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led zeppelin

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Led Zeppelin's sources (55)
Led Zeppelin - Celebration Day! (14)
Led Zeppelin dvd of O2 concert! (4)
Review: Led Zeppelin III (45)


Raydom14@aol.com 17 Jan 99 - 07:09 PM
Roger in Baltimore 17 Jan 99 - 10:07 PM
alison 18 Jan 99 - 05:52 AM
Steve Latimer 18 Jan 99 - 10:12 AM
Barry Finn 18 Jan 99 - 03:33 PM
Joe Offer 19 Jan 99 - 01:51 PM
Will (inactive) 19 Jan 99 - 02:58 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 19 Jan 99 - 06:17 PM
alison 19 Jan 99 - 06:42 PM
Art Thieme 19 Jan 99 - 07:01 PM
catspaw49 19 Jan 99 - 07:22 PM
Dani 19 Jan 99 - 10:23 PM
Bill D 19 Jan 99 - 11:27 PM
Ritchie 20 Jan 99 - 11:14 AM
Steve Latimer 20 Jan 99 - 11:31 AM
Bert 20 Jan 99 - 12:06 PM
Jon W. 20 Jan 99 - 01:11 PM
Sam Hudson 20 Jan 99 - 05:43 PM
RWilhelm 20 Jan 99 - 06:56 PM
Will (inactive) 20 Jan 99 - 09:06 PM
John in Brisbane 20 Jan 99 - 09:23 PM
Jo Taylor 21 Jan 99 - 06:33 PM
Jo Taylor 21 Jan 99 - 06:40 PM
RWilhelm 21 Jan 99 - 06:55 PM
Art Thieme 21 Jan 99 - 08:00 PM
Jon W. 22 Jan 99 - 10:54 AM
Steve Latimer 22 Jan 99 - 01:37 PM
Bert 22 Jan 99 - 04:29 PM
Art Thieme 22 Jan 99 - 08:40 PM
Alice 22 Jan 99 - 09:27 PM
RWilhelm 23 Jan 99 - 12:25 AM
Ritchie 23 Jan 99 - 06:27 AM
Roger in Baltimore 24 Jan 99 - 07:47 PM
Jon W. 25 Jan 99 - 12:04 PM
Art Thieme 25 Jan 99 - 02:27 PM
Barry Finn 25 Jan 99 - 02:36 PM
Steve Latimer 25 Jan 99 - 02:42 PM
catspaw49 25 Jan 99 - 09:13 PM
Ritchie 26 Jan 99 - 07:50 AM
Steve Latimer 26 Jan 99 - 03:53 PM
Roger in Baltimore 26 Jan 99 - 05:42 PM
catspaw49 26 Jan 99 - 08:08 PM
Will (inactive) 26 Jan 99 - 08:32 PM
Steve Latimer 27 Jan 99 - 10:10 AM
Roger the zimmer 27 Jan 99 - 11:17 AM
quokka 30 Oct 08 - 11:33 PM
GUEST,BanjoRay 31 Oct 08 - 08:35 AM
GUEST,Dani 31 Oct 08 - 09:51 AM
quokka 01 Nov 08 - 04:26 AM
Bobert 17 Jul 10 - 07:47 PM
mousethief 18 Jul 10 - 12:28 AM
Bonzo3legs 29 Sep 11 - 01:56 PM
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Subject: led zepplin
From: Raydom14@aol.com
Date: 17 Jan 99 - 07:09 PM

if anyone knows the name of the led zepplin kind of ragae song, with the chorus " you don't have to go", mail me the name at Raydom14@aol.com, thanks


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Roger in Baltimore
Date: 17 Jan 99 - 10:07 PM

Raydom14,

Although Led Zeppelin was influenced by the folk tradition, including the blues, they really don't fit in as folk music or blues. I would suggest you visit a search engine site like Excite.com. Type in +led+zeppelin and you should find a site that can answer your question.

Roger in Baltimore


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: alison
Date: 18 Jan 99 - 05:52 AM

Hi,

Try the International Lyrics server and do a search for Led Zepplin. Unfortunately I can't do you a link.... my computer is very sick and has hidden all of my bookmarks.... and everything else for that matter.......

Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Steve Latimer
Date: 18 Jan 99 - 10:12 AM

The song is D'yer Maker, a play on Jamaica not Dier maker. I can't remember if it's from "Led Zeppelin III" or "Houses of the Holy".

Roger, interesting response, I am not quite sure how I sit with this one. Early Zeppelin was almost exclusively Blues, many of their songs were covers of Blues Classics. Zeppelin III has a lot of very interesting acoustic songs, deeply rooted in both American and British Folk, and probably was the introduction for many people to these varied musical styles.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Barry Finn
Date: 18 Jan 99 - 03:33 PM

Roger's reply sits just perfect from where I stand, polite with a decent explanation. You could also throw in Jethro Tull & many other rock bands that had a blues or folk tilt in their start but they are very accessable on rock sites as well as there own. Folk casts a wide net, some perfer a tigher & smaller net, others light a larger one that would encompass more, but to encompass all & allow overfishing would deplete our resources. Sorry for the analogy. (Thank you Roger) Barry


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Jan 99 - 01:51 PM

Click here to get to the International Lyrics Server, except that it's not running at the moment. It does have lots of Led Zeppelin lyrics. I guess for once that I would agree with Barry and the Folk Police and say that Led Zeppelin lyrics are a bit beyond our scope.
The request does give me inspiration, though. I think I'll get out some Lez Zeppelin and put it on the stereo. I'm typing financial reports today, and mere folk music is not enough to get me to plow through it. I'm more likely to stop and listen to the folk music, and that slows me down. Hard rock is much better for dull work.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Will (inactive)
Date: 19 Jan 99 - 02:58 PM

Actually, I kind of like the conversation that this sort of request sparks. I haven't listened to Zep III in 25 years. Time to dig it out.

Seriously, more or less, it's very useful to get reminders of how what we think of as (gasp) "popular" music has roots in less commercial music.

Besides, its really easy for me to ignore requests of this sort when I'm not interested. I just don't click on the thread.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 19 Jan 99 - 06:17 PM

Led Zepplin did that hangman song which was allegedly traditional.

I agree about Jethro Tull. I always thought that Ian Anderson had a fine voice for folk music if he ever wanted to turn to the "pure" stuff. But being a huge rock band in the era of arena rock probably paid a lot better than spending time in little folk clubs.:)


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: alison
Date: 19 Jan 99 - 06:42 PM

Hi,

"Babe I'm gonna leave you" (great track) is on Zep II, and also in the Joan Baez songbook........ does that keep the folk police happy? **grin**

Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Art Thieme
Date: 19 Jan 99 - 07:01 PM

You folks don't wanna know what I think about this!

Some people have tact; others tell the truth!!

Tactful Art


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: catspaw49
Date: 19 Jan 99 - 07:22 PM

No Art, you're wrong. I'm interested in whatever you've got to say on this and I'd be happy to agree or argue with you anytime about it.

Go for it. Aging folkies are aging folkies and nobody really gives a damn what we think. Maybe that's why humor comes easily.

"If I laugh at any mortal thing, 'tis that I may not weep."...George Gordon (Lord Byron)

catspaw


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Dani
Date: 19 Jan 99 - 10:23 PM

Oh, but we DO want to hear what you have to say, Art. And then I'll invite you to come listen to my Zeppelin albums ;)

Tact has it's place, but it's highly overrated in conversations of any depth and meaning.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Bill D
Date: 19 Jan 99 - 11:27 PM

fascinating!....I am not alone...(Art...it is an interesting dance we do here..)


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Ritchie
Date: 20 Jan 99 - 11:14 AM

I never really listened to Led Zeppelin ,I think it was probably because of the clothes that they wore. I think that's a very important part of music, don't you ? Dressing up to listen to music, after all they do it for opera. However I was listening to Frank Zappa last night,a live performance of 'Stairway to Heaven'( also a rather spiffing version of 'Sunshine of your love' the old Cream classic.) I bet old Frank could play the blues.

Don't nobody start a 'what do Mudcatters wear thread'

love & happiness

Ritchie


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Steve Latimer
Date: 20 Jan 99 - 11:31 AM

"That Hangman song" that Tim Jacques refers to is in fact Leadbelly's "Gallow's Pole". It features some interesting banjo playing and is a fine example of a wonderful Folk song being introduced to several million young people who most likely would have never heard it otherwise. How many of them then went out and tried to find more material by the original artist? This may have even led to them broadening their musical horizons enough to eventually become Mudcatter's.

Mike Myers on Saturday Night Live had his famous "If it's Nae Scottish, It's Crap" Let's try to avoid this kind of thinking when it comes to music. For many years I have tried to give a chance to all kinds of music. My criteria for music is basically does it have soul or feel and would it sound good if it was being played at the kitchen table. Zeppelin's "Gallow's Pole", "Bron Y'aur Stomp" and "Hat's Off to Roy Harper" certainly meet my critertia.

Tim, you're right, Ian Anderson would have made a great folkie. I believe that Jethro Tull's sound is strongly rooted in English folk. Perhaps it's something that he may explore later.

Now, If anyone disagrees that rock and folk can mix, I will gladly send them a tape of me playing Black Sabbath's "War Pigs" on my five string banjo. It is after all a protest song.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Bert
Date: 20 Jan 99 - 12:06 PM

Ritchie,

Real Mudcateers wear the MUDCAT T SHIRT
buy one today

Bert


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Jon W.
Date: 20 Jan 99 - 01:11 PM

I don't see anyone grousing about Fairport Convention mixing rock and folk. By the way Sandy Denny (isn't that her name?) joined Led Zepplin for one song on their fourth album. The fact that Zep did a lot of traditional material was one of the reasons they were one of my favorite bands back in the early '70s when I still listened to that crap. There were a lot of rock bands in those days that (re)did a lot of traditional songs. Are there any nowadays? I don't know because I can't stand wading through the drivel waiting for something good to come on.

Somehow this connects to the "where are the kids" thread.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Sam Hudson
Date: 20 Jan 99 - 05:43 PM

Yep, Sandy Denny was her name. And Fairport supported Zeppelin on tour way back when... and a few years ago I stood in the dark at Cropredy and listened to Robert Plant singing with Fairport and feeling the hairs go up on the back of my neck. As the song says... "It all comes round again."


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: RWilhelm
Date: 20 Jan 99 - 06:56 PM


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Will (inactive)
Date: 20 Jan 99 - 09:06 PM

In the spirit of drift, it is fascinating to listen to the first "Fairport Convention" album (1968). It's basically soft rock, a la the Hollies with a bit of Beatles thrown in. A couple of Joni Mitchell songs (I Don't Know where I Stand and Chelsea Morning), a Dylan cover (Jack of Diamonds), a 60's rocker called "Time will show the wiser", and several similar songs written by those died-in-the-wool folkies Simon Nicol, Tyger Hutchings, and Richard Thompson. FC also had Ian Macdonald Judy Dyble, and Martin Lamble at the time. Nice enough stuff, but not really much more interesting (other than the good lyrics in the Mitchell songs) than the Spice Girls or 1910 Fruitgum Company or the Monkees. (well, in fairness, FC had better musicians, but the music really wasn't great)

The "traditional" folk stuff from Fairport only came later. There's another 1968 album called "What we did on our holidays" (including Fotheringay & She moves throught the fair), with Sandy Denny, which begins to sound more like what we think of as the Fairport of "Liege and Lief".

The basic point is that it's difficult to separate different styles of music by the musicians.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 20 Jan 99 - 09:23 PM

Maybe I should start a new thread, but I won't. My 12 year old son has a great CD from a young Canadian band called 'Moxey Purvis'. I've given up trying to pigeon-hole music types, but they're folk-ish. Anyone else ever heard them?

Regards
John


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Jo Taylor
Date: 21 Jan 99 - 06:33 PM

Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull certainly played with some of the Fairport people in later years......and I think one of the recent Fairport line up play/s/ed with Jethro Tull but I can't remember who...


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Jo Taylor
Date: 21 Jan 99 - 06:40 PM

And there was a programme on UK TV couple of years ago featuring Robert Plant with a hurdy gurdy player (might have been Nigel Eaton) - can't get more folky than that.
Here in France the musicians I know make a distinction between 'folk' and 'traditional' which is fairly useful.
I'm sure you all know the quote by Louis Armstrong - "All music is folk music - whenja ever hear a horse sing?"


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: RWilhelm
Date: 21 Jan 99 - 06:55 PM

I knew that horse would show up.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Art Thieme
Date: 21 Jan 99 - 08:00 PM

Hopefully, mudcatters do wear their condoms---whatever the brand...

Look, there's no reason for me to say what I think on this as all that'd do is make good people pick up their flame throwers.

It's enough for me to know I'm correct!

Also, if a million people say a wrong thing, it's still wrong. Not very democratic, but true nonetheless.

Art


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Jon W.
Date: 22 Jan 99 - 10:54 AM

Still, the inclusion of some folk/traditional music by high-powered rock bands can at least spark an interest in those rockers who have the corresponding mindset. Would I have ever discovered Robert Johnson if not for Jimmy Page and Eric Clapton? Would I have ever discovered Blind Willie McTell if not for the Allman Bros' rendition of Statesboro Blues? Who knows? Those who knew Robert Johnson's music before it was covered by the English flash blues guitarists might feel that the latter desecrated it, but those who never would have known it otherwise are grateful for the introduction at least.


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Subject: Re: Led Zeppelin
From: Steve Latimer
Date: 22 Jan 99 - 01:37 PM

Jon W. Very well put, I think this is what I was trying to say. Personally I feel that Eric, Jimmy, Johnny Winter and the Allmans did a fine job of taking these standards into another era.

How do those of you who don't like the above artists feel about Muddy Waters, Albert King, Little Walter and the electric sounds of the Chicago blues scene?

My Jazz loving father hated the former without listening to them because they were long-haired, no talent, three chord, Rock and Rollers. (To my fathers credit, when I finally got him to listen to selected cuts from Johnny Winter and Eric Clapton, he really liked them)

Art, believe it or not, I know how you feel about this one. It drives me crazy to hear a grunge band cover Neil Young or Bob Dylan. However Woody Guthrie, Robert Johnson, Leadbelly etc. wrote tremendous songs that will continue to re-surface because of the strength of these songs. If it is a cover of a cover of a cover that leads someone to the source, I see it as a good thing. And along the line, I'll bet some of the covers are good.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Bert
Date: 22 Jan 99 - 04:29 PM

Earl,

I thought that horse was dead.
"And we say so, and we know so"

Bert.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Art Thieme
Date: 22 Jan 99 - 08:40 PM

Good people,

I do enjoy isolated performances by all those bands and people mentioned--even Led Zepplin--just don't recall which single track that might be. I grew up loving/living in the Chicago folk/blues world. Butter & Bloom-(fields) & Nick Gravanitis & Little Walter & Arvella Gray & Charlie Musselwhite etc. etc.---all wonderful artists. And I do see the lineage there---influences going all over the place. But the only coffeehouse/folk-venue is 30 miles away from me. When there's someone worth going to see I'll try to find a ride over there if it can be made to happen. But 75% of the stuff is just navel-gazing stuff about how bad or good it might be to be in love while riding the elevated train to the prom & your speed's worn off---what Mr. Seeger used to characterize (once upon a time) as "nothin' but moon--June--croon and spoon songs". Now-a-days you can add the precious self-help songs from the pages of "Why Bad S... Happens To Good People"---an OK book but not what I'd pay to hear as music lately.

Songwriters I'd go hear: Cisco & Woody & Utah & Craig Johnson & Mary McCaslin & Bok and Kate Wolfe & Buffet & Jim Ringer & Debby McClatchy and Tom Russell and a reunion of the Beatles. Also Muddy's band when Otis Spann & Jimmy Cotten were with him or the Lovin' Spoonful with Zal & Sebastian or the Butterfield Band or Wolf with Hubert Sumlin on guitar or Little Walter when he wasn't drunk or Lightnin' Hopkins accoustic---hell even drunken electric if I was half stinko too---Charlie Parker & Diz (any time)---I'd stand in freezin' rain for 4 hours to hear 'em all and I'd do it in a minute!

I won't mention the ones I'd not go to hear. (Tact again, I guess.)

Comes down to what we prefer. I prefer the traditional masters even to the above folks, but that list is simply too long to post. Said enough already after sayin' I wouldn't say anything. More o' the vasssillashuns some have come to expect from me. Glad to live up to my reputation.

With great respect for y'all!

Art


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Alice
Date: 22 Jan 99 - 09:27 PM

... drifting back to Frank Zappa.... "movin' to Montana soon, gonna be a dental floss tycoon" (rhymes with moon, spoon, June... I love it..)

alice in montana


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: RWilhelm
Date: 23 Jan 99 - 12:25 AM

Bert,

I didn't get the reference, but I'll beat a dead horse if there's nothing better to do.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Ritchie
Date: 23 Jan 99 - 06:27 AM

Earl,

You'd be better off beating an egg...

Thanks ,good Alice,for it had to be you ..I even read it with a husky deep growl to my voice..

Now about my 'T shirt' When's the best time to phone Max from the UK ? Does he work week-ends ?

love & happiness Ritchie


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Roger in Baltimore
Date: 24 Jan 99 - 07:47 PM

Yeah,

When does it stop being folk music?

I've got a vinyl record with some prison worker singing a field holler entitled "Baby, Please Don't Go." I think we would all agree this is folk music.

I'm sure some Delta blues guitarist picked this song up and added a guitar part (probably with slide in open G tuning). Most of us would still be calling that folk music.

Well, ole Mc Kinley Morgenfield (aka Muddy Waters) played the same song in Chicago. You know he heard it in the Delta. Now, we get a little iffy. He used his electric band. Is it folk? I don't know. Is it blues? Hell, yeah.

Then in the late '60's some punk in England named Van Morrison got together with some studio musicians and called the band "Them." The flip side of their hit "Gloria" (you know, G, L, O, R, I, A, Glo-o-o-ria!!!) was a little ditty called "Baby, Please Don't Go." Mucho faster than Muddy. Is it folk music? Oh, I think not, not by now. I did enjoy it, though. More than "Gloria".

And now that guy Morrison is singing Celtic music. Is that folk?

Just a little side trip. I am surprised how many of us have Led Zeppelin albums (oh yes, lots of vinyl I bet). Thought it was only me. My listening emphasis has gone from pop-rock, to folk, to '70's rock, and back to folk. Maybe we should just appreciate the flattery of folk music implied in the use of folk-songs, folk instruments, and folk-tunes in modern music of any sort. Maybe we should also be sure to point it out when we hear it.

Roger in Baltimore


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Jon W.
Date: 25 Jan 99 - 12:04 PM

Big Bill Broonzy did an accoustic version of "Baby Please Don't Go" which I like a lot better than the Muddy Waters version. Don't get me wrong, I like Muddy a lot. And yes, Art, I'd much rather hear Sonny Boy Williamson's "Bring It On Home" than Led Zepplin's - but if it weren't for Led Zepplin's version I may have never found Williamson's. That's all I'm saying.

Jon W.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Art Thieme
Date: 25 Jan 99 - 02:27 PM

I once mentioned in a thread that when I was young I followed Big Joe Williams around Chicago (when Joe was recording for Delmark there) and Joe's big 78 rpm hit in the 30s had been "Baby, Please Don't Go". All Muddy had to do back then was to step out of Big Johns to see Big Joe walkin' down Wells St. Could've been Bill Broonzy he got it from too. Bill was living in Chicago when he died; hangin' with Win Stracke & Studs Terkel then. His guitar is at the Old Town School o' Folk Music along with his death certificate in a frame on the wall.

What I'm sayin' I guess is that what is being lost is the knowledge of the lineage! There's so much false information out there. And with the current disdain for history and/or looking to the past for valuable nuggets of wisdom (folksongs), there's not much chance for the survival of FOLKLORE. The deluge of FAKELORE that surrounds the music in these latter days assures the continued wattering down of THE REAL THING.

What will be, will be. Change is the name o' the game. But it is a shame stuff we do care about is getting lost in the shuffle called progress. And unbridled progress is the ideology of a cancer cell.

Art


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Barry Finn
Date: 25 Jan 99 - 02:36 PM

How many songs have been mass marketed by white rockers only to have the roots found at some later date. Is this a deliberate effort on the part of the money making end of the industry or did alot of us just happen upon this phenomenon all at once & think that it's coincidence? I can't really say that if it weren't for so & so I wouldn't have heard Muddy or Little Robert, I can say if the music industry have an once of justice we all would've been hearing this music years earlier from the sources. Barry


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Subject: RE: This horse is feeling much better
From: Steve Latimer
Date: 25 Jan 99 - 02:42 PM

Art,

Thank you for finally getting in on this one. Your background certainly puts any opinion that you may have regarding Led Zeppelin et. al. in a new light. I quite frankly, am jealous. I'm not familiar with all of the artists that you've mentioned, of the ones that I know I'd agree with all but the Lovin' Spoonful. I am aware that some of the people I've mentioned are most likely on your 'tact list', but that's fine by me.

Roger in Baltimore, very nice post regarding "Baby Please Don't Go". I like just about every version of this that I've heard including Them, which I agree is not Folk, but Van doing Celtic music is.

Alice, who you jivin' with that Kosmic Debris?

Steve


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: catspaw49
Date: 25 Jan 99 - 09:13 PM

Maybe we all can meet down at St Alphonzo's Pancake Breakfast as soon as I heal up where them weasles ripped my flesh.

catspaw


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Ritchie
Date: 26 Jan 99 - 07:50 AM

Just reading Steve saying that he liked 'about every version of " Baby Please Don't Go" ' got me thinking of a particular quirk I've got..There are a couple of songs of which I am fond of, namely.." Bring It On Home To Me ,It's All Over Now and Baby Please Don't Go " so much so that I try to collect as many versions of them that I can. It's interesting to see how the same song is interpretated and more often than not the nearer to the original the better it is. It could be smuggness or music snobbery but it's nice when you can say to someone " yes ,but have you heard it by..." Although I do get upset at times when people introduce songs that they are about to perform and instead of giving the credit to the original artist/writer accredit to the most current performer.

There I feel better now.

Ritchie


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Subject: RE: Folklore/fakelore
From: Steve Latimer
Date: 26 Jan 99 - 03:53 PM

Art,

Great point. The 'orrible Murder thread suggested searching @murder. I did so and stopped scrolling at approximately song #100, I believe that I had made it as far as the letter "F". I know that there were songs about Lizzie Borden, Jack the Ripper and other famous murders and murderers. But what about these other songs, many that have been passed on through generations, who do they refer to, what were the circumstances etc. I will bet that at least 60% of these murder songs are based on actual cases. How do we retain this history?

Catspaw, "St. Alphonzo's Pancake Breakfast" can in no way be considered folk, blues, traditional or a even a hymn, but a case might be made for Alice's "Movin' to Montana", being a Cowboy Song. There is a rumour that Gene Autry penned it and the Frank stole it.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Roger in Baltimore
Date: 26 Jan 99 - 05:42 PM

I sure am glad I nipped this thread in the bud with my first post (tongue in cheek).

Roger in Baltimore


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: catspaw49
Date: 26 Jan 99 - 08:08 PM

Steve...Talk about your Cosmic Debris......St. Alphonso's is about a guy stealin' margerine, probably to feed his family...cadgin' a meal too. OF COURSE THAT'S FOLK!!! And Weasel is obviously a C & W tune about huntin'. Sure, these are the real thing.catspaw


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Will (inactive)
Date: 26 Jan 99 - 08:32 PM

I've got side two of LZ III on now. As Steve L. mentioned earlier, its mainly acoustic blues/whatever (though no one would confuse the banjo on Gallow's Pole for Pete Seegar). As well as "Gallows Pole" there's some really nice slide work on "Hats off to you (Roy) Harper". Unfortunatly, the cassette I've got doesn't give any credits at all, not even "traditional", let alone someone specific.

I did go back to my Leadbelly book to look for more information about Gallows Pole. The book I've got (an Oak Publications book about the 12-string, from the early 1970s) credits the song as an "old English ballad", which probably qualifies as "traditional" if correct.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Steve Latimer
Date: 27 Jan 99 - 10:10 AM

Could we be rejuvenating the career of Led Zeppelin with this thread. How many people have actually gone back and given it a listen? If you're like me, you've probably realized that the sound quality of your vinyl or Cassette is terrible, that it's a pretty neat album, and you are going to get Zep III on CD. If 20 or 30 or sold in a 3 day period, the marketing people might see it as a movement, get the lads together along with Jason Bonham and start a world tour. Should we ask for a Mudcatter's discount?

All kidding aside, I like every teenager in the seventies thought that Jimmy page was fantastic. I have since come to hear his electric playing as sloppy, showy and flashy. However, I still really like his acoustic work. Very nice feel.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: Roger the zimmer
Date: 27 Jan 99 - 11:17 AM

No opinion on the Led Zeps but must speak up for my favourite bottleneck guitarist Mississippi Fred McDowell's version of "Baby Please Don't Go". It might not be folk but it sure is the blues. [didn't some young poser called Jagger have a try at it as well?]And at the risk of being pedantic (my wife:"Pedantic? You? You're just a pompous prat") Ian Anderson of Tull wouldn't like to be discribed as English as he comes from the Black Isle in Ross-shire, according the my Scots friends.


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Subject: RE: led zepplin
From: quokka
Date: 30 Oct 08 - 11:33 PM

I just keep running across great old threads. This one definately deserves a refresh. Would love to knoe if any of these posters have anything to add...do you still think the same, have you changed your mind about any of this stuff over the last few years?

Cheers, Quokka ( I promise to stop trawling through old threads now)


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Subject: RE: led zeppelin
From: GUEST,BanjoRay
Date: 31 Oct 08 - 08:35 AM

In Easter 2007 I attended a week long old time fiddle workshop in the Coswolds (Sore Fingers Summer School) with about a dozen other fiddlers of varying ability. One of the guys turned out to be John Paul Jones, Zep's bass playerand a very nice guy, who's now very keen on Old Time music, and does a lot of record production in Nashville. He was great in sessions, usually playing mandolin superbly. I've since jammed with his daughter Cindy who's turning into an excellent OT fiddler. It's great to see Rockers taking up music...(heads for the door)
Ray


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Subject: RE: led zeppelin
From: GUEST,Dani
Date: 31 Oct 08 - 09:51 AM

And since then, of course, we've had Robert Plant and Allison Kraus's "Raising Sand" album. Go listen to some at Amazon. From the reviews:

"The musical collaboration of the decade, Raising Sand is the sound of two iconic figures stepping out of their respective comfort zones and letting their instincts lead them across a brave new sonic landscape. Despite hailing from distinctly different backgrounds, Alison Krauss and Robert Plant share a maverick spirit and willingness to extend the boundaries of their respective genres. This spirit, expertly honed by producer T Bone Burnett, has resulted in an album pitched three steps beyond some cosmic collision of early urban blues, spacious West Texas country, and the untapped potential of the folk-rock revolution.

Supported by the unparalleled musicianship of Marc Ribot, Dennis Crouch, Mike Seeger, Jay Bellerose, Norman Blake, Greg Leisz, Patrick Warren, and Riley Baugus, Plant and Krauss -- as both solo and harmony vocalists -- tackle an intriguing selection of songs from such tunesmiths as Tom Waits, Gene Clark, Sam Phillips, Townes Van Zandt, The Everly Broth! ers, and Mel Tillis. Raising Sand finds Robert Plant and Alison Krauss exploring popular music's elemental roots while still sounding effortlessly, breath-takingly contemporary."

Dani


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Subject: RE: led zeppelin
From: quokka
Date: 01 Nov 08 - 04:26 AM

Certainly sounds like it would be worth a listen.


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Subject: RE: led zeppelin
From: Bobert
Date: 17 Jul 10 - 07:47 PM

Who cares... Great band!!! Hey, I don't care if they ripped off Willie Dixon... At least they didn't hide their theivery and gave credit to the folks they borrowed from... Fir the most part, that is...

B~


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Subject: RE: led zeppelin
From: mousethief
Date: 18 Jul 10 - 12:28 AM

Although "brave new sonic landscape" deserves to be hit repeatedly with a canoe paddle and dumped in the swamp. Also "cosmic collision". Clearly the reviewer was not afraid of being accused of purpling their prose. :D


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Subject: RE: led zeppelin
From: Bonzo3legs
Date: 29 Sep 11 - 01:56 PM

Listened to a soundboard yesterday of their 15/01/73 gig - magnificent. Today, I listened to a soundboard of their final rehearsal (it says) before their O2 gig in December 2007 - again magnificent. There will always be glass half empty whingers complaining about their material - the fact is that they performed with an energy never shown by some toothless USAian blues singer who may have invented the original song!!!


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Subject: RE: led zeppelin
From: GUEST,Paul Slade
Date: 29 Sep 11 - 06:02 PM

Robert Plant - a man with admirably open ears - used to like referring to Zeppelin at their peak as "the world's loudest folk band". He also turned up for a few early punk gigs when many other rocks gods of his generation were terrified of the phenomenon and has been known to join in the odd casual campfire session at world music events like the Tuaregs' Festival in the Desert.

It was certainly the Led Zep version of Gallows Pole that got me interested in that particular song, and led me to discover many older versions of it. Similarly, it was the first two or three Rolling Stones albums which first got me curious about Muddy Waters, Jimmy Reed and Robert Johnson. As Muddy himself once said of the Stones: "They stole my music, but they gave me my name." He thought that was a fair exchange, and who are we to argue?


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Subject: RE: led zeppelin
From: Acme
Date: 29 Sep 11 - 11:34 PM

Good post, Paul.

SRS


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