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Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'

DigiTrad:
FRANKLIN THE BRAVE or LADY FRANKLIN'S LAMENT 2
LADY FRANKLIN'S LAMENT
LADY FRANKLIN'S LAMENT (4)
THE FRANKLIN EXPEDITION


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Lyr Req: Bob Dylan's Dream (Bob Dylan) (32)


GUEST,MichaelKM 01 Feb 22 - 11:59 AM
GUEST,Julia L 01 Feb 22 - 05:30 PM
GUEST,MichaelKM 01 Feb 22 - 06:38 PM
GUEST,MichaelKM 02 Feb 22 - 10:46 AM
Reinhard 02 Feb 22 - 11:20 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 02 Feb 22 - 12:38 PM
Joe Offer 02 Feb 22 - 01:56 PM
The Sandman 02 Feb 22 - 04:30 PM
Richard Mellish 02 Feb 22 - 05:08 PM
GUEST,Iains 05 Feb 22 - 04:56 AM
GUEST 05 Feb 22 - 05:04 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 05 Feb 22 - 06:04 AM
Reinhard 05 Feb 22 - 08:25 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 05 Feb 22 - 11:04 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 05 Feb 22 - 07:14 PM
GUEST 06 Feb 22 - 06:19 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 06 Feb 22 - 07:04 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 06 Feb 22 - 07:06 AM
Jeri 06 Feb 22 - 11:10 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 06 Feb 22 - 12:33 PM
GUEST,MichaelKM 10 Feb 22 - 07:15 AM
Brian Peters 10 Feb 22 - 11:37 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 10 Feb 22 - 01:04 PM
The Sandman 11 Feb 22 - 04:03 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 11 Feb 22 - 04:45 AM
The Sandman 11 Feb 22 - 05:09 AM
Brian Peters 11 Feb 22 - 08:09 AM
The Sandman 11 Feb 22 - 11:55 AM
The Sandman 11 Feb 22 - 11:57 AM
Stewie 12 Feb 22 - 04:53 AM
Brian Peters 12 Feb 22 - 06:44 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 12 Feb 22 - 07:59 AM
Richard Mellish 12 Feb 22 - 12:38 PM
Richard Mellish 12 Feb 22 - 12:53 PM
GUEST,MichaelKM 12 Feb 22 - 06:16 PM
Joe Offer 12 Feb 22 - 06:25 PM
Joe Offer 12 Feb 22 - 06:41 PM
GUEST,MichaelKM 12 Feb 22 - 07:50 PM
Stewie 12 Feb 22 - 08:14 PM
Joe Offer 12 Feb 22 - 08:20 PM
GUEST,MichaelKM 13 Feb 22 - 03:29 AM
Richard Mellish 14 Feb 22 - 03:01 PM
GUEST,Iains 14 Feb 22 - 06:28 PM
GUEST,MichaelKM 15 Feb 22 - 02:42 AM
Reinhard 15 Feb 22 - 03:06 AM
GUEST 15 Feb 22 - 04:18 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 15 Feb 22 - 05:46 AM
GUEST 15 Feb 22 - 05:57 AM
GUEST,MichaelKM 22 Feb 22 - 05:32 PM
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Subject: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 01 Feb 22 - 11:59 AM

Some years ago, in another thread, Richard Mellish quoted the second verse of Cyril Tawney's rendition of 'Lady Franklin's Lament', presumably taken from his cassette album 'Sailor's Delight'. This verse is identical to the second verse of 'Franklin's Crew' in Joanna C. Colcord's 'Songs of American Sailormen', first published in 1938. I would like to establish whether Tawney took his version of the ballad from this publication or whether he simply added the verse to the ubiquitous 'Lord Franklin'. I hope that someone who has the cassette can help me resolve this question.


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Subject: ADD: The Fate of Franklin (from Flanders)
From: GUEST,Julia L
Date: 01 Feb 22 - 05:30 PM

The Maine version has an additional first verse, as do the Canadian (Fowke) and Australian (Mark Gregory) variants. Will Merritt (1941), the singer of the Maine variant says he learned it from his Scottish mother. Colcord (actually first published in 1924) does not include this verse, nor does she give the origin of her version. Sam Henry (1939), from Northern Ireland, also does not include this verse.

THE FATE OF FRANKLIN
Will Merritt, Ludlow Maine USA 1941
Helen Hartness Flanders Collection
Middlebury College, VT

A sailor bold and undaunted stood
As waves rolled over the briney flood
Come pay attention to what I say
'T will put you in mind of a sailor's dream

We were homeward bound one night on the deep
When in my hammock I fell asleep
I dreamt a dream which I thought was true
Concerning Franklin and his brave crew

As we drew near to old England's shore
I heard a lady so sad implore
She wept aloud and she seemed to say
"Alas my Franklin's so far away"

It' s seven long years since that ship of fame
It bore my Franklin across the main
With a hundred sailors with courage true
To find a northwestern passage through

To find a passage around the Pole
Where lightning flashes and loud thunder rolls
It's more than any man can do
With a heart undaunted and courage true

There was Captain Kelly of Sedgewick town
And Captain Osburn of high renown
And Doctor Tate like so many more
That's long been cruising the Arctic shore

Oh they sailed east and they sailed west
From Greenland's Island where they thought best
They met hardships and vainly strove
With mountains of ice where their ship was stove

In Baffin's Bay where the cold wind blows
There the fate of Franklin nobody knows
Five hundred pounds would I freely give
To know on earth does my Franklin live

But alas he's gone like many more
That's left their home to return no more
God bless the widows who sorely weep
For loss of husbands upon the deep.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 01 Feb 22 - 06:38 PM

The first verse that you mention derives ultimately from the broadside 'Lady Franklin's Lament for her Husband', as does the second that I mentioned. This broadside is dateable to 1852/3 and is the origin of virtually all the Franklin ballads that have been collected.

Joanna Colcord's 1924 book 'Roll and Go: Songs of American Sailormen' does not include 'Franklin's Crew'.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 02 Feb 22 - 10:46 AM

Julia,

Could you be more explicit about what you mean by the Canadian and Australian variants? I think I know what you have in mind but would like to be sure.

I am still looking for help on Cyril Tawney's version, though.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Reinhard
Date: 02 Feb 22 - 11:20 AM

Mark Gregory has a website Australian Folk Songs: Lady Franklin's Lament For Her Husband


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 02 Feb 22 - 12:38 PM

Yes, I've seen that. There are two English broadsides (one of which I mentioned above, the one you linked to) and a song taken from a Tasmanian newspaper of 1853.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Joe Offer
Date: 02 Feb 22 - 01:56 PM

Can somebody post the lyrics as Cyril Tawney sang it? I couldn't find a recording to transcribe.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: The Sandman
Date: 02 Feb 22 - 04:30 PM

I saw Cyril perform live many times ,I never heard him sing this song live


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 02 Feb 22 - 05:08 PM

I have just happened to see this thread. I think I have a recording from the radio series "Shanty Time" but I'm a dubious of the legitimacy of making it available and a bit busy at present to transcribe it.

Joe, would you transcribe it if I send it to you? (Please reply to me mailbox.)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,Iains
Date: 05 Feb 22 - 04:56 AM

Lady Franklin's Lament / Lord Franklin (Roud 487 - Mainly ...
https://mainlynorfolk.info › lloyd › songs › ladyfrankli...
Cyril Tawney sang Lady Franklin's Lament on his 1990 Neptune Tapes cassette Sailor's Delight

https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/ladyfranklinslament.html


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Feb 22 - 05:04 AM

Cyril Tawney Sailor's Delight


https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/records/sailorsdelight.html


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 05 Feb 22 - 06:04 AM

It's a pity that mainlynorfolk did not include Tawney's version among the texts that it reproduced. The search goes on.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Reinhard
Date: 05 Feb 22 - 08:25 AM

Sorry Michael, can't do. Sailor's Delight is one of the two Cyril Tawney albums that I do not have.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 05 Feb 22 - 11:04 AM

It probably doesn't help that cassettes are yesterday's technology.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 05 Feb 22 - 07:14 PM

Sorry, Reihard, I've just realised who you are. My apologies; no criticism was intended.

I was interested to see the version by Artisan on your site. As far as I am aware, they and Kings of the South Seas are the only two who have gone back to the original broadside. I have sent off for the 'Voices in Harmony' CD to hear their treatment of it.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Feb 22 - 06:19 AM

I have just been engaged to narrate an audiobook of a novel based upon the Franklin expedition, so I have found this thread very interesting. If anyone has a link to the original broadside, I would be grateful to see it so that I can forward it to the author.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 06 Feb 22 - 07:04 AM

If you scroll up to Reinard's post on 22 Feb, there is a link to an Australian website with a copy of the broadside and a transcript. I haven't checked the accuracy of the transcript.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 06 Feb 22 - 07:06 AM

Correction: 02 Feb.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Jeri
Date: 06 Feb 22 - 11:10 AM

Not quite the same one, I think: Broadside at the Bodleian: Sir J. Franklin and his Crews


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 06 Feb 22 - 12:33 PM

It's a different ballad but interesting in its own right. It is dateable to late 1854 and encapsulates news of Franklin's expedition as it emerged during that year.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 10 Feb 22 - 07:15 AM

I don't know if any progress is being made in transcribing this song but, if those having access to it do not have time to do so, perhaps they might be able to answer a few questions which could establish which version Tawney was singing.

1. In the first verse, how is Franklin's crew described - gallant, brave or something else?

2. Is there a verse naming those searching for the lost expedition?

3. Is there a verse mentioning an Eskimo in his skin canoe?

4. Is there a verse offering £10,000 for news of Franklin?

5. Is Franklin described as 'Lord Franklin'?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Brian Peters
Date: 10 Feb 22 - 11:37 AM

I'm afraid I can't help with Cyril's version, but anyone who is interested in the song's history, from broadside to folk revival, should read this.

Note that the 'eskimo' doesn't really belong in the original song at all - yet another Bert Lloyd 'improvement'!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 10 Feb 22 - 01:04 PM

I could go on at length about what I think about Bert Lloyd's version. I get a bit peeved when I see it referred to as 'traditional' when, as far as I can see, it did not exist in that form before he recorded it for the 1955 LP 'The Singing Sailor'.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: The Sandman
Date: 11 Feb 22 - 04:03 AM

Michael does that matter? ,it could be argued that all tradtional songs evolve and get added to, that is part of what makes tradtional songs differ from recently composed songs,
recently composed songs generally have their lyrics copyrighted, that means in practice they do not evolve, that is why recently composed songs are not tradtional even if they are in a folk style,
an example Yesterday" lyrics are in my experience always sung as Paul MacC   wrote them


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 11 Feb 22 - 04:45 AM

I think it does, because 'Lord Franklin' is not a natural evolution but a modern compilation, albeit derived from traditional sources.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: The Sandman
Date: 11 Feb 22 - 05:09 AM

1 the important thing is to sing the song,
2 as regards copyright, legally it is known as trad.
3. what is a natural evolution? rather than any other kind of evolution, any evolution has a degree of consciousness about it.
4. someone once showed me a final verse they had written about the lead poisoining, a conscious evolution.
I would make my own decision on whether to sing that modern verse, on the strength of the verse not whether it was modern or not


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Brian Peters
Date: 11 Feb 22 - 08:09 AM

'I think it does, because 'Lord Franklin' is not a natural evolution but a modern compilation, albeit derived from traditional sources.'

I agree with Michael here. There's nothing wrong with anybody singing Bert's version, but if we're looking at the song in a historical context then we need to be sure what belongs to the period, and what is a 1950s concoction. Bert's passing it off as 'Trad.' for copyright purposes doesn't alter that.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: The Sandman
Date: 11 Feb 22 - 11:55 AM

well the way i would look at a song and the way i think tradtional singers like Bob Roberts looked at a song is what makes a good song ,an example of this is Bob Roberts version of "whilst gamekeepers lie sleeping" does anyone twiiter on about that being a rewrite and therefore not trad.
imo singers look at songs as good stories not histoical context, and that appears to have been the attitude of trad singers like Bob Roberts
Scholars have a different approach as do pedants

    a person who is excessively concerned with minor details and rules or with displaying academic learning.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: The Sandman
Date: 11 Feb 22 - 11:57 AM

no offence intended to you,Brian you are a good singer as well as a scholar, and also a gentleman


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Stewie
Date: 12 Feb 22 - 04:53 AM

Thanks to my good mate in Tasmania, Michael Manhire, I have a copy of 'Sailor's Delight'. I will transcribe the song tomorrow if no one beats me to it.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Brian Peters
Date: 12 Feb 22 - 06:44 AM

Very kind of you, Dick! Personally I look at songs both as things to sing and (wearing another hat) as historical artefacts. Bert Lloyd's interventions have been the subject of my lockdown research project, and I've found many, many examples. I actually argue that, without Bert's improvements, the Folk Revival would never have taken off. But that's a discussion for another place.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 12 Feb 22 - 07:59 AM

Thank you, Stewie. I look forward to that.


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Subject: ADD: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 12 Feb 22 - 12:38 PM

I've dug out the recording. I first typed out what was in my head, then corrected it from the recording. Not many changes, apart from one verse that I had entirely forgotten. Anyway, here it is.

Stewie please do check against the 'Sailor's Delight' recording as there may well be some differences.

There are considerable differences from the version I've mostly heard in the Revival (presumably Bert's?), including the absence of the "Eskimo" verse.

Cyril introduced it as "Franklin's Crew".


FRANKLIN'S CREW
(as recorded by Cyril Tawney)

While cruisin' home across the deep,
Snug in my hammock, I fell asleep.
I dreamed these lines, which I think are true,
Concerning Franklin and his brave crew.

And as we neared old England's shore
I saw a lady in deep deplore.
She wept aloud and she seemed to say
"Alas my Franklin is long away.

"It's a long time now since those ships of fame
Bore my long-lost husband across the main,
With a hundred men, with courage stout,
To find the north-western passage out.

"To find a passage by the North Pole
Where the storms do rage and wild waters roll.
'Twas more than mortal man can do
With heart undaunted and courage true.

"They sailéd east and they sailéd west
Along Greenland's coast, which they knew the best.
'Gainst hardships and dangers they vainly strove.
'Gainst mountains of ice their ships were drove.

"Oh Captain Osborne of Scarborough Town,
Granville and Fairey of great renown,
And Captain Ross and many more
Have since been cruising by that arctic shore.

"In Baffin's Bay where the right whale blows,
The fate of Franklin no-one knows.
Which causes many to weep and mourn
While praying for their safe return."


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 12 Feb 22 - 12:53 PM

PS: I see that what Cyril sand was the Colcord version.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 12 Feb 22 - 06:16 PM

Thank you, Richard. That is indeed the Colcord version, with just a word changed here and there. It would be interesting to see how it compares with his 'Sailor's Delight' version.


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Subject: ADD Franklin's Crew (from Colcord)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Feb 22 - 06:25 PM

Here's the version from page 158 Joanna Colcord's Songs of American Sailormen (published in 1938 by Bramhall House). The book was originally published by Norton in 1924 as Roll and Go, Songs of American Sailormen. A message above says "Franklin's Crew" is not found in Colcord's 1924 book, and I didn't find it in that edition, either.


FRANKLIN'S CREW

While homeward bound across the deep,
Snug in my hammock I fell asleep.
I dreamt these lines, which I think are true,
Concerning Franklin and his brave crew.

And as we neared old England’s shore
I saw a lady in deep deplore,
She wept aloud and seemed to say,
Alas, my Franklin is long away.

It’s a long time now since those ships of fame
Bore my long–lost husband across the main,
And a hundred seamen with courage stout
To find the Northwestern passage out.

To seek a passage by the North Pole
Where storms do rage and wild waters roll,
‘Tis more than mortal men can do,
With heart undaunted and courage true.

They sailed east and they sailed west,
Along Greenland’s coast which they knew the best,
Against hardships and dangers they vainly strove,
Against mountains of ice their ships were drove.

Oh, Captain Osborne of Scarbury town,
Granville and Perry of great renown,
And Captain Ross and many more
Have since been cruising on the Arctic shore.

In Baffin’s Bay where the right whale blows
The fate of Franklin no one knows,
Which causes many to weep and mourn
While praying for their safe return.

    Notes (from Colcord): In 1845, Sir John Franklin, the Arctic explorer, sailed from England with 219 [actually 129] men in the ships Erebus and Terror to attempt to discover the Northwest Passage. The party disappeared, and although many expeditions were sent out in search of them, their fate was not learned until fourteen years later. Lady Franklin had been indefatigable in her efforts, and in 1859 an expedition which she had organized and sent out under Captain McClintock was successful in finding the cairn in which the Franklin expedition had left an account of the loss of the two ships in the ice, and their attempts to reach safety overland. The last entry was made in April, 1848; an Eskimo woman told Captain McClintock that after that “the men fell down and died as they walked.”
    The relief expeditions sent out both from England and America greatly extended knowledge of the Arctic, and kept alive the interest and concern of the civilized world in the fate of Franklin and his men. Naturally, it be-came a subject for the ballad-makers. It is possible to fix with considerable accuracy the dates between which the following version must have been composed; it was after Captain Osborne sailed for the Arctic in 1852, and before Captain McClintock’s discovery in 1859.


Recording by Eilis Kennedy: https://eiliskennedy.bandcamp.com/track/franklins-crew


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Feb 22 - 06:41 PM

Interesting page titled ""Bob Dylan's Dream" & "Lady Franklin's Lament":


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 12 Feb 22 - 07:50 PM

Thank you for posting Colcord's version, Joe. There is a typo in her notes to the ballad (her error, not yours). Franklin set out with 134 officers and men but five were sent back for various reasons leaving 129, not 219. The ballad can be dated with even greater accuracy. It derives from the broadside 'Lady Franklin's Lament for her Husband' (linked to by Reinhard above) which contains the line, 'For since that time seven years are past', so it can be dated to 1852/3.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Stewie
Date: 12 Feb 22 - 08:14 PM

Hi Richard,

'Sailor's Delight' has the title as 'Lady Franklin's Lament'. Your transcription accords with the rendition on 'Sailor's Delight' except stanza 2 line 2 has 'I heard a lady in deep deplore'. In stanza 6 line, it sounds to me more like 'Perry' rather than 'Fairey'. There is a final stanza on 'Sailor's Delight':

And now my burden it gives me pain
For my long-lost husband across the main
Ten thousand pounds would I freely give
To know on earth that my Franklin do live

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Feb 22 - 08:20 PM

I'm loving this. Thanks, everyone.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 13 Feb 22 - 03:29 AM

Thanks, Stewie. In stanza 6 line 2 Colcord has 'Perry', so that is probably what Tawney sang. The final stanza seems to have been added from Bert Lloyd's version with the substitution of 'husband across the main' for 'Franklin I'd cross the main' in line 2.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 14 Feb 22 - 03:01 PM

> In stanza 6 line 2 Colcord has 'Perry', so that is probably what Tawney sang.

I think there was a Perry who explored the Arctic, so put that one down to my mishearing.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,Iains
Date: 14 Feb 22 - 06:28 PM

Perry, Parry or Peary ?
Robert Peary, in full Robert Edwin Peary, (born May 6, 1856, Cresson, Pennsylvania, U.S.—died February 20, 1920, Washington, D.C.), U.S. Arctic explorer
Sir William Edward Parry FRS (19 December 1790 – 8 July 1855) was an Anglo-Welsh explorer of the Arctic
English rear-admiral and Arctic explorer, William Edward Perry, attempted one of the earliest North Pole expeditions.Parry seems the correct spelling and the most likely candidate


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 15 Feb 22 - 02:42 AM

Sir William Parry did not take part in the search for Franklin. The name 'Perry' probably arises from a mishearing or misunderstanding on the part of someone in the oral transmission of this version of the ballad. The correct name is 'Penny', as in the original broadside, referring to William Penny, a whaling captain from Aberdeen, who was part of the expedition that found Franklin's 1845/6 wintering site on Beechey Island in 1850.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: Reinhard
Date: 15 Feb 22 - 03:06 AM

Gale Huntington wrote in his notes to "Franklin the Brave" in "Sam Henry's Songs of the people", where the name is Parry and not Perry:

Captain Parry, mentioned in the song, gave his name to Parry's Island in the Arctic. Captain Ross was Sir John Ross, who led an expedition in 1829 to the Artic and named King William's Island. He made a voyage in the Felix in 1850 in an endeavour to trace Franklin.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Feb 22 - 04:18 AM

After doing some internet digging:
In 1847 whaler William Penny attempted to make contact with the missing expedition and in the autumn of that year the Navy began to show concern and to make plans for relief expeditions.
"In the course of a decade almost 40 expeditions were sent out to search for Franklin. Among those who led these British expeditions were John Ross, his nephew James Clark Ross,. Horatio Austin, Henry Kellett, John Richardson, Edward Inglefield, and Edward Belcher. It was eventually learnt that on the brink of success his ships had been icebound off King William Island. After what must have been a dreadful winter, Franklin had died on 11 June 1847, and his surviving crew perished in a terrible ordeal while attempting to reach the Back River to the south of the icebound ships."
"The discoverer of Franklin's fate was John Rae (1853-54) who was given a reward of £10,000 despite the opposition of Franklin's widow (and Charles Dickens). The Inuit had supplied information about the lost expedition to Rae and their reports were confirmed by Leopold McClintock (1857-59) who brought back to England the only written documentation relating to Franklin's voyage"
A bit of clarificatio9n:
(Sir John Ross CB (24 June 1777 – 30 August 1856) was a Scottish Royal Navy officer and polar explorer. He was the uncle of Sir James Clark Ross,Sir James Clark Ross FRS FLS FRAS (15 April 1800 – 3 April 1862) was a British Royal Navy officer and polar explorer known for his explorations of the Arctic, participating in two expeditions led by his uncle Sir John Ross, and four led by Sir William Parry, and, in particular, for his own Antarctic expedition from 1839 to 1843.
In 1848, Ross was sent on one of three expeditions to find Sir John Franklin. The others were the Rae–Richardson Arctic expedition and the expedition aboard HMS Plover and HMS Herald through the Bering Strait. He was given command of HMS Enterprise, accompanied by HMS Investigator. Because of heavy ice in Baffin Bay he only reached the northeast tip of Somerset Island where he was frozen in at Port Leopold. In the spring he and Francis McClintock explored the west coast of the island by sledge. He recognized Peel Sound but thought it too ice-choked for Franklin to have used it. In fact Franklin had used it in 1846 when the extent of sea ice had been atypically low. The next summer he tried to reach Wellington Channel but was blocked by ice and returned to England. (Wiki)
Sherard Osborn CB FRS (25 April 1822 – 6 May 1875) was a Royal Navy admiral and Arctic explorer.
He took a prominent part in 1849 in advocating a new search expedition for Sir John Franklin, and in 1850 was appointed to the command of the steam-tender HMS Pioneer (1850) in the Arctic expedition under Horatio Thomas Austin, in the course of which he performed a remarkable sledge-journey to the western extremity of Prince of Wales Island.[2] He published an account of this voyage, entitled Stray Leaves from an Arctic Journal (1852), and was promoted to the rank of commander shortly afterwards.

In the new expedition of 1852–1854 under Sir Edward Belcher he again took part as commander of Pioneer. In 1856, he published the journals of Captain Robert McClure, giving a narrative of the discovery of the Northwest Passage


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 15 Feb 22 - 05:46 AM

The Ross mentioned in the ballad could be either Sir John Ross or Sir James Clark Ross, as both were involved in the search for Franklin, although Sir John Ross was 72 by then.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Feb 22 - 05:57 AM

The 1852 British expedition sent in search of Franklin consisted of five ships:
Assistance.Commander Sir Edward Belcher, C.-in-G, 424 tons, sixty-one men.¹
Resolute.Captain Henry Kellett, 424 tons, sixty-one men.
Pioneer.Captain Osborn. Attached to Assistance,steamer, 60 hp, thirty men.
Intrepid.Captain McClintock. Attached to Resolute,steamer, 60 hp, thirty men.
North Star.Captain Pullen. Transport, 600 tons, thirty men.²


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Subject: RE: Origins: Cyril Tawney's 'Lady Franklin's Lament'
From: GUEST,MichaelKM
Date: 22 Feb 22 - 05:32 PM

This thread has been quiet for a week or so and may have run its course. I have the answer to my original query and would like to take the opportunity to thank everyone who has contributed.


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