've never... –Never what? –Never... –Never what?
–I've never seen a straight banana.
–I guess you'll admit
You've searched quite a bit.
–They're even curved when they are served in my banana split.
–I have seen them by the carloads
On the Delaware and Lackawanna.
–Have you ever, ever? –No I've never.
I've never seen a straight banana.

PATTER: –Crazy song, ain't it, Bill?
–Yes, it is.
–Ha-ha-ha!

VERSE 2: –I recall when I was in Alaska,
I have seen the sun shine twelve o'clock at night.
–Yeah? I have seen the waterfalls in old Niagara.
I confess that it's a most impressive sight.
–I'd like to see that certain thing, but if it's not to be,
We'd like to meet somebody else who saw what we can't see.

CHORUS 2: –I've never... –Never what? –Never... –Never what?
–I've never seen a straight banana.
–Though they're things I hate,
Millions I have ate.
–Well, I'll bet you've yet to see bananas that are straight.
–I have traveled far to find one.
–Yes, I heard you were in Chile and Havana.
–Still I never... –Never? Never what? –Never... –Never what?
–I've never seen a straight banana.

CHORUS 3: Well I never (never), never (never), never (never), never (never),
I've never seen a straight banana.
Once I chanced to see
A murder mystery.
The jury found the pris'ner guilty in the first degree.
All at once we heard the pris'ner
Holler out, "This is the truth, your honor,
But I've never (never), never (never), never (never), never (never),
I've never seen a straight banana."


[The Red Hot Jazz Archive also has recordings by Harry Reser and His Orchestra and Waring's Pennsylvanians .]


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Subject: Lyr Add: YOU'RE IN KENTUCKY, SURE AS YOU'RE BORN
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Aug 11 - 07:44 PM

The following lyrics are from the sheet music at IndianaHistory.org: Click for a PDF. Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) stick pretty close to the original lyrics, but they embellish the song with some new lines after the first chorus.


YOU'RE IN KENTUCKY, SURE AS YOU'RE BORN
Words and music by George A. Little, Haven Gillespie & Larry Shay
New York: Broadway Music Corporation, ©1923.

1. I've heard a lot 'bout Paradise,
But Paradise ain't half as nice
As my Kentucky home-sweet-home.
You'll sure believe just what I say
If you should ever stray some day
Down to my old Kentucky home.
It won't be hard to find
If you'll keep this on your mind:

CHORUS: When you see a field where grass is blue,
And ev'rything looks good to you,
You're in Kentucky sure as you're born.
When a million sunbeams light your way,
Says, "Come on, stranger, won't you stay?"
You're in Kentucky sure as you're born.
When the shadows creep,
You can go to sleep
On a carpet of moonbeams.
You can dream your dreams
'Neath a blanket of gleaming stars.
If you wake at dawn 'mid glist'nin' dew,
And find old Dixie kissin' you,
You're in Kentucky sure as you're born.

2. I'd surely love to fall asleep,
Let pretty dreams around me creep
Of my Kentucky home-sweet-home.
Just put me on a railroad track.
Won't need no train to take me back
To my Kentucky home-sweet-home.
If you go down there someday
Please remember what I say: CHORUS


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Subject: Lyr Add: OH, YOU CAN'T FOOL AN OLD HOSS FLY
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Aug 11 - 01:59 PM

Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys), sing a shortened version of this, with a few new lines and some patter between the verses.

From the sheet music at Indiana University:


OH, YOU CAN'T FOOL AN OLD HOSS FLY
Words & music by Blanche Franklyn. Nat Vincent, and Harry Von Tilzer.
New York: H. Von Tilzer Music Pub. Co., ©1924.

1. April fool we all learned at school. It comes but once a year.
Most ev'ry one has a lot of fun each time that day draws near.
Now, you can fool some folks sometimes, once Lincoln he did say,
But I will ne'er forget the words that I heard my old dad say:

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, you won't find feathers on a bulldog's legs.
A hen won't lay you hard-boiled eggs.
It snows but never in July.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

2. Adam Howe had a Jersey cow who had a little calf.
He named the calf Elizabeth, which made the neighbors laugh.
He asked the folks what made 'em grin. Their answer was a wow:
"You named that calf Elizabeth but it ain't that kind a cow."

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, you won't call rye-bread choc'late cake.
You can't get milk from a cow named Jake.
A Turkish bath's an alibi,
But you can't fool an old hoss fly.

EXTRA VERSES AND CHORUSES:

3. Flossie Green the village queen in autos liked to roam;
Had a mishap for a city chap, made Flossie walk back home.
She got home late; her dad got sore, and said, "Here's what to do:
Next time you go in an auto, Flo, take roller skates with you."

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, a bee won't hurt you when he's buzzin' around,
But glory hallelujah when the bee sets down!
He'll sting you where the clouds roll by.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

4. Farmer Brown came to New York town to see the Gay White Way.
He took a stroll and his bankroll passed out in just one day.
When he got home, a friend said, "Gee, I'll be you bought Grant's Tomb."
He said, "Not me. I fooled 'em, see. I bought the Hippy-Drome."

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, a mouse ran up an elephant's trunk,
But he's too wise to fool with a skunk.
Crabapples won't make pumpkin pie.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

5. A suffragette made a little bet that in this land of free,
A woman nowadays could be what any man could be.
A young man in the crowd spoke up; his answer made her wild.
Said he, "I'd like to see you be the father of a child."

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
A dog sat on the trolley track.
A car hit him an awful smack.
We'll have hot doggies by and by.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

6. Abie Fein said to Finklestein, "I passed your house today.
I saw you hug and kiss your wife. You sure can love, I'll say!"
Said Finklestein to Abie Fein: "Such funny words you speak!
I'll tell you true, the joke's on you; I ain't been home for a week!"

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, Finklestein said, "Listen to me.
If you saw your wife on Goldberg's knee—."
Said Abe, "I'd sell the darn settee!"
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly

7. Humpty Dumpty took a fall from off the wall, great Scott!
He raised a great big bumpty on his goodness-knowsy-what.
You know the reason why he fell? I'll tell you pretty quick:
His wifie caught him flirtin' and she soaked him with a brick.

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, Jack and Jill went up the hill.
They went for water but they found a still,
And that's why they came tumbling down.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

8. Doctor Small he used to call on sick folks every day.
He fell in love with a Mrs. Dove, a married woman gay.
One night he fell into a well; we heard him loudly groan.
He should have tended to the sick and let the well alone.

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Young Johnny Jones marries Sally Meek.
They plan a home, just so to speak:
A dollar down and a sheriff a week.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

9. Mary had a little lamb, which made the fellows laugh.
They made her sore because they yelled, "Oh, look at Mary's calf!"
She got so mad she got a gun and shot her lambie dead,
And now she takes her lamb to school between two hunks of bread.

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
George Washington would never tell a lie.
He chopped down the cherry tree but didn't say why.
His favorite fruit was cherry pie.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

10. Now, Percy Hare wed Peggy Clare; they fell in love at sight.
Their honeymoon they started soon and on their bridal night,
Her teeth came out; her hair came off; poor Percy said, "Oh, gee!"
When Peg took off her wooden leg, he yelled, "I married a tree!"

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
A camel goes dry for a week, I vow,
But who the H—— wants to be a camel now?
Bootleggers say we still get rye.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHY AREN'T YEZ EATIN' MORE ORANGES?
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Aug 11 - 08:22 AM

WHY AREN'T YEZ EATIN' MORE ORANGES? (FROM CAL-I-FOR-NI-AY)
Words, Lew Brown. Music, Clarence Gaskill. ©1925
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

PATTER: —Say, Ernie, you have to be a doctor in this record.
—All right, Bill.
—Say, doc!
—What is it, Bill?
—Do you think I'll live to be a hundred years old?
—Well, I don't know. Let me see, do you smoke?
—No.
—Do you drink?
—No.
—Do you stay out late at night?
—No, sir.
—Do you run around with the flappers?
—I should say not!
—Well, what in the world do you want to live to be a hundred years old for?
—Well, anyway, there's something wrong with me.
—Well, there must be if you've come to me.
—Well, there will be if I pay you.
—Do you mean that you won't pay me?
—Well, how much do I owe you, doc?
—Well now, let me see. You owe me for four visits already, and this makes five.
—Well, put it all on one bill and I'll disappoint you in a lump.
—Ha-ha-ha...! Come, Bill. Let's get into the song. All right, Dave.

VERSE 1: —Oh, tell me tell me, doctor, what can be wrong with me?
—Say, have you got a headache or water on the knee?
—Well, someone said I'm full of prunes; that's why I'm sad and blue.
—Say, here's the only remedy. —Please tell me what to do.

CHORUS 1: —Why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?
—I don't know. I'll get myself a Sunkist maiden.
—And I'll bet you'll like her orange aidin'.
Oh, the fruit of the old apple tree
Is a lot of applesauce today.
—Say, why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?

PATTER: —Say, Bill, you know my father's doing very well since his operation.
—Say, Ernie, what did the surgeon do when he operated on your father?
—Well there must be some catch in this. What does the surgeon do when he operates on my father?
—Sews your old man!
—Ha-ha-ha...!

VERSE 2: —Oh, tell me tell me, doctor, what is this pain right here?
—If you had waited one day more, you would have died, I fear.
—Well, is the case a chronic one? I'd love to know. Oh gee!
—I'll write a nice prescription, sir. —Oh, doctor, let me see!

CHORUS 2: —Why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?
—You know my sweetie's very fond of fruities.
—Well, go buy a box of Sunkist beauties.
—You can go there and eat them, you see.
It's a great investment any day.
—Say, why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?

CHORUS 1: Why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?
Go get yourself a Sunkist maiden.
I'll bet you'll like her orange aidin'.
Oh, the fruit of the old apple tree
Is a lot of applesauce today.
Say, why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHO CARES ANYHOW (Midgley/Van Cleve)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Aug 11 - 07:15 AM

WHO CARES ANYHOW
Words and music by Charles Midgley & Fred Van Cleve
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) (1929)

1. They say that ev'ry fireman wears suspenders that are red,
Because they hold his trousers up and keep him out of bed.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
My folks all say I was born this way, but who cares anyhow?

2. A bumblebee will never sing about his little honey.
I hardly think a policeman's club will ever strike me funny.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
I know some jokes that that I can't tell folks, but who cares anyhow?

—Say Bill, what's the difference between the North and the South Pole?
—All the difference in the world, Ernie.

3. I never saw a butterfly that ever could make butter,
And even all the nicest streets will end up in the gutter.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
I'm so darn bright that I shine at night, but who cares anyhow?

—Ernie, did I tell you my last Scotch story?
—I hope so.

4. They call me maple sugar 'cause I'm just a refined sap,
And when my girl feels all run down, she winds up in my lap.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
You'll all agree something's wrong with me, but who cares anyhow?

—Speaking of Scotch jokes, you know I often wonder how you ever get away with all the Scotch jokes that you tell.
—Well, half of my ancestors were Scotch.
—What was the other half?
—Oh, ginger ale.

5. A bullfrog lives a long, long time although each night he croaks,
And I know my sweetie's not so hot because she never smokes.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
It's a crazy song and it won't last long, but who cares anyhow?

—Hey, Bill! Whatever became of your sister?
—Oh, she has a new position now.
—What's she doing?
—She's a waitress in a lunatic asylum.
—A waitress in a lunatic asylum?
—Yeah, she carries soup to nuts.

6. They say that a banana skin will make a lovely slipper.
I don't believe I'll ever drink moonshine from the big dipper.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
We tolled the bell, but the bell can't tell, but who cares anyhow?

Who cares? Who cares?
Who cares? Who cares?
Who cares who cares anyhow?
I do! I do! I do! Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
Oh, we don't care. We know you don't care.
So who cares anyhow?


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN LINDY COMES HOME (George M Cohan)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Aug 11 - 08:18 PM

Publication data from WorldCat.org:

WHEN LINDY COMES HOME
"Written in honor of the aerial triumph of Charles A. Lindbergh."
"Dedicated to the American public exclusively through the Chicago Herald and Examiner and Associated Hearst newspapers."
Words and music by George M Cohan
[Chicago, Ill.: Chicago Herald and Examiner], ©1927

First Line: He's a coming He's a coming, Hear the drumming, Rum-tum-tumming
First Line of Chorus: Oh say what a day when Lindy comes home, When Lindy comes home to his mother


Lyrics as sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys):

PATTER: Here he comes, Ernie.
Yes, here he comes, Bill.

VERSE 1: He's a-coming; he's a-coming.
Hear the drumming, rum-tum-tumming.
See those flags, oh, boy, how they fly,
And see those airplanes up in the sky.
Oh, hear them humming; hear them humming.
Lindy's coming; Lindy's coming home.

CHORUS 1: Oh, say, what a day when Lindy comes home,
When Lindy comes home to his mother.
Say, what a day from the earth to the dome.
Like the ancients of Rome, we shall welcome him home.
Oh, wait and see America rise
With one, two, three, four fourth of Julys.
Oh, say, what a day from Gotham to Nome,
When Lindy comes back from across the foam,
To his home sweet home.

VERSE 2: Crowds are teeming, eagles screaming,
Bedlam breaking, hist'ry making,
Yankee Doodles singin' their song.
Hear that shrieking, worshipping throng.
All wild and willing, he is thrilling.
Lindy's coming; Lindy's coming home.

CHORUS 2: Oh, say, what a day when Lindy comes home,
When Lindy comes home to his mother.
Say, what a day, what a hip-hip-hooray.
We'll put Europe away with the honors we'll pay.
The cannons' roar you'll hear in the air.
A thousand bands will play over there.
Oh, say, what a day for poet and poem,
When Lindy comes back from across the foam
To his home sweet home.

REPEAT CHORUS 1.


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