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Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)

Steve Shaw 14 Jan 20 - 07:54 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Jan 20 - 06:48 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Jan 20 - 06:31 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Jan 20 - 03:17 PM
Sandra in Sydney 04 Jan 20 - 01:24 AM
Stilly River Sage 04 Jan 20 - 12:51 AM
Sandra in Sydney 03 Jan 20 - 08:21 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 Jan 20 - 11:58 AM
Iains 19 Dec 19 - 04:51 AM
Stilly River Sage 18 Dec 19 - 12:04 AM
Donuel 17 Dec 19 - 09:14 PM
Donuel 17 Dec 19 - 08:23 PM
Bill D 17 Dec 19 - 08:17 PM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Dec 19 - 06:37 PM
Iains 17 Dec 19 - 03:26 PM
Stilly River Sage 17 Dec 19 - 02:22 PM
Iains 17 Dec 19 - 01:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 17 Dec 19 - 12:05 PM
Donuel 14 Dec 19 - 04:00 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Dec 19 - 03:57 PM
Donuel 14 Dec 19 - 03:54 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Dec 19 - 03:22 PM
Donuel 14 Dec 19 - 03:11 PM
Donuel 14 Dec 19 - 01:20 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Dec 19 - 12:06 PM
Donuel 14 Dec 19 - 07:35 AM
Donuel 14 Dec 19 - 07:14 AM
Sandra in Sydney 13 Dec 19 - 06:33 PM
Stilly River Sage 13 Dec 19 - 01:22 PM
leeneia 06 Nov 19 - 06:38 PM
Stilly River Sage 05 Nov 19 - 10:15 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 05 Nov 19 - 07:08 PM
Stilly River Sage 15 Sep 19 - 04:08 PM
Bill D 15 Sep 19 - 02:26 PM
Stilly River Sage 15 Sep 19 - 10:15 AM
Stilly River Sage 13 Sep 19 - 11:13 PM
Helen 13 Sep 19 - 03:49 PM
Mrrzy 13 Sep 19 - 11:20 AM
Stilly River Sage 13 Sep 19 - 11:03 AM
Sandra in Sydney 13 Sep 19 - 10:19 AM
Helen 13 Sep 19 - 01:09 AM
Stilly River Sage 12 Sep 19 - 06:51 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Sep 19 - 03:11 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 Sep 19 - 03:06 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Aug 19 - 10:09 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Aug 19 - 12:25 PM
Bill D 04 Aug 19 - 10:07 PM
Stilly River Sage 04 Aug 19 - 09:49 PM
JennieG 04 Aug 19 - 08:59 PM
Bill D 02 Aug 19 - 09:31 PM
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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Jan 20 - 07:54 PM

I had a problem with "Ragusa" on the map, a town which I know from Sicily. Having been forced to look it up, I discovered that it's also the ancient name for Dubrovnik. So I've learned something today!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Jan 20 - 06:48 PM

Many things aren't shown, this is the Big Picture wide-ranging stuff. There was lots of trading in the Americas, literally from North to South and between the coasts.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Jan 20 - 06:31 PM

Not shown on the map from SRS, Aborigines were probably trading with Malay people back then.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Jan 20 - 03:17 PM

This will keep a few of you busy. Crank up the Google Earth and start exploring. (You might want to save a copy of this map in case the link isn't durable.)

You're welcome. :)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 04 Jan 20 - 01:24 AM

yes!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 Jan 20 - 12:51 AM

Down the rabbit hole, eh?


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 03 Jan 20 - 08:21 PM

thanks, Stilly, that link led me to other good info


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Jan 20 - 11:58 AM

Archaeologists find a Roman London Bridge in a very short video added to British Pathé.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Iains
Date: 19 Dec 19 - 04:51 AM

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/03/150325-underground-city-cappadocia-turkey-archaeology/

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2016/05/20160511-Maya-Lost-City-Canadian-Teen-Discover-Constellations-Archaeology-Satell

I wonder how that Mayan City?is going to play out.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Dec 19 - 12:04 AM

I probably saw this in Smithsonian when it first came out and forgot all about it. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/gobekli-tepe-the-worlds-first-temple-83613665/


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 09:14 PM

I am a huge Globeki Tepi fan. Some distance away in Turkey there is an underground city with ventillation and room for livestock that is nearly 20 stories deep.

I've climbed cliffside dwellings and seen pictures of mountain top temples in Nepal, Peru, underground cities and now underwater cities. We are damn clever animals especially in trying to escape other predatory people or enviorments. We are now looking to interplanatary travel while our ancestors were more advanced in building with 'unliftable stone'.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 08:23 PM

Admiral O Voyus says it is clear that sea levels were significantly lower in the past. In addition to the underwater architecture already mentioned, there are structures remaining off of Japan, Cuba, India, China, Argentina and HERE


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Bill D
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 08:17 PM

When I was in college in the 1960s, I remember a lecture noting that Mohenjo-daro in India and Harappa in what is now Pakistan were some of the earliest known major cities known. Other excavations find evidence of settlements, but very few large ones.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 06:37 PM

wikipedia on Yonaguni Monument

thanks to all who post here, I've seen so many interesting pages & bookmarked several more pages.

I've been buying 2 magazines over the past year or so as my local libraries no longer get archaeology magazines (shock, horror, no regular archaeology!) & a growing pile of magazines when I'm trying to downsize. Fortunately I have a friend who volunteers on archaeological sites ...

Current World Archaeology - Archaeological Institute of America
Current World Archaeology

sandra


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Iains
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 03:26 PM

Not disputing some are old news. Others are more recent news. If the accepted dating of gobekli tepi is 12000BP then I would anticipate many more underwater discoveries. It is probably no exaggeration to say we know more of the surface features of Mars than the underwater features of our own planet.
The Yonaguni Island Submarine Ruins are subject to controversy as to whether they are manmade or natural.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 02:22 PM

Archaeological materials underwater are old news, Iains, New World and Old, with divers finding Mayan relics in an underwater cave and Robert Ballard has pushed those limits even further with discoveries of the ancient ruins under the Black Sea. To say nothing of Alexandria, Egypt, many Greek ruins, all sorts of Mediterranean stuff, etc.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Iains
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 01:04 PM

I am leaning toward India as the heart of ancient civilization. Now I will look at the genetic records, architecture and dates to see if my guess is reasonable.

Conventional archeology holds that the Romans built Baalbek. They may have built the temple to jupiter However this sits atop 3000ton dressed megaliths. Funny the Romans left no written record of how they moved those megaliths. Even stranger they had the technology to move them.
But this is a pattern repeated throughout the world, ancient ruins are built on top of carefully dressed megaliths. Frequently the basal craftmanship is of far greater quality than the overlying constructions.
This suggests to me that conventional archeology needs to get out and about more and rethink a few basics. Gobekli Tepi has given them a bit of a poke in the eye as far as shifting boundaries back is concerned. In the last 20000 years sea level has risen 400feet. How many ruins lie under the sea? I suspect a paradigm shift is in the offing.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Dec 19 - 12:05 PM

This one is out of this world: Indian Moon Lander Crash Site located by an amateur astronomer.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 04:00 PM

Ramses II does look buff.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 03:57 PM

Could follow its construction (will be the biggest museum in the world, I think), as priceless items are moved across Cairo from the old museum.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 03:54 PM

WHY ? What do we look for?


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 03:22 PM

Check the Grand Egyptian Museum's construction, not far from the pyramids.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 03:11 PM

Back on Earth there are many early Olmec sites but the Mayans have on occaision built on top of other ancient structures so even lidar can not show everything.

The Olmec people interest me the most since they are the most global cosmpolitan ancient civilization I have ever seen. There are quite a few links with India Hindu statues of various gods like Garuda and Shiva as well as stone heads with African features. Europeans, not so much.

I am leaning toward India as the heart of ancient civilization. Now I will look at the genetic records, architecture and dates to see if my guess is reasonable.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 01:20 PM

I was comparing photos of the polar regions of Saturn and Jupiter and noticed a profound similarity. Saturn has a north polar vortex that is in the perfect shape of a hexagon. Jupiter has a brand new polar storm of 6 hurricanes that trace a hexagon shape, all surrounding a central storm. There are obviously forces that resolve into a hexagon shape around planetary gas giant polar regions. THE questions are how and why.

Ancient images of the hexagon and star of David as well as Gurjiefian and Kabalistic cosmology may have no bearing but there is an intriguing cosmic question here.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 12:06 PM

Lidar! Another way to get sucked into the close details using Google Earth. It's also very good for hard science.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 07:35 AM

google lidar Earth


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Dec 19 - 07:14 AM

Yes indeed, thanks for your Herculean efforts Professor Sage.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 13 Dec 19 - 06:33 PM

thanks for posting, Stilly, I now have a new bookmark (here) - Live Science, lots of interesting stuff.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Dec 19 - 01:22 PM

WWI German vessel Scharnhorst found off of Falkland Islands

Maritime archaeologists have located the wreck of the S.M.S. Scharnhorst, an armored battle cruiser that served as the flagship of German Admiral Maximilian Graf von Spee’s East Asia Squadron during World War I, the Falklands Maritime Heritage Trust announced this week.

The Scharnhorst sank in the south Atlantic on December 8, 1914, with more than 800 crew members onboard. The cruiser was one of four German ships lost during the Battle of the Falkland Islands; according to official dispatches, two support vessels from the squadron were later evacuated and scuttled.

Per a press release, the heritage trust started looking for the sunken ships on the centenary of the battle in 2014. Initial search attempts were unsuccessful, but archaeologists recently returned to the site of the naval engagement with state-of-the-art subsea exploration equipment, including a specialized vessel called the Seabed Constructor and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs).


The rest is at the link.

There are other views of it here.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: leeneia
Date: 06 Nov 19 - 06:38 PM

that's interesting. And amazing. Thanks, SRS.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Nov 19 - 10:15 PM

Canine Archaeologists Sniff Out 3,000-Year-Old Graves in Croatia

A new study shows how canines trained to find human remains could help archaeologists locate new sites

Dogs have helped law enforcement and search-and-rescue crews discover human remains for decades. But recently, a new group has enlisted the help of canines and their olfactory superpowers: archaeologists.

In a recent paper in the Journal of Archeological Method and Theory, Vedrana Glavaš, an archaeologist at the University of Zadar in Croatia, and Andrea Pintar, a cadaver dog handler, describe how dogs trained to find human remains helped them track down gravesites dating to around 700 B.C. . . .To test the dogs, Glavaš had them sniff around an area where they she had excavated three grave sites the year before. The human remains had been removed, and due to weathering, it was no longer apparent where the excavations had taken place. Two dogs, working independently, easily located all three spots.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 05 Nov 19 - 07:08 PM

Interesting related programme on BBC One just now - "Earth from Space".


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Sep 19 - 04:08 PM

I recognize the name because it periodically comes up in historical novels. :-/


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Bill D
Date: 15 Sep 19 - 02:26 PM

I was introduced to Mithra in History 101 in college about 1958. It was explained as descending from Persian Zoroastrianism and having been brought, in various forms, to Rome...probably by slaves... where gradually, Mithra became the focus until it was displaced by, as DR. J. Kelly Sowards called it "dockyards Christianity".

Here is a quote from the Zoroastrian Avesta scriptures: " We sacrifice to Mithra, The Lord of all countries, Whom Ahura Mazda created the most glorious, Of the Supernatural Yazads. So may there come to us for Aid, Both Mithra and Ahura, the Two Exalted Ones,...."
Rome has a myriad of barely explored underground tunnels and tombs. Some may never be excavated due to the city above them.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Sep 19 - 10:15 AM

Temple to ancient Roman cult resurrected beneath London

    In central London, seven meters underground, lies an ancient Roman temple to a mysterious god called Mithras.

    Nearly 2,000 years after the temple was frequented by the all-male members of an exclusive, enigmatic cult, it has now been faithfully restored and opened to the public.

    Visitors descend into a dimly lit cave beneath the new London headquarters of business news outlet Bloomberg. The temple slowly comes to life as torch light flickers and a recording of a low chanting fills the room.

    Channels of light and haze extend from the rocky ruins, recreating shadowy columns to give the impression of the temple's superstructure.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Sep 19 - 11:13 PM

If your armchair was at the beach or on a boat: 11 amazing message-in-a-bottle stories.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Helen
Date: 13 Sep 19 - 03:49 PM

Great minds, Mrzy!!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Sep 19 - 11:20 AM

Helen, I was about to post that!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Sep 19 - 11:03 AM

Agreed - wow! There are lots of archaeological discoveries made this way also.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 13 Sep 19 - 10:19 AM

wow!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Helen
Date: 13 Sep 19 - 01:09 AM

Is this an old enough site to be classified as "archaeology"? Probably not, but interesting:

Missing man's remains found after 22 years thanks to Google Earth


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Sep 19 - 06:51 PM

Hidden Japanese Settlement Found in Forests of British Columbia



More than 1,000 items have been unearthed there, among them rice bowls, sake bottles and Japanese ceramics


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Sep 19 - 03:11 PM

Bones of Roman Britons provide new clues to dietary deprivation

Researchers at the University of Bradford have shown a link between the diet of Roman Britons and their mortality rates for the first time, overturning a previously-held belief about the quality of the Roman diet.

Using a new method of analysis, the researchers examined stable isotope data (the ratios of particular chemicals in human tissue) from the bone collagen of hundreds of Roman Britons, together with the individuals' age-of-death estimates and an established mortality model.

The data sample included over 650 individuals from various published archaeological sites throughout England.

The researchers—from institutions including the Museum of London, Durham University and the University of South Carolina—found that higher nitrogen isotope ratios in the bones were associated with a higher risk of mortality, while higher carbon isotope ratios were associated with a lower risk of mortality.

Romano-British urban archaeological populations are characterised by higher nitrogen isotope ratios, which have been thought previously to indicate a better, or high-status, diet. But taking carbon isotope ratios, as well as death rates, into account showed that the nitrogen could also be recording long-term nutritional stress, such as deprivation or starvation.

Differences in sex were also identified by the researchers, with the data showing that men typically had higher ratios of both isotopes, indicating a generally higher status diet compared to women. (The rest is at the link)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Sep 19 - 03:06 PM

This one via YouTube, Sir David Attenborough and the Giant Dinosaur, the Titanosaur, this one found in Patagonia, Argentina.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27441156

https://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/permanent/orientation-center/the-titanosaur


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Aug 19 - 10:09 PM

Here's something interesting from Smithsonian magazine: This Map Lets You Plug in Your Address to See How It’s Changed Over the Past 750 Million Years.

Interactive Map the article describes how to use it.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 12:25 PM

This travel is more time consuming and distant but is also interested in ancient history - Mars Missions Stop in Their Tracks as Red Planet Drifts to the Far Side of Sun. (Google Earth didn't participate in this one, but I think they do have a site for exploring the moon.) Through some glitch this page has the message repeated several times, the actual article is only five paragraphs).


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Bill D
Date: 04 Aug 19 - 10:07 PM

Yep.. like an early version of Civic Associations.... promoting the virtues and attractions of the town. I have one photo of a model T with a big sign hanging on the side saying "Good Eats at Day Hotel"
I was in Lost Springs once... when I was about 10-12... for my father's HS reunion. All I really remember is that it was still small, off the main road, and had nothing for kids to do! Boosting only works when you have something to offer.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 Aug 19 - 09:49 PM

A "booster" is someone who promotes the local businesses in a community for the benefit of both. It can probably be used on a larger scale, but I'm thinking in particular of a novel. If you've ever read Sinclair Lewis's Babbitt, he is a big booster in his community.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: JennieG
Date: 04 Aug 19 - 08:59 PM

Interesting photos, Bill! Tell me, please - what is "Booster Day", as shown in some of those pics? I have never heard the term before.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Bill D
Date: 02 Aug 19 - 09:31 PM

Yes... I do that a lot. I also look up all my old addresses from the past.. only to find urban renewal has eaten up many of them.
But I did find an OLD B&W pic in a family album of where my father was born in 1907 in Pitcairn, PA... with the address noted. I went to GE and LO! The house is till there and recognizable and occupied. I also find ancestors' cemeteries and look up where they are buried.... and, because the Santa Fe Trail went right by a tiny town where my father went to school, there is a site that collects old pics & info about it, and my family owned the hotel there from about 1911 to 1920 or so. About 8 years ago, I sent them some info and pics, which are included near the bottom. I now have even more to send.
(and because I know where you live after the Katlaughing memorial, I browse your neighborhood also...)

My GoogleEarth placemarks are around 50-60 now.


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