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Lyr/Chords Req: The Generations of Change (Armour)

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GENERATIONS OF CHANGE


Related threads:
A request from Jane Armour re' Song Loft bookings (13)
Obit: Matt Armour (Great kNight Folk Club) - 2009 (122)
Lyr Req: A Wee Session, Matt Armour (3)
Matt Armour's Songs / Lyrics (2)


Susanne (skw) 29 Apr 00 - 05:40 PM
DonMeixner 21 Aug 01 - 10:50 PM
Dita 22 Aug 01 - 01:44 AM
jacko@nz 22 Aug 01 - 02:06 AM
Thomas the Rhymer 22 Aug 01 - 02:06 AM
DonMeixner 22 Aug 01 - 07:22 AM
jacko@nz 23 Aug 01 - 06:40 PM
Lin in Kansas 24 Aug 01 - 03:35 PM
GUEST 11 Dec 10 - 01:19 PM
GUEST,Para Handy 27 Oct 11 - 07:28 AM
Susanne (skw) 09 Nov 11 - 07:35 PM
Joe Offer 09 Jul 15 - 11:29 PM
GUEST,mg 10 Jul 15 - 09:33 PM
Steve Byrne 05 Aug 15 - 06:05 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: GENERATIONS OF CHANGE (Matt Armour)^^
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 29 Apr 00 - 05:40 PM

Looking up GENERATIONS OF CHANGE in the DT I found a version (obviously taken down by ear) where few of the place-names are correct, plus one or two Scottish words such as the 'East Neuk' or 'thole'. The following is what Cilla Fisher and Artie Trezise sing on their award-winning 1979 album of the same name, according to the songsheet. Rather than pointing out the flawed words, I have copied the complete lyrics again. Hope that's all right.


GENERATIONS OF CHANGE
(Matt Armour)

My faither was a baillie frae a wee fairm at Caiplie
He worked on the land a' the days o' his life
By the time he made second he aye said he reckoned
He'd ploughed near on half o' the East Neuk o' Fife
He fee'd on at Randerston, Crawhill and Clephinton
Cambo and Carnbee and big Rennie Hill
At Kingsbarn he married, at Boarhills he's buried
But man, had he lived, he'd be ploughing on still

For those days were his days, those ways were his ways
Tae follow the ploo while his back was still strong
But those days have passed and the time came at last
For the weakness of age to make way for the young

I wisnae fir plooin', tae the sea I wis goin'
Tae follow the fish and the fisherman's ways
In rain, hail and sunshine I've watched the lang run line
Nae man mair contented his whole working day
I've lang lined the Fladden Ground, the Dutch and the Dogger Bank
Pulled the big fish frae the deep Devil's Hole
I've side trawled off Shetland, the Faroes and Iceland
In weather much worse than a body could thole

For that day was my day, that way was my way
Tae follow the fish while my back was still strong
But that day has passed and the time come at last
For the weakness of age to make way for the young

My sons they have grown and away they have gone
Tae search for black oil in the far northern sea
Like oilmen they walk and like Yankees they talk
There's no' much in common 'tween my sons and me
They've rough rigged on Josephine, Forties and Ninian
Claymore and Dunlin, Fisher and Awk
They've made fortunes for sure for in one run ashore
They spend more than I earned in a whole season's work

But this day is their day, this way is their way
Tae ride the rough rigs while their backs are still strong
But this day will pass and the time come at last
For the weakness of age to make way for the young

My grandsons are growing, to the school they're soon going
But the lang weeks o' summer they spend here wi' me
We walk through the warm days, talk o' the auld ways
The cornfield and codfish, the land and the sea
We walk through the fields my father once tilled
Talk wi' the old men that once sailed wi' me
Man, it's been awfu' good, I showed them all I could
O' the past and the present, what their future might be

For the morn will be their day, what will be their way
What will they make of their land, sea and sky
Man, I've seen awfu' change but it still it seems gie strange
Tae look at my world through a young laddie's eyes


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Subject: The Generations of Change
From: DonMeixner
Date: 21 Aug 01 - 10:50 PM

I can probably figure these out by myself but I'd also like to know the meaning of the line:

"By the time he made second"

Can anyone help here?

Thanks.

Don


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: The Generations of Change
From: Dita
Date: 22 Aug 01 - 01:44 AM

The plowmen when they were hired (fee'd), were ranked in order. The "first", would get the best team of horses and plow, the second the next best and so on.
love, john.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GENERATIONS OF CHANGE (Matt Armour)
From: jacko@nz
Date: 22 Aug 01 - 02:06 AM

Without suggesting that the place-names are 100% the rest of this is a lot more accurate than appears in the DT

GENERATIONS OF CHANGE By Matt Armour

My faither was a bailey on a wee fairm at Capely
He worked on the land all the days o' his life
By the time he made second he aye said he reckoned
He'd ploughed near on half o' the east nuke of Fife.
He'd fee'd on at Rambuston, Crawhill and Clephington
Tambo and Cornby and Big Renniehill
At Kingsbarns he married, at Bowhills he's buried
But man had he lived, he'd be ploughin' on still

For those days were his days, those ways were his ways
To follow the plough while his back was still strong
But those days have past, and the time came at last
For the weakness of age to make way for the young.

I wasnae for ploughin', to the sea I was goin'
To follow the fish and the fisherman's ways
In rain, hail and sunshine, I've watched the lang run line
Nae man mair contented his hale working day.
I've lang lined the shottie grounds, Dutch and the Dogger Bank,
Pulled the big fish frae the deep devil's hole.
I've side-trolled off Shetland, the Faroes and Iceland
In weather much worse than a body could thole

For those days were my days, those ways were my ways
To follow the fish while my back was still strong
But those days are past, and the time come at last
For the weakness of age to make way for the young.

My sons they have grown, and away they have gone
To search for black oil in the far northern sea
Like oilman they walk and like yankees they talk
There's no much in common 'tween my sons and me.
They've rough-rigged on Josephine, Forties and Ninnian,
Claymore and Dunlin,the Fisher an' a'
They've made fortunes for sure, for in one run ashore
They spend more than I earned in a hale seasons work.

But this day is their day, this way is their way
To ride the rough rigs while their backs are still strong
But this day will pass, and the time come at last
For the weakness of age to make way for the young.

My grandsons are growin', to the school they're soon goin'
The lang weeks o' summer they spend here wi' me
We walk through the warm days and talk o' the old days
O' cornfields and codfish, the land and the sea.
We walk through the fields that my father once tilled,
Talk wi' the old men who once sailed wi' me
Man it's been awf'y good, I've showed them all I could
O' the past and the present, what their future might be.

For the morn will be their day, what will be their way
What will they mak' o' the land, sea and sky?
Man, I've seen awf'y change, but it still seems gae strange
To look at my world through a young laddie's eyes.

Jack


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Subject: Chords Add: GENERATIONS OF CHANGE (Matt Armour)
From: Thomas the Rhymer
Date: 22 Aug 01 - 02:06 AM

C/F/C/G
C/F/C/G
C/F/C/G
C/F/G/C
G/C
C/G
C/F/C/G
C/F/G/C

CHORUS:
C/F/C/G
C/F/C/G
C/F/C/G...
C/F/G/C
Holdstock & Mcleod don't play durring the chorus...ttr


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: The Generations of Change
From: DonMeixner
Date: 22 Aug 01 - 07:22 AM

Thank you all, I do appreciate it greatly. In some parts of the states, central New York included we had teams of harvesters. These men owned the equipment the family farmer couldn't afford and would follow a harvesting circuit. I can recall as a small boy in the mid fifties seeing a combine team come down our road and go into a wheat field to harvest. The machine was big as a house and wide as the road. Kids on bikes and dogs chased it while four or five men, my Dad included followed at a distance and set up in the hedges to watch it work. Listen to Art Thieme's recording of The Big Combine to get an idea of whast harvesting was like in the mid west around the turn of the century.

Thanks again.

Don


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: The Generations of Change
From: jacko@nz
Date: 23 Aug 01 - 06:40 PM

Thanks for that, Susanne

Jack


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: The Generations of Change
From: Lin in Kansas
Date: 24 Aug 01 - 03:35 PM

Don, YES!

My brothers both used to hire on as crew for the harvest, and traveled from Texas up into Nebraska and back, combining the wheat. I think Joe was about 14 the first time he made the trip. Quite an adventure and a chance to earn good money, too.

They always came home so tanned they'd disappear in a dark room!

Lin


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Subject: Lyr/Chords Add: GENERATIONS OF CHANGE (Matt Armour
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Dec 10 - 01:19 PM

Well after a few years, This is how I play it now.

Don

GENERATIONS OF CHANGE By Matt Armour

(G,C,D,G)

M(G)y faither was a bai(C)ley on a we(G)e fairm at Cap(D)ely
He wor(G)ked on the la(C)nd all the da(G)ys o' his li(D)fe
By the ti(G)me he made sec(C)ond he ay(G)e said he recko(D)ned
He'd plou(G)ghed near on ha(C)lf o' the ea(G)st nuke(D) of Fi(G)fe.
He'd fe(D)e'd on at Rambuston, Craw(G)hill and Clephington
Tambo and Cornby and Big Rennie hi(D)ll
At Kin(G)gsbarns he mar(C)ried, at Bow(G)hills he's bur(D)ied
But ma(G)n had he liv(C)ed, he'd be plou(G)ghin' o(D)n st(G)ill

For those days were his days, those ways were his ways (G,C,G,D)
To follow the plough while his back was still strong   (G,C,G,D)
But those days have past, and the time came at last    (G,C,G,D)
For the weakness of age to make way for the young.    (G,C,G,D,G)


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Subject: Lyr Add: GENERATIONS OF CHANGE (Matt Armour)
From: GUEST,Para Handy
Date: 27 Oct 11 - 07:28 AM

The lyrics from the album cover still have a few mistakes on the place names. Maybe I'm being pedantic but I grew up in Pittenweem in the 70's and 80's and remember well the fairmers, rich fishermen - they were loaded in the 70's so the song's a bit inaccurate here - or maybe it's jealousy because then came the oil and many of my pals went to the rigs and made a lot of money.

So the corrections are: Kingsbarns (it's plural), Fladen Ground and finally Auk.

I never knew this song existed until I heard it recently on BBC Alba's Hor Gheallaidh recording of a session during Celtic Connections.

Man, it's gie braw.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GENERATIONS OF CHANGE (Matt Armour)
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 09 Nov 11 - 07:35 PM

PH, I've since learned that Cilla and Artie got a few names wrong, like "big Rennie Hill" - Kilrennie Mill, I think it should have been. Just never got round to correcting them. Thanks for bringing the thread up again.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: The Generations of Change (Armour)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 09 Jul 15 - 11:29 PM

Here are the lyrics from the Digital Tradition:
    GENERATIONS OF CHANGE
    (Matt Armour)

    1. My father was a ploughman in a wee place near Capely
    He worked on the land all the days o' his life
    By the time he made second he aye said he reckoned
    he'd ploughed near on half o' the east nuke of Fife.

    He'd feed on at Rambuston, Crawhill and Clephington,
    Tambo and Cornby and Big Renniehill
    At Kingsbarns he married, at Bowhills he's buried
    But man had he lived, he'd be ploughin' on still

    Ah but those days were his days, those ways were his ways
    To follow the plow while his back was still strong
    But those days are past, and the time come at last
    When the weakness of age must give way to the young.

    2. Well I was nae for ploughin', to the sea I was goin'
    To follow the fish and the fisherman's ways
    In rain, hail and sunshine, I watch the long run line
    No man mere contented his whole working day.

    I've long lined the shottie grounds,
    Dutch and the Dogger bank,
    Pulled the great fish from the deep devil's hole.
    I've side-trolled off Shetland, the Faroes and Iceland
    In weather much worse than a body could thole.

    Ah but those days were my days, those ways were my ways
    To follow the fish while my back was still strong
    But those days are past, and the time come at last
    For the weakness of age to make way for the young.

    3. Now my sons they are grown, away they have flown
    To search for black oil in the far northern sea
    Like oilman they walk and like Texans they talk (yankees?)
    Aye, there's no much in common 'tween my sons and me.

    They've rough rigged on Josephine, Forties and Ninnian,
    Claymore and Dunlin, the Fisher and a',
    They've made fortunes for sure, for in one trip ashore
    They spend more than I earned in a whole seasons work.

    Ah but this day is there day, this way is there way
    To ride the rough rigs while there backs are still strong
    But their day will pass, and the time come at last
    For the weakness of age to make way for the young.

    4. Now my grandsons they're growing, to the school soon be goin'
    But the long days of summer they'll spend here with me
    We walk through the warm days and talk of the old days
    Of cornfields and codfish, the land and the sea.

    We'll walk through the fields that my father once tilled,
    Talk to the old men who once sailed with me
    Man it's been awfully good, I'm showing them all I could
    Of the past and the present, what their future might be.

    For the morn will be their day, what will be their way
    What will they make o' the land, sea and sky?
    Man, I've seen awfully change, but it still seems very strange
    To look at the world through a young laddie's eyes.

    (Man, I've seen naught but change, but .....)

    Copyright Matt Armour)
    from Ed Miller singing at FSGW program. learned 1985
    by Archie Fisher
    sung by Cila Fisher and Artie Trezeise
    @Scottish @work
    filename[ GENCHANG
    DC

Have we agreed on complete, correct lyrics for this song?

Here's a recording of this song by Joe Aitken:



The melody is vary familiar, but I can't think what it is right now. So, what's the melody from?

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: The Generations of Change (Armour)
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 09:33 PM

I think bold krish harper streets of laredo


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: The Generations of Change (Armour)
From: Steve Byrne
Date: 05 Aug 15 - 06:05 AM

Hi Joe - we met at one of Jim Malcolm's tour of Scotland shows. Hope you're well! I heard this song sung wonderfully by Allan Prior at the Cullerlie Traditional Singing Weekend in Aberdeenshire last week and went hunting to check the lyrics. It's a brilliant piece of writing!

The place-names in the first few verses are a bit faulty in the DT version. Susanne Kalweit (skw) has them pretty close.

They are all within a fairly small area of the East Neuk of Fife, just over the Forth from me here in East Lothian, many of them within a short distance of Anstruther (Ainster, in the local parlance).

Caiplie seems to have been at Cornceres, between Anstruther and Crail
Randerston Farm is at Kingsbarns
Crawhill Farm is right outside Anstruther (Crowhill on some older maps)
Clephanton is north of Anstruther, not to be confused with Clephanton in Inverness-shire.
Cambo is an estate near Kingsbarns (with I think an animal park that we visited when I was at primary school!)
Carnbee is a bit further inland, north of Anstruther and Pittenweem.
Kilrenny Mill is east of Anstruther (sometimes one word, Kilrennymill on older maps)
Boarhills is between St Andrews and Kingsbarns.

Giving approx:

My faither was a baillie frae a wee fairm at Caiplie
He worked on the land aa the days o his life
By the time he made second he aye said he reckoned
He'd ploughed near on half o the East Neuk o Fife
He fee'd on at Randerston, Crawhill and Clephanton
Cambo and Carnbee and Kilrenny Mill
At Kingsbarns he merried, at Boarhills he's buried
But man, had he lived, he'd be plooin on still

Also as picked up earlier in the thread, the lines about the oilfields should end in "Auk". I can't find reference to a "Fisher" field but it may mean the Fisher Bank in the North Sea. All the others are all correct.

Also in the fishing verses, "long lined the shottie grounds" should be "long lined the Fladen Ground", it's an area of the North Sea, (although we'd sing 'Grund', the Scots pronunciation)

The second last line, I've usually heard sung as Jack suggests - "but it still seems gey strange", 'gey' meaning 'very' or 'rather' in Scots.


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