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Origins: Galway Shawl - author

DigiTrad:
THE GALWAY SHAWL


Related threads:
(origins) Origins: Galway Shawl rhyming scheme (16)
Lyr Req: Galway Shawl parody / Galway Drawl (7)
Tune Req: The Galway Shawl (68)
Chord Req: The Galway Shawl (8)
rude version of Galway Shawl (4)
She wore no jewels, no costly diamonds.. (15)


Peterr 27 Aug 04 - 07:52 AM
Malcolm Douglas 27 Aug 04 - 11:03 AM
Peterr 27 Aug 04 - 12:17 PM
Arkie 29 Sep 12 - 10:54 PM
GUEST,JeffB 30 Sep 12 - 10:42 PM
GUEST,Tunesmith 01 Oct 12 - 02:55 AM
GUEST,Pizel 01 Oct 12 - 05:56 AM
Mysha 13 Aug 14 - 03:03 PM
Alan Day 13 Aug 14 - 06:00 PM
Dave Hanson 14 Aug 14 - 03:34 AM
GUEST,Desi C 14 Aug 14 - 05:17 AM
GUEST,Tweetiepie 25 Oct 18 - 02:36 AM
Dave Hanson 25 Oct 18 - 03:05 PM
meself 25 Oct 18 - 03:44 PM
RunrigFan 23 Dec 20 - 07:16 PM
Gurney 24 Dec 20 - 02:41 PM
GUEST,Tunesmith 24 Dec 20 - 06:08 PM
GUEST,Peterr 26 Dec 20 - 10:36 AM
Richard Mellish 27 Dec 20 - 07:08 AM
RunrigFan 27 Dec 20 - 08:56 PM
Richard Mellish 28 Dec 20 - 05:03 AM
Snuffy 28 Dec 20 - 06:46 AM
Maryrrf 29 Dec 20 - 11:38 AM
meself 29 Dec 20 - 03:29 PM
Joe Offer 29 Dec 20 - 06:29 PM
meself 29 Dec 20 - 07:54 PM
Reinhard 29 Dec 20 - 08:25 PM
Joe Offer 29 Dec 20 - 09:38 PM
GerryM 29 Dec 20 - 11:39 PM
GUEST,JeffB 30 Dec 20 - 06:58 AM
GUEST 30 Dec 20 - 07:42 AM
RunrigFan 02 Jan 21 - 04:26 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 02 Jan 21 - 06:06 PM
RunrigFan 03 Jan 21 - 07:48 PM
RunrigFan 03 Jan 21 - 08:49 PM
RunrigFan 03 Jan 21 - 09:43 PM
mayomick 05 Jan 21 - 03:01 PM
RunrigFan 03 Jun 21 - 07:20 PM
Felipa 03 Jun 21 - 07:35 PM
Reinhard 03 Jun 21 - 10:38 PM
GUEST,tony 19 Jul 21 - 10:49 PM
GUEST,Mark 20 Jul 21 - 05:24 AM
meself 20 Jul 21 - 10:10 AM
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Subject: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: Peterr
Date: 27 Aug 04 - 07:52 AM

I think I've searched all the threads, but probably not. I know that 'no song ever wrote itself' but I am trying to discover the song's origins - or is it 'Trad Anon'?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 27 Aug 04 - 11:03 AM

You'll know that it's already been extensively discussed here; this new thread will probably just attract repetition of what has already been said. I can add a little, though.

The earliest example I know of is in Sam Henry's Songs of the People, p 269, from Bridget Kealey, Dungiven, 1936. Frank Harte told Ewan MacColl "The Galway Shawl is not a very serious song and has always been sung at a kind of popular level and of late was adopted by the showband crowd." (MacColl and Seeger, Till Doomsday in the Afternoon, Manchester University Press, 1986, 218-220; note accompanying a set recorded from Shelia MacGregor [Sheila Stewart]).

I don't find any reference to broadside examples, though it's not unlikely that it was issued on songsheets at some point. Clearly related, though, is a song called The Red Plaid Shawl, which has a very different tone. It reads like a parody of the sentimental song. Copies can be seen at Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads. None are from identified printers, so are undated; but the song appears in catalogues issued by Sanderson (Edinburgh) and Such (London) so would likely be of the second half of the 19th century. Galway Shawl, if it was indeed the model, would be a little earlier, but probably not by very much.

The red plaid shawl


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: Peterr
Date: 27 Aug 04 - 12:17 PM

Malcolm
Many thanks - I obviously didn't look hard enough. I realised that were yards of thread on the song but I didn't discover any attribution


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: Arkie
Date: 29 Sep 12 - 10:54 PM

Heard the Galway Shawl for the first time a few days ago, and have now listened to several versions of the song. While I would not call it a great song, it is pretty, and a bit sad. I have now read all four threads on Mudcat and do not care a bit about the the author. I am curious if there is any significance to the term Galway shawl. In one thread it was mentioned there were four styles. In one youtube performance, the singer indicated the wearing of the shawl indicated that the wearer was betrothed. This was not mentioned in any of the threads on Mudcat. Is that an Irish tradition, or was it an Irish tradition to wear a shawl to indicate impending marriage?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: GUEST,JeffB
Date: 30 Sep 12 - 10:42 PM

The shawl was not specifically Irish but at one time a very common article of clothing for women generally. There very well might have been regional styles of Irish shawl, and Galway certainly had its own. It was red with long fringes, and made by the women of the Claddagh. Up until the 1930s this was an especially poor community of fisherfolk near the town of Galway.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 01 Oct 12 - 02:55 AM

Arkie says that he wouldn't call Galway Shawl a great song.
Well, thinking about it, there are not many songs that I would call great, but The Galway Shawl is certainly a very fine song.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: GUEST,Pizel
Date: 01 Oct 12 - 05:56 AM

Talking of shawls I can remember the time when working class women carried their bairns in shawls. They had a special way of fixing the shawl which allowed the free use of both hands for work, without fear of the bairn falling out.
A traveller woman at the kitchen door of a manse trying to sell "delf"
[pottery ware} to the ministers wife got so exasperated at the low prices offered for her wares that she exclaimed as she turned to walk away "ye can kiss ma erse" a wee head popped out of the shawl and said "an ye can kiss mine tae" [too].


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE RED PLAID SHAWL
From: Mysha
Date: 13 Aug 14 - 03:03 PM

Hi,

That would be:


The Red Plaid Shawl

One summer's morning, I took a ramble,
Down by a bramble I took my way,
I met a damsel, she looked so charming,
I list to what she had to say:
Oh! she wore no jewel or costly diamonds
She had no finery - none at all,
She wore no chignon, but sung a sweet song,
This lovely colleen with a red plaid shawl.

I stepped up to her, she smiled so sweetly,
She winked at me - she looked so shy,
Will there be any harm in, I said so charming,
My sweet colleen one kiss to try.
She cocked her eye, she look'd so sheepish,
I scare knew myself - no not at all,
She asked me to tread her - this fair young creature,
May they all look sideways on her red plaid shawl.

She stole my heart this artful colleen,
I kept on speaking - I could not stop,
At last she said what is your calling,
I'm a clerk, I said, in a marine store shop.
I treated her and spent my money,
She gave me a clump which made me fall
I fell in the gutter and there did sputter,
Bad cess to the damsel with the red plaid shawl.

Next morning early when day was dawning,
I found my coat, chain and watch was gone,
My had was aching, my limbs was shaking,
You may guess, my boys, I felt forlorn,
The kids were bawling - some were squalling,
Jim twig the cove up against the wall,
While they were shouting I kept on spouting,
May the devil wife the damwel with the red plaid shawl.


Other versions seem to exist under titles "The Old Plaid Shawl", "The Ould Plaid Shawl", and "The Auld Plaid Shawl", apparently. But that title is also used for a different song.

Bye
                                                               Mysha


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: Alan Day
Date: 13 Aug 14 - 06:00 PM

I found the ending rather sad and wrote another verse.Some like it some do not,but I like happy endings.

I soon returned to see my colleen, to the sweetest girl of all.
She was laughing as she ran to greet me when I reached her garden wall
We are now married with two lovely children and I am pleased I can recall.
That day when first I saw her and round her shoulders hung the Galway Shawl,

Al


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 14 Aug 14 - 03:34 AM

Why do some people find it hard to accept that no-one knows who wrote certain well known songs ?

Dave H


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: GUEST,Desi C
Date: 14 Aug 14 - 05:17 AM

Yes Arkie, the wearing of the shawl did signify that the girl wearing it was spoken for. Hence the song is really a comedic tale of a young minstrel thinking he's struck lucky, in fact if you take the words literally the shawl is ALL she wears. But the shawl symbolically acts as a protection in the shape of her Father, to protect her virtue. The joke in Ireland is that The Galway Shawl is an old form of birth control, and that you can buy the shawl in packets of three! ;)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: GUEST,Tweetiepie
Date: 25 Oct 18 - 02:36 AM

Sang this song last night and said the shawl was a sign that the girl was taken, ie betrothed. I was researching to see if this was infact true. Also the shawl was handed down to the girl who was to be married.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 25 Oct 18 - 03:05 PM

Like it or not Ewan MacColl selected this song to be sung at his EFDSS Gold Badge presentation ceremony.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: meself
Date: 25 Oct 18 - 03:44 PM

Is there any reason whatsoever to think that the wearing of the shawl indicates that the girl is betrothed? Seems highly unlikely to me - but I'm willing to stand corrected ......


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Subject: Lyr Add: The Galway Shawl
From: RunrigFan
Date: 23 Dec 20 - 07:16 PM

Traditional song

Dubliners

At Oranmore in the county Galway
One pleasant evening in the month's of May
I spied a damsel, she was young and handsome
Her beauty fairly took my breath away

She worn no jewels, nor costly diamonds
No paint nor powder, no none at all
But she worn a bonnet with ribbons on it
And 'round her shoulders was the Galway shawl

We kept on walking she kept on talking
'Till her fathers cottage came in to view
Said she, 'Come in sir', and meet my father
And play, to please him, 'The Foggy Dew'

She sat me down beside the hearthstone
I could see her father he was six feet tall
And soon her mother, had the kettle singing
All I could think of, was the Galway shawl

She worn no jewels, nor costly diamonds
No paint nor powder, no none at all
But she worn a bonnet with ribbons on it
And 'round her shoulders was the Galway shawl

I played, 'The Black Bird', 'The Stack of Barley'
'Rodney's Glory' and 'The Foggy Dew'
She sang each note like an Irish linnet
And tears weld in her eyes of blue

'Twas early, early, all in the morning
I hit the road for old Donegal
Said she, 'goodbye sir', she cried and kissed me
But my heart remain with the Galway shawl

She worn no jewels, nor costly diamonds
No paint nor powder, no none at all
But she worn a bonnet with ribbons on it




from a recording by Andrew Huggan on his Travels album.

At Oranmore in the county Galway
One pleasant evening in the month of May
I spied a maiden, she was young and handsome
Her beauty fairly took my breath away

Cos she wore no jewels, no costly diamonds
No paint nor powder, no none at all
But she wore a bonnet with the ribbon on it
And around her shoulders was the Galway shawl

We kept on walking, she kept on talking
'Till her father's cottage came in to view
She said, 'Come in sir', and meet my father
And play, to please him, 'The Foggy Dew'

And she wore no jewels, no costly diamonds
No paint nor powder, no none at all
But she wore a bonnet with the ribbon on it
And around her shoulders was the Galway shawl

She sat me down beside the fire
I could see her father, he was six feet tall
And then her mother, had the kettle singing
All I could think of, was the Galway shawl

And she wore no jewels, no costly diamonds
No paint nor powder, no none at all
But she wore a bonnet with the ribbon on it
And around her shoulders was the Galway shawl

I sang 'The Black Bird', and 'The Stacks of Barley'
'Rodney's Glory' and 'The Foggy Dew'
And she sang each note like an Irish linnet
While tears fell from her, eyes of blue

And she wore no jewels, no costly diamonds
No paint nor powder, no none at all
But she wore a bonnet with the ribbon on it
And around her shoulders was the Galway shawl

'Twas early, early, all in the morning
When I hit the road for, old Donegal
She said 'goodbye sir', and she sang when kissed me
And my heart remain with the Galway shawl

And she wore no jewels, no costly diamonds
No paint nor powder, no none at all
But she wore a bonnet with the ribbon on it
And around her shoulders was the Galway shawl

    Note from Joe Offer: both of these versions are almost identical to the lyrics we already have in the Digital Tradition. You have a tendency to do this. Best to post lyrics that are substantially different from what we have, or ones that offer legitimate corrections. It also helps to document the source of the lyrics you're posting.
    Also, use the Filter to search for other threads on the same song, instead of starting new threads.
    Thank you.
    Joe Offer, Mudcat Music Editor, 29 Dec 2020


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Galway Shawl
From: Gurney
Date: 24 Dec 20 - 02:41 PM

I heard it first from Sean Cannon, a Galway native but then a Coventry resident, long before he became a Dubliner.
Lovely guy, great singer.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Galway Shawl
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 24 Dec 20 - 06:08 PM

Of course, Carolyn Hester sang it on her Columbia early sixties album ( the one with Bob Dylan ). The album was pretty well known in the Uk because of Carolyn's TV appearances.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Galway Shawl
From: GUEST,Peterr
Date: 26 Dec 20 - 10:36 AM

Gurney, me too, Sean Cannon at Redditch Folk Club. Also from Coventry Pat Cooksey and Brian Patten. Happy days!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Galway Shawl
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 27 Dec 20 - 07:08 AM

Besides this song being sung far too often, I have also been put off it by the anomaly of the narrator apparently being more interested in the shawl than in the girl wearing it. The line "she kept on talking" suggests that he may have been glad to get away from her prattling. But there was also a suggestion on another thread that the shawl might have indicated that she was a widow.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Galway Shawl
From: RunrigFan
Date: 27 Dec 20 - 08:56 PM

The line "she kept on talking" suggests that he may have been glad to get away from her prattling

Read the lyrics

We kept on walking she kept on talking
'Till her fathers cottage came in to view
Said she, 'Come in sir', and meet my father
And play, to please him, 'The Foggy Dew'


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Galway Shawl
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 28 Dec 20 - 05:03 AM

I am familiar with the rest of the song without needing to read the lyrics. I see no contradiction between (on the one hand) the narrator accepting the parents' hospitality and playing them some tunes and (on the other) clearing off early the following morning.

We are not told why he departs so promptly – maybe he has an important commitment somewhere – but he does go on about the shawl (and about the girl's lack of embellishments) rather than about the girl herself, hence the speculation. Maybe he's uncertain whether to pursue the relationship both because of her prattling and because the shawl indicates that she's a widow. Is she a very recent widow with a baby on the way? Have the parents advised her to catch another man ASAP?

(None of this need be taken too seriously.)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Galway Shawl
From: Snuffy
Date: 28 Dec 20 - 06:46 AM

"but he does go on about the shawl (and about the girl's lack of embellishments) rather than about the girl herself,"

How do you reconcile that hypothesis with "But my heart remained with the Galway shawl"?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Galway Shawl
From: Maryrrf
Date: 29 Dec 20 - 11:38 AM

I don't see any contradiction in the song. It's possible to be charmed by someone, to find them attractive, etc. but for various reasons one may not be in a position to pursue a relationship. The narrator is headed for Donegal, he doesn't live in the same area as the girl with the shawl, he may have a sweetheart somewhere else, he may be a rambler not in a position to court a young woman...Whatever the case, I've always liked the song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Galway Shawl
From: meself
Date: 29 Dec 20 - 03:29 PM

As I had occasion to say about another song lyric here the other day: this is poetry, not journalism. Specifically, in this case, it is a clear example of the use of the literary device known as "metonymy" - that is, the indirect indication of a thing - or person - by naming something closely associated with the thing or person rather than naming the thing or person itself. Thus, "the crown" meaning royal authority, "blade" meaning sword, etc. - including "Galway shawl" meaning a woman who wears a Galway shawl.

It's really a pretty simple little song about falling in love, although it is "open-ended" - we don't know if the speaker never saw the girl again or if he came back as fast as he could and they got married straightway.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: Joe Offer
Date: 29 Dec 20 - 06:29 PM

Here's the entry for this song in the Traditional Ballad Index:

Galway Shawl, The

DESCRIPTION: The singer walks out in May and sees a beautiful girl in a Galway shawl. He comes to her home and meets her parents. She sings beautifully to his musical accompaniment. He leaves the next morning, but cannot stop thinking of her.
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1936 (Sam Henry collection)
KEYWORDS: courting beauty father mother music separation
FOUND IN: Ireland Canada(Newf)
REFERENCES (3 citations):
SHenry H652, p. 269, "The Galway Shawl" (1 text, 1 tune)
Bennett-Downey 14, pp. 108-110, "The Galway Shawl" (1 text)
DT, GLWYSHWL*

Roud #2737
RECORDINGS:
Margaret Barry, "The Galway Shawl" (on IRMBarry-Fairs)
Lou O'Driscoll, "Galway Shawl" (on MUNFLA/Leach)

NOTES [43 words]: Also see a text and hear an excerpt of "Galway Shawl" among Newfoundland songs as sung by Lou O'Driscoll on the "MacEdward Leach and the Songs of Atlantic Canada" site at http://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD1/1-06.htm, accessed February 17, 2015. - BS
Last updated in version 4.2
File: HHH652

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Song List

Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2020 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.



And here are the lyrics we have in the Digital Tradition. Any corrections?

THE GALWAY SHAWL (DT Lyrics)

At Orenmore in the County Galway,
One pleasant evening in the month of May,
I spied a damsel, she was young and handsome
Her beauty fairly took my breath away.

Cho: She wore no jewels, nor costly diamonds,
No paint or powder, no, none at all.
But she wore a bonnet with a ribbon on it
And round her shoulder was a Galway Shawl.

We kept on walking, she kept on talking,
'Till her father's cottage came into view.
Says she: 'Come in, sir, and meet my father,
And play to please him " The Foggy Dew."

She sat me down beside the fire
I could see her father, he was six feet tall.
And soon her mother had the kettle singing
All I could think of was the Galway shawl.

I played "The Blackbird" and "The Stack of Barley",
" Rodney's Glory" and "The Foggy Dew",
She sang each note like an Irish linnet.
Whilst the tears stood in her eyes of blue.

'Twas early, early, all in the morning,
When I hit the road for old Donegal.
She said 'Goodby, sir,'she cried and kissed me,
And my heart remained with that Galway shawl.

@Irish @music
filename[ GLWYSHWL
TUNE FILE: BOULVOGE
CLICK TO PLAY
TUNE FILE: GLWYSHWL
CLICK TO PLAY
ARB

Popup Midi Player




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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: meself
Date: 29 Dec 20 - 07:54 PM

(A correction to my previous post, in case there's anyone who is weird enough to care: "blade" for sword would be "synecdoche" - using a part to indicate the whole - rather than "metonymy".)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: Reinhard
Date: 29 Dec 20 - 08:25 PM

Corrections would be difficult to make, Joe, since the DT version like those posted by RunRig Fan gives no source to compare to. But the town in the first line is Oranmore, not Orenmore.

According to Discogs, the only Dubliners recording of The Galway Shawl seems to be on their 1992 album "30 Years A-Greying".

I wonder where the DT version with the now usual phrase "bonnet with (a) ribbon(s) on it" comes from. Bridget Kealy in Sam Henry's Songs of the People (1936) sings "a pink sunbonnet with roses on it", and Margaret Berry (1956) sings "a bonnet with red roses on it".


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: Joe Offer
Date: 29 Dec 20 - 09:38 PM

Yeah, a good first step would be to identify the source of the lyrics in the Digital Tradition.
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: GerryM
Date: 29 Dec 20 - 11:39 PM

Synecdoche, metonymy, onomatopoeia
Litotes, hyperbole, irony.
Alliteration, repetition, oxymoron, bathos
Periphrasis, simile.

Now if these words sound strange to your ears,
And maybe a little bit jivey,
Get a dictionary!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: GUEST,JeffB
Date: 30 Dec 20 - 06:58 AM

Joe - The tune you posted above. The D on bars 14 - 16 ("May")I have always heard sung as E.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Dec 20 - 07:42 AM

Good catch, Jeff. It's not often that I've seen errors in the melodies Dick Greenhaus transcribed for the Digital Tradition, but an E definitely works better there.
Unfortunately, we don't have a way to correct the Digital Tradition, so we record corrections in "Origins" threads like this one.
Thanks.
Joe


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: RunrigFan
Date: 02 Jan 21 - 04:26 PM

Sorry for posting, didn't think it was not allowed

The version I heard was Andrew Huggan on his Travels album.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 02 Jan 21 - 06:06 PM

The tune, as was remarked elsewhere, methinks - is essentially the same as that of "The Auld Triangle".

Regards


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: RunrigFan
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 07:48 PM

I never heard the song before


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: RunrigFan
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 08:49 PM

Lyrics was from hearing the song


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: RunrigFan
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 09:43 PM

https://www.google.co.uk/books/edition/Encyclopedia_of_National_Dress_Tradition/lazWAQAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=galway+shawl&pg=PA267&printsec=frontcover

https://www.google.co.uk/books/edition/Spin/ZSvaAAAAMAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=galway+shawl&dq=galway+shawl&printsec=frontcover

https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thegalwayshawl.html


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: mayomick
Date: 05 Jan 21 - 03:01 PM

At six feet tall her father would have been something of a giant around the time the song was written - thus the mention in the song presumably.


Irish men in 1980 were an average of 8cm or almost three and a half inches taller than they were a century ago .The average Irish male born in 1980 was 1.76m tall (5ft 9ins).


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: RunrigFan
Date: 03 Jun 21 - 07:20 PM

Am I allowed to post lyrics


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Subject: RE: Galway Shawl - lyrics
From: Felipa
Date: 03 Jun 21 - 07:35 PM

Joe Offer, re corrections to DT, Oranmore is the spelling of the placename. And there is a space missing in the next to last line.

RunrigFan, I suppose you are allowed. But it makes sense to look at what is already posted and only add lyrics or lines that are significantly different from what is here already.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: Reinhard
Date: 03 Jun 21 - 10:38 PM

> Am I allowed to post lyrics

Have you ever read Joe's comment, RunrigFan? Use your head for once.

To repeat what Joe wrote on 29 December:

> Best to post lyrics that are substantially different from what we have, or ones that offer legitimate corrections. It also helps to document the source of the lyrics you're posting.

So: Of course you may post if it adds information to the forum.

Check if what you want to post isn't already here (or already here in a nearly identical version) to avoid duplication.

Give your source. Who (singer or band name) sang this song where (album title if known, possibly YouTube link)?

Don't start a new thread if there is already a discussion on the song in an existing thread. In that case add it there.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: GUEST,tony
Date: 19 Jul 21 - 10:49 PM

exactly which instrument does the singer carry?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: GUEST,Mark
Date: 20 Jul 21 - 05:24 AM

"which instrument does the singer carry?"

I've always assumed the fiddle, but Euphonium's a nice image.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Galway Shawl - author
From: meself
Date: 20 Jul 21 - 10:10 AM

I thought it was a piano .....


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