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The Highwayman (musical sound poem)

DigiTrad:
HIGHWAYMAN


Related threads:
ADD: The Highwayman (Noyes) (32)
Tune Req: The Loom of Years (Alfred Noyes) (5)
Lyr Req: The Highwayman (Jimmy Webb) (32)
Lyr/Chords Add: The Highwayman (Jimmy Webb) (15)
BS: The Highwayman (16) (closed)
Req Only: the highwayman (Noyes) (5) (closed)
Lyr Req: The Highwayman as sung by Phil Ochs (9)
Lyr/Chords Req: The Highwayman (Noyes & Webb) (12)
Lyr Req: Highwayman:I'll come back again and again (8)


GUEST,Jim Clark..London..England 27 Oct 02 - 07:15 AM
Santa 27 Oct 02 - 09:36 AM
Richard Wright 27 Oct 02 - 10:46 AM
Mike Regenstreif 27 Oct 02 - 10:57 AM
Susanne (skw) 27 Oct 02 - 01:09 PM
GUEST,Jim Clark..London..England 27 Oct 02 - 01:49 PM
GUEST,Darowyn 10 May 06 - 08:56 AM
gnomad 10 May 06 - 11:55 AM
Mr Fox 10 May 06 - 05:54 PM
GUEST,Gerry 11 May 06 - 01:58 AM
GUEST,Henryp 11 May 06 - 08:33 AM
Big Tim 11 May 06 - 08:48 AM
GUEST,Darowyn 11 May 06 - 12:22 PM
GUEST,Tunesmith 11 May 06 - 03:31 PM
Cathie 11 May 06 - 05:42 PM
DonMeixner 11 May 06 - 06:24 PM
GUEST,Gerry 11 May 06 - 11:24 PM
GUEST,Don Meixner 12 May 06 - 12:04 AM
harpmolly 12 May 06 - 01:30 AM
GUEST,Tunesmith 12 May 06 - 05:25 AM
GUEST,squeezeboxhp 12 May 06 - 08:08 AM
GUEST,Tunesmith 12 May 06 - 02:31 PM
Big Tim 12 May 06 - 02:44 PM
Mr Fox 12 May 06 - 04:07 PM
GUEST,Tunesmith 12 May 06 - 04:41 PM
Tig 13 May 06 - 10:41 AM
Santa 13 May 06 - 04:09 PM
GUEST,Rob Hunt 22 Oct 10 - 12:00 PM
Bettynh 22 Oct 10 - 01:40 PM
GUEST 22 Oct 10 - 01:53 PM
Rog Peek 22 Oct 10 - 01:56 PM
DonMeixner 22 Oct 10 - 02:56 PM
GUEST,rebecca 02 Oct 12 - 12:24 PM
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Subject: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Jim Clark..London..England
Date: 27 Oct 02 - 07:15 AM

This is Alfred Noyes most famous poem....Its a rather colourful romanticised account of the legendary 18th century English outlaw/highwayman Dick Turpin 1705 - 1739..alas the true story of Turpin is rather less romantic he wasnt a man one would like to meet face to face ...in reality he was probably a psychotic brute,but one must never let truth get in the way of a good story,It is perhaps surprising that Noyes who was born a protestant,but in later life converted to catholocism with his deeply religious outlook would write a poem about a criminal,but legend has rather transformed the popular perception of Turpin into a hero,so one supposes thats how Noyes percieved him.....Noyes who like Dave Russell was born in Wolverhampton central England was popular throughout his life as a successful published poet..He was a professor of modern English studies princeton university in the united states from 1915 to 1923..he died in 1958 and is buried in a catholic cemetary on the Isle of Wight southeast England..

This musical poem is over 13 minutes long so in order to meet the technical requirements of uploading this wav file i've given you it in 2 halves...The second and cocluding part will appear as a reply to this message on the acoustic musicians and poets sound archive "poetry sounds" board...heres the link to the page with the sound files....
The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes 1888 - 1958 performed by Dave Russell


Regards...

Jim Clark

All rights are reserved on this sound recording/copyright/patent Jim Clark 2002


The Highwayman-- Alfred Noyes 1888 - 1958 (musical sound poem performed by Dve Russell)....

The wind was a torrent of darkness upon the gusty trees,
The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
The road was a ribbon of moonlight looping the purple moor,
And the highwayman came riding--
Riding--riding--
The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn door.
He'd a French cocked hat on his forehead, and a bunch of lace at his chin;
He'd a coat of the claret velvet, and breeches of fine doe-skin.
They fitted with never a wrinkle; his boots were up to his thigh!
And he rode with a jeweled twinkle--
His rapier hilt a-twinkle--
His pistol butts a-twinkle, under the jeweled sky.
Over the cobbles he clattered and clashed in the dark inn-yard,
He tapped with his whip on the shutters, but all was locked and barred,
He whistled a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there
But the landlord's black-eyed daughter--
Bess, the landlord's daughter--
Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.
Dark in the dark old inn-yard a stable-wicket creaked
Where Tim, the ostler listened--his face was white and peaked--
His eyes were hollows of madness, his hair like mouldy hay,
But he loved the landlord's daughter--
The landlord's black-eyed daughter;

Dumb as a dog he listened, and he heard the robber say:
"One kiss, my bonny sweetheart; I'm after a prize tonight,
But I shall be back with the yellow gold before the morning light.
Yet if they press me sharply, and harry me through the day,
Then look for me by moonlight,
Watch for me by moonlight,
I'll come to thee by moonlight, though hell should bar the way."
He stood upright in the stirrups; he scarce could reach her hand,
But she loosened her hair in the casement!
His face burnt like a brand
As the sweet black waves of perfume came tumbling o'er his breast,
Then he kissed its waves in the moonlight
(O sweet black waves in the moonlight!),
And he tugged at his reins in the moonlight, and galloped away to the west.
He did not come in the dawning; he did not come at noon.
And out of the tawny sunset, before the rise of the moon,
When the road was a gypsy's ribbon over the purple moor,
The redcoat troops came marching--
Marching--marching--

King George's men came marching, up to the old inn door.
They said no word to the landlord; they drank his ale instead,
But they gagged his daughter and bound her to the foot of her narrow bed.
Two of them knelt at her casement, with muskets by their side;
There was Death at every window,
And Hell at one dark window,
For Bess could see, through her casement, the road that he would ride.
They had bound her up at attention, with many a sniggering jest!
They had tied a rifle beside her, with the barrel beneath her breast!
"Now keep good watch!" and they kissed her.
She heard the dead man say,
"Look for me by moonlight,
Watch for me by moonlight,
I'll come to thee by moonlight, though Hell should bar the way."

She twisted her hands behind her, but all the knots held good!
She writhed her hands till her fingers were wet with sweat or blood!
They stretched and strained in the darkness, and the hours crawled by like years,
Till, on the stroke of midnight,
Cold on the stroke of midnight,
The tip of one finger touched it!
The trigger at least was hers!
The tip of one finger touched it, she strove no more for the rest;
Up, she stood up at attention, with the barrel beneath her breast.
She would not risk their hearing, she would not strive again,
For the road lay bare in the moonlight,
Blank and bare in the moonlight,
And the blood in her veins, in the moonlight, throbbed to her love's refrain.

Tlot tlot, tlot tlot!
Had they heard it?
The horse-hooves, ringing clear;
Tlot tlot, tlot tlot, in the distance!
Were they deaf that they did not hear?
Down the ribbon of moonlight, over the brow of the hill,
The highwayman came riding--
Riding--riding--
The redcoats looked to their priming!
She stood up straight and still.
Tlot tlot, in the frosty silence!
Tlot tlot, in the echoing night!
Nearer he came and nearer!
Her face was like a light!
Her eyes grew wide for a moment, she drew one last deep breath,
Then her finger moved in the moonlight--
Her musket shattered the moonlight--
Shattered her breast in the moonlight and warned him--
with her death.

He turned, he spurred to the West; he did not know who stood
Bowed, with her head o'er the casement, drenched in her own red blood!
Not till the dawn did he hear it, and his face grew grey to hear
How Bess, the landlord's daughter,
The landlord's black-eyed daughter,
Had watched for her love in the moonlight, and died in the darkness there.
Back, he spurred like a madman, shrieking a curse to the sky,
With the white road smoking behind him and his rapier brandished high!
Blood-red were his spurs in the golden noon, wine-red was his velvet coat
When they shot him down in the highway,
Down like a dog in the highway,
And he lay in his blood in the highway, with the bunch of lace at his throat.

And still on a winter's night, they say, when the wind is in the trees,
When the moon is a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
When the road is a gypsy's ribbon looping the purple moor,
The highwayman comes riding--
Riding--riding--
The highwayman comes riding, up to the old inn-door.
Over the cobbles he clatters and clangs in the dark inn-yard,
He taps with his whip on the shutters, but all is locked and barred,
He whistles a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there
But the landlord's black-eyed daughter--
Bess, the landlord's daughter--
Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Santa
Date: 27 Oct 02 - 09:36 AM

Phil Ochs recorded a shortened version, I think on All The news That's Fit To Sing.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Richard Wright
Date: 27 Oct 02 - 10:46 AM

Lorena McKennit does a fine version on one of her recetn albusms

Richard


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Mike Regenstreif
Date: 27 Oct 02 - 10:57 AM

I haven't heard the Dave Russell setting that Jim Clark is posting. However, the settings by Phil Ochs and Loreena McKennitt that are mentioned are different from each other. And since both Phil and Loreena took credit for their settings, I am assuming that the Russell setting is also different.

BTW, there are really good versions of the Phil Ochs setting by Steve Gillette & Cindy Mangsen and by Katy Moffatt.

Mike Regenstreif


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 27 Oct 02 - 01:09 PM

I like Andy Irvine's version on his latest CD.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Jim Clark..London..England
Date: 27 Oct 02 - 01:49 PM

Well,

I'd never have guessed there were so many different versions ha ha..I did see a mention of the Mckennit version on a messageboard and hoped to find it to listen to over the net,but I didnt find any...Dave had this poem sent to him by a lady friend sometime ago who suggested he might like to give it his treatment....I wouldnt be surprised if his friend hadnt come across it probably from that Phil Ochs version that was mentioned because Dave has been a regular performer on the London Bohemian type open mike acoustic music poetry scene and was a regular performer at the famous but now extinct "Bunjies Folk Cellar" for getting on for the last 40 years..Though! he himself performed it on my recording somewhat spontaneosly providing the music on keyboard made up on the spot to suit the mood of the poem....we are going to use this track on a CD I am putting together of poems recorded by him unusualy for(he's usualy purely acoustic) him accompanied by his own keyboard playing...
The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes 1888 - 1958 performed by Dave Russell


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Darowyn
Date: 10 May 06 - 08:56 AM

I sing the Phil Ochs version, based on memories of hearing it in 1968,
Does anyone know how close this edit is to the words Phil Ochs used?

The wind was a torrent of darkness upon the gusty trees,
The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
The road was a ribbon of moonlight looping the purple moor,
And the highwayman came riding--
Riding--riding--
The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn door.

Over the cobbles he clattered and clashed in the dark inn-yard,
He tapped with his whip on the shutters, but all was locked and barred,
He whistled a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there
But the landlord's black-eyed daughter--
Bess, the landlord's daughter--
Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.

"One kiss, my bonny sweetheart; I'm after a prize tonight,
But I shall be back with the yellow gold before the morning light.
Yet if they press me sharply, and harry me through the day,
Then look for me by moonlight,
Watch for me by moonlight,
I'll come to thee by moonlight, though hell should bar the way."

He did not come in the dawning; he did not come at noon.
And out of the tawny sunset, before the rise of the moon,
When the road was a gypsy's ribbon over the purple moor,
The redcoat troops came marching--
Marching--marching--
King George's men came marching, up to the old inn door.

They said no word to the landlord; they drank his ale instead,
But they gagged his daughter and bound her to the foot of her narrow bed.
Two of them knelt at her casement, with muskets by their side;
There was Death at every window,
And Hell at one dark window,
For Bess could see, through her casement, the road that he would ride.

They had bound her up at attention, with many a sniggering jest!
They had tied a rifle beside her, with the barrel beneath her breast!
"Now keep good watch!" and they kissed her.
She heard the dead man say,
"Look for me by moonlight,
Watch for me by moonlight,
I'll come to thee by moonlight, though Hell should bar the way."

She twisted her hands behind her, but all the knots held good!
She writhed her hands till her fingers were wet with sweat or blood!
They stretched and strained in the darkness, and the hours crawled by like years,
Till, on the stroke of midnight,
Cold on the stroke of midnight,
The tip of one finger touched it!
The trigger at least was hers!

Tlot tlot, in the frosty silence!
Tlot tlot, in the echoing night!
Nearer he came and nearer!
Her face was like a light!
Her eyes grew wide for a moment, she drew one last deep breath,
Then her finger moved in the moonlight--
Her musket shattered the moonlight--
Shattered her breast in the moonlight and warned him, with her death.

He turned, he spurred to the West; he did not know who stood
Bowed, with her head o'er the casement, drenched in her own red blood!
Not till the dawn did he hear it, and his face grew grey to hear
How Bess, the landlord's daughter,
The landlord's black-eyed daughter,
Had watched for her love in the moonlight, and died in the darkness there.

Back, he spurred like a madman, shrieking a curse to the sky,
With the white road smoking behind him and his rapier brandished high!
Blood-red were his spurs in the golden noon, wine-red was his velvet coat
When they shot him down in the highway,
Down like a dog in the highway,
And he lay in his blood in the highway, with the bunch of lace at his throat.

And still on a winter's night, they say, when the wind is in the trees,
When the moon is a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
When the road is a gypsy's ribbon looping the purple moor,
The highwayman comes riding--
Riding--riding--
The highwayman comes riding, up to the old inn-door.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: gnomad
Date: 10 May 06 - 11:55 AM

Just on a small point of fact, this poem relates the end of a highwayman, but not that of Dick Turpin.

Turpin was hanged at York after due trial, having been arrested in conection with the shooting of his landlord's cockerel and identified as Turpin while in prison (he had been hiding out under the name Palmer). He spent most of his criminal career as part of an Essex gang which specialised in robbing isolated houses, sometimes torturing occupants into revealing the whereabouts of their valuables. A one-time butcher, he also went in for the theft of livestock.

I heard this sung by an unknown duo who visited my secondary school around 1970, I can still remember the tune so they must have made an impression, I wonder who they were?


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Mr Fox
Date: 10 May 06 - 05:54 PM

Don 'King of the Buskers' Partridge did a version on his (so far as I know) one-and-only album.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Gerry
Date: 11 May 06 - 01:58 AM

Darowyn, you've included more of the original poem than Ochs did. Up top there's a link to an older thread on this song, Lyr Req: Highwayman (from Phil Ochs) (9), and if you go there you will find that someone posted the lyrics as Ochs recorded them.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Henryp
Date: 11 May 06 - 08:33 AM

Loreena McKennitt invited Andy Irvine to play on her recording of The Highwayman. In the end he wasn't able to, but he did like the arrangement and has recorded it himself.

He is on tour now and last night at the Folk Club at the Clarence in Blackpool he closed the first half of his act with this 12 minute tour de force. A terrific evening altogether!


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Big Tim
Date: 11 May 06 - 08:48 AM

I've loved the Ochs version for about 40 years. Didn't know Irvine had recorded it, must buy. Anyone got the relevant album title?


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Darowyn
Date: 11 May 06 - 12:22 PM

Thanks Gerry,
The Phil Ochs version is cut a little too close to the bone for the drama of the story to come out.
Incidentally, the first time I sang my version it was Halloween Night in a pub in Yorkshire that was supposed to have been one of Turpin's hidouts- though anyone with a York connection would know that the song was not about him.
(I do it with a straight 1,6,4,5 turnaround- so my tune is probably a little different too. That's the oral tradition in action, I suppose.)
I can't help noticing that some of the verses I leave out were clearly written in a pre-Freudian world. There is some kind of hair fetishism going on, and if the description of the highwayman's outfit was on Ebay, it would be subtitled "gay interest".
But it's a fabulous piece of melodrama, and great to sing!
Cheers
Dave


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 11 May 06 - 03:31 PM

I disagree with Darowyn, I think Ochs did a great job, and, the first time I heard it, I thought it was one of the most dramatic pieces of folkie music I'd heard in my life. Ochs, of course, cuts out quite a bit of the desciptive passages ( which are a bit too flowery, anyway), and all reference to the chap who tells the red coats where to find the highwayman - but his inclusion is not necessary to the basic drama.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Cathie
Date: 11 May 06 - 05:42 PM

Andy Irvine sang this at Hitchin Folk Club last week. He was just excellent. The 12 minutes must have flown by - I am amazed it was that long.

CD details are on his website.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: DonMeixner
Date: 11 May 06 - 06:24 PM

I am preferential to the Ochs version. It may be abridged to some extent but it is infinately more melodic than Loreena McKennitt's.

And no reason not to do Ochs' melody to the complete poem.

Don


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Gerry
Date: 11 May 06 - 11:24 PM

I got the Ochs record about the time we were reading the poem in my high school English class, so I brought the record in to school & the teacher played it for the class.

I love the Ochs version and I've been singing it (in the shower, and on rare occasions in public) ever since, but when I first heard Andy Irvine sing the McKennitt version I decided there's plenty of room in this world for two different musical settings of that poem.

Actually, I know of a third setting. About 10 years ago an American (or possibly Canadian) singer-songwriter named Barbara Brown sent her new CD to the radio program I was doing, and it had her own setting of The Highwayman. I don't have the CD any more, and I don't remember anything about the setting, except that I liked it, but not as much as I liked the Ochs (and this was before I knew of the McKennitt).


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Don Meixner
Date: 12 May 06 - 12:04 AM

I must admit I may be preferential to Ochs as it was the first song I heard. I was very sick as a small child and my mother would read this poem to me daily sometimes two or three times. I knew it by heart before I was seven.
   I think I even heard a recorded recitation of it by James Robertson Justice or someone with a similar voice.
   That was nearly fifty years ago. So a bit of memory lapse is acceptable.

Don


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: harpmolly
Date: 12 May 06 - 01:30 AM

I've always adored this poem, as my grandfather used to recite it in a great rolling Charlton Heston-like voice at family gatherings. I was very favorably impressed with Loreena McKennitt's setting of it--even though I'm a fan, I had my doubts (thought she was a bit soft-spoken for this sort of material) but I love the dark flavor of her version. I even named my little guitar (an all-mahogany Baby Taylor) "Bess the Landlord's Daughter" because I thought she had a sweet dark sound.

I also liked Andy Irvine's cover a lot, but both his and Phil Ochs' versions have instrumentals that feel sort of cluttered to me--I like the languid, almost creepy quality of McKennitt's original arrangement. (Oh my God, I just realized that album has been out for nine YEARS. Good God, I was in college when it came out!)   I especially like the use of the bodhran to subtly suggest the hoofbeats of the horse--hey, it's not subtle, but I like it anyway. *grin*

Of course, I had to sing it at a family reunion. Now every single freakin' wedding, reunion, birthday, or (unfortunately) funeral, after a pint or two, it's "All right, Molly, it's time for the Highwayman!" Oh, okay, twist my arm. ;)

Cheers,

Molly


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 12 May 06 - 05:25 AM

I've just realized that I've got a recording of The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes - the man who wrote it! Not as good as Phil's version, though.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,squeezeboxhp
Date: 12 May 06 - 08:08 AM

i prefered andy irvines version on the cd way out yonder


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 12 May 06 - 02:31 PM

When I said that I have a recording of The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes, I meant I have a recording of The Highwayman recited by Alfred Noyes.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Big Tim
Date: 12 May 06 - 02:44 PM

I think it's amazing that Alfred Noyes only died as recently as 1958.
When I first heard Phil Ochs sing it, when his album first came out (now available on CD), I imagined it was centuries old.                                                         

Looking forward to hearing such a great singer as Andy Irvine singing it. I think the fact that Andy has taken it on is further proof of what a great lyric it is.

Did Phil Ochs claim to have written the melody? Did he write the melody?

Tunesmith: is the Alfred Noyes recital accessible in any way (other than via yourself!)? I'd love to hear it. When was it recorded?


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Mr Fox
Date: 12 May 06 - 04:07 PM

Ochs didn't abridge The Highwayman - He butchered it.

Loreena McKennitt cut a vital verse, too (the one about Tim the ostler - which explains how the authorities found out when the Highwayman was due to return).

I'm of the view that if you're going to record a poem, either as a song or recital, then you do the whole thing or none.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 12 May 06 - 04:41 PM

If you hear Ochs version of - with no knowledge of the original poem - it has all the drama you could want and it makes perfect sense; infact, Ochs version does away with alot of superfluous descriptions/detail; for example, the ostler is not needed - there's enough drama without his presence.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Tig
Date: 13 May 06 - 10:41 AM

Marie Little has recorded a fine version on her CD Roundabouts and Swings- Greenage HGN CD 003.
She can sometimes be persuaded to sing it live - time permitting!

The Badger


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Santa
Date: 13 May 06 - 04:09 PM

I saw/heard Andy Irvine sing this at the Clarence too, and I noticed extra verses not in the Ochs version that I knew from long ago. I had read the poem first, but hadn't realised how much Ochs had shortened it.

Count me among those who think that nothing of dramatic importance was cut, and also among those who feel that the world is big enough for two or more versions to co-exist. It's good to hear it being sung again, and the Irvine version is fine.

How many of the traditional ballads are currently sung at full length, anyway? If Fred Wedlock can forget the 42nd verse of Sir Patrick Spens, and sing the 27th, in reverse, and no-one noticed, does it actually matter if it's still a good song?

Awful admission time - in the Orkney session (see other thread) Meg missed a verse in Jenny Greenteeth but it still had the desired effect on the audience. This is not an actual recommendation for others to do the same - it is better with the missed verse. Welcome back to the UK, Cloudstreet.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST,Rob Hunt
Date: 22 Oct 10 - 12:00 PM

Just for the record, Dick Turpin, who this is believed to based upon is a mythical character. The Dick Turpin in the book was based on a man called Higgins who lived in Knutsford, Cheshire. Turpin was supposed to have ridden from London to York in such a short time it was consideded impossible therefore providing him with an alibi. In reality Higgins committed murder in Wrexham North wales but rode so quickly to Knutsford again providing a perfect alibi. He was hung for a double murder a few years later.No offence but I like the Marie Little version of this song.


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Bettynh
Date: 22 Oct 10 - 01:40 PM

From Youtube:

Loreena Mckennit

Phil Ochs


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Oct 10 - 01:53 PM

Lyrics and chords for Phil's version are here . I happen to think Phil did a superb job with The Highwayman, as he did with 'The Bells' by Edgar Allen Poe.

The Bells here

Rog


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: Rog Peek
Date: 22 Oct 10 - 01:56 PM

That was me! My Cookie keeps disappearing.

Rog


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Subject: RE: The Highwayman (musical sound poem)
From: DonMeixner
Date: 22 Oct 10 - 02:56 PM

Oatmeal Raisin?

Don


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Subject: the Highway man
From: GUEST,rebecca
Date: 02 Oct 12 - 12:24 PM

we did Bess kill herself and how wrote the love letter


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