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Lyr Add: My Orchet in Linden Lea (William Barnes)

Related threads:
Lyr Add: Linden Lea (42)
Lyr Req: Under the Old Linden Tree (20)
Lyr Req: Linden Lea (6)
Lyr Req: The Linden Lea (13)
Tune Add: Linden Lea (7) (closed)
Lyr Req: Linden Lea (9)


Liz the Squeak 26 Nov 99 - 10:32 PM
Liz the Squeak 26 Nov 99 - 10:33 PM
sophocleese 27 Nov 99 - 01:18 AM
wildlone 27 Nov 99 - 04:14 AM
Liz the Squeak 27 Nov 99 - 04:28 AM
Stewie 27 Nov 99 - 10:12 AM
Stewie 27 Nov 99 - 10:17 AM
Liz the Squeak 27 Nov 99 - 03:48 PM
McGrath of Harlow 27 Nov 99 - 09:12 PM
Liz the Squeak 28 Nov 99 - 03:21 AM
McGrath of Harlow 28 Nov 99 - 12:16 PM
Doug in Saudi Arabia 28 Nov 99 - 12:31 PM
wildlone 28 Nov 99 - 12:54 PM
Jim Dixon 22 Aug 08 - 07:53 AM
GUEST 22 Aug 08 - 08:23 AM
Andy Jackson 22 Aug 08 - 08:25 AM
GUEST,GUEST 27 Sep 11 - 12:28 PM
GUEST 07 May 14 - 05:13 PM
GUEST,henryp 08 May 14 - 09:18 AM
GUEST 09 May 14 - 08:23 PM
GUEST,Xithi 19 Aug 17 - 02:43 AM
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Subject: ADD: Linden Lea in dialect
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 26 Nov 99 - 10:32 PM

Can't think why this isn't in the DigiTrad in any form, unless it's because the tune may still be copyright (although R V Williams died 51 years ago now, it may be out of it...)

Originally published as 'My Orchard in Linden Lea' as part of a collection called "Hwomely Rhymes" in 1859. Translation available as a thread here from 1998, search 'Linden Lea'

The sound e>a is sort of pronounced 'e' as in Beth, with the mouth opening to 'a' as in apple, all as one vowel.

'Ithin the woodlands, flow'ry gle>aded
By the woak trees massy moot,
The sheenen grass ble>ades, timber she>aded,
now do quiver undervoot;
An birds do whissle overhed
An water's bubblen in is bed,
An there vor me the apple tree
Do lean down low in Linden Lea.

When leaves that le>atley wer a-springen
Now do ve>ade 'ithin the copse,
An painted birds, do hush their zingen,
up upon the timber tops;
An brown leav'd fruit's a turnen red,
Wi cloudless zunsheen over head,
Wi fruit vor me, the apple tree
Do lean down low in Linden Lea,

Let other vo'k me>ake money vaster
In the air o dark room'd towns.
I don't dread a peevish master,
Though noo man do heed my vrowns
I be free to go abrode,
Or te>ake age>an my hwomeward road,
To where, vor me, the apple tree
Do lean down low in Linden Lea

I've posted this in an effort to clear the homesickness that I'm suffering from at the moment - lots of threads here about Dorset and I keep breaking down and wailing like a baby - new acronym, BDAWLAB. Plus, it is a lovely song if you can manage the dialect. Can't believe it isn't in the DigiTrad...

LTS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 26 Nov 99 - 10:33 PM

OK, so I can't get the hang of formatting it yet, sorry, too busy BDAWLAB!

LTS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: sophocleese
Date: 27 Nov 99 - 01:18 AM

Thanks LTS. I haven't sung that in years, you just reminded me of it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: wildlone
Date: 27 Nov 99 - 04:14 AM

Liz, I am lucky to be living in Dorset,Sherborne to be exact. A most beutiful county.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 27 Nov 99 - 04:28 AM

Wildlone, don't get me started again, just purged the West Dorset homesickness, now you want me to start on North?!!

'Cleese, enjoy it, it is about a man who genuinely loves his homeland, and although he is highly educated, and has the opportunity to go far into the world, earning lots of money, he would rather stay in the place he loves, and be a priest for pennies. The song, as is most of Barnes' work, is totally autobiographical, and completely beautiful. I'm glad it has spread around the world that he shunned himself.

LTS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: Stewie
Date: 27 Nov 99 - 10:12 AM

LTS, it's lovely. 'I don't dread no peevish master/Though no man do heed my vrowns I be free to go abrode' - great stuff! However, I was tempted to pass it by - as I think others might - because of the way it is presented. It's not hard to put
at the end of each line before you post it (as I learned from a Joe Offer posting - thanks Joe). Just copy the first and paste the rest - it's boring and repetitious but worth the effort. You say you are 'too busy', but if you have taken the time to post something that obviously means a great deal to you, surely a extra couple of minutes to frame it in a more attractive format is well worth the time expended.

Regards, Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: Stewie
Date: 27 Nov 99 - 10:17 AM

Well, that was a great help! I don't know how to put the line ending tag here without its disappearing and starting a new line when I post. Help Joe!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 27 Nov 99 - 03:48 PM

Sorry chaps, I set it out nicely, do all the little clicky paste things, and then when I submit, it goes to buggery. Think I'll go back to being a luddite....

LTS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 27 Nov 99 - 09:12 PM

Put in at the end of every line a BR,
but in front of it you put <
and after it you put >

I hope what I have just put down makes it through the mincer in a useful form.

There's a lovely rendering of Linden Lea by Dave Goulder (who wrote "The January Man"), on a CD called Stone Steam and Starlings, whuich was put out by Harbourtown records in 1993. And Tim Laycock, down in Dorset also sings it beautifully, as well as his version of another William Barnes poem, "Crowns", which he rightly reckons shouild be the copunty anthem.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 28 Nov 99 - 03:21 AM

County anthem has always been (in most Dorzet volks minds) Dorset is Beautiful by the Yetties. The actual anthem, if regimental marches are anything to go by, has been 'To be a Farmer's boy' since the formation of the Dorsetshire regiment back in 1852 or there abouts, can't remember quite, only worked in their museum for 2 years......

Formed from the 39th and 52nd Regiments of Foot, which have their roots in the armies of 1770's. And they were first onto the subcontinent of India, which is why their motto is 'Primus in Indus' and has nothing to do with camping stoves.....

LTS But Crowns is an excellent poem - he always was a better poet than Hardy, who gave up writing novels when Jude the Obscure was slated by the critics and dubbed 'Jude the Obscene'!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 28 Nov 99 - 12:16 PM

Dorset is Beautiful,may be current title holder, but "Crowns" by Barnes/Laycock (or "Wheat" I think is really the correct name for it)is the contender, and a far better song I'd say.

Anyway that's for the volk down there to sort out.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: Doug in Saudi Arabia
Date: 28 Nov 99 - 12:31 PM

Originally dorset dialect poem by William Barnes set to music beautifully by Ralph Vaughan-Williams. Enjoy


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: wildlone
Date: 28 Nov 99 - 12:54 PM

I be zorry volks but I do zay thic Praise O Do'set be Do'sets zong as it be zung at the Society of Dorset Men's dinners.
Another fine poem by the Great William Barnes.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MY ORCHET IN LINDEN LEA (William Barnes)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 Aug 08 - 07:53 AM

From Barnes, William. Hwomely Rhymes. A Second Collection of Poems in the Dorset Dialect. London: J.R. Smith, 1859, page 3f:

MY ORCHET IN LINDEN LEA.

'Ithin the woodlands, flow'ry gleäded,
  By the woak tree's mossy moot,
The sheenèn grass-bleädes, timber-sheäded,
  Now do quiver under voot;
An' birds do whissle auver head,
An' water's bubblèn in its bed,
An' there vor me the apple tree
Do leän down low in Linden Lea.

When leaves that leätely wer a-springèn
  Now do feäde 'ithin the copse,
An' painted birds do hush ther zingèn
  Up upon the timber's tops;
An' brown-leav'd fruit's a-turnèn red,
In cloudless zunsheen, auver head,
Wi' fruit vor me, the apple tree
Do leän down low in Linden Lea.

Let other vo'k meäke money vaster
  In the aïr o' dark-room'd towns,
I don't dread a peevish meäster;
  Though noo man do heed my frowns,
I be free to goo abrode,
Or teäke ageän my hwomeward road
To where, vor me, the apple tree
Do leän down low in Linden Lea.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Aug 08 - 08:23 AM

Wow, the mudcat time machine stikes again!! 1999 to 2008 in one leap.
Another chance to mention Forest Tracks though.
Go and look at Lydlinch Bells, a collection of Dorset dialect poems some set to music. A great work by Tim Laycock, who carefully auditioned local poets for the readings.

Andy


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Linden Lea in dialect
From: Andy Jackson
Date: 22 Aug 08 - 08:25 AM

I cannot tell a lie the above guest was me. Carried away in the excitement I hadn't signed in.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: My Orchet in Linden Lea (William Barnes)
From: GUEST,GUEST
Date: 27 Sep 11 - 12:28 PM

Lovely song but a bit 'drawing-roomy' in most professional recordings . .
Anyone out there got guitar chords available . . ?
John Oslo


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: My Orchet in Linden Lea (William Barnes)
From: GUEST
Date: 07 May 14 - 05:13 PM

Comes from a collection of 19th Century poems by William Barnes edited by Thomas Hardy.
Fill your boots, folks, there's space enough for all in there...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: My Orchet in Linden Lea (William Barnes)
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 08 May 14 - 09:18 AM

Music from a Small Island by Simon Mayor with Hilary James features a setting of the poem - in standard English!

They originally intended to adapt the Ralph Vaughan Williams setting. However, Ursula Vaughan Williams was unwilling to give her permission, so they composed a beautiful tune of their own.

It's a stunning CD!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: My Orchet in Linden Lea (William Barnes)
From: GUEST
Date: 09 May 14 - 08:23 PM

That's just one of the poems - there's dozens there waiting to be arranged.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: My Orchet in Linden Lea (William Barnes)
From: GUEST,Xithi
Date: 19 Aug 17 - 02:43 AM

I might be being a bit dim... but is / was Linden Lea a real place? If so, does anyone know where exactly I can find it?

Thanks

Max


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