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Origins: Fill, Fill, a Run O

JT Thompson 29 Oct 99 - 06:05 PM
Philippa 29 Oct 99 - 09:18 PM
Áine 30 Oct 99 - 11:08 AM
jtt 30 Oct 99 - 01:26 PM
Philippa 30 Oct 99 - 02:49 PM
Áine 31 Oct 99 - 12:40 PM
Philippa 01 Nov 99 - 02:37 PM
Philippa 01 Nov 99 - 07:37 PM
JT Thompson 02 Nov 99 - 01:08 PM
GUEST,Veronika 25 Feb 02 - 04:32 AM
GUEST,Philippa 25 Feb 02 - 01:13 PM
Veronika 25 Feb 02 - 04:26 PM
MMario 25 Feb 02 - 04:32 PM
Veronika 25 Feb 02 - 04:56 PM
GUEST,Philippa 01 May 02 - 02:00 PM
GUEST,Philippa 26 May 02 - 08:17 PM
MMario 28 May 02 - 12:03 PM
GUEST,Philippa 28 May 02 - 04:39 PM
GUEST,Philippa 14 Oct 03 - 01:36 PM
GUEST,Philippa 05 Feb 04 - 10:49 AM
GUEST,JTT 06 Feb 04 - 04:08 AM
GUEST,Suedrift@optonline.net 28 Nov 04 - 06:27 PM
GUEST 28 Nov 04 - 07:22 PM
GUEST,Barbara 15 Nov 08 - 01:59 PM
GUEST,Sweden 07 Dec 11 - 08:58 AM
GUEST,Davy Sean Clark 16 Aug 14 - 02:32 PM
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Subject: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: JT Thompson
Date: 29 Oct 99 - 06:05 PM

Listening to the words of Fill, Fill, a Run O as sung beautifully on Triona and Maighread Ni Dhomhnaill's current album, I was struck by the interesting use of a kind of emotional pun by the (19th-century? 18th-century?) songwriter.

For instance, the verb Fill - return - has its most common and familiar reference in most people's subconscious filing system in the seanfhocal "Filleann an feall ar an bhfeallaire" - the wrong returns on the wrongdoer, or more exactly, in the context of this song of a priest who has forsaken his religion and shamed his people by becoming a Protestant minister, the betrayal returns on the betrayer: feall means wrong, but more precisely, a betrayal.

Then there's the opening line, bitterly addressing the minister as "a hAthair Ui Domhnaill" - obviously any Irish-speaker would know that St Colmcille, the designer of the Book of Kells and the great local saint of Donegal, and especially the area from which the song comes, was an O'Donnell, and would of course have been "Athair Ui Domhnaill" himself.

And when I listened desultorily first I thought there was a reference to "Orangemen in their boots" - "Buachailli bui ina mbroga", only to realise that it was "buclai bui ina broga" - "yellow buckles on her shoes" as Neili (the priest's old mother, if I remember right) is "pulled down the road like a ghost" on her way to Mass.

In Connemara this is sung as "Shean tu Peadar is Pol" - you *refused* (St) Peter and Paul - though "shean" also has the implication of "betrayed"; the Donegal version more explicitly says "threigh tu Peadar is Pol".

Does anyone have the full history of the song, and is its writer remembered?


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O / Sagart O Dónaill
From: Philippa
Date: 29 Oct 99 - 09:18 PM

some info. from Deora Aille, recording of Máire Aine Ní Dhonnchadha, Ceirníní Claddaigh (Claddagh Records), about the song "Sagart O Dónaill": although the song is known in every Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking) area of Ireland, it's thought to originate in Donegal, where the priest is known by his first name. One of the verses begins "Crádh ort, a Dhoimnic Uí Dhónaill" - a plague on you, Dominic O Dónaill.

"Dominic is said to have become a Protestant minister at Downings near Carrigart, County Donegal, and his tomb in the Protestant churchyard at Carrigart is inscribed:
'In memory of Rev. Dominck O'Donell who departed this life 1793 aged 93 years'."

Einrí O Muirgheasa, compiler of "Dhá Céad de Cheoltaí Uladh", gives the probable date of this song as 1740-50. I'll get back to you when I have a chance to read through O Muirgheasa's notes and see if there is any further detail.


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: Áine
Date: 30 Oct 99 - 11:08 AM

A chairde,

Below are the two verses for this song that I have. I would be interested in seeing any others that you might have.

Philippa -- Thank you for the historical background!

JT -- what is the name of Triona and Maighread's current album?

Le meas, Áine

Shiúl mise thall is abhus
I Móta Ghráinne Óige a rugadh mé
Is ní fhaca mé iontas go fóill
Mar an Sagart Ó Dónaill ina mhinistéir

Dhiúltaigh tú Peadar is Pól
Mar gheall ar an ór is ar an airgead
Dhiúltaigh tú Banríon na Glóire
Agus d'iompaigh tú i gcóta an mhinistéir


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Subject: Lyr Add: PILL, PILL A RÚN Ó
From: jtt
Date: 30 Oct 99 - 01:26 PM

Crá ort, a shagairt Uí Domhnaill
Nach dona go deo mar a d'imigh tú
Léigh sé an tAifreann Dé Domhnaigh
Is bhí sé maidin Dé Luain ina mhinistéir

Pill, pill a rún ó
Pill, a rún ó, is ná h-imigh uaim
pill, a chúisle is a stóirín ó
Is gheoghaidh tú an ghlóir má phillean tú

Dá bheicfeadh sigh Neilí Dé Dómhnaigh
Is a gúna bhán go sala uirthi
Búclai buí ina bróga
Is í á tarraingt sa ród mar phúca

Pill, pill 7rl

Tá mallacht na sagart is na mbráithre leat
i do mhála ag imeacht duit,
Is nach measa duit mallacht do mháthartha
Ná a bhaca tú aríamh den bhunadh sin

Pill, pill 7rl

Thréigh tú Peadar is Pól
Agus thréigh tú Eoin is an bunadh sin
Thréidh tú an Mhaighdean is an ghlór
Is nach dona go deo mar a d'imigh tú

Pill, pill 7rl

Béidh tú in Ifreann go fóill
Is na stróite deorea ag sileadh leat
Sin an áit a bhfaighidh tú an t-eólas
Cé acu is fearr Leis - an sagart, no an mhinistear.

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 16-May-02.


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: Philippa
Date: 30 Oct 99 - 02:49 PM

Charlie (CC) Logue of Derry was telling me that Dominic O Donaill was one of two brothers educated at a seminary at Salamanca, one a priest - buried at Meevagh, the other a minister - buried at Carrigart. He says there's information in Lucas(former prof. of Irish studies at Queen's University Belfast) "Facts from Meevagh"


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: Áine
Date: 31 Oct 99 - 12:40 PM

Thank you for the lyrics, jtt.

And thank you Philippa for the additional info. Have you had a chance to read through O Muirgheasa's notes yet?

Le meas, Áine


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Rúin O
From: Philippa
Date: 01 Nov 99 - 02:37 PM

If you are very interested in this song, it's worth getting acces to a copy of Éinrí Ó Muirgheasa, "Céad de Cheolta Uladh" (1915), new edition edited by Brother Beausang, published by Comhaltas Uladh, 1983. The songs are in Irish, but the notes are in English and there are three A5 pages of information about song number 6, "Doiminic Ó Dómhnaill. Some of the information is about two other pairs of brothers in Donegal, one a minister and the other a priest. When I was discussing Dominic Ó Dómhnaill with C C Logue, he did mention the two MacLaughlin brothers of Clonmany, Inis Eoghain. I hadn't thought earlier that this detail was worth mentioning on the thread. But it is, for two reasons. From the information given by Ó Muirgheasa, it appears that some of what CC told me about the Ó Dómhnaill brothers actually referred to the MacLaughlins, and he's hardly the first person to combine the two stories. Ó Muirgheasa quotes a passage from O'Harkin, "Inis-Owen; its History, Traditions and Antiquities" (1867). I gather O'Harkin's information is largely from oral tradition. Domhnall and Peter MacLaughlin were being sent to study at a seminar on mainland Europe, but their boat was shipwrecked and they landed on the English coast where an English nobleman offered them shelter. He also offered to have them educated in an English university if they would accept the Established Church. Dómhnall accepted the offer, but Peter refused and continued the journey to 'the continent'.

Dómhnall's brother and his mother were much aggrieved by his apostasy. O'Harkin wrote that Dómhnall MacLaughlin's mother composed a ballad which included lines which he translates as:
Can it ever be spoken how my heart is broken
For thy fall, O'Donnell[*] from the ancient faith.

With less of sorrow could I view to-morrow
My lost one herding on the mountain brown,
Than strange doctrines teaching, and new tenets preaching,
At yon lordly window in his silken gown.

[* understood in this case as "o, Dómhnall" ? - but that would be "a Dhómhnaill", with a 'g' sound, in Irish].

Ó Muirgheasa writes:
"This item of Harkin's history answers so fully in all its essential parts to the story of Dominick O'Donnell that it looks at first sight to be nearly a version of the latter. Of the 'translation' given by O'Harkin the last quatrain is evidently a free rendering of the following version of verse II. which I heard near Dungloe: -

B'fhearr duit bheith buachailleacht bó, Do bhata i do dhorn is pluideog ort, Ná i do shuí ar fhuinneoga ard', Ag éisteacht le glórtha ministir.

"However, Harkin's account is borne out by the traditions still living around Clonmany. The two brothers- McLaughlin - are still familiarly known there as Domhnall Gorm, who became the minister, and Peadar, who became the priest. Their whole history, place of abode, &c., are known to the people living aropund there.
"It is not improbable that there were two songs, one about each pair of brothers, and that these got mixed up, and with them some of the incidents as well.
... ...
"The partial similarity of the names - Dominick O'Domhnaill and Domhnall MacLaughlin - may have contributed to the confusion betweent he two cases, but that the two parallel cases occured I have no doubt, singular as the coincidence may be."

As for Dominic Ó Dómhnaill, his gravestone also mentions his wife Susana, but the date of her death is not legible. "Other inscriptions in this graveyard show that a Richard O'Donnell died 1790 aged 42, and a Rev. William O'Donnell died 1792 aged 56; these would appear to have been children of Dominick's who died before him."

Legend has it that as a young priest, Doiminic was friendly with the Protestant minister of the parish. One day he was visiting the minister's house and found a baby in a cradle unattended and crying. He picked up the baby and soothed it. The two formed an attachment and when this child Susana grew up, doiminic changed his religious affiliation and married her.

One of the verses in the version sung by Máire Ní Dhonnchadha goes

Mo mhallacht go deo do na mná,
Siad a mheall uaimse mo shagairtín
Léigh sé an tAifreann Dé Domhnaigh
Is bhí sé Dé Luain ina mhinistéir

My curse forever on Women,
'Tis they led astray my darling,
He read Mass on Sunday
On Monday became a minister.

(translation by Seán MacMathghamhna)

Watch this thread for further discussion!!


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Rúin O
From: Philippa
Date: 01 Nov 99 - 07:37 PM

More snippets from Ó Muirgheasa, "Céad de Cheolta Uladh":
1) "In Hardiman's "Irish Minstrelsy, vol.1, page 194, there is a song entitled Móta Ghráinne Óige, with almost the same refrain as that of Doiminic Ó Dónaill. Popular and catchy refrains of this sort were sure to be appropriated by other rhymsters, such would appear to have been done by the unknown author of the Móta Ghráinne Óige, for the refrain in this song has no bearing whatever on the subject of the verses, which latter are light and trivial, while in Doiminic Ó Dómhnaill the refrain is the soul of the piece."

2) "The song, it should be stated, is supposed to have been uttered by Dominick's mother, but according to two Teelin seanachies - Conall Cunningham and Charley McCann - the real author was Dominick's brother the priest."

One version of the song has a verse in which Doiminic's mother says he should have seen his brother the Catholic priest at the altar weeping about Doiminic the Protestant minister:

Dá bhfeichfeá do dheartháir ar an altóir Dé Domhnaigh,
Ag léamh de leabhar a phortannais [= phortúis]
A bhos ar a leiceann go brónach,
Is é ag gol sagart óg 'na mhinistir.

Note that Teelin is in the south of County Donegal and Carrigart is in the north of the county (near Downings). Ó Muirgheasa found numerous Irish speakers throughout the county knew versions of the song, but, he wrote, "Strange enough the Irish speakers about Carrigart, where O'Donnell lived, have forgotten the song as if they would fain forget the whole episode."

I myself am somewhat surprised that this song remains quite popular. I've been familiar with the song for years, but never tried to learn it. I felt I would be embarassed to sing such a lament with its sectarian overtones; I see nothing intrinsically wrong with someone choosing to follow a different path from the one s/he was raised in. And I'm quite sympathetic to Doiminic becoming a minister so that he could enjoy family life!

We could - and have in other threads - have interesting discussions about to what extent we need to believe in songs we sing and to what extent we can sing a song as a way of understanding history and different points of view, geting inside someone else's head. While I personally don't relate to the religious basis, that Doiminic has forsaken the True Church ("Thréig tusa Peadar is Pól ...", you forsook Peter and Paul ...), I do sympathise with the lament from a political viewpoint as Doiminic changed his faith at a time when Protestants were privileged in relation to Catholics. Even Doiminic's mother has other reasons beside religious principles for decrying his defection; she fears the approbation of her neighbours. A verse from the singing of Máire Áine Ní Dhonnchadha goes:

Nuair a théimse chun Aifrinn Dé Domhnaigh
'S mo bhrat ar mo bhráid mar phluid orm,
Séard a deireanns na cailíní óga;
Siúd í máthair an mhinistéir.

When I attend Mass on Sunday
I hide my shame in my mantle,
I hear the young girls say;
There goes the minister's mother.

This exercise of looking at the song more carefully and learning more of the history behind it is making me think again of learning to sing the song myself. I suppose it's a type of acting, for a couple of minutes I would be like Doiminic's mother; afterwards I return to my own beliefs!


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: JT Thompson
Date: 02 Nov 99 - 01:08 PM

Maighread & Triona Ni Dhomhnaill's current album with Donal Lunny is Idir an Da Sholas (I've written all this with no fadas in case you're searching on something like cdnow.com, though you can probably also get it from Custy's or Claddagh or somewhere like that, in Ireland.


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST,Veronika
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 04:32 AM

I am very new member here and I don't know really if there are any rules here about, so I just post here as it feels right for me, let me know if somethin was wrong.

anyway, you have been discussing the lysice of Fill, Fill, a Rúin o, so I was wondering if there is a way t get the lyrics. I have a version of the song at home, but I am not able to find out the lyrics.


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 01:13 PM

plenty of lyrics above - see the first two messages especially. Which recording of the song do you have; I suppose you are looking for lyrics to match the verses you are hearing?


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: Veronika
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 04:26 PM

actually my version is from the movie The Nephew, where they sing it at a wake. I loved the song so much when I first heard it, that I wanted to find out what the lyrics were, but that is hardly possible, since there is not even a OST to the movie and the song is not listed in the end of the movie. Anyway if anyone can help me with that I would be more than glad!


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: MMario
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 04:32 PM

Veronika - there are multiple verses and the full lyrics to the chorus above in the thread.

in particular see the post from jtt 30-october-99 at 1:26


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: Veronika
Date: 25 Feb 02 - 04:56 PM

thank you MMario and everyone else!


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 01 May 02 - 02:00 PM

I didn't recall Veronika's message and had a surprise hearing the American Nephew sing this song at the Irish wake - the film was on tv here on Tuesday; then Wed morning I heard Aoife Ní Fhearaigh's rendition on Raidio na Gaeltachta. Am undecided whether the song was an appropriate choice at the wake scene. The film was 1998 and stars included Pierce Brosnan and Sinéad Cusack. I don't know who the young American with the dreadlocks was played by. And as Veronika says, this song was not on the list of music in the credits.


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 26 May 02 - 08:17 PM

At this month's Foyle Folk Club singer's circle, I heard a song with an air similar to Fill, fill, a Rúin Ó. It was called Dance Around the Spinning Wheel. The chorus went:
Oh then dance with me, oh my charming one
With your golden, golden slippers on
Oh then dance with me, oh my charming one
With your golden, golden slippers on
The singer did not know who wrote the words.


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Subject: Tune Add: FILL, FILL, A RÚN Ó
From: MMario
Date: 28 May 02 - 12:03 PM

X:1
T:FILL, FILL, A RÚN Ó
N:Mícheál Ó hÉidhin. "Cas Amhrán", 1975
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:D
d3e d2|c3d c2|(B4A2|B4)c2|d3e d2|c3d c2|B A F4-|F4F2|F3B B2|c3d c2|[M:4/4](B2A B2 (3ABA|[M:3/4]F4)D E|F3F F/2|F3F E2|E D D4-|D4z2"^Curfa"|d6|c3d c2|(B4A2|B4c2)|d3e d2|c3d c2|B A F4-|F4F2|F2B/2 B3/2 B2|c3d c2|[M:4/4](B3A B2 (3ABA|[M:3/4]F4)D E|F3F F2|F4E2|E D D4-|D4z2
w:Shiúl mis-e thall is ab-hus__I Mó-ta Ghráinne Ói-ge a ru-gadh mé_'s~ní fha-ca mé nion-tas go fóill______Mar an Sa-gart Ó Dó-naill 'na mhin-is-téir_Fill, fill a rún ó___Fill, a rún ó, is ná h-imigh uaim__ Fill, a chúis-le is a stói-rín ó_____Is gheo-ghaidh tú an ghlóir má phil-lean tú_



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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 28 May 02 - 04:39 PM

source of the sheet music, Mícheál Ó hÉidhin. "Cas Amhrán", 1975 (still available from Cló Iar-Chonachta)


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 14 Oct 03 - 01:36 PM

it turns out that Wolfgang Hell had already posted the Dance Around the spinning Wheel lyrics on a Mudcat thread.


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O -An Sagart Ó Domhnail
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 05 Feb 04 - 10:49 AM

a recent recording of a Conamara style rendering of "An Sagart Ó Domhnaill" (Fill, fill, a rúin) is on Meaití Jó Shéamuis Ó Fáthartha, "Bóithríní an Locháin", Cl Iar-Chonnachta, 2003


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 06 Feb 04 - 04:08 AM

Phillipa, my father used to sing that Dance With Me My Charming One song - I remember particularly his singing "For you the sun and moon I'd steal, if you'll dance with me, sweet Mary Neill!" while walking down a tree-lined road.

"Ah, dance with me, my charming one, with your golden slippers on"


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST,Suedrift@optonline.net
Date: 28 Nov 04 - 06:27 PM

I wish someone could give me the lyrics of the song, translated line by line. I also fell in love with the melody when I saw "the Nephew". Last evening I went to a show with the Irish tenors, bought the CD and was so happy to see the song on their album. Until then, I did not even know the name of the song.
Could anyone just translate the song line by line? I would so much appreciated it.

Thanks
Sue


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Subject: RE: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST
Date: 28 Nov 04 - 07:22 PM

Could someone translate this song line by line.
Would so appreciate it:

Fill fill a rún ó
Fill a rún ó
is ná h'im-igh uaim
Fill o-rm achuis le's a stó
óir ag-us chi fidh tú'n glór má fhil-lean tú

Shiuil mi-sethal is a bhus i mól-ta ghrainn
ói-ge a rug-adh mé
'sni fha-ca mé nion-tas go tóill
már an sa-gart ó
Dó-náill ná mhi-ni-stir

Fill fill a rún ó
Fill a rún ó
is ná h'im-igh uaim
Fill o-rm achuis le's a stó
óir ag-us chi fidh tú'n glór má fhil-lean tú

Dhiul-tigh tú Pea-dar is Pói már gheall
ar an ór's as an air-gid
Dhiul-tigh tú ban-rion ná glóir
a-gus d'iom-paifg tú gcóta an mhi-nistir

Fill fill a rún ó
Fill a rún ó
is ná h'im-igh uaim
Fill o-rm achuis le's a stó
óir ag-us chi fidh tú'n glór má fhil-lean tú

Thanks
Sue


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Subject: RE: Origins: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST,Barbara
Date: 15 Nov 08 - 01:59 PM

RTE, the Irish Televison Station, showed a programme about 10 or 12 years ago telling the story of "Fill, Fill a Run O". I was fascinated with the story as I had learned this song in school in 1966 and had been singing it ever since but I never knew its origins.

A Donegal mother composed it in the mid-1800's as her lament for one of her sons who had become a Protestant Minister.

The story goes that her two sons had set sail for a Seminary in Europe to become priests of the Roman Catholic Church. They were shipwrecked off the coast of Wales and a Welsh family took them in and nursed them back to full health. Then one of the two men continued his travels to Europe to become a priest of the Roman Catholic Church (in which he was reared - "an ord inar oileadh tu")and the other stayed on in Wales where he later became a Minister of the Church of England.

After a number of years, both sons returned to their home town in Donegal - one as a Priest (of the poor parish i.e. Catholic) and the other as a Minister (of the wealthy parish i.e. Church of Ireland). It broke the mother's heart to see her son turn his back on the faith in which he was reared, the faith of Ss. Peter and Paul and the Mother of Glory, to gain the riches of gold and silver. Her plea in the chorus of the song is to her son, the Minister, to "Return, return my Love" ("Fill, fill a Run O") to the faith in which he was reared.

The music conveys the heartbreak of the mother. I understand that the mother composed both the music and the words.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST,Sweden
Date: 07 Dec 11 - 08:58 AM

Hello i found this forum when i search on google so i wonder if anyone can tell me who sings this version of the song


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKGocbc1XA0


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Subject: RE: Origins: Fill, Fill, a Run O
From: GUEST,Davy Sean Clark
Date: 16 Aug 14 - 02:32 PM

This thread, from so many years ago. Anyway, the late Antoinette McKenna sang a lovely version of this on her and Joe's CD, "The Best of J & A McKenna. Worth checking out.


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