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Folklore: Lord Thomas and Fair Annie Translation

GUEST,Guest # 0ne Million 27 Feb 16 - 09:47 PM
Steve Gardham 28 Feb 16 - 08:17 AM
GUEST,Philippa 28 Feb 16 - 08:40 AM
Jeri 28 Feb 16 - 10:37 AM
GUEST,padgett 28 Feb 16 - 10:54 AM
GUEST 28 Feb 16 - 04:08 PM
Steve Gardham 28 Feb 16 - 04:18 PM
Richard Mellish 28 Feb 16 - 06:32 PM
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Subject: Folklore: Lord Thomas and Fair Annie
From: GUEST,Guest # 0ne Million
Date: 27 Feb 16 - 09:47 PM

Ok, so I found this version of this ballad:

Lord Thomas was a very fine man Went oot to hunt his career. Fair Annie she was the fairest woman That ever the sun shone on, That ever the sun shone on.

Lord Thomas he spoke a word in jest, And Annie she took it ill. He said, 'I'll marry nane o' your mean maidens Withoot my parents' will, Withoot my parents' will.'

Then Thomas he is hame to his mither And bowed low doon til his knee, O shall I wed the nut-brown may Or shall I wed fair Annie? Or shall I wed fair Annie?

The nut-brown maid she has cows and ewes, Fair Annie she has nane, And for my blessin's, my son Thomas, I pray ye let her alane, I pray ye let her alane.

Then oot it spak his little sister, Stood by her nurse's knee. 'O marry ye your fair Annie And let the ither yen be, And let the ither yen be.'

'A coo may dee in her calvin, An ox may droon in the mire, But marry ye your fair Annie, Ye'll get your heart's desire, Ye'll get your heart's desire.'

'A coo may dee in her calvin, Or an ox may hing in the ploo, But marry ye your fair Annie, And ye'll get gear eneugh, And ye'll get gear eneugh.'

Lord Thomas he's gane to Annie's bower door, And tirled low at the pin, Nae readier was than fair Annie To let Lord Thomas in, To let Lord Thomas in.

It's will ye come to my weddin', Annie? The morn's tae be the day. 'It's never a fit.' said fair Annie. 'Unless the bride I be, Unless the bride I be.'

Lord Thomas he gaed up the high highway, And Annie gaed doon the glen. An' Annie shone as fair her lane As Thomas and a' his men. As Thomas and a' his men.

O where got ye the water, Annie, That washed ye sae clean? I got it by my mither's bower door Beneath a marble stane, Beneath a marble stane.

O, ye maun wear my hat, Annie, And ye maun wear my glove. Until my wife hae born a son. And that will end our love. And that will end our love,

I winna wear your hat, Lord Thomas, I winna wear your glove, But ye maun gie't your nut-brown bride, Tae her ye's constant prove. Tae her ye's constant prove.

Then he sent hame wi' fair Annie His hairt and his hairt's bleid, But ere the hour of twal o the clock Fair Annie she was deid, Fair Annie she was deid.

Then Thomas he's gane to Annie's bower door. And tirled low at the pin, Nae readier was than Annie's mither To let Lord Thomas in. To let Lord Thomas in.

O deal ye weel at my lover's lyke The white breid and the wine. And ere the morn at twelve o' the clock Ye'll deal as weel at mine. Ye'll deal as weel at mine.

The ane was laid in Mary's kirk And the ither in Mary's choir, And fae the yen, there sprang a birk Frae the ither a bonny sweet brier, Frae the ither a bonny sweet brier.

I live in America and don't understand some Scottish phrases. Can somebody translate this to "standard English" ? Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Lord Thomas and Fair Annie Translation
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 08:17 AM

Are the many English and American versions no use to you? Child 73.

Try Googling Lord Thomas and Fair Annet (Scottish)
Lord Thomas and Fair Eleanor (English)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Lord Thomas and Fair Annie Translation
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 08:40 AM

it's mostly just spelling to represent different pronunciation of words

nane = none, oot = out, hame = home, mither = mother, doon = down, ye = you, alane = alone, ither yen = other one, dee= die, droon = drown, hairt= heart, ane = one, stane = stone. breid = bread, twal= twelve Those are not so hard really

gaed isnt the same word as "went", I suppose the past tense of go here is "goed". "tirling at the pin" obviously means he knocked at the door (as others wrote, looking at other versions of the ballad would make the meaning plain)
maun = must, winna = won't

I'm sure there are on-line Scots dictionaries
And you could practice reading Rabbie Burns poetry in editions with glossaries, if you are interested.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Lord Thomas and Fair Annie Translation
From: Jeri
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 10:37 AM

There is a Scots glossary in the "Quick links" at the top of this page.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Lord Thomas and Fair Annie Translation
From: GUEST,padgett
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 10:54 AM

Mr G having trouble wit' Mudcat I see, o dear I will apologies for him he int too good wit' technical matters

Yes I agree with Phillipa, there are English translations of lyrics but the Scots words are largely fathomable and glossaries can help

Ray


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Lord Thomas and Fair Annie Translation
From: GUEST
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 04:08 PM

Thanks guys this was all very helpful. But still, I don't get how Annie died in this version. Was it just from disappointment and love? And also, what does the phrase 'mean maidens' mean here?


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Lord Thomas and Fair Annie Translation
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 04:18 PM

Dying for love or lost love is common in these romantic ballads. 'Mean' here is referring to Annie, simply meaning poor, lacking wealth, as described later in the ballad. In many ballads the relationship is often based on unequal matches. Sometimes love triumphs, sometimes it doesn't.

Many ballads have a moral. Here we have the moral, follow your heart, not your purse. Often the moral is the raison d'etre for the whole ballad and this is sometimes overlooked.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Lord Thomas and Fair Annie Translation
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 06:32 PM

In the last few days I've just started listening to the CD re-issues of Ewan MacColl LPs this one and this one

They include that very version cited by the OP, which I had not heard before. It starts off very similarly to Child 73 A, but the ending is completely different, with the cause of Annie's death unclear, but anyway apparently not her being murdered by the Brown Girl as in most versions.


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