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Lyr Req: Early One Morning (trad English)

GUEST,oriena@onebox.com 22 Feb 00 - 12:34 PM
Molly Malone 22 Feb 00 - 12:47 PM
Amos 22 Feb 00 - 01:27 PM
Molly Malone 22 Feb 00 - 01:31 PM
Bert 22 Feb 00 - 01:38 PM
McGrath of Harlow 22 Feb 00 - 01:59 PM
katlaughing 22 Feb 00 - 03:20 PM
GUEST,Marymac90 22 Feb 00 - 05:03 PM
Amos 22 Feb 00 - 05:06 PM
Metchosin 22 Feb 00 - 06:11 PM
Barbara 22 Feb 00 - 06:36 PM
Lanfranc 22 Feb 00 - 07:25 PM
Jim Dixon 20 Mar 18 - 06:00 PM
leeneia 20 Mar 18 - 06:46 PM
Jim Dixon 20 Mar 18 - 06:50 PM
GUEST,Ebor Fiddler 22 Mar 18 - 06:51 PM
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Subject: Need title for song...
From: GUEST,oriena@onebox.com
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 12:34 PM

Several years ago I heard this tune on "Bewitched". I'd like to learn the name of it and if all the lyrics are available. The part I remember went like this:

Early one morning Just as the sun was rising
I heard a maiden singing In the valley below
"Oh never leave me. Oh, don't deceive me
How could you use a poor maiden so?"

If anyone could come up with information about this tune, I'd deeply appreciate it.


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Subject: RE: Help: Need title for song...
From: Molly Malone
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 12:47 PM

Try this one: EARLY ONE MORNING.


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Subject: RE: Help: Need title for song...
From: Amos
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 01:27 PM

Richard Dyer Bennett sang this on an early Fifties release. The second verse goes:

Remember the vows,
That you made to your Mary,
Remember the bower,
Where you vowed to be true,

Oh, don't deceive me,
Oh, never leave me,
How could you use
A poor maiden so?

I believe it is called "Early One Morning", along with about fifty other songs.

A


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Subject: RE: Help: Need title for song...
From: Molly Malone
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 01:31 PM

Ever notice that a lot of songs are "Early in the Mornin'"?

Or "As I walked out one mornin' fair..."

Or "As I went (insert place here)"


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Subject: RE: Help: Need title for song...
From: Bert
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 01:38 PM

It's here


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Subject: RE: Help: Need title for song...
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 01:59 PM

"Early one morning" means it's a folk song

"Woke up,this morning" means it's a blues.


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Subject: RE: Help: Need title for song...
From: katlaughing
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 03:20 PM

Pernell Roberts also sang it on Bonanza.:-)


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Subject: RE: Help: Need title for song...
From: GUEST,Marymac90
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 05:03 PM

Yes, he did, kat! I also remembered that, and was going to add it, but you beat me to it!


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Subject: RE: Help: Need title for song...
From: Amos
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 05:06 PM

And "Woke up early this morning" means it was recorded by Peter, Paul, and Mary?

A


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Subject: RE: Help: Need title for song...
From: Metchosin
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 06:11 PM

It was also the theme song of the "Friendly Giant" a Canadian Childrens programme on CBC TV for years.


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Subject: RE: Help: Need title for song...
From: Barbara
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 06:36 PM

And Haley Mills sings it in "Pollyanna".
Wonder if it's in the running for the most co-opted folksong? Nah, probably way behind "Turkey In the sTraw", and "Oh, Susanna".
Blessings,
Barbara


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Subject: RE: Help: Need title for song...
From: Lanfranc
Date: 22 Feb 00 - 07:25 PM

One reason for songs beginning with "As I roved out ..." "As I walked over London Bridge ..." "As I walked out on a May morning ..." etc is to enable a man to sing a song, the main narrative of which is from a female viewpoint.

cf "My husband's got no courage in him", "Geordie", "Bushes and Briars" and dozens of others.

Blues songs starting with "Woke up this morning ... " are different - could be delight at surviving another night, or it could be just cliche. There was a UK radio programme called "I'm sorry, I haven't a clue" where the contestants had to improvise a blues and they almost always started "Woke up this morning". Thinking about it, are there many real blues that start that way?


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE LAMENTING MAID / EARLY ONE MORNING
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 20 Mar 18 - 06:00 PM

Wikipedia cited this as the earliest known printing of EARLY ONE MORNING. It's so different from the well-known version, it's hard to see how you could call it the same song. But it has the same opening line, it fits the same meter and rhyme scheme, and the theme is similar.

From the Bodleian collection, Firth c.18(103):


THE LAMENTING MAID.

Early one morning just as the sun was rising,
There did I hear and a fair maiden say,
Crying: "O Cupid, O send my love to me.
Give me my shepherd or else I shall die.

"How can you slight a poor girl that loves you?
False-hearted young man, tell me why.
'Twas your fond doing which provèd my ruin.
'Tis all for the sake of a young man I die.

"Down in the meadow and sweet shady bower
There can I witness the vows to me you made.
Go, you false pretender! Don't you remember
When first my poor innocent heart you betray'd?

"How can you slight a poor girl that loves you?
How would you like to be servèd so?
You're ever a-ranging; your mind is always changing.
You're always seeking for beauties that are new.

"But when you have rang'd and have try'd every fair one,
The truth of my love perhaps you then may find.
Some they will cheat you; with false arts they'll meet you,
But my love to you's of the purest kind.

"Should you fall in love with a false-hearted woman,
Perhaps she may slight you and treat you unkind.
Anguish, grief, and sorrow, they will bid you good morrow.
The torture of a lover you surely then will find."

THE ANSWER

Who's that I hear now making lamentation?
Surely it is the voice of my love.
I'll be no longer cruel to my dearest jewel,
But constant and true like the turtle dove.

Tho' I've been ploughing the wide ocean
For honour and riches to bring to my dear,
Now the wars are over, I'll be no more a rover,
For a sailor's heart is ever sincere.

Tho' I have rang'd and have seen many a fair one,
And many have sought my heart to invade,
The truth I'll discover: I ne'er sought a lover,
For 'tis you alone the conquest have made.

Why does my fair one then sit hesitating?
Let us go to the church where I'll make you my wife.
I am no pretender; my heart I'll surrender,
Then take it in keeping and bless me for life.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Early One Morning (trad English)
From: leeneia
Date: 20 Mar 18 - 06:46 PM

I have a book called "Jacobean and Restoration Musicke for the Recorder," and this song is in it. The book gives no further information about it.

My sense of when the Jacobeans and the Restoration actually occurred is quite vague. Anybody know?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Early One Morning (trad English)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 20 Mar 18 - 06:50 PM

From A Collection of National English Airs, Volume 2, edited by W. Chappell (London: Chappell, 1838), page 77:

No. LXXXIII. EARLY ONE MORNING. Of this song, though very generally known, and frequently sung, we have seen no printed copy, nor have we been enabled to ascertain anything more than that only the first verse of the words now adopted is old, and the others added by Mr. Paul. The following doggrel lines, taken from a volume of old Penny Song Books, collected by Ritson, are probably the original words, and, possessing no pretension to rhyme beyond the first verse, may, for that reason, have been thrown aside and forgotten, while the beautiful melody to which they were coupled has deservedly survived.

THE MAID'S LAMENTATION, from The Songster's Magazine.

Early one morning, just as the sun was rising,
I heard a pretty damsel to sigh and complain,
"Oh gentle shepherd, why am I forsaken?
Oh why should in sorrow remain!

How can you slight a pretty girl that loves you,
And one to whom you are dear as her life?
But love is a folly, a foolish, foolish fancy,
Still it proved my overthrow!

But whene'er you meet a pretty woman,
You will go and court her too, for a while:
You are always ranging, chopping, and changing,
Always seeking a girl that is new.

Thro' yonder grove there is a pleasant bower,
Where you and I have spent many an hour
In kissing and courting, and in gentle sporting,
Oh! my innocent heart you've betray'd."

THE WORDS USUALLY SUNG.

Early one morning, just as the sun was rising,
I heard a maid sing in the valley below;
"Oh don't deceive me! Oh do not leave me!
How could you use a poor maiden so?

Oh! gay is the garland, and fresh are the roses
I've culled from the garden to bind on thy brow;
Oh, don't deceive me! Oh, do not leave me!
How could you use a poor maiden so?

Remember the vows that you made to your Mary,
Remember the bow'r where you vow'd to be true;
Oh, don't deceive me! Oh, do not leave me!
How could you use a poor maiden so?"

Thus sung the poor maiden, her sorrows bewailing,
Thus sung the poor maid in the valley below;
Oh, don't deceive me! Oh, do not leave me!
How could you use a poor maiden so?"

A hornpipe occasionally played at the theatres, which will perhaps be recognized by the name of a slang song, "Come all ye young blades that in robbing take delight," (words sung to that tune) is also apparently founded upon this melody.

* * *
[The tune can be seen here.]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Early One Morning (trad English)
From: GUEST,Ebor Fiddler
Date: 22 Mar 18 - 06:51 PM

I have heartily detested this song since having had to sing it at Sunday School parties in the early 1950's. I suspect it of being one of those absolutely filthy songs rewritten by Baring-Gould.


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