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Lyr Req: Gold Miners' Songs (American)

DigiTrad:
JOE BOWERS


Related threads:
Lyr Add: Gold Miners' Songs (American) 2 (46)
Tech? query re DigiTrad links-O My Rolling River (7)
song wanted: calif. gold rush (15)
Lyr Add: Emigrant from Pike (4)
Songs in Gold Camps of 1800's (15)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
Arrival of the Greenhorn


27 Aug 98 - 02:45 AM
Barry Finn 27 Aug 98 - 03:03 AM
Joe Offer 27 Aug 98 - 04:51 AM
Joe Offer 27 Aug 98 - 05:31 AM
Bob Schwarer 27 Aug 98 - 08:17 AM
Ralph Butts 27 Aug 98 - 09:28 AM
Gene 27 Aug 98 - 10:26 AM
Art Thieme 27 Aug 98 - 10:40 AM
Art Thieme 27 Aug 98 - 11:38 AM
Bob Schwarer 27 Aug 98 - 01:49 PM
rich r 27 Aug 98 - 09:45 PM
Art Thieme 27 Aug 98 - 10:41 PM
Barry Finn 28 Aug 98 - 12:05 AM
BSeed 28 Aug 98 - 01:58 AM
Joe Offer 28 Aug 98 - 04:13 AM
Bojangles 28 Aug 98 - 04:28 AM
Barry Finn 28 Aug 98 - 08:32 AM
Dale Rose 28 Aug 98 - 08:50 AM
Joe Offer 28 Aug 98 - 06:20 PM
Joe Offer 28 Aug 98 - 09:21 PM
Barry Finn 28 Aug 98 - 11:11 PM
rich r 29 Aug 98 - 11:22 AM
Art Thieme 29 Aug 98 - 03:40 PM
Joe Offer 29 Aug 98 - 05:41 PM
29 Aug 98 - 06:51 PM
Joe Offer 29 Aug 98 - 08:19 PM
Richard Wright 04 Sep 98 - 07:37 PM
Bob Bolton 06 Sep 98 - 08:04 PM
Art Thieme 07 Sep 98 - 12:18 PM
Richard Wright 07 Sep 98 - 12:30 PM
Bob Bolton 07 Sep 98 - 07:21 PM
Jerry Friedman 08 Sep 98 - 11:34 PM
BSeed 09 Sep 98 - 01:07 AM
Barry Finn 26 Jun 99 - 10:24 PM
Joe Offer 16 Sep 00 - 03:50 PM
Art Thieme 19 Sep 00 - 06:12 PM
Joe Offer 19 Sep 00 - 06:30 PM
radriano 19 Sep 00 - 06:55 PM
Uncle_DaveO 19 Sep 00 - 07:10 PM
Art Thieme 19 Sep 00 - 10:27 PM
GUEST,JohnB 23 Jan 02 - 12:16 PM
Genie 23 Jan 02 - 03:40 PM
MMario 23 Jan 02 - 03:58 PM
WyoWoman 23 Jan 02 - 08:03 PM
Sandy Paton 23 Jan 02 - 11:33 PM
Genie 24 Jan 02 - 01:27 AM
WyoWoman 24 Jan 02 - 10:33 PM
Genie 24 Jan 02 - 11:32 PM
GUEST,MAG at work 19 Apr 02 - 07:45 PM
rich-joy 20 Apr 02 - 08:04 AM
Uncle_DaveO 20 Apr 02 - 10:58 AM
GUEST,MAG at work 20 Apr 02 - 11:31 AM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 20 Apr 02 - 02:44 PM
GUEST,metrolga@yahoo.com 11 Feb 04 - 08:43 PM
Bob Bolton 11 Feb 04 - 08:57 PM
BanjoRay 12 Feb 04 - 05:30 AM
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Subject: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From:
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 02:45 AM

G'day all,

A friend (who perform a music show in Primary Schools) asked about American Gold Mining / Goldrush songs. We were surprised that we could think of nothing more than passing mentions in 'Clementine' and 'Sweet Betsy from Pike'. I Australia we have a great number of gold songs, both the stage songs of music-hall performers and songs of unknown miners from the 50 of so years in which individuals followed goldrushes and staked individual claims.

My friend thought he would like to do a well-known American song for comparison ... and found none in any corner of his repertoire.

Surely you Yanks sang - at some point in the proceedings ... you can't have spent every spare minute digging! Can anyone steer me to a few good gold rush songs?

Regards,

Bob Bolton


Click for part 2
Also see: Days of 49


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Barry Finn
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 03:03 AM

I was just about to lay my head down, so I'll be brief & come back later if there's not much here. Debby McClatchy did a recording, I think recently on this, doing alot of "John Stone (known to the gold diggers as "Old Put") material & Holdstock & Murphy did a tape of this type also. Barry


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 04:51 AM

Hi, Bob - try searching the database with the keywords @gold or @mining, and you'll find lots. Just put @mining in the search box on this page, and you'll see lots - although not all are gold mining songs. I'll see if I can post a couple from the California Gold Rush over the next couple of days.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: THE NATIONAL MINER (Stone & Foster)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 05:31 AM

Here's one:

The National Miner
John A. Stone & Stephen Foster

When our gold was first discovered
At Coloma near the mill.
All the world at first endeavored to get here
And they keep a-coming still.

Chorus:
Down in the deep ravines
Hear that roaring sound.
There the miners are a-digging.
Digging in the cold, damp ground.

When our war was through with Mexico,
And we paid them for the land;
Those who fought at Palo Alto
Were driven off by the nations they had tanned.

The most popular songwriter and singer of ballads in 1864 was John A. Stone, or "Old Put" as he preferred being called. He and his Sierra Nevada Rangers went from camp to camp entertaining; singing songs he knew the miners liked to hear. Those songs live on and tell the story of another day. (from Singing Gold, a songbook published by the Sacramento Bee in 1977)

I can't quite figure out what the tune is, but it sure sounds familiar.

MIDI file: NATION~1.MID

Timebase: 192

Name: The National Miner
Text: By John A. Stone & Stephen Foster
Key: D
TimeSig: 4/4 24 8
Start
0000 1 69 110 0288 0 69 000 0000 1 71 110 0094 0 71 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 74 110 0336 0 74 000 0048 1 71 110 0160 0 71 000 0032 1 71 110 0094 0 71 000 0002 1 71 110 0094 0 71 000 0002 1 69 110 0160 0 69 000 0032 1 66 110 0160 0 66 000 0032 1 66 110 0256 0 66 000 0032 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 64 110 0528 0 64 000 0240 1 69 110 0256 0 69 000 0032 1 71 110 0094 0 71 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 74 110 0336 0 74 000 0048 1 71 110 0160 0 71 000 0032 1 71 110 0160 0 71 000 0032 1 71 110 0094 0 71 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 62 110 0528 0 62 000 0240 1 74 110 0336 0 74 000 0048 1 73 110 0160 0 73 000 0032 1 71 110 0160 0 71 000 0032 1 69 110 0256 0 69 000 0032 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 66 110 0160 0 66 000 0224 1 71 110 0160 0 71 000 0032 1 69 110 0160 0 69 000 0032 1 66 110 0256 0 66 000 0032 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 64 110 0528 0 64 000 0240 1 69 110 0256 0 69 000 0032 1 71 110 0094 0 71 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 74 110 0336 0 74 000 0048 1 71 110 0336 0 71 000 0048 1 71 110 0094 0 71 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 66 110 0094 0 66 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 64 110 0160 0 64 000 0032 1 64 110 0160 0 64 000 0032 1 62 110 0528 0 62 000
End

This program is worth the effort of learning it.

To download the March 10 MIDItext 98 software and get instructions on how to use it click here

ABC format:

X:1
T:The National Miner
M:4/4
Q:1/4=120
K:D
A3BAFED|d4B2BB|A2F2F3D|E8|A3BAFED|d4B2B2|
BAFDFFEE|D8|d4c2B2|A3FF4|B2A2F3D|E8|A3BAFED|
d4B4|BAFDE2E2|D11/2||


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Bob Schwarer
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 08:17 AM

The first one that comes to mind is "North to Alaska". There is another Alaskan song I'm familiar with but I'll need some time to find it.

Bob S.


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Subject: Lyr Add: NORTH TO ALASKA (Johnny Horton)^^
From: Ralph Butts
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 09:28 AM

Bob.....

North to Alaska was a bit country hit here for Johnny Horton, I'd guess about 40 years ago.

......Tiger

North To Alaska
Johnny Horton

Big Sam left Seattle in the year of ninety-two,
With George Pratt, his partner, and brother Billy, too.
They crossed the Yukon river and found the Bonanza gold,
Below that old White Mountain, just a little southeast of Nome.

    CHORUS
    Where the river is winding,
    Big nuggets they're finding.
    North to Alaska,
    Go north, the rush is on.

Sam crossed the majestic mountains to the valley far below.
He talked to his team of huskies as he mushed on through the snow,
With the northern lights a'running wild in the land of the midnight sun.
Yes, Sam McCord was a mighty man in the year of nineteen-one.

    CHORUS

George turned to Sam with his gold in his hand,
Said: "Sam, you're lookin' at a lonely, lonely man.
I'd trade all the gold that's buried in this land
For one small band of gold to place on sweet little Jenny's hand.

"'Cause a man needs a woman to love him all the time.
Remember, Sam, a true love is so hard to find.
I'd build for my Jenny, a honeymoon home,
Beneath that old White Mountain,
Just a little southeast of Nome."

    CHORUS

    North to Alaska,
    Go north, the rush is on.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Gene
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 10:26 AM

See the separate lyrics post:
SUTTER's MILL


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Subject: Lyr Add: AUSTRALIA AND THE AMAZON (J A Stone)^^
From: Art Thieme
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 10:40 AM

only 1 verse to this,

The miners came in '49,
The whores in '51.
And then they got together,
And raised a native son.

There are many, many songs from the California gold rush. Try SONGS OF THE GOLD ROSH byRichard A Dwyer and Richard E. Lingenfelter------Univ. of California Press (Berkeley and LosAngeles)1964

The old ballad "The Sailor Boy" from England became "The Pinery Boy" in the lumber woods and then "The California Boy" in 1849 in the gold rush. Only the occupation and a few details of the different jobs were changed from song to song. Other than that, the songs are the same.

Now here's one from the Calif. goldrush that you good folks in Australia should enjoy.

"AUSTRALIA AND THE AMAZON"
by J.A.Stone (OLD PUT)

Farewell old California, I'm going far away,
Where gold is found more plenty, in larger lumps they say;
And climate, too, that can't beat, no matter where you go---
Australia, that's the land for me,where all have got a show.

CHORUS)
But I found that good time over,
For all was grief and pain,
And I should never, never make,
My ounce a day again.

I sold a claim that paid me just an half an ounce a day,
Got robbed at Sacramento and licked down at the bay,
I took the Monumental--for Sydney she was bound,
Her boilers bursted, she burnt up, and 500 were drowned.

We soon found we were lousy, which did us much surprise,
To hear the cabin gentry say, "They're lousy, blast their eyes!"
But when our journey ended and we had seen the mines,
Without a cent were shoved in jail, for taxes and for fines.

But give me California where all have equal rights,
Or the Amazon with all her snakes, I'd run the risk of bites;
Such mean, infernal thieving outlandish lies are told,
The devil will get the first poor whelp that does discover gold.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE DREARY BLACK HILLS^^
From: Art Thieme
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 11:38 AM

Here's one from the gold rush of 1874 in the Black Hills of Dakota. There was a small amount of gold in the Black Hills; just enough to perpetrate a legitimate hoax. An officer of the Northern Pacific railroad started the rush to stimulate business. General George Custer was part of the plan and he spread the word. The folks that came forced the Sioux Indians off their treatied/native lands. This was a travesty as the Black Hills were sacred to the Indians. Eventually Custer was repaid by the Sioux for this offense at the Battle of Little Big Horn where Custer and his Seventh Cavalry was defeated and slain. The army took out it's frustration on the Indians at the battle of Wounded Knee by slaughtering everyone there--mostly women and children. I first learned this from Frank Hamilton, a former member of the WEAVERS, about 1961---a tape of him I made of a concert he did at the University of Illinois--Chicago (Navy Pier--2 year branch.)---We used to say that was the only university that could be torpedoed! ;-) Later, Jim Ringer did a great version of this song on his wonderful Folk Legacy LP---the one with "California Joe" (Folk Legacy will make custom cassettes from any of their wondrous LPs for anyone desiring to purchase one---a great service and resource.Check out their website ! I'm there too.

THE DREARY BLACK HILLS

Kind friends won't you listen to my horrible tale,
I'm an object of pity and I'm feelin' quite stale,
I gave up my job selling Wright's Patent Pills,
To go hunting for gold in the dreary Black Hills.

CHORUS)
Don't go away, stay to home if you can,
Stay away from that city--they call it Cheyenne,
Where Chief Crazy Horse and old Sittin' Bull,
They,ll lift up your scalps in the dreary Black Hills.

As I went out ridin' one morning in May,
I spied old Kit Carson---he was ridin' away,
He was riding out west with Buffalo Bill,
Gone to huntin' the gold in the dreary Black Hills.

The roundhouse at Cheyenne is filled every night,
With loafers and bummers of most every plight,
On their backs is no clothes, in their pockets no bills,
Each day they keep startin' for the dreary Black Hills.

When I got to Cheyenned no gold could I find,
I thought of the lunch route that I'd left behind,
Through rain, hail and snow---froze plumb to the gills,
They called me the orphan of the dreary Black Hills.

I wish that the man that started this sell,
Was captive and Crazy Horse had him in hell,
But there's no use moanin' or swearin' like pitch,
'Cause the man who'd stay here is a son of a bitch.

And so, my kind friends, this advice I'll unfold,
Don't go to them Black Hills a-diggin' for gold,
For the railroad speculators, their pockets you'll fill,
From takin' that trip to the dreary Black Hills.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Bob Schwarer
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 01:49 PM

The other song I was thinking of is "Sourdough/The Miners Song" by Bill Staines. It is on his "Wild, Wild Heart" cassette, & I think on his "First Million Miles" CD.

I can't decipher all the words so I'll leave that to someone with better ears, or a copy of it.

Bob S.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: rich r
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 09:45 PM

There is a version of "Root Hog or Die" that is set in the Colorado rush of 1859. It doesn't seem to be among the various "root hogs" in the DT, so I will try to get it entered soon. It's got at least 9 verses so it's a bunch of key punching. "Root Hog or Die" was a popular minstrel show song in the 1850's and a number of lyric sets have used the song including several from the Civil War that are in the DT.

rich r


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Art Thieme
Date: 27 Aug 98 - 10:41 PM

My favorite gold rush recording was a vinyl LP on the old Riverside label by Pat Foster.

Does anyone know where Pat Foster went?

Who he is?

If he is?

Who he was?

Dick Weisman backed Pat Foster's guitar with nice banjo on both records.

He NEVER made the rounds gigging as far as I can figure. Also had a strange LP on another label called DOCUMENTARY TALKIN' BLUES.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Barry Finn
Date: 28 Aug 98 - 12:05 AM

"Seeing The Elephant" is according to Debby McClatchy the acknowledged fist song written in California about the gold rush. "Just From Dawson" from the last of the big gold rushes, 1898 in the Yukon. You could probably start an Old Put (John Stone) thread, he's been mentioned often with these gold rush songs, he had been a broken down miner like the rest & then made a big hit in 1853, put together a group, as Joe mentions above, the Sierra Nevada Rangers & started sing at the camps & halls, basically financing his pastime with his gain from the ground. Another of his is the "Humbug Steamship Companies" a great rendering of the passages through the Panama Canal made by gold seekers aboard steamers kept together by gum & glue. Probably his most famous would be the "Days Of 49". Old Put died of drink when his fans moved on with the later rushes of Nevada & South Dakota the last moving futher north to the frozen fields of the Yukon. Stone published 4 books of his songs before he roared out his soul in a glory hole. Most of this came by way of Debby McClatchy. Barry


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: BSeed
Date: 28 Aug 98 - 01:58 AM

A couple of notes: The Panama Canal wasn't dug until the end of the century so any goldrush song about it is probably one from the Alaskan gold rush. There could be a California gold rush song about rounding the Cape of Good Hope or crossing the Isthmus of Panama on foot or on mules. The Alaska gold rush, of course, was immortalized in the poems of Robert Service: "The Cremation of Sam McGee," etc. Anyone know any musical settings for Robert Service poems? (Just before I stopped teaching English, I started practicing "The Cremation of Sam McGee" as a rap. Some Frost poems are fun to rap, too, especially "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" and "The Road Not Taken."

"Acres of Clams" is about someone who gave up on the gold rush and went to Washington to farm, found that as unrewarding, and finally ended up digging clams. It's on the db, with melody.


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Subject: Tune Add: LOUSY MINER
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Aug 98 - 04:13 AM

John Stone's Lousy Miner is in the database, but there's no tune. The tune is "Dark-eyed Sailor," but I don't know if it's the tune for the Dark-Eyed Sailor we have in the database.
Anyhow, here's the tune.
-Joe Offer-

MIDI file: LOUSYM~1.MID

Timebase: 192

Name: The Lousy Miner
Text: By John A. Stone (1855)
Copyright: tune: Darkeyed Sailor, traditional
Key: F
TimeSig: 3/4 24 8
Start
0000 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 69 110 0160 0 69 000 0032 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 65 110 0094 0 65 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 62 110 0256 0 62 000 0032 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 72 110 0142 0 72 000 0002 1 72 110 0046 0 72 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 72 110 0094 0 72 000 0002 1 72 110 0094 0 72 000 0002 1 74 110 0094 0 74 000 0002 1 69 110 0256 0 69 000 0032 1 72 110 0094 0 72 000 0002 1 72 110 0094 0 72 000 0002 1 65 110 0094 0 65 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 62 110 0160 0 62 000 0032 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 65 110 0094 0 65 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 69 110 0256 0 69 000 0032 1 69 110 0046 0 69 000 0002 1 69 110 0046 0 69 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 60 110 0094 0 60 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 60 110 0160 0 60 000 0032 1 62 110 0046 0 62 000 0002 1 62 110 0046 0 62 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 72 110 0094 0 72 000 0002 1 74 110 0094 0 74 000 0002 1 72 110 0160 0 72 000 0032 1 74 110 0094 0 74 000 0002 1 67 110 0160 0 67 000 0032 1 69 110 0160 0 69 000 0032 1 67 110 0160 0 67 000 0032 1 65 110 0160 0 65 000 0032 1 62 110 0256 0 62 000
End

This program is worth the effort of learning it.

To download the March 10 MIDItext 98 software and get instructions on how to use it click here

ABC format:

X:1
T:The Lousy Miner
M:3/4
Q:1/4=120
K:F
DAAA2A|GFGD3|DDDc3/2c/2A|ccdA3|ccFED2|DFGA3|
A/2A/2ACDC2|D/2D/2Acdc2|dG2A2G|-GF2D11/4||


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Bojangles
Date: 28 Aug 98 - 04:28 AM

Check out the Ballad of Soapy Smith...just posted as a neew thred.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Barry Finn
Date: 28 Aug 98 - 08:32 AM

BSeed, your right about the Canal, now that you've joged my memory , I think Debby's interest I think in the song came from one of her ancestors made the journey on foot across the Isthmus to finish off the trip by boat, I think I recall her saying that the boat met it's end & he was rescued & continued on to San Francisco. Barry


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Dale Rose
Date: 28 Aug 98 - 08:50 AM

Boy, I love it when people mention musicians that I have loved for years! Where else but here?

Well, anyway, speaking of Debby McClatchy, how about California Faith? In the early 70s, Jim Ringer recorded California Joe, and a couple of years later, she did that as a followup. Off hand, I cannot remember whether the words were traditional, or if she wrote them.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Aug 98 - 06:20 PM

Click here to get to the literature collection of Malakoff Diggins State Park near Nevada City, California. The collection has a nuber of stories and a few songs. At Malakoff, they used high-pressure hoses to blast away the hillsides in their search for gold. Where I live near the American River in Sacramento, they used dredgers to dig for gold in deep trenches, leaving huge ridges of rocks that still extend for half a mile or more on either side of the river. The Gold Rush was a romantic period in some ways, but it certainly did horrible damage to the ecology of this area.
There were also many underground mines in the Mother Lode, some still operating; and many fascinating old mining towns. I have friends who go panning for gold, and they regularly find small nuggets. It's nice to have a chance to present some of the music that is part of the history of this area.
But I'm still waiting to see if Barry is going to type all 17 verses of "Seeing the Elephant".....
-Joe Offer-

OK, Barry... You win. I'll type it. The office computer is down, so I can't work, can I? Back in half an hour.


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Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: SEEING THE ELEPHANT^^
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Aug 98 - 09:21 PM

SEEING THE ELEPHANT
Words: D. G. Robinson
Music: D. E. Emmett ("de Boatman Dance")


When I left the States for gold
Everything I had was sold:
A stove and bed, a fat old sow
Sixteen chickens and a cow

chorus:
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, Leave, you miners, leave,
Take my advice, kill off your lice, or else go up to the mountains;
Oh, no, lots of dust, I'm going to the city to get on a "bust."
Oh, no, lots of dust, I'm going to the city to get on a "bust."

Off I started, Yankee-like,
I soon fell in with a lot from Pike;
The next was, "Damn you, back, wo-haw,"
A right smart chance from Arkansaw

On the Platte we couldn't agree,
Because I had the di-a-ree;
We were split up, I made a break,
With one old mule for the Great Salt Lake.

The Mormon girls were fat as hogs,
The chief production, cats and dogs;
Some had ten wives, others none,
Thirty-six had Brigham Young.

The damn fool, like all the rest,
Supposed the thirty-six the best;
He soon found out his virgin dears
Had all been Mormons thirteen years.

Being brave, I cut and carved,
On the desert nearly starved;
My old mule laid down and died,
I had no blanket, took his hid.

The poor coyotes stole my meat,
Then I had nought but bread to eat;
It was not long till that gave out,
Then how I cursed the Truckee route!

On I traveled through the pines,
At last I found the northern mines;
I stole a dog, got whipt like hell,
Then away I went to Marysville.

There I filled the town with lice,
And robbed the Chinese of their rice;
The people say, "You've got the itch,
Leave here, you lousy son of a bitch."

Because I would not pay my bill,
They kicked me out of Downieville;
I stole a mule and lost the trail
And then fetched up in Hangtown jail.

Canvas roof and paper walls,
Twenty horse-thieves in the stalls;
I did as I had done before,
Coyoted out from 'neath the floor.

I robbed a nigger of a dollar,
And bought unguent to grease my collar;
I tried a pint, not one had gone,
Then it beat the devil how I daubed it on.

I mined a while, got lean and lank,
And lastly stole a monte-bank;
Went to the city, got a gambler's name
And lost my bank at the thimble game.

I fell in love with a California girl;
Here eyes were gray, her hair did curl;
Her nose turned up to get rid of her chin ?
Says she, "You're a miner, you can't come in."

When the elephant I had seen,
I'm damned if I thought I was green;
And others say, both night and morn,
they saw him coming round the Horn.

If I should make another raise,
In New York sure I'll spend my days;
I'll be a merchant, buy a saw,
So, good-bye, mines and Panama.

Songwriter D.G. Robinson was a New England road-show trouper who opened one of San Francisco's first theaters (from "Songs of the American West," Lingenfelter & Dwyer")

To forty-niners and those following, no expression characterized the California gold rush more than the words "seeing the elephant." Those planning to travel west announced they were "going to see the elephant." Those turning back claimed they had seen the "elephant's tracks" or the "elephant's tail," and confessed they'd seen more than enough of the animal.
The expression predated the gold rush, arising from a tale current when circus parades first featured elephants. A farmer, so the story went, hearing that a circus was in town, loaded his wagon with vegetables for the market there. He had never seen an elephant and very much wished to. On the way to town he encountered the circus parade, led by an elephant. The farmer was thrilled. His horses, however, were terrified. Bolting, they overturned the wagon and ruined the vegetables. "I don't give a hang," the farmer said, "for I have seen the elephant."
For gold rushers, the elephant symbolized both the high cost of their endeavor -- the myriad possibilities for misfortune on the journey or in California -- and, like the farmer's circus elephant, an exotic sight, and unequaled experience, the adventure of a lifetime.

The tune is supposed to be "De Boatman Dance," but it seems different from the "Boatman" tune in the database.

MIDI file: SEEING~1.MID

Timebase: 192

Name: Seeing the Elephant
Text: By D.G. Dobinson (words)
Copyright: music: D.D. Emmett "De Boatman Dance"
TimeSig: 2/4 24 8
Start
0000 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 67 110 0142 0 67 000 0002 1 64 110 0046 0 64 000 0002 1 69 110 0046 0 69 000 0002 1 69 110 0046 0 69 000 0002 1 67 110 0160 0 67 000 0032 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 64 110 0142 0 64 000 0002 1 67 110 0046 0 67 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 67 110 0160 0 67 000 0032 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 67 110 0046 0 67 000 0002 1 64 110 0142 0 64 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 60 110 0094 0 60 000 0002 1 64 110 0256 0 64 000 0032 1 60 110 0046 0 60 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 67 110 0160 0 67 000 0128 1 69 110 0094 0 69 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 60 110 0094 0 60 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 60 110 0160 0 60 000 0128 1 60 110 0094 0 60 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 60 110 0094 0 60 000 0002 1 62 110 0142 0 62 000 0002 1 64 110 0046 0 64 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 60 110 0094 0 60 000 0002 1 60 110 0094 0 60 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 62 110 0094 0 62 000 0002 1 64 110 0046 0 64 000 0002 1 64 110 0046 0 64 000 0002 1 60 110 0094 0 60 000 0002 1 60 110 0094 0 60 000 0194 1 72 110 0160 0 72 000 0032 1 72 110 0160 0 72 000 0032 1 72 110 0094 0 72 000 0002 1 72 110 0094 0 72 000 0002 1 69 110 0142 0 69 000 0002 1 60 110 0046 0 60 000 0002 1 60 110 0046 0 60 000 0002 1 64 110 0046 0 64 000 0002 1 69 110 0046 0 69 000 0002 1 67 110 0046 0 67 000 0002 1 64 110 0046 0 64 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 67 110 0046 0 67 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 67 110 0046 0 67 000 0002 1 67 110 0046 0 67 000 0002 1 60 110 0094 0 60 000 0098 1 72 110 0160 0 72 000 0032 1 72 110 0160 0 72 000 0032 1 72 110 0094 0 72 000 0002 1 72 110 0094 0 72 000 0002 1 69 110 0142 0 69 000 0002 1 60 110 0046 0 60 000 0002 1 60 110 0046 0 60 000 0002 1 64 110 0046 0 64 000 0002 1 69 110 0046 0 69 000 0002 1 67 110 0046 0 67 000 0002 1 64 110 0046 0 64 000 0002 1 67 110 0094 0 67 000 0002 1 67 110 0046 0 67 000 0002 1 64 110 0094 0 64 000 0002 1 67 110 0046 0 67 000 0002 1 67 110 0046 0 67 000 0002 1 60 110 0094 0 60 000
End

This program is worth the effort of learning it.

To download the March 10 MIDItext 98 software and get instructions on how to use it click here

ABC format:

X:1
T:Seeing the Elephant
M:2/4
Q:1/4=120
K:C
A2A2G3E|AAG4A2|A2G2E2G2|G2E3GA2|A2G2E2A2|
A2G4A2|A2GE3G2|G2E2C2E2|-E4CD2E|-EG6A|-AE2C2D2E|
-EC6C|-CE2C2D3|EG2G2C2C|-CE2G2D2E|EC2C5|-Cc4c3|
-cc2c2A3|CCEAGEG2|GE2GGC3|-Cc4c3|-cc2c2A3|
CCEAGEG2|GE2GGC2||


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Barry Finn
Date: 28 Aug 98 - 11:11 PM

You're a good man Joe. Another of "Old Put's" songs, set to the tune of "Pop Goes the Weasel" is "A Ripping Trip" (from "Put's Golden Songster" 2nd edition 1858), you'll find it in the DT. again it's about the a steamer used to take 49ers' from Panama to San Frrancisco. Dick Holdstock & Tom Murphy recorded this on their "San Francisco Shanties", along with another of Put's "Coming Around The Horn". Barry


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROOT HOG, OR DIE (Colorado version)^^
From: rich r
Date: 29 Aug 98 - 11:22 AM

ROOT HOG, OR DIE (Colorado gold rush version)

Way our upon the Patte, near Pike's Peak we were told,
There by a little digging, we could get a pile of gold,
So we bundled up our duds, resolved at least to try
And tempt old Madam Fortune, root hog, or die.

So we travelled across the country, and we got upon the ground,
But cold weather was ahead, the first thing we found,
We bult our shanties on the ground, resolved in spring to try,
To gather up the dust and slugs, root hog, or die.

Speculation is the fashion even at this early stage,
And corner lots and big hotels appear to be the rage,
The emigration's bound to come, and to greet them we will try,
Big pig, little pig, root hog, or die.

Let shouts resound, the cup pass 'round, we all came for gold
The politicians are all gas, the speculators sold,
The "scads" are all we want, and to get them we will try,
Big pig, little pig, root hog, or die.

Surveyors now are at their work, laying off the towns,
And some will be of low degree, and some of high renown.
They don't care a jot nor tittle who do buy
The corner lots, or any lots, root hog, or die.

The doctors are among us, you can find them where you will,
They say their trade it is to cure, I say it is to kill;
They'll dose you and they'll physic you, until you make a sigh,
And their powders and their lotions make you root hog, or die.

The next in turn comes lawyers, a precious set are they,
In the public dairy they drink the milk, their clients drink ther whey
A cunning set these fellows are, they'll sap you till you're dry,
And never leave you till they have to root hog, or die.

A preacher now is all we want, to make us all do good,
But at present, there's no lack of spiritual food,
The kind I refer to will make you laugh or cry,
And it's real name is Taos, root hog, or die.

I have finished now my song, or if you please, my ditty
And that it was not shorter is about the only pity.
And now that I have had my say, don't say I've told a lie,
For the subject I've touched will make us root hog, or die.

words by A. O. McGrew
tune "Root Hog Or Die" by G.W.H. Griffin

The Colorado (or Pike's Peak) goldrush was based on a little bit of fact, the discovery of some gold outcroppings and the mineral wealth of Colorado. But mostly it was fueled by businessmen and land speculators whose Colorado holding weren't moving very well. They planted newspaper articles and took out adds in places like Kansas City & Omaha & Independence. The efffective PR campaign induced tens of thousands to "cross the wide prairie" with "Pike's Peak of Bust!" crudely lettered on their covered wagons. It was "bust" for most of them. The wealth was their but not accessible to pick and pan mining. The big money was made much later by using power tools and dynamite. The westward trek became a chaotic eastward retreat and the signs now read "Busted, By Gosh!"


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Art Thieme
Date: 29 Aug 98 - 03:40 PM

How did the guy take the name "OLD PUTZ" ??


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 29 Aug 98 - 05:41 PM

"Put" yer readin' glasses back on, Art! That's "Old Put." The other name hasn't been called for yet. You gonna take that up as your nom de guerre? You could be called, affectionately, of course, "the scholarly old putz." Like it?
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From:
Date: 29 Aug 98 - 06:51 PM

The Cowboy Junkies recorded a traditional called, "Mining for Gold", on their album, "Trinity Sessions". It's worth the listen.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 29 Aug 98 - 08:19 PM

I hadn't even thought of listening to the Cowboy Junkies. Just now, I took a look at their lyrics at The International Lyrics Server (click here). There are some very interesting (and some very familiar) songs there. I'm going to have to give them a listen. Thanks for the tip.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Richard Wright
Date: 04 Sep 98 - 07:37 PM

Bseed;

Ah hem-- where I'm from we call it the Klondike Gold Rush, Or the Yukon Gold Rush--Alaska? Where's that.

The late David Perry of Ottaw wrote some brilliant music for many of Service's poens. They are on a tape called the Man from Eldorado. Don't know if it is still available.

Many of the songs used in California and Australia found their way north to the Fraser River (1858) and Cariboo (1862) Gold Rush here in British Columbian Some of the words were changed of course. Also popular at the time were civil war songs and of course popular Music Hall type songs.

I have a local parody for instance based of Katy or Kitty Wells and another on Fathr Dear Father. Several years ago I was a street musician in Barkville and we recorded a few of these songs. Somethime this winter my wife3 and I hope to record a CD of similar stuff.

For songs you might also try Phil Thomas who has a vinyl of BC Folk Songs and a book. Some of these are picked up from the earlier Gold Rushes.

I spend much of my working life researchint the gold rushes and it is interesting to find that fwhat we had from California in 1840 through Australia in 1852 to B.C. in 58 and 62, was a gold rush society. Men and women moved between the rushes and knew each other from California or Australia. In a court case for instance a woman was refered as " I knew her as Mrs. Christian in California." Interesting stuff.

The Klondike rush, however, was late enough that it was a whole new set of folks for the most part.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 06 Sep 98 - 08:04 PM

G'day all,

Thanks for the beaut response to my original request!

I didn't remeber to put a tracer on it and then my server was down for a few days and I lost track of the the thread. Fortunately you wonderful mudcatters kept popping in new items and the thread re-appeared. Now I will 'Trace' it!

I will have to go through carefully to find material suitable for primary school performance. The thing that surpised me - and still does - is that there isn't some well-known song that all the kids would know. It must be the only area were Aussie kids don't know a swag of American songs ... maybe Walt Disney didn't get around to 'doing' the gold-rush!

The Song "Australia and the Amazon" is interesting - I had never heard it appearing here (and there was a lot of crossover as so many Australians went to the American goldrush and then so many Americans came out here when gold was found in early 1850s.

I should reciprocate with a good cross-cultural song for you (that dos not seem to be in the DT); 'Herbert Hoover's Love Song'. This was apparently written by HH when he was a mining engineer in Western Australia in the early 1900s - to a local barmaid! The verses were picked up and published by a local newspaper and (presumably with a tune written later) appear in a local book "Great Australian Folk Songs", Hill of Content, (Melbourne?), (1964?).

Actually, I seem to remember that this book was picked up and republished (1970s?) by Oak Publications ... I hope their version didn't disintegrate in a few weeks ... my book has been held together by a bulldog clip for 35 years! (Damned early model "perfect bimding")

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Art Thieme
Date: 07 Sep 98 - 12:18 PM

Joe, I've been called worse. When your name is "Art" that happens.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Richard Wright
Date: 07 Sep 98 - 12:30 PM

Art;

That's why I chose to use Richard instead of the "Dick" my mother prefers. I've written a few books and it is a family joke that "this is another book of Dick's."

Richard (please)


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 07 Sep 98 - 07:21 PM

G'day all you wonderful Mudcatters,

The Australian/American 'Herbert Hoover's Love Song' I promised yesterday is now posted under: "LYR ADD: Herbert Hoover's Love Song". The story (which I slightly mis-remembered ... hey, some of those grey cells have been flickering for 35 years) is included in the new thread.

Enjoy,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 08 Sep 98 - 11:34 PM

Joe, it may be just as well that you couldn't remember the tune of "The National Miner". The more familiar lyric is the incredibly politically incorrect "Massa's in de Cold Cold Ground". Actually, some may like having acceptable words to this charming Foster tune.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: BSeed
Date: 09 Sep 98 - 01:07 AM

Richard--You are, of course, right. I have gone off half-cocked so many times and eaten my words that I might as well create a new web acronym: ISC. I stand corrected. and as for names, I once had a student named Fanny Darling, and on the scantron roll sheets, that was of course reversed (a problem you would have had as Dick).

--seed


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Barry Finn
Date: 26 Jun 99 - 10:24 PM

Refresh


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Subject: Lyr Add: ARRIVAL OF THE GREENHORN (John A Stone)^^
From: Joe Offer
Date: 16 Sep 00 - 03:50 PM

ARRIVAL OF THE GREENHORN
(John A. Stone, 1855)

1
I've just got in across the Plains, I'm poorer than a snail,
My mules all died, but poor old Clip I pulled in by the tail;
I fed him last at Chimney Rock, that's where the grass gave out,
I'm proud to tell, we stood it well, along the Truckee route.
But I'm very weak and lean, though I started plump and fat.
How I wish I had the gold machine, I left back on the Platte!
And a pair of striped bedtick pants, my Sally made for me
To wear while digging after gold; and when I left says she,
"Here, take the laudanum with you Sam, to check the diaree."

2
When I left Missouri River, with my California rig,
I had a shovel, pick and pan, the tools they used to dig;
My mules gave out along the Platte, where they got alkalied,
And I sick with the "di-a-ree," my laudanum by my side.
When I reached the little Blue, I'd one boot and a shoe,
Which I thought by greasing once or twice, would last me nearly through;
I had needles, thread and pills, which my mammy did prescribe,
And a flint-lock musket full, to shoot the Digger tribe,
But I left them all on Goose Creek where I freely did imbibe.

3
I joined in with a train from Pike; at Independence Rock,
The Indians came in that night, stampeded all their stock;
They laughed at me said, "Go a-foot," but soon they stopped their fun,
For my old mule was left behind so poor he could not run.
So I packed my fancy nag, for the rest I could not wait,
And I traveled up Sweet Water, till I came to Devil's Gate;
When my mule gave out in sight of where I started in the morn,
I'd have given all my boots and shoes if I had not been born,
Or I'd rather stripped at New Orleans, to swim around the Horn.

4
I arrived at Salt Lake City, on the 18th of July,
Old Brigham Young was on a "bust," he swore they'd never die;
I went to see the Jordan, with a lady, God forgive her;
She took me to the water's edge, and shoved me in the river;
I crawled out and started on, and managed very well,
Until I struck the Humboldt, which I thought was nearly hell;
I traveled till I struck the sink where outlet can't be found,
The Lord got through late Saturday night, he'd finished all around,
But would not work on Sunday, so he run it in the ground.

5
The Peyouts stole what grub I had, they left me not a bite,
And now the devil was to pay-the Desert was in sight;
And as the people passed along, they'd say to me, "You fool,
You'll never get through in the world, unless you leave that mule."
But I pushed, pulled and coaxed, till I finally made a start,
And his bones, they squeaked and rattled so, I thought he'd fall apart;
I killed a buzzard now and then, gave Clip the legs and head.
We crossed the Truckee thirty times, but not a tear was shed,
We crossed the summit, took the trail, that to Nevada led.

6
When I got to Sacramento, I got on a little tight,
I lodged aboard the Prison brig, one-half a day and night;
I vamosed when I got ashore, went to the Northern mines,
There found the saying very true, "All is not gold that shines."
I dug, packed and chopped, and have drifted night and day,
But I haven't struck a single lead, that would me wages pay,
At home they think we ought to have gold on our cabin shelves,
Wear high-heeled boots, well blacked, instead of rubbers, No. twelves;
But let them come and try it, `till they satisfy themselves.

Source: Lingenfelter & Dwyer, "Songs of the American West," 1968.
tune: Jeanette and Jeanot

@gold @goldrush
JRO
Oct00


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Art Thieme
Date: 19 Sep 00 - 06:12 PM

This song is on one of my "FAVORITES" cassettes---number 27 I think---as done by Pat Foster.

Art


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Sep 00 - 06:30 PM

That's where I heard "Greenhorn," Art - my neighbor lent me a cassette of the Pat Foster recording. Are his recordings currently available?
-Joe-


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Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: THE CALIFORNIA SONG^^
From: radriano
Date: 19 Sep 00 - 06:55 PM

How's about this one?


THE CALIFORNIA SONG
La Grange logbook, 1849
From "Songs the Whalemen Sang"


We've formed our band and we are all well manned
To journey afar to the promised land
Where the golden ore is thick in store
On the banks of the Sacramento

Chorus:
Then ho boys ho, to California go
For the mountains bold are covered with gold
On the banks of the Sacramento
Heigh ho, away we go
Digging up gold in Frisco

Oh the gold is thar most anywhar
They dig it out with an iron bar
And where it's thick with a spade and pick
They've taken out lumps as big as a brick

Oh don't you cry or heave a sigh
For we'll come back again by and by
Don't have a fear or shed a tear
But patiently wait for about two years

We expect our share of the coarsest fare
And sometimes sleep in the open air
Upon the cold ground we will sleep sound
Except when the wolves come howling round

Then we'll roam o'er the dark sea foam
But we'll never forget kind friends at home
For memory kind will bring to mind
The thoughts of those we've left behind

In the days of old the prophet told
Of the city to come all paved with gold
Peradventure they forsaw the day
Now dawning upon California

Here's the ABC notation

X:1
T:California Song, The
M:4/4
L:1/8
S:Songs the Whalemen Sang, from logbook of the ship Lagrange, 1849
K:D
F2 | A2A2 AA AA | B2A2A2A2 | F2AA E2AA | F2D2 D2FF | A2A2A2A2
B2A2 A2AA | F2AA E2A2 | F2D2 D2A,2 || D4 F4 | A6 d2 | B2A2d2B2 |
A6 AA | A2A2A2A2 | BBA2 A2AA | F2AA E2A2 | F2D4A,2 | D4 F4 | A2d2 B4 | BBA2 d2F2 | E2 D4 ||


Regards,
Radriano


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 19 Sep 00 - 07:10 PM

I was about to give the lyrics to The Dirty Miner, which I've sung for many years, having it from the singing of Earl Robinson. I saw a reference above to The Lousy Miner, which turns out to be the same song, with "lousy" for "dirty". If it were nothing more than this, I wouldn't do this post.

I saw a comment that it's the same tune as The Dark Eyed Sailor, and so looked for it in the DT. No tune given. I have the tune for The Dirty (Lousy?) Miner, and have no means of submitting it. I'll be glad to sing it at HearMe if requested, and whoso wanteth the tune may record from my singing.

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Art Thieme
Date: 19 Sep 00 - 10:27 PM

Joe,

I don't think those are available now. Only the Riverside jazz recordings has been rleased by FANTASY RECORDS who now owns Riverside I do believe. They did issue ONE (1) of the folk records----THE YOUNG AND WONDERFUL BOB GIBSON---a compilation from a few of the things he did for Riverside. Fantasy also owns Kicking Mule where I recorded my first two LPs in the 70s.

Anyhow, I think DICK GREENHAUS used to be Pat Foster's agent or manager or whatever--in the 1950s. Apparently, it was a less than pleasant experience for Dick. I'd sure love to find a good tape of that old "Gold Rush" LP. The "SWEET BETSY FROM PIKE" was a truly complete varient.

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: GUEST,JohnB
Date: 23 Jan 02 - 12:16 PM

Someone mentioned David Parry's CD "The Man from Eldorado" David's earlier release, the title evades me at the moment, (I think it was something like "the Wind that Shakes the World")also had some very suitable songs on it, plus a couple of Robert Service poems. One title I remember was "Klondike" the other "I wish I was Eighty again" I will try to remember to look them up this weekend, unless anyone else has the words for them, said he hopefully. JohnB


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Subject: Lyr Add: THERE'S A GOLD MINE IN THE SKY
From: Genie
Date: 23 Jan 02 - 03:40 PM

I don't know if this song 'counts' as a "gold rush" song, because I think it was written at least a few decades after the California gold rush, but this song, popular in the 1930's, I think, is a prospector singing to his pack mule.


THERE'S A GOLD MINE IN THE SKY
Words and music by Charles & Nick Kenny, ©1937.
As recorded by Gene Autry

There's a gold mine in the sky far away.
We will find it, you and I, some sweet day.
There'll be clover just for you down the line
Where the skies are always blue, pal of mine.

Take your time, old mule; I know you're growin' lame,
But you'll pasture in the stars when we strike that claim
And we'll sit up there and watch the world roll by
When we find that long-lost gold mine in the sky.

Far away (far away), far away (far away),
We will find that long-lost gold mine some sweet day,
And we'll say hello to friends who said goodbye
When we find that long-lost gold mine in the sky.

Far away (far away), far away (far away), in the sky.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: MMario
Date: 23 Jan 02 - 03:58 PM

Genie? YOu wouldn't happen to have the music for that would you?


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: WyoWoman
Date: 23 Jan 02 - 08:03 PM

I'd love to find songs about women in the gold rush era. They were there from the very beginning, but seem to have disappeared from the songs and, somewhat, the history books. Anyone know any songs about the women who cooked and cleaned and prospected and whored in the mining camps?

ww


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 23 Jan 02 - 11:33 PM

Gene Autry recorded "Gold Mine in the Sky." I think it was sung in a movie, circa 1937, and probably written for it. Take the words given above and add, at the end:

Far away, far away,
We will find that long, lost gold mine some sweet day.
And we'll say "Hello" to friends who've said "Goodbye."
When we find that long, lost gold mine in the sky.

And Gene took it out with:

Far away, far away in the sky.

Clearly a recently composed song, but it worked its way into the oral tradition, in a limited fashion. Helen Schneyer recorded a version she learned from the wonderful Nova Scotia singer Fred Redden, who had misremembered it, unfortunately. It's on her Somber, Sacred and Silly CD, available through Folk-Legacy.

Sandy


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Genie
Date: 24 Jan 02 - 01:27 AM

Sandy, Thanks for adding the reprise part to "Goldmine In The Sky." It had slipped my mind.

If anyone wants the tune, I can email a Finale Notepad sheet music file to you.

Dicho, Doughbelly Price's credo is on a par with Woody Guthrie's and is worth posting here:

Doughbelly produced at least one (and I believe more than one) self-published collection of his columns from local newspapers, the Taos News and El Crepusculo. One of those, DoughBelly's sCrap Book, bears the legend "Printed by El Crepusculo, 1951" and the following distinctive copyright statement:

I did not entend to copyright it all. but I got to talking to one of these men of the legal Profession and he said some one might steal it. now I cannot amagine anyone stealing anything as worthless as this will be. but they might. human beings do such funny things sometimes. And if some one was to steal it. I dont know what I could say. as I have stold nearly every thing but A book. And if it was A book to show you how to beat income tax. I would be Tempted to steal that. as I know how. and my concience would not bother me in the least. And there is not A doubt in my mind. that some of the people that read this thing. has stold plenty. but if you told them so they would want to do a fistic combat with you. which is the real American way of setteling A difference of opinion. so if anything in this mess will give you an idea. how to make A living honest or other wise. I dont see why you should not use it. and if there is any profit. send me my Cut.

doughBelly


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: WyoWoman
Date: 24 Jan 02 - 10:33 PM

Genie, that's great. 'Fistic combat.' Shure enough.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Genie
Date: 24 Jan 02 - 11:32 PM

Well, Dicho really deserves the credit for posting the link to it.

Genie


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Subject: Lyr Add: SOURDOUGH/MINER'S SONG (Bill Staines)
From: GUEST,MAG at work
Date: 19 Apr 02 - 07:45 PM

I'll see if I can remember all the words to the Bill Staines song mentioned way above. I like it a lot and am always hitting "replay" on my tape. I highly recommend it; the picking is impeccable, and the fiddle solo adds just the right note of melancholy.

SOURDOUGH/MINER'S SONG
(Bill Staines)

When first unto this country a stranger I came,
Pick and shovel on my back, no money to my name,
O, no money to my name.

I landed in old Juneau, Seattle down the line;
I boated 'cross the channel for to work the Treadwell mine,
O, to work the Treadwell mine.

Well, it was hard times in the old tin pit, 18 hundred down.
One day you'd make 2 dollars and the next you're glory bound,
O, the next you're glory bound.

So we dodged the rocks and the sudden slides and we swam out of the flood.
In the rain and cold, we dug for gold through the water and the mud,
O, the water and the mud.

Well, there's color in the eagle's eye, and in the sun at the break of day,
But there ain't no color I can find to keep me on that pay,
O, to keep me on that pay.

So it was straightway through the wilderness (only line I can't remember...)
Then down the frozen Yukon in the year of '99,
O, the year of '99.

God help the snow-blind traveller and help him on his way,
And bless the drunken fiddler when he finds the time to play,
And hear the words of the dyin' man left frozen in the cold,
And pity the weary miner who never found his gold,
O, who never found his gold.

There's 50 thousand of us here out on the beach at Nome,
And there ain't but 1 in 50 who can pay his way back home,
O, can pay his way back home.

Please pardon the inconsistencies. It's a great song.


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: rich-joy
Date: 20 Apr 02 - 08:04 AM

I have a tape of Jon Bartlett & Rika Ruebsaat's "Green Fields of Canada" on which they do "Hard Rock Miner" (to the tune of "When You Wore a Tulip" c.1914) which Phil ("Songs of the Pacific NorthWest") Thomas apparently found more frequently than any other song. They also do "Far From Home" written by "W.H.D." and published 1859,(tune by Phil Thomas), about life on The Frazer.
Cheers! R-J


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 20 Apr 02 - 10:58 AM

I've been wondering about the time source of The Dirty (Lousy) Miner. I sing it and enjoy it, and I'd like to be able to introduce it as being from whatever gold rush is appropriate. Does anybody know?

Dave Oesterreich


This thread has been closed, so I won't make it longer.
Dave, Lingenfelter-Dwyer say that "Lousy Miner" was written by John A. Stone, "Old Put," the most prolific writer of Gold Rush songs. Lingenfelter-Dwyer got the text from the Original California Songster.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: GUEST,MAG at work
Date: 20 Apr 02 - 11:31 AM

Erg; for whatever reason, the lines with numerals disappeared above; let me redo two (2) verses:

Well it was hard times in the old tin pit,
eighteen hundred down;
one day you'd make two dollars and
the next you're glory bound ...

Well there's fifty-thousand of us here
out on the beach at Nome;
and there ain't but one in fifty who
can pay his way back home, O ...


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 Apr 02 - 02:44 PM

This thread is getting unwieldy. Please post to:
GOLD MINERS' SONGS (American) 2

Click for part 2


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: GUEST,metrolga@yahoo.com
Date: 11 Feb 04 - 08:43 PM

I am looking for words to an old song of the 49's called givemy love to nellie: JACK and kiss her once for me. that is all i know of this song. i desperatly need them for my band. thanks if any one has the words please e-mail me. ericka


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 11 Feb 04 - 08:57 PM

G'dayEricka,

It's in the DT (Digital Tradition) as Give My Love to Nell (names are always a trap ... fortunately I searched on "Give My Love to Nell*"!).

Here it is: Give My Love to Nell

Regards,

Bob Bolton
E-Mail sent - Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ: Gold Miners' Songs (American)
From: BanjoRay
Date: 12 Feb 04 - 05:30 AM

Debby McClatchy is doing a workshop this weekend on American Gold Rush songs, as part of the Gainsborough Old Time Festival (see the current thread) in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, UK.
Cheers
Ray


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