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Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In

Related threads:
Lyr Req: When the Saints Go Marching In (18)
The Island Song Book - When the Saints (7)
Lyr Req: O When the saints go marching in (2) (closed)
Lyr Req: When the Saints Go Marching In (4)


RINI.WIT@WVS.NL 13 Oct 98 - 03:26 PM
mls 13 Oct 98 - 07:55 PM
Barry Finn 13 Oct 98 - 08:01 PM
Alix 13 Oct 98 - 08:11 PM
53 13 Feb 02 - 07:58 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 13 Feb 02 - 08:35 PM
masato sakurai 03 Nov 04 - 09:01 AM
black walnut 31 Jul 07 - 05:33 PM
vectis 31 Jul 07 - 05:34 PM
Azizi 31 Jul 07 - 05:54 PM
PoppaGator 31 Jul 07 - 06:10 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 31 Jul 07 - 08:11 PM
masato sakurai 31 Jul 07 - 08:22 PM
Azizi 31 Jul 07 - 09:39 PM
Amos 31 Jul 07 - 10:31 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 31 Jul 07 - 10:33 PM
Azizi 31 Jul 07 - 11:59 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 Aug 07 - 06:20 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 15 Aug 07 - 08:30 PM
GUEST,leeneia 16 Aug 07 - 01:26 PM
Mikefule 16 Aug 07 - 06:01 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Aug 07 - 08:02 PM
Mikefule 18 Aug 07 - 08:00 AM
Joe Offer 18 Aug 07 - 02:40 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Aug 07 - 04:48 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Aug 07 - 06:22 PM
eddie1 19 Aug 07 - 06:10 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 19 Aug 07 - 11:59 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 20 Aug 07 - 02:55 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 20 Aug 07 - 07:05 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 21 Aug 07 - 10:24 PM
GUEST,Lighter 22 Aug 07 - 10:40 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 22 Aug 07 - 11:49 AM
jazzhistoria 08 Nov 10 - 03:22 AM
GUEST,shiningphoenix01 26 Jun 11 - 06:31 AM
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Subject: traditional folksong
From: RINI.WIT@WVS.NL
Date: 13 Oct 98 - 03:26 PM

looking for the lyrics of the folksong: When the saints go marching in. Thanks.


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN THE SAINTS GO MARCHING IN
From: mls
Date: 13 Oct 98 - 07:55 PM

O when the saints go marching in
O when the saints go marching in
O lord I want to be in that number
When the saints go marching in

And on that hallelujah morn
And on that hallelujah morn
O lord I want to be in that number
On that hallelujah morn

I think there are more versus... we used to sing it and make up words as we went along

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 14-Feb-02.


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Subject: RE: WHEN THE SAINTS
From: Barry Finn
Date: 13 Oct 98 - 08:01 PM

When the moon, it turns blood red

When the sun refuse to shine


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN THE SAINTS GO MARCHING IN
From: Alix
Date: 13 Oct 98 - 08:11 PM

This is probably more info than what you are looking for, but thought it was interesting. Hope it helps,

Snookums
^^
I found this at the following site:
http://ingeb.org/spiritua/whenthes.html

When the Saints Go Marching In

1.I am just a lonesome traveller,
Through this big wide world of sin;
Want to join in that grand procession,
When the Saints go marching in.

Oh when the saints, go marching in,
Oh when the saints go marching in,
Lord I want to be in that number,
When the saints go marching in.

2. All my folks have gone before me,
All my friends and my kin;
But I'll meet them up yonder,
When the saints go marching in.

Oh when the saints, go marching in,
Oh when the saints go marching in,
I will meet them all up in heaven,
When the saints go marching in.

3. Come and join me in my journey,
'Cause it's time that we begin;
And we'll be there for that judgement,
When the saints go marching in.

Oh when the saints, go marching in,
Oh when the saints go marching in,
We will be in line for that judgement,
When the saints go marching in.

Other choruses are as follows:

And when the stars begin to shine,
And when the stars begin to shine,
then Lord, let me be in that number,
When the stars begin to shine

When Gabriel blows in his horn
When Gabriel blows in his horn,
Oh Lord I want to be in that number,
When Gabriel blows in his horn.

And when the sun refuse to shine
And when the sun refuse to shine,
Oh Lord I want to be in that number,
When the sun refuse to shine.

And when the moon has turned to blood,
And when the moon has turned to blood,
Oh Lord I want to be in that number,
When the moon has turned to blood.

And when they gather round the throne,
And when they gather round the throne,
Oh Lord I want to be in that number,
When they gather round the throne.

And on that Halleluja Day
And on that Halleluja Day
Oh Lord I want to be in that number,
On that Halleluja Day.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: O When the saints go marching in
From: 53
Date: 13 Feb 02 - 07:58 PM

Tony Sheridan and the Beatles did a good version of this song in 62, give it a listen.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: O When the saints go marching in
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Feb 02 - 08:35 PM

Best known through Louis Armstrong. An interesting note in cufresno Traditional Ballad Index. Apparently copyrighted twice in 1896; prior occurrence unknown; also found in the Bahamas. "Possibly older."
The version posted by Alix (thread # 2, George Seto, above) has more verses than most, and epitomizes the gospel marching tunes often used at funerals with its references to the judgement day. As I understand it, this tune would be sung and played on the way back from a funeral, with more mournful ones played on the way there. Perhaps someone from New Orleans will have better information than mine.
It is odd that this song does not appear in more of the books on Negro song. Was it considered a white or minstrel tune?


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Subject: RE: Req. When the Saints go Marching
From: masato sakurai
Date: 03 Nov 04 - 09:01 AM

This is not in the DT.

See also The Traditional Ballad Index: When the Saints Go Marching In.

When the Saints Go Marching In

DESCRIPTION: "O when the saints go marching in (x2), Lord I want to be in that number, When the saints...." Similarly "When the sun refuse to shine"; "When the moon goes down in blood"; "We are traveling in the footsteps of those who've gone before"; etc.
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1896 (copyright)
KEYWORDS: religious nonballad
FOUND IN: US West Indies(Bahamas)
REFERENCES (4 citations):
Lomax-FSNA 236, "When the Saints Go Marching In" (1 text, 1 tune)
Arnett, p. 154, "When the Saints Go Marching In" (1 text, 1 tune)
Silber-FSWB, p. 369, "When The Saints Go Marching In" (1 text)
Fuld-WFM, pp. 641-642, "When the Saints Go Marching In"

Roud #13983
RECORDINGS:
Fiddlin' John Carson, "When The Saints Go Marching In" (Bluebird B-5560, 1934)
Chosen Gospel Singers, "When the Saints Go Marching In" (Nashboro 567, n.d.)
Chuck Wagon Gang, "When The Saints Go Marching In" (Columbia 20630, 1949)
Blind Willie Davis, "When the Saints Go Marching In" (Paramount 12658, 1928; Herwin 93005 [as Blind Willie Jackson], 1929; on Babylon)
Slim Ducket & Pig Norwood, "When the Saints Go Marching In" (OKeh 8899, 1931; rec. 1930)
Eureka Jubilee Singers, "When the Saints Go Marching In" (Sharon X-507, n.d.)
The Georgia Peach [Clara Belle Gholston] "When the Saints Go Marching In" (Banner 32654/Oriole 8191/Romeo 5191/Perfect 0221 [possibly as Clara Belle Gholston]/Melotone 12571, 1933; rec. 1932; on Babylon)
Elder Ella Hall, Effie Fitts, Jennie Jackson & congregation "When the Saints Go Marching" (on MuSouth10)
Eureka Band, "When the Saints Go Marching In" [instrumental version] (on MuSouth10)
Frank & James McCravy, "When the Saints Go Marching Home" (Brunswick 196, 1928; rec. 1927) (OKeh 45435, 1930)
Monroe Brothers, "When the Saints Go Marching In" (Montgomery Ward M-7142, 1937)
Mozelle Moore, "When the Saints Go Marching" [instrumental version] (on MuSouth10)
John D. Mounce et al, "When the Saints Go Marching In" (on MusOzarks01)
Pace Jubilee Singers w. Hattie Parker, "When The Saints Go Marching In" (Victor 21582, 1928)
Paramount Jubilee Singers, "When All The Saints Come Marching In" (Paramount 12073, 1923)
Snowball & Sunshine, "When the Saints Go Marching In" (Columbia 15722-D, 1932; rec. 1931)
Horace Sprott & group "When the Saints Go Marching Home" (on MuSouth02)
Wheat Street Female Quartet, "When the Saints Go Marching In" (Columbia 14067-D, 1925)

NOTES: This song was published twice in 1896, once (according to the copyright records; no copies of the music survive) as by J. M. Black and once with words credited to Katherine E. Purvis and music by Black. (We should note, however, that Eldar Hasund, who has seen the copy which survives, does not consider it the same in either text or tune).
The song is very likely older in any case, as it was collected in Nassau by the McCutcheons in 1917 (again in a form unlike modern pop versions, though recognizably the same song and with much the same tune), and may have originated in the Bahamas. - RBW
File: LoF236

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Song List

Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2016 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: RE: WHEN THE SAINTS
From: black walnut
Date: 31 Jul 07 - 05:33 PM

This is trad, right?

~b.w.


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Subject: RE: WHEN THE SAINTS
From: vectis
Date: 31 Jul 07 - 05:34 PM

No! It's the song of my football club Southampton.


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Subject: RE: WHEN THE SAINTS
From: Azizi
Date: 31 Jul 07 - 05:54 PM

"When The Saints Go Marching In" originated as a 19th century or earlier African American religious song.

See this excerpt from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/When_the_Saints_Go_Marching_In

"When the Saints Go Marching In", so well-known that it is often referred to merely as "The Saints", is a United States gospel hymn that has taken on certain aspects of folk music. Though it originated as a spiritual, people today are more likely to hear it played by a jazz band.

A traditional use of the song is as a funeral march. In the traditional funeral music traditions of New Orleans, Louisiana, often called the "jazz funeral", while accompanying the coffin to the cemetery, a band would play the tune as a dirge. On the way back from the interment, it would switch to the familiar upbeat "hot" or "Dixieland" style. While the tune is still heard as a slow spiritual number on rare occasions, from the mid-20th century it has been massively more common as a "hot" number. The number remains particularly associated with the city of New Orleans, to the extent that New Orleans' professional football team was named the New Orleans Saints, after the song".

-snip-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/When_The_Saints_Go_Marching_In_(sport) provides a list of sports teams which use "When The Saints Go Marching In' as the team's theme song or [the song or instrumental is] reserved for when they score. It may be used with the standard lyrics, specialized lyrics, or no lyrics at all".


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Subject: RE: WHEN THE SAINTS
From: PoppaGator
Date: 31 Jul 07 - 06:10 PM

On the wall behind the bandstand at Preservation Hall, venerable French Quarter home of the best in old-timey traditional jazz, is a sign reading:

Requests: $2
Traditional Requests: $1
"The Saints": $10

I might be wrong on the dollar-amounts; it's an old, faded, yellowed sign from the 1950s and the prices predate many years of inflation, but the message is clear: "We're sick of playing nothing but this one tired old song for you tourists!!!"

Of course, a song has to have plenty of intrinsic value to become over-played and trite to the point of nausea, and this is a wonderful song or it would never have become so popular. But, enough already!

Somebody from the UK must have posted that Wikipedia article ~ how else can one explain the listing of all those Brit soccer teams above the genuine "owners" of this song as a rallying cry, the New Orleans Saints?

As most of you who are Americans and even slightly aware of spectator sports, the traditionally lousy Saints suddenly became a truly excellent pro football team last year, just when our poor devastated city needed something good to happen.

Right now it's almost time for another football season to begin, with high expectations for our newly-respectable NFL team to perform even more brilliantly than last year. The preseason home opener is just ten days away ~ the Buffalo Bills will be at the Superdome on Friday evening, Aug 10 ~ and the wife and I will "be in that number," occupying the cheapest seats in the whole National Football League, high above the south end zone.

"WHEN THE SAINTS," indeed!


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Subject: RE: WHEN THE SAINTS
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Jul 07 - 08:11 PM

Azizi reports commonly heard comments about the song, which cannot be verified in written sources.

In error, Fuld and others confuse the well-known song with the white gospel "When the Saints Are Marching In," 1896, J. M. Black copyright (unfortunately the deposit copy apparently is lost). This gospel song is entirely different from the New Orleans and world favorite.
Black published his song in a gospel songbook he edited in the same year, 1896. A midi may be heard at Cyberhymnal.
Black's version was reprinted by Ira D. Sankey et al. in "Sacred Songs No. 1, for Use in Gospel Meetings," also 1896.
These white gospel books were printed in large quantities.


"When the Saints..." was reported from the Bahamas in 1917, and was recorded by the Paramount Jubilee Singers in 1923.

Anecdote places the tune as a funeral song at the beginning of the 20th c. in New Orleans, but written documentation is lacking.

The song probably is African-American in origin, perhaps from a spiritual, but this has not been verified. From its nature, gospel camp meeting origin seems likely.
Its first publication as a spiritual was in 1930, by Hall Johnson. It was used in the show, "Green Pastures."

If anyone has found an earlier publication, please post the information.

Fuld compares the tune to that of "When the Roll Is Called up Yonder," also by J. M. Black, and there are similarities, but this seems coincidental.
---------------------------------------------------------
With regard to the post by PoppaGator, one of the musicians at Preservation Hall told me, "If anyone comes in here whistling that, he has to make a donation or he gets tossed out."


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Subject: RE: When the Saints
From: masato sakurai
Date: 31 Jul 07 - 08:22 PM

There're audio samples of "When All The Saints Come Marching In" (2 takes) HERE from
Paramount Jubilee Singers: Complete Recorded Works In Chronological Order (1923-28)
[CD].


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Subject: RE: When the Saints
From: Azizi
Date: 31 Jul 07 - 09:39 PM

Alright, Q. I'll revise my statement like so:
"When The Saints Go Marching In" originated as a 19th century or earlier or a later {early 20th century} Black religious song {"Black" here is inclusive of Afro-Caribbean people as well as African Americans}.

The possiblitity that the inspiration for "When The Saints Go Marching In" could have come in part or in whole from "the white gospel 'When the Saints Are Marching In',[which was first published in] 1896" does not negate the fact that the song was primarily associated with Black religious worship.

I suppose that Q may agree that just because the "White" version was published first, doesn't mean that it was the source for the "Black" version. And maybe this song has both white and black roots.

Be that as it may, I'm interested in reading more about the history and current use of this song.


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Subject: RE: When the Saints
From: Amos
Date: 31 Jul 07 - 10:31 PM

Oh, I used to have some playmates
Who used to play with me.
But since I've been converted, Lord!
They shun my company.

(From memory of hearing Mahalia Jackson sing it).


A


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Subject: RE: When the Saints
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Jul 07 - 10:33 PM

Azizi, the 1896 gospel song by J. M. Black is unrelated to the 'Black' "Saints." Black was a big name in white gospel around 1890-1910, writing many religious songs (see the Cyberhymnal for some) and his books are easily obtained. "When the Role Is Called Up Yonder" is the best known of his songs.

The one we consider to be a 'black' song and which has gained popularity everywhere should have more of a history- the tune is catching- and it is surprising that the 1923 recording by the Paramount Jubilee Singers is the first good version we can find.
As several have suggested, it may be West Indian, but the 1917 Bahamian mention (and only a mention) is the first record of it there.

There should be more of a record, since many anecdotes take it back to about 1900.

Brown University, African-American sheet music, 1820-1920, has no record of the song in sheet music of that period.

Red Hot Jazz has two band versions that may be downloaded; Louis Armstrong 1938 and Wingy Malone 1939.


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Subject: RE: When the Saints
From: Azizi
Date: 31 Jul 07 - 11:59 PM

When I wrote my comment about the Black version of the song "When The Saints go Marching In", I didn't mean it to refer to the composer J. M. Black. I meant that word as a group referent for people of African descent. The fact that that White composer's last name was Black was something I had skimmed over and forgotten when I wrote that comment.

Mostly off topic:

As a matter of information, I capitalize the first letter of the group referents "Black" and "White" because I recall the strenous efforts that folks made in the 1950s to get "Negro" [the former referent for Black Americans] capitalized as other group referents such as English, Scottish, Chinese, Spanish were routinely capitalized while "Negro" was almost always written with a small "n". The position of folks who successfully advocated for the first letter in the word "Negro" to be capitalized was that failure to do so conveyed the message that folks thought that "Negroes" were less than people who "belonged to" other racial and ethnic groups.

Since "Black" is an informal referent for the same group of people as "Negro" {though the informal term "Black" includes people other than Americans having some African descent}, it seems logical to me to capitalize that word. And since I capitalize the "B" in "Black" when I'm using it as a group referent, it also seems logical to me to capitalize the "W" in "White" when I'm using it as a group referent. However, I'm aware this is not the norm in mainstream media or even in Black oriented media, though I have seen the group referent "Black" capitalized by other Black writers and sometimes also by non-Black writers. Btw, when the uncapitalized word "negro" is used by Black writers to refer to other Black folks, it's meant as an insult which speaks to that person's social/political "Uncle Tom-ism" [and/or "Aunt Jemima-ism" attitudes and/or actions or lack of actions on behalf of themself and/or other Black people. The same negative connotations aren't associated with the uncapitalized group referent "black".

As a matter of record, for at least 20 years now, "African American" has been the formal group referent for Black Americans.

**

And just as there are White people whose last names is "Black", there are Black people whose last names is "White". Here's an example of a Black man whose last name was White:

Walter White


**

Here's a clicky for the song that Q mentioned which was composed by J. M. Black:

http://library.timelesstruths.org/music/When_the_Roll_Is_Called_Up_Yonder/


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Subject: RE: When the Saints
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Aug 07 - 06:20 PM

Digression, but adding comment to Azizi's post.

New York Times style policy is to capitalize neither white nor black.

I have several handbooks for writers, put out for guidance of   authors, reviewers and proofreaders by publishing houses, but they are from 1985-1995 and perhaps are out-of-date.

Prentice-Hall, under 28, Capitals-
Swahili, English, etc. are capitalized.
In a note, "Usage varies for the term black(blacks) as an ethnic designation. Although it is often not capitalized, and is never capitalized in the phrase "blacks and whites," many authors regularly capitalize other use in current writing.

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich
9a- "Capitalize proper names, words used as an essential part of proper names and usually, derivatives and abbreviations of proper names." Jews, Jewish, English would be capitalized but neither black nor white.

Mirriam Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 1996
black, noun, 4a- a person belonging to any of various population groups having dark pigmentation of the skin. b. Afro-American.
(neither black nor white is capitalized in their entries).

Oxford English Dictionary 1971 edition; 1987 revisions.
Black, 1c. having an extremely dark skin; strictly applied to negroes and negritos, and other dark-skinned races, ...
d. of or pertaining to the negro race.
Negro capitalized was adopted in 1987 but black remained lower case.
Perhaps someone has a current Oxford and would check the most recent usage.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: When the Saints Are Marching In
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 15 Aug 07 - 08:30 PM

^^
WHEN THE SAINTS ARE MARCHING IN
Katherine E. Purvis, J. M. Black 1896

Chorus:
When the saints         are marching in
         When the saints             are marching in,
When the saints         are marching in
          When the saints          are marching in
Joyful songs of salvation thro' the sky shall ring,
When the saints       are marching in
          When the saints          are marching in.

1.
Thro' the shining gate
Where the angels wait,
When the saints ... are marching in, ......
The Redeemed shall come
And be crowned at home
When the saints ... are marching in.......
2.
Parted friends shall meet
On the golden street,
When the saints ... are marching in ......
Spotless robes shall wear,
Victors' palms shall bear,
When the saints ... are marching in. ....
3.
Ev'ry tongue and race
Shall extol God's grace,
When the saints ... are marching in ....
And the blood-washed throng
Shall repeat the song,
When the saints ... are marching in.
4.
To the Lamb once slain,
But who lives again,
When the saints ... are marching in, ...
We shall offer praise
Through eternal days,
When the saints ... are marching in.

With score.
Note: "Copyright 1896, by J. M. Black. Used by per."

Ira D. Sankey, James McGranahan and Geo. C. Stebbins, 1896, "Sacred Songs No. 1," The Biglow and Main Co., NY and Chicago. Copyright.

I made comments to the effect that this gospel song was unrelated to the "Saints Go Marching In" popular in New Orleans. After seeing these lyrics and the music, which I have tried to lay out as printed, I am no longer certain that that is correct. There is a lot in common.
In other words, they could be the same song.

Click to play

(MIDI from cyberhymnal.org)


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Subject: RE: When the Saints
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 16 Aug 07 - 01:26 PM

A few years ago, and before Hurricane Katrina, I was a tourist in New Orleans. A band was playing music on the square, and of their own volition and without any prompting, they played "When the Saints Go Marching In" for their closing number.

So I think there are plenty of people who still enjoy it.


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Subject: RE: When the Saints
From: Mikefule
Date: 16 Aug 07 - 06:01 PM

Been Googling for the words as sung by William John Clifton Haley, the half-blind singer from Michigan, but no luck. His version was excellent, though. ;0)

Never realised he was blind in one eye until I looked up the Wikipedia article.

As for the capital B for Black issue, if I were black, I would object to being lumped together with people from different cultures and continents purely on the basis of skin colour, with or without the capital letter.


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Subject: RE: When the Saints
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Aug 07 - 08:02 PM

Listen to Louis Armstrong in a 1938 recording of "When the Saints Go Marching In" on redhotjazz.com.
Louis Armstrong

Scroll well down to find it in the nice collection of his recordings that are on this fine website.


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Subject: RE: When the Saints
From: Mikefule
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 08:00 AM

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQ4FskqCCu0

You could transcribe the words from this. :0)


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Subject: RE: When the Saints
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 02:40 PM

Q sent me a scan of "When the Saints Are Marching In" from one of the Sankey hymnals. I finally got around to transcribing it today; but before I started, I found the hymn at Cyberhymnal.org. I don't think anyone would say it's the same song as "When the Saints Come Marching In," but it's a great song, a real rouser. I think I may add it to my repertoire.

While they're not the same song, I think we could say that both describe the same images found in the Book of Revelation. I tried to find an exact passage in Revelation, but I couldn't find any specific reference to marching saints in the Bible. The general idea of the saints gathering is all through the Book of Revelation, but I couldn't find any one passage that could be considered the basis for this song - anybody got a passage they can cite?
-Joe-




Click to play

(MIDI from cyberhymnal.org)


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Subject: RE: Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 04:48 PM

Many thanks indeed, Joe. I am surprised that it isn't often heard.
The way it is organized in the sheet music in Sankey suggests the repetition that often is heard in the New Orleans 'Saints,' with a soloist 'echoed' by chorus or musical instrument.
I hope to have Black's sheet music in a few days and will compare it with the score in Sankey; they should be the same, but who knows?

I still find it strange that only a few anecdotes are found about "The Saints Go Marching In," nothing definite until a mention (only that) of the song in the Bahamas, 1917.
J. J. Fuld, in "The Book of World-Famous Music," pp. 641-642, considered the origin to be the J. M. Black gospel song of 1896, and pointed to the "famous 'echo.'"
He also mentioned the similarity to the melody and lyrics of "When the Saints March In for Crowning," by Harriet E. Jones and James D. Vaughan, No. 49 in "The Silver Trumpet for Revivals, ....," 1908 (cannot locate.
I believe already mentioned is the 1923 recording by "The Paramount Jubilee Singers," Paramount 12073-A, as "When All the Saints Come Marching In."
In 1927, it was printed among Bahamian songs.
In 1927 it was included in Edward Boatner, "Spirituals Triumphant," National Baptist Convention. This is the first appearance of the exact title, "When the Saints Go Marching In."

Most of the above quoted from Fuld.


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Subject: RE: Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 06:22 PM

Bruce Springsteen, at his website, gives the following as the "Original Version."
^^
Lyr. Add: When the Saints Go Marching In

We are trav'ling in the footsteps
Of those who've gone before,
And we'll all be reunited,
On a new and sunlit shore.

Oh, when the saints go marching in (2x)
Lord, how I want to be in that number
When the saints go marching in.

And when the sun refuse to shine (2x)
Lord, how I want to be in that number,
When the sun refuse to shine.

And when the moon turns red with blood (2x)
Lord, how I want to be in that number
When the moon turns red with blood.

Oh, when the trumpet sounds its call (2x)
Lord, how I want to be in that number
When the trumpet sounds its call.

Some say this world of trouble,
Is the only one we need,
But I'm waiting for that morning,
When the new world is revealed.

Springsteen traces a straight-line history (copied from Wackipedia) that begins with James Milton Black's gospel song, 1896, "the earliest incarnation," with lyrics by Katherine Purvis; morphing to "When the Saints March In for Crowning," 1908; "When All the Saints Come Marching In," 1923; "When the Saints Go Marching Home," 1927, and finally, in 1927, with Boatner's "When the Saints Go Marching In," from the hymn book, "Spirituals Triumphant."

http://www.springsteenlyrics.com/lyrics/w/whenthesaintsgomarchingin2.php
When the Saints

There is no mention of an African-American or Caribbean origin for the song.

Springsteen's live 25 Apr 2006 performance differs slightly.


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Subject: RE: Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In
From: eddie1
Date: 19 Aug 07 - 06:10 AM

I found Bruce Springsteen's version of "When the Saints Go Marching In" on his "Live in Dublin" album, so very refreshing after a lifetime of requests for the footstompin version. To stick to this slow, and really quite beautiful rendition with a large, and very vocal audience just waiting on the intro finishing called for guts and a lot of confidence. It gave the song a whole new life for me. The only comparison I can think of is Mary Black's down-tempo version of "The Holy Ground"
Maybe this is the way to breathe new life into songs that have been played to death?

Eddie


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Subject: RE: Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Aug 07 - 11:59 AM

A performer can do a lot with 'old' material, giving it new life, or new understanding.
Many people think that only 'as it is scored' performance is correct, but that means the performer should only be a mimic, not an interpreter. It seems that the 'Saints' has undergone many changes since its first incarnation; each one offers a different interpretation of the theme.

On the classical side, I especialy enjoy Bach's cello pieces; I have five recordings by different cellists, and each has something new or variant to add. Composers themselves often added variants to their compositions. The same process is important in all music.


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Subject: RE: Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 Aug 07 - 02:55 PM

Other verses sung to "The Saints Go Marching In"

Golden Gate Quartet

Oh, when the saints, go marching in,
Yes, when the saints go marching in.
Oh Lord I want to be in that ever lovin' number
When the saints go marching in.

Oh yes, I had a dear old mother,
And if you should see her before I do,
Won't you tell her that you saw me coming,
I was strutting straight on through.

Oh, when the saints, go marching in,
Yes when the saints go marching in.
Oh Lord I want to be in that number
When the saints go marching in.


Verse also sung by Harry Belafonte.


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Subject: RE: Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 Aug 07 - 07:05 PM

"Songs of the Soul No. 2," edited by James M. Black, Curts & Jennings, Cincinnati, 1896, contains both "When the Saints Are Marching In," and "When the Roll Is Called Up Yonder," both by James M. Black, the former with words by Katharine M. Purvis and the latter with words by E. M. J.
The lyrics are the same as those published above in the volume edited by Sankey.

Flatt and Scruggs recorded this song, with two verses not mentioned before. Others also borrowed verses from other songs.

Oh when the stars begin to fall,
When the stars begin to fall,
Oh Lord I want to be in that number
When the stars begin to fall.

Oh when they crown him Lord of all,
When they crown him Lord of all,
Oh Lord I want to be in that number
When they crown him Lord of all.


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Subject: RE: Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 21 Aug 07 - 10:24 PM

A version in "Songs That tell a Story, no. 2, Arlen and Jackie Vaden, The Southern Gospel Singers, nd. Published by Albert E. Brumley and Sons, Powell, MO.

No. 30. WHEN THE SAINTS GO MARCHING IN

1.
When the sun refuses to shine (2x)
Dear Lord I want to be in that number
When the sun refuses to shine.
2.
When the moon turns into blood (2x)
etc.
3.
When we crown Him King of Kings (2x)
etc.
4.
When they gather 'round the throne (2x)
etc.
5.
While the happy ages roll, (2x)
etc.

"Owned by R. E. Winsett, Arr. R. E. Winsett, Anon & R. E. W." I haven't found the date of this arrangement.

Robert Emmett Winsett, 1876-1952, from Tennessee. Started publishing gospel songbooks in 1903. "Pentacostal Power," 1907, appealed to the Church of God members in the mountains of North Carolina. He composed about 1000 gospel songs according to the Cyberhymnal: http://www.cyberhymnan.org/bio/w/i/n/winsett_re.htm

Winsett Publishers have published some 60 different songbooks; some 10 million copies sold.


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Subject: RE: Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 22 Aug 07 - 10:40 AM

Unless "when the saints go/come marching in" was a cliche' by 1896, the words of the well-known version would seem to be derived from Black's song.

Otherwise maybe not.


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Subject: RE: Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 22 Aug 07 - 11:49 AM

I have failed to find any pre-1896 evidence for the song.


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Subject: RE: Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In
From: jazzhistoria
Date: 08 Nov 10 - 03:22 AM

I have tried to transcribe the lyrics of "When All the Saints..." with Paramount Jubilee Singers, 1923. (See message from From: masato sakurai, 31 Jul 07 - 08:22). Unfortunately, my English is not good enough to recognize the lyrics. Can anyone help?? It is completely different from the common lyrics.

Thanks,
Ingemar Wagerman, Sweden


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Subject: RE: Origins: When the Saints Go Marching In
From: GUEST,shiningphoenix01
Date: 26 Jun 11 - 06:31 AM

check out my iphone/ipad app that teaches how to play this song on piano ….
Its all for a good cause!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1ttgKUc98Y&feature=related
www.appsforhunger.com


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