Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Logging Songs

GUEST,Jim 12 Jun 06 - 10:36 AM
Scrump 12 Jun 06 - 11:00 AM
open mike 12 Jun 06 - 11:05 AM
GUEST,allan s 12 Jun 06 - 11:15 AM
Metchosin 12 Jun 06 - 11:19 AM
clueless don 12 Jun 06 - 11:19 AM
Wolfgang 12 Jun 06 - 11:28 AM
Metchosin 12 Jun 06 - 11:28 AM
Hollowfox 12 Jun 06 - 12:38 PM
LilyFestre 12 Jun 06 - 01:05 PM
GUEST,mg 12 Jun 06 - 01:12 PM
Doug Chadwick 12 Jun 06 - 01:23 PM
Scoville 12 Jun 06 - 01:25 PM
Big Mick 12 Jun 06 - 01:27 PM
Louie Roy 12 Jun 06 - 01:35 PM
HiHo_Silver 12 Jun 06 - 01:50 PM
Zhenya 12 Jun 06 - 02:00 PM
Tannywheeler 12 Jun 06 - 02:31 PM
bobad 12 Jun 06 - 02:36 PM
GUEST,mg 12 Jun 06 - 02:41 PM
Artful Codger 12 Jun 06 - 02:41 PM
bobad 12 Jun 06 - 02:42 PM
open mike 12 Jun 06 - 03:38 PM
14fret 12 Jun 06 - 04:30 PM
Stewart 12 Jun 06 - 05:32 PM
GUEST,thurg 12 Jun 06 - 05:36 PM
GUEST,mg 12 Jun 06 - 05:43 PM
GUEST,mg 12 Jun 06 - 05:44 PM
GUEST,Jim 12 Jun 06 - 06:37 PM
GUEST,Texas Guest 12 Jun 06 - 08:22 PM
Dave Ruch 12 Jun 06 - 08:48 PM
Barry T 12 Jun 06 - 09:12 PM
Desert Dancer 12 Jun 06 - 10:09 PM
GUEST,mg 13 Jun 06 - 04:39 PM
Hollowfox 13 Jun 06 - 07:43 PM
GUEST,Art Thieme 13 Jun 06 - 08:46 PM
Willie-O 13 Jun 06 - 08:54 PM
Severn 13 Jun 06 - 09:06 PM
artbrooks 13 Jun 06 - 10:20 PM
Sandy Paton 13 Jun 06 - 10:20 PM
GUEST,.gargoyle 13 Jun 06 - 10:49 PM
Acme 14 Jun 06 - 01:12 PM
GUEST,Joe_F 14 Jun 06 - 09:31 PM
Dave (the ancient mariner) 14 Jun 06 - 09:54 PM
rich-joy 14 Jun 06 - 10:18 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 14 Jun 06 - 10:27 PM
Severn 15 Jun 06 - 07:08 PM
GUEST,Art Thieme 15 Jun 06 - 07:32 PM
GUEST 15 Jun 06 - 07:35 PM
open mike 15 Jun 06 - 10:10 PM
Uncle_DaveO 16 Jun 06 - 06:01 PM
GUEST,Jim 17 Jun 06 - 11:21 AM
GUEST 17 Jun 06 - 12:27 PM
Saro 18 Jun 06 - 04:22 AM
GUEST,guest ian 18 Jun 06 - 08:30 PM
Genie 18 Jun 06 - 11:36 PM
GUEST,Mark Despault 17 Oct 12 - 03:46 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,Jim
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 10:36 AM

We have been asked to sing a program of logging songs at a pioneer village next October. Any suggestions would be appreciated.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Scrump
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 11:00 AM

Well, there's "The Logger" for a start (listed in DT as "The Frozen Logger"). Search DT and the forum for "logger" and there are a few other refs that might help.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: open mike
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 11:05 AM

a friend sings "sick of setting chokers in the god damn rain"
and i can think of some anti-logging songs, but i think you want
pro logging, correct?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,allan s
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 11:15 AM

The loggers/lumbermans ? alphabet


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Metchosin
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 11:19 AM

The Log Driver's Waltz


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: clueless don
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 11:19 AM

How about "The Log Driver's Waltz"?

Don


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Wolfgang
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 11:28 AM

Peter A(E)mberly.

Wolfgang


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Metchosin
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 11:28 AM

And from the Pacific Northwest:

The Grand Hotel
Way Up the Ucletaw
The Greenchain Song
Buck's Camp Down at Munroe
and The Potlatch Fair


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Hollowfox
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 12:38 PM

The Folk Legacy cd "Adirondack Songs and Ballads" sung by Lawrence Older not only has songs about logging (eg Once More A-Lumbering Go), but songs sung in the lumbering camps (suitable for all ages).It's also a treat to listen to.
Just where will you be doing this program? Would it matter if the song was geographically specific? (I'm thinking Blue Mountain Lake)
some songs like the Jam on Gerry's Rocks have apparently traveled around a bit.
And you might want to check to see if your library has William Doerflinger's book Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman. Good luck.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LUMBERJACK SONG (Monty Python)
From: LilyFestre
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 01:05 PM

It's probably not appropriate for your venue, but when I think of Logging songs, Monty Python comes to mind immediately.

The Lumberjack Song

I'm a lumberjack and I'm okay,
I sleep all night and I work all day.

Chorus: He's a lumberjack and he's okay,
He sleeps all night and he works all day.

I cut down trees, I eat my lunch,
I go to the lavatory.
On Wednesdays I go shopping
And have buttered scones for tea.

Mounties: He cuts down trees, he eats his lunch,
He goes to the lavatory.
On Wednesdays he goes shopping
And has buttered scones for tea.

Chorus: He's a lumberjack and he's okay,
He sleeps all night and he works all day.

I cut down trees, I skip and jump,
I like to press wild flowers.
I put on women's clothing,
And hang around in bars.

Mounties: He cuts down trees, he skips and jumps,
He likes to press wild flowers.
He puts on women's clothing,
And hangs around in bars.

Chorus: He's a lumberjack and he's okay,
He sleeps all night and he works all day.

I cut down trees, I wear high heels,
Suspendies and a bra.
I wish I'd been a girlie,
Just like my dear pappa.

Mounties: He cuts down trees, he wears high heels?
Suspendies...and a bra?

...he's a lumberjack and he's okay,
He sleeps all night and he works all day.

...he's a lumberjack and he's OKAAAAAAAAAAYYY.
He sleeps all night and he works all day

:) Michelle


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 01:12 PM

Hi thee to Stewart's Songs of the Pacific Northwest...there are several there including Frozen Logger..a great one about an accident in B.C...I have one on there about loggers being out of work...several to chose from. mg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 01:23 PM

How about the Joan Baez song "River in the Pines". The lyrics can be found in this thread River in the Pines




DC


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Scoville
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 01:25 PM

I don't know any "positive" ones, but:

Breakfash in Hell (Slaid Cleaves)
Damned Old Piney Mountains


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Big Mick
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 01:27 PM

"Jack Haggerty" also known as "Flat River Girl" is a song about the lumbering days in Michigan. Slap Jack Haggerty in the search engine and you will find lyrics and threads.

Mick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Louie Roy
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 01:35 PM

How about Johnny Cash's recording The Lumberjack


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE TOBIQUE PULP WOOD HAULERS
From: HiHo_Silver
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 01:50 PM

THE TOBIQUE PULP WOOD HAULERS
(Tobique - pronounce toe-b-atic)

Have you ever heard the story
Of the pulpwood hauling crew
Who came to Tobique
To work the winter through?

They came from east; they came from west.
They came from south and north,
Uniting in their efforts
To bring the pulpwood forth.

And one among their number—
We'll not disclose his name—
Sought by writing poetry
To spread abroad his fame.

So now I'll tell the story
This unknown person wrote.
If Joe Crosby ever hears it,
The poet he will choke.

Two woodsman came from Yarmouth.
Their names were Ralph and Joe.
Their aim was hauling pulp wood
On Tobique snow.

Joe had a pair of horses.
He wanted the world to know
That he'd beat Ralph Delaney
And he told the people so.

Joe's striker's name was Randolph
And he was young and strong.
Joe said he'd haul the biggest loads
If Randolph peavied him along.

Joe started on a new road
And he was doing fine
Till Randolph got quite careless
And left some stumps behind.

The roads were rough and stony.
The stumps were rather high,
But Joe said Nance and Bess are good;
They'll take it out on high.

They started cutting bushes
And skidding up the roads
Till Joe got too ambitious
And hauled too big a load.

He started up the ice hill
With full three cord of wood.
He said that he could make the top
If Ralph Delaney could.

"Come now, Nance," cried Joe.
"You know that you can do it.
You help a little too, Bess.
There's really nothing to it."

"Go ahead," cried Joe with all his might.
"Go ahead," he cried again.
Though Nance and Bess hauled quite hard,
Their hauling was in vain.

But Joe was fast upon a rock.
His load would be there still,
But twenty men with peaveys
Pushed him up the hill.

Then Ralph Delaney came along
With just as big a load.
His horses made the hill on high.
They didn't mind the road.

Now Joe is sometimes hoggish,
And every chance he gets,
He loads his sleds in front of Ralph
To put him back a bit.

One day Joe passed another team.
Poor Nance got in the slough.
"Now, see," said Joe unto the boss,
"Where this man made me go."

Poor Joe was hopping up and down
And turned around to Ace,
And said, "If this man don't shut up,
I'll slap his sassy face."

Now Joe was having trouble.
Liar, try hard as he might,
He's always hung up on a stump
Till way on in the night.

One night his striker quit him
And Joe was feeling sad,
But the boss gave him another man.
Now Joe is feeling glad.

Next day Joe got in early.
We suffered quite a shock.
'Twas extraordinary
For 'twasn't eight o'clock.

And on the following morning,
While going out to work,
Joe cautioned his new striker:
"Now, boy, you must not shirk."

But chancing to look backward,
Quite aghast he stood,
For upside down was rack and sled
And on the ground his load.

And now we'll end our story.
Soon homeward we will go,
But we hope to meet poor Joe again
On Tobique snow.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Zhenya
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 02:00 PM

The Jolly Raftsman O    --- it's in The Penguin Book of Canadian Folk Songs and also see the references below. I have a recording on an old LP. The chorus is:

To hew and score it is his plan
And handle the broad ax neatly o
It's lay the line and mark the pine
And do it most completely o


This is what I found online just now:

Jolly Raftsman O, The
DESCRIPTION: "I am sixteen, I do confess, I'm sure I am no older O, I place my mind, it never shall move, It's on a jolly raftsman, O." She praises his work and calls him "brave as Alexander," though someone (her mother?) wants her to marry a freeholder
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1961 (Fowke)
KEYWORDS: love logger courting mother
FOUND IN: Canada(Ont)
REFERENCES (2 citations):
Fowke-Lumbering #58, "The Jolly Raftsman O" (1 text, 1 tune)
Fowke/MacMillan 51, "The Jolly Raftsman O" (1 text, 1 tune)
Roud #2318
Notes: No particular storyline here, a short (three verses) love song wherein the singer repeatedly states her conviction to wait for and marry her jolly raftsman. [Fowke's source was] Mrs. A. Fraser of Lancaster, Ontario, who said she learned it from her mother. - RBW
File: FowL58
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2006 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Tannywheeler
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 02:31 PM

Has "Jam on Gerry's Rocks" already been mentioned?       Tw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr/Chords Add: LUMBERJACK SONG (Monty Python)
From: bobad
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 02:36 PM

ARTIST: Monty Python
TITLE: I'm a Lumberjack
Lyrics and Chords


I'm a lumberjack and I'm okay
I sleep all night and I work all day
    He's a lumberjack and he's okay
    He sleeps all night and he works all day

/ G - CE7 Am7 / D D7 GC G / :

I cut down trees, I eat my lunch
I go to the lavat'ry
On Wednesdays I go shopping
And have buttered scones for tea
    He cuts down trees...
    He's a lumberjack...

/ G - C Am7 / D D7 G - / G - C A7 / D7 - GC G /

I cut down trees, I skip and jump
I love to press wild flow'rs
I put on women's clothing
And hang around in bars
    He cuts down trees...
    He's a lumberjack...

I cut down trees, I wear high heels
Suspendies and a bra
I wish I'd been a girlie
Just like my dear papa
    He cuts down trees...
    He's a lumberjack...

WAHH! And I thought you were so RUGGED!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 02:41 PM

some great ones from Newfoundland..Tickle Cove Pond and "there's one class of men in this country that's never been mentioned in song." for get the name. mg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Artful Codger
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 02:41 PM

My favorite is "The Little Brown Bulls".

There is an earlier thread which lists a bunch of logging songs.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: bobad
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 02:42 PM

Whoops, I see LilyFestre beat me to it, oh well now you have the chords as well.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: open mike
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 03:38 PM

My name is Yon Yonson
I come from Visconsin
I work in the lumber mills there

When i walk donw the street
all the people i meet
say what is your name and i say...

repeat..

see former thread--

http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=64869


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: 14fret
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 04:30 PM

One of the best is, 'Summer Wages' by Ian Tyson.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Stewart
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 05:32 PM

As Mary (mg) said there are several on my CD "Songs of the Pacific Northwest"

Shake Rats - words & music by Ana Green. Cutting cedar shakes from forest stumps. Linda Allen

The Chokerman - words & music by Don Olds of Hope, B.C. Don Olds

Hoedad Song - words & music by Jim Guthrie* for the Hoedad Treeplanting Collective. Percy Hilo

The Frozen Logger - words & music by James Stevens*, 1951. Andy Blyth

Big Red Saloon - words & music by Mary Garvey. In Winlock, WA. Mary Garvey (recorded in Long Beach, WA)

Cheers, S. in Seattle


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,thurg
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 05:36 PM

"there's one class of men in this country that's never been mentioned in song." for get the name. mg


That's from The Badger Drive.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 05:43 PM

0Could someone post words to Badger Drive. It is an alltime great song, somewhat similar in my mind to Log Drivers Waltz.

Also, check out CDs by Fraser Union of B.C. They are great singers and usually would have a couple at least of logging songs I think. Snap the line tight is a song about getting the sunk logs...I thyink they and many others..Hank Cramer comes to mind..do it...

Here is an anecdote told me to me by an old Franciscon nun...that the French Canadian loggers used to sing "Hail Holy Queen" presumably in French...and stay close enough so they could hear each other so they wouldn't get separated. Pretty song. mg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 05:44 PM

actually I have a new one about single bolt drivers of Toledo, Washington but no tune yet.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,Jim
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 06:37 PM

Thank you to all posters. Ican't believe that 27 of you replied when I just posted my request this morning. I am forever greatful to the late Rick Fielding for directing me to the Mudcat Cafe.
The gig is at Lang Pioneer Village near the north shore of Rice Lake in Southern Ontario.

p.s. You're right, I won't be able to use the Monty Python song, but thanks for reminding me of it. Hmmmm...Maybe if we get the right audience...Nah, I don't think so.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE LOGGING SONG (Bill Staines)
From: GUEST,Texas Guest
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 08:22 PM

Always like to contribute when I can. Here's an old Bill Staines
tune off of his, "The Whistle Of The Jay" disc:

The Logging Song

It's early in the morning when the birds sing in the pines
The sun peeks through the forest where the coal river climbs
Men are up at five o'clock and to the trees at six
Hard days work a good nights sleep is all they ever mix

Whey - hey another brand new day
On the wild and windy shores of old Su-peer-eye-ay

From North Bay to Fort William on the rocky northern shore
The millss are filled with cedar cones
                           and the boats are filled with ore
I worked in a logging camp / my daddy did before
We're caloused hands and weathered skin and iron to the core

(CHORUS)

Now the flys are thick and the men get sick / it's cold as it can be
Nothing's unexpected in the north country
When the summer ends and the winter comes it's forty-two below
We'll settle down in plywood shacks and cover up with snow

(CHORUS)

Now when I die I will have seen the wonders of the sea
Now when I've climbed the mountains in the western country
But most of all I won't forget the wild and wonderous thing
The falling of the timber when it's early in the spring

(CHORUS X2 OUT)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Dave Ruch
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 08:48 PM

I would think that "Lumbering Songs from the Ontario Shanties" would be an excellent choice, given your location. Many excellent field recordings of singing lumbermen (OJ Abbott, Jim Doherty, etc) from Edith Fowke's collecting in Ontario.

You can hear samples and purchase here:
http://www.smithsonianglobalsound.org/containerdetail.aspx?itemid=655


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Barry T
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 09:12 PM

I have a few possibles in my collection (some already mentioned in this thread)...

Donkey Riding
The Grand Hotel
The Lumber Camp Song
The Maid from Tidehead
Peter Emberley
Les Raftsmen
When the Shanty Boy Comes Down
Jim Whelan

- - - - -


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 12 Jun 06 - 10:09 PM

You can put "@logger" into the "Lyrics & Knowledge Search" box at the top of the page to find those songs listed in the DT.

~ Becky in Tucson


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 13 Jun 06 - 04:39 PM

they wouldn't be all in English though would they..Finn? French? Swedish? mg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Hollowfox
Date: 13 Jun 06 - 07:43 PM

I can't believe it took me this long to remember the Lumberman's Alphabet. This is a decent little singalong if you have the right audience.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,Art Thieme
Date: 13 Jun 06 - 08:46 PM

There is a great ballad that seems to me to be a Wisconsin lumber woods remake of Romeo And Juliet. It is called "The Shanty Boy On The Big Eau Claire"
I recorded it twice but those are out of print now. Sandy Paton plans to get it out on a CD one day. That'll be called "Art Thieme--ON THE RIVER"

Art


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE CRANE OF BLOCK FROZEN
From: Willie-O
Date: 13 Jun 06 - 08:54 PM

Can't remember where I stole this from, but if you need an icebreaker, this might help (recited; I wouldn't try to sing it, it don't scan too good):

"where you use an internet "translation" program and translate first from English to German, then from German to French, and finally from French back to English -- but this particular song "circular translation" was way to funny to leave buried there, so here is The Frozen Logger, BabelFish style: ;-D"

THE CRANE OF BLOCK FROZEN

Like me one evening in the small coffee hinsass,
has the forty waitresses of year of to me that these words said:
"I sees that you are a crane of block, and not precisely ordinary Gammler,
because nobody, a crane of block agitates however his coffee is an inch.

My liked was a crane of block. There is none today of it but him.
If you pour Whisky on him, it would eat a package hay.

It never shaved its Whiskers by far its skin hornigen.
It would bite it far towards the interior inside with a hammer zerstossen and it right.

My liked came to see one day of winter me afterwards.
It held covered me in a vernarrtem which broke three movements.

It embraced me, distributed us, therefore strongly it in my Kiefer fallows some;
I could not speak, to declare to him that it forgot its mackinaw.

Then, sauntering I saw wanting to say liked to leave and by snow
and joyeusement heimwaerts went to the bottom forty-eight.

Time tried to freeze time him; it tested its level well.
With degrees hundred below zero, it buttoned its waistcoat.

It has cold it towards China, has clearly cold in top with stars.
It has cold my love of crane of block to miles degrees above below zero.

In futile, you would thaw out it and tried to believe you him, Sir?
He in the axtblaetter, the Douglas ones precisely left you with Spot cuts.

And thus, I lost want to say liked, and I came to this coffee,
and here I, wait somebody agitates his coffee with his inch."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging In More Songs
From: Severn
Date: 13 Jun 06 - 09:06 PM

Here's some song suggestions to entertain for your next Logger Rhythmic Function, all cited from LP sources:

Tom Brandon-"The Rambling Irishman" (Folk Legacy FSC-10) A fine singer with experience as a lumberjack/sawyer recorded by Edith Fowke and appears on a few of her Collections of field recordings, such as "Ontario Ballads & Folksongs" (Prestige International INT 25014)
Fowke said, "Just as O.J. Abbott was the finest of the older singers I recorded, Tom is the finest of the younger singers". Sandy Paton may have others on Folk Legacy besides the aforementioned Larry Older and Brandon. Check his catalog.

Any of Edith Fowke's field recordings might yield some goodies. I have no idea how much of the stuff's on CD in Canada, or whether the equivalent of Rounder and Atlantic reissuing the Lomax and the Library Of Congress recordings was ever undertaken up there, but the material was scattered on many different labels in the LP days. Google O.J.Abbott in particular. I hope some Canadian catter can help here, as I'd like to find out more on the Fowke Collections on CD, myself.

Two recordings on Folkways to check out are "Wolf River Songs" (Ethnic Folkways Library FE 4001), field recordings from Wisconson in the 50's made by Sidney Robertson Cowell including some by the excellent Warde Ford.

"Songs Of A New York Lumberjack"-Ellen Stekert (Folkways FA 2354) is by a singer covering collected material and has some good songs on it.

You'll find the material recorded from lumberjacks often includes sea songs and ballads and Civil War songs as well (both areas of particular interest to me, personally). A lot of them would go out on ships in the great lakes or on the coasts in the summer and work in the logging camps in the winter, so songs like "The Flying Cloud" were popular among them. You'll find "The Wild Colonial Boy" collected from loggers, as well as music hall songs, 19th century sentimental ballads, hobo songs and others, as people drifted in and out of the work from various places.

Check within the Folkways catalog further on the subject.

Lastly, there's a great song by Vic Bell that both James Keelaghan (on "Timelines") and Tom Lewis (on "Sea-Dog See Dog"),recorded about the practice of "salvaging" in the coastal Pacific Northwest, where the fishermen, if the halibut catch is down, round up the stray logs that got away from the log drives down river (They still do it the old fashioned way) and have washed ashore somewhere and gather them with their fishing boats and float large numbers of them at a time for much needed money into town.

Hope you can find the appropriate CD versions or the LPs. Folkways and Folk Legacy both keep their whole catalog available for custom orders. Good luck.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: artbrooks
Date: 13 Jun 06 - 10:20 PM

Ken Lonnquist's song about the great Peshtigo fire is worth while, but I'm not sure where you'd get the tune from.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: PAT McBRAID (Grant Rogers)
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 13 Jun 06 - 10:20 PM

One of my own favorites comes from the great Catskill stone cutter and woodsman Grant Rogers titled "PAT McBRAID." Tells the story of a young man going up the river to find where all the logs were coming from. "For food, I took my fishing pole, with the hook stuck in my hat." Once he reaches the lumbercamp, he applies for a job and is given an axe "to stand the test." He accomplishes the task in less time than required.

    I'm proud to say I stood me test with a little time to spare.
    Stuck up me axe and turned around, the whole crew standing there.
    The boss he blew his whistle, his watch still in his hand.
    "The way it looks, go tell the cook we've got an extra man."

    He took me to the paying shack; says he "Give me your name,
    And whether fake or otherwise, to me it's just the same.
    But you must have a handle if you're looking to be paid."
    Says I, "I'll take my wages to the name of Pat McBraid."

    Through me fifty years of logging I have seen a mighty change;
    From river rafts to steamships, from motor trucks to trains.
    If there's a moral you're lookin for, I'm sure it's plain to see:
    We took the roof from the red man's head to shelter you and me.
   
Grant wrote it, so it ain't an old traditional logger's song like Larry Older's ""Once More a-Lumbering Go," but it's a dandy and very singable. Larry Older's CD is CD-15 in the Folk-Legacy catalog; Grant Rogers' is CD-27. Both give us simple guitar accompaniments. Tom Brandon's recording isn't on CD yet, but the cassette is available - C-10. All three come with accompanying booklets of background information and complete texts.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 13 Jun 06 - 10:49 PM

Jim - something is "phishy" about you postings.

You answered WHERE, however....

Who "asked you"
Why did they ask YOU (someone that lacks NE American loggin background)?
What is your instrument?
How long have you been "accomplished" on your instrument?
Can you change keys - or do you use a "capo?" How many in your group?
Do you have a "group name?"
Is this a continuous gig (3 night or more) or a "one-night-stand."
Are you performing before Cub-Scouts or a paying audience?

Jim - at least two dozen performers, in this forum, have similar gigs, and can suggest a multiple of jigs....

PLEASE reply soon - the season will get busy in two weeks and replies may be month's late....if answered at all.

Sincerely,
Gargoyle


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Acme
Date: 14 Jun 06 - 01:12 PM

Good questions. Adapting songs that are new to a group of performers and their instruments may take a while.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,Joe_F
Date: 14 Jun 06 - 09:31 PM

"Silver Jack", in the DigiTrad & in Lomax's _Folk Songs of North America_. Delicious irony, and very smoothly written. Tho it is not attributed, I have trouble believing it is a folksong. I would have guessed Bret Harte, but it seems not.

--- Joe Fineman    joe_f@verizon.net

||: Where reasons are no reason, cause is true. ||


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE LOG DRIVER'S WALTZ (Wade Hemsworth)
From: Dave (the ancient mariner)
Date: 14 Jun 06 - 09:54 PM

THE LOG DRIVER'S WALTZ
(Wade Hemsworth)

If you should ask any girl from the parish around
What pleases her most from her head to her toes,
She'll say - I'm not sure that it's business of yours,
But I do like to waltz with a log driver.

Cho: For he goes birling down a-down the white water;
That's where the log driver learns to step lightly.
It's birling down, a-down white water;
A log driver's waltz pleases girls completely.

When the drive's nearly over, I like to go down
To see all the lads while they work on the river.
I know that come evening they'll be in the town
And we all want to waltz with a log driver.

To please both my parents I've had to give way
And dance with the doctors and merchants and lawyers.
Their manners are fine but their feet are of clay
For there's none with the style of a log driver.

I've had my chances with all sorts of men
But none is so fine as my lad on the river.
So when the drive's over, if he asks me again,
I think I will marry my log driver.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: rich-joy
Date: 14 Jun 06 - 10:18 PM

"Les Raftsmen", the French Canadian song that Barry T has linked to above, is a goodun!! (good rhythm and chorus, for public performance)
(I have Jon Bartlett & Rika Ruebsaat on tape doing this ...)


Cheers! R-J


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 14 Jun 06 - 10:27 PM

This far along, and my favorite loggin song hasn't appeared (it's on the Wolf River Songs album): We Are Anchored By The Roadside, Jim.

Jerry


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Songs Under Influence Of Lager
From: Severn
Date: 15 Jun 06 - 07:08 PM

My favorite song on the album too, Jerry. The singled out Warde Ford happens to be my favorite singer on tha album, but Robert Walker gets the prize obscure gem of a song. "We Are Anchored By The Roadside" may sound like the title of some hymn, but of course it's not. It's two drunken buddies reminiscing of pre-prohibition days when booze was more readily available, and I'm glad to see someone else besides me, other than Joe Hickerson, who recorded it on "Drive Dull Care Away" on Folk Legacy, knows of this fine song. Once again, Jerry, you prove yourself a man of exquisite taste.

A record well worth seeking out.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,Art Thieme
Date: 15 Jun 06 - 07:32 PM

Joe Hickerson did a wonderful recording of that fine song on one of his Folk Legacy albums. I highly recommend it to all.

Art


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Jun 06 - 07:35 PM

Springtime will roll along
And glad will be the day
When some of us who left our homes
Will wonder back that way
'Twas in the lonesome pinewood
This song was sang with glee
I've sung a song for you my friend
now you sing one for me.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: open mike
Date: 15 Jun 06 - 10:10 PM

yes donkey riding
is a good one

were you ever in quebec, stowing lumber on the deck...

a good sing along


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 16 Jun 06 - 06:01 PM

I'm pushed for time, so I've had to skip the latter part of the thread. If there are any duplications here, I apologize.

The Frozen Logger
The Lost Jimmy Whalen
The Little Brown Bulls
Blue Mountain Lake
The Jam on Gerry's Rocks

Durn! I should be able to think of more, but that's as much as I can cudgel out of my aging brain in the time I have available.

Dave Oesterreich


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,Jim
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 11:21 AM

Thanks once again. My partner Al has a bunch of songs and now I too can contribute. Before this thread was started I could only think of THE FROZEN LOGGER, THE LOG DRIVER'S WALTZ and WERE YOU EVER IN QUEBEC?. You have reminded me of tunes I'd forgotten and introduced me to many new ones.

Gargoyle had some questions:

1.Who "asked you"? Al Kirby and I perform 5 or 6 times a year at Lang. Al is an ethnomusicologist with special knowledge of Edith Folk's work in Peterborough County. He was asked to do the gig, but I wanted to make some contributions as well.

2.Why did they ask YOU (someone that lacks NE American loggin background)? They asked Al, who has the knowledge.

3.What is your instrument? I play clawhammer banjo, guitar, mandolin and concertina at Lang.

4.How long have you been "accomplished" on your instrument? I don't know what "accomplished" means, but I've been playing for paying audiences since the '6os.

5.Can you change keys - or do you use a "capo?" For "folky" sounding music I certainly make use of a capo. I wouldn't play The Frozen Logger in Bb without a capo. For swing songs or jazz standards I wouldn't use a capo, but we don't do too many of them at this gig.

6.How many in your group? For this gig two.

7.Do you have a "group name?" Kirby & Yates

8.Is this a continuous gig (3 night or more) or a "one-night-stand."?
We let The administrator know at the beginning of the summer which weekends we didn't have other gigs and he gave us those weekends. Al and I play in other groups and the summer festival season is our busiest time. The logging gig is one day.

9.Are you performing before Cub-Scouts or a paying audience? There is a fee to enter the site, but not a separate fee to see us. The audience probably includes some cub scouts, but we played there yesterday and the audience also included senior citizens, families and school tours.


10. At least two dozen performers, in this forum, have similar gigs, and can suggest a multiple of jigs....
And they have...thanks again.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 12:27 PM

A neat version of "Badger River Drive" can be heard on Stan Rogers LP "For the Family". "When the Shanty Boy Comes Down" can be found in the Warner collection and is on the 9th Annual (1988) Mystic Seaport Sea Music Festival release (cassette only).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Saro
Date: 18 Jun 06 - 04:22 AM

Rather spooky that I should see this thread, when I've just been looking at a book by Shelley Posen of Finest Kind, all about a logging community and its songs. The book is called "For Singing and Dancing and all Sorts of Fun" ISBN 0-88879-178-X

Sarah


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,guest ian
Date: 18 Jun 06 - 08:30 PM

look for any Buzz Martin songs , Tired of settin chokers in the doggone rain ,Whistle Punk Pete , Where there walks a logger , there walks a man , Unemployment Compensation , Used Log Truck ,These are from the Pacific NW .


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: Genie
Date: 18 Jun 06 - 11:36 PM

Does "Put Another Log On The Fire" count?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Logging Songs
From: GUEST,Mark Despault
Date: 17 Oct 12 - 03:46 PM

Better late than sorry (or whatever the saying is...)

No one mentioned the group the Wakami Wailers of Ontario. Two dedicated albums of lumber-camp songs. Performing them across north america for over thirty years.

The CD's are

Last of the White Pine Loggers
and
River Through the pines

Both available on line.

Most of the songs mentioned have been recorded in good faith by this band.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 19 June 4:44 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.