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Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseekueste

DigiTrad:
HELL'S ANGEL (WILD BIKER)
WILD ROVER (NO NAY NEVER)


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Nickhere 17 Jan 09 - 08:20 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jan 09 - 09:01 PM
Joe Offer 28 Mar 09 - 01:34 AM
Marje 28 Mar 09 - 04:22 AM
Reinhard 28 Mar 09 - 05:20 AM
alanabit 28 Mar 09 - 06:37 AM
Marje 28 Mar 09 - 06:45 AM
GUEST,ich bein ine Englander 28 Mar 09 - 08:19 AM
michaelr 28 Mar 09 - 04:43 PM
Susanne (skw) 28 Mar 09 - 09:36 PM
Declan 28 Mar 09 - 09:47 PM
Joe Offer 28 Mar 09 - 10:24 PM
synbyn 29 Mar 09 - 06:28 AM
michaelr 29 Mar 09 - 02:08 PM
MudGuard 29 Mar 09 - 02:55 PM
Rafflesbear 29 Mar 09 - 04:01 PM
GUEST,leeneia 29 Mar 09 - 10:54 PM
Joe Offer 29 Mar 09 - 11:31 PM
Susanne (skw) 30 Mar 09 - 06:33 PM
GUEST,Traveler 13 Dec 09 - 01:21 PM
Susanne (skw) 13 Dec 09 - 05:28 PM
alanabit 14 Dec 09 - 12:24 AM
Rafflesbear 14 Dec 09 - 03:26 PM
Mysha 14 Dec 09 - 07:19 PM
GUEST,Ken Hunt 15 Dec 09 - 08:36 AM
Mysha 15 Dec 09 - 11:17 AM
GUEST,Traveler 07 Feb 10 - 04:07 PM
Susanne (skw) 07 Feb 10 - 07:44 PM
GUEST,just a little help on the song 20 May 11 - 11:23 PM
eddie1 21 May 11 - 03:14 AM
GUEST,Desi C 21 May 11 - 02:49 PM
GUEST,leeneia 21 May 11 - 06:19 PM
michaelr 21 May 11 - 06:57 PM
Jack Campin 21 May 11 - 07:32 PM
GUEST,leeneia 22 May 11 - 12:35 AM
Mysha 23 May 11 - 04:30 AM
GUEST,Alan Whittle 23 May 11 - 06:19 AM
GUEST,leeneia 23 May 11 - 11:47 PM
GUEST,Alan Whittle 24 May 11 - 02:16 AM
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Subject: Origins: Was The Wild Rover a German song?
From: Nickhere
Date: 17 Jan 09 - 08:20 PM

Over recent years if I played The Wild Rover the odd person now and again mentioned that the chords and melody are identical to a song originating in Hamburg in Germany. They were unable to be more specific about the lyrics (if they were the same) or title of the German version. But they seemed adamant that it was the same melody and from the few lyrics they heard, didn't sound like the same song.

Does anyone know anything about this? Has anyone heard this other version?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Was The Wild Rover a German song?
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jan 09 - 09:01 PM

Has been discussed before, thread 97556: Wild Rover
The lyrics are English, before 1820. Several broadsides at the Bodleian. Where the tune originated is another question but the experts so far have not quarrelled with a British origin.

In the thread, note that the music was used quite a number of years ago for a later German song.

This thread should be combined with the previous thread.


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Subject: ADD: An Der Nordseekueste (tune: Wild Rover)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Mar 09 - 01:34 AM

There's a moderately strange YouTube recording here (click) of Klaus & Klaus singing "An der Nordseeküste" in 1985. In another thread, Wolfgang says the German song is a rather recent composition.

Klaus & Klaus - An der Nordseeküste 1985
(lyrics posted on the Youtube video)

AN DER NORDSEEKÜSTE

Damals vor unendlich langer Zeit
Da machten wir Friesen am Wasser uns breit
Die Jahre vergingen wie Saus und wie Braus
Aber breit seh'n wir Friesen auch heute noch aus

An der Nordseeküste, am plattdeutschen Strand
Sind die Fische im Wasser und selten an Land

Nach Flut kommt die Ebbe, nach Ebbe die Flut
Die Deiche sie halten mal schlecht und mal gut
Die Dünen sie wandern am Strand hin und her
Von Grönland nach Flandern, jedenfalls ungefähr

An der Nordseeküste, am plattdeutschen Strand
Sind die Fische im Wasser und selten an Land

Die Seehunde singen ein Klagelied
Weil sie nicht mit dem Schwanz wedeln können, so'n Schiet
Die Schafe sie blöken wie blöd auf dem Deich
Und mit schwarzgrünen Kugeln garnier'n sie ihn reich

An der Nordseeküste, am plattdeutschen Strand
Sind die Fische im Wasser und selten an Land

An der Nordseeküste, am plattdeutschen Strand
Sind die Fische im Wasser und selten an Land

An der Nordseeküste, am plattdeutschen Strand
Sind die Fische im Wasser und selten an Land


It's getting late, so I won't attempt a translation. The third verse has me stumped. Anybody?
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: Marje
Date: 28 Mar 09 - 04:22 AM

Third verse:
The seals sing a lament
Because they can't wave with their tails [can't get this bit -such a shot?]
The sheep they bleat stupidly on the dyke [sea wall]
And decorate it with greenish-black balls

There, I bet you wish you hadn't asked. But I can make the chorus rhyme, with a bit of poetic licence:

On the north sea coastline, on the cold German sand
There are fish in the water, but not on the land

It makes the Wild Rover sound like Shakespeare.

I should think some real German-speaker will come along before long to tidy up my rather ragged efforts.

Marje


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: Reinhard
Date: 28 Mar 09 - 05:20 AM

Well that's what counted for party humour in Germany in the 1970s.

"Schiet" is a Low German expletive. Drop the c and e and you know what it is. "So'n Schiet" means "more's the pity".


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: alanabit
Date: 28 Mar 09 - 06:37 AM

This monstrosity has thankfully been (deservedly) forgotten by most Germans in the twenty-four years since it reared its ugly head. Some of the trashings of Brit and Irish folk songs in Carneval - in particularly by witless opportunists like De Höhner, have caused me no less grief. I think these things survive on the principle that if you are drunk enough you do not care what you are singing:

A familiar tune.

Another high point of Carneval culture.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: Marje
Date: 28 Mar 09 - 06:45 AM

Thank you, Reinhard! I'm not sure that I will put that bit of information to any use, but it's nice to have that loose end tied up.

Marje


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: GUEST,ich bein ine Englander
Date: 28 Mar 09 - 08:19 AM

nine nine nine.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: michaelr
Date: 28 Mar 09 - 04:43 PM

That's possibly just a wee bit worse than the original.

Hi Alan!

Cheers,
Michael


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküst
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 28 Mar 09 - 09:36 PM

Marje - it's "because they can't waggle their tails, unlike 'land' dogs. Don't go looking for sense in this product. I absolutely disagree with Michael - it's miles worse than the original, and best forgotten. May I request that this thread be closed asap by a Mudelf? I can't think of anything that could reasonably be added on this topic.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: Declan
Date: 28 Mar 09 - 09:47 PM

I remember a session in the Bedford in Sidmouth a few years back when for no particular reason, we all spent about an hour doing different renditions of the Wild Rover. There was a German couple who are regulars at the Bedford - I know them well but their names are not coming to me, who sang versions in German. I remember Clive on the keyboard had a number of different rendtitions in various styles (as he does) - my contribution was to sing "Níl na lá" a song in Irish Gaelic which carries much the same story line in the first couple of verses. (Everyone took my word for that!)

A very enjoyable little interlude which gave a good insight into how far this particular song has travelled and the creativity of the folk process,


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Mar 09 - 10:24 PM

Aw, c'mon, Susanne!

The second verse is really profound:

    Nach Flut kommt die Ebbe, nach Ebbe die Flut
    Die Deiche sie halten mal schlecht und mal gut
    Die Dünen sie wandern am Strand hin und her
    Von Grönland nach Flandern, jedenfalls ungefähr

    An der Nordseeküste, am plattdeutschen Strand
    Sind die Fische im Wasser und selten an Land


    After flood comes the ebb, after ebb comes the flood,
    The dikes, they hold; sometimes bad, sometimes good.
    The dunes, they wander on the strand here and there,
    From Greenland to Flanders, sometimes dangerously (sometimes give me a scare?)

    On the North Sea Coastline, on the Low German Strand,
    Are the fishes in water, and selsom on land.


Oh, well, maybe you're right....
But we don't close song threads, just because the songs are stupid.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: synbyn
Date: 29 Mar 09 - 06:28 AM

and there's always doug hudson's version...


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: michaelr
Date: 29 Mar 09 - 02:08 PM

"ungefahr" means approximately, not dangerously.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: MudGuard
Date: 29 Mar 09 - 02:55 PM

Die Seehunde singen ein Klagelied
Weil sie nicht mit dem Schwanz wedeln können, so'n Schiet
Die Schafe sie blöken wie blöd auf dem Deich
Und mit schwarzgrünen Kugeln garnier'n sie ihn reich

a very rough translation of the third verse of that nonsense song (for which the wild rover tune was stolen):

The seals sing an elegy
cause they can't wag their tails, what a pity
The sheep bleat like stupid on the dike
and with their blackgreen droppings they decorate it richly


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: Rafflesbear
Date: 29 Mar 09 - 04:01 PM

"This monstrosity has thankfully been (deservedly) forgotten by most Germans in the twenty-four years since it reared its ugly head"

Sorry - far from it. Norcsalordie had a short tour of Germany last year and had been tipped off about the song by their German sponsors and learned it in full. They started by singing the first verse of Wild Rover to not much reaction then switched to An Der Nordseekuste to a roar of approval from the audience.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 29 Mar 09 - 10:54 PM

I like 'An der Nordseekuste.' It's fun. And it gives me a chance to practice my German.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: Joe Offer
Date: 29 Mar 09 - 11:31 PM

"ungefähr" means approximately, not dangerously.
    I knew that.....but it was a long day. "Gefährlich means dangerous.

    -Joe-


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküst
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 30 Mar 09 - 06:33 PM

Ok, ok, I can see there are still things to say about this lovely song ... And of course I knew you wouldn't, Joe. I still think it was worth a try. :-)


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: GUEST,Traveler
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 01:21 PM

You have to know that the song is quite self-mocking. So it's pretty nonsensical to take it seriously ;) But I guess a lot of the humour gets lost in translation; the puns of course, but also the lyrics in general. For example, this one

      Nach Flut kommt die Ebbe, nach Ebbe die Flut
      Die Deiche, sie halten mal schlecht und mal gut

is hilariously playful and colloquial in German, while

      After flood comes the ebb, after ebb comes the flood,
      The dikes, they hold; sometimes bad, sometimes good.

sounds rather poetic and serious. Or take the image of "wandering dunes" wandering from Greenland to Belgium, over the Atlantic Ocean! And how this statement is slightly weakened by a laconic "Well, nearly" ^^ A joke doesn't really work when you explain it, but when you hear it and instantly know how it is meant, it is quite funny. And by the way, don't underestimate its regional popularity just because the rest of Germany may not be familiar with it. This song is nothing less than the inoffical anthem of North Germany ;)


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküst
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 05:28 PM

Traveler, I've no idea where you live. Where I grew up and still live (Schleswig-Holstein), no self-regarding folkie would touch the song with a bargepole! It's only played on 'folk-style' radio and TV programmes and sung at private parties by people who don't know any better songs.

I'm not denying the lyrics are humorous. However, I don't see any irony or subtlety in it. It's humour of the 'flattest' and most mundane kind, what we call 'Kalauer'. It can't lose in translation because there isn't anything to be lost in the first place.

IMHO, of course.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: alanabit
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 12:24 AM

The parrot is now...


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: Rafflesbear
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 03:26 PM

Norcsalordie had a couple of brief german tours including concerts at a camp site where they were staying and where they became well known

The first year they went and sang Wild Rover and were told about the german version by the audience. The next year they sang the first verse of Wild Rover then switched to the Klaus + Klaus version to a huge cheer

the words may be daft but it is immensely popular


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: Mysha
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 07:19 PM

Hi,

Well, something sometimes gets lost when translation is too literal. Maybe this will get the idea across - somewhat modified translations and the last bits and pieces (hoping that my brethren from the other side of the Ems will forgive me):


At the North Sea coastline

In a time long forgotten, it once came to be
That we Frisians expanded along the edge of the sea
Since then we have lived on the fat of the land
And if you meet us today, you'll see we still expand

At the North Sea coastline, at Low Germany's end.
You'll find fish in the water, and not on the land.

After flood comes the ebb, after ebb comes the flood,
The dikes, they protect us, unless they do not
The dunes, they all wander, on the strand, to and fro
From Greenland to Flanders, or more or less so

At the North Sea coastline, at Low Germany's end.
You'll find fish in the water, and not on the land.

Seals are cuddly, like puppies, but they always lament
That a seal is unable, to wag its rear end
The sheep bleat like stupid, for as long as they like
And with their dark green droppings, they'll decorate the dike

At the North Sea coastline, at Low Germany's end.
You'll find fish in the water, and not on the land.

At the North Sea coastline, at Low Germany's end.
You'll find fish in the water, and not on the land.

At the North Sea coastline, at Low Germany's end.
You'll find fish in the water, and not on the land.


Probably should be:
"At the North Sea coastline (splash, splash, splash, splash), at Low Germany's end."

Bye
                                                                Mysha


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: GUEST,Ken Hunt
Date: 15 Dec 09 - 08:36 AM

Hitherto unmentioned, there's a pun in the line about waggling the tail because Schwanz also means 'prick'. The pun works in Frisian, Platt (Low German) and High German. Agree with Suzanne, no self-respecting folkie is likely to sing it but then Frisian is a different kettle of fish bait. Ken


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: Mysha
Date: 15 Dec 09 - 11:17 AM

Hi,

Of course, whether "tail" can be read as "penis", isn't really a language issue. Many languages share this, but whether the one can be used for the other does seem to depend on the environment you're in; in a way it might be part of certain sociolects. I've yet to hear "wag his tail" or "sein Schwanz wedeln" be used with that meaning, though, so I didn't bother about it. Then again, I don't speak those sociolects mentioned above.

Self-respect is of course the characteristic that allows you to make fun of yourself. So, I'd say few folkies are likely to sing this unless self-respecting; not really different from non-folkies, but then, that probably holds for The Wild Rover as well.

Bye
                                                                Mysha


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: GUEST,Traveler
Date: 07 Feb 10 - 04:07 PM

@ Susanne
It could be a rural vs. urban thing, but I rather think that it is a question of the appropriate setting. Quite similar to "Viva Colonia": You won't have trouble to find people who can't stand it, and you can't say it is sung at every occasion. But if the mood and the time is right, then it's quite a popular and well-known song. Even those who eagerly claim they never listen to such music then show that they are mysteriously familiar with the lyrics right from the start - at least when they've drunk a few beers. A phenomenon one can observe regarding many "Schlagers", by the way. Just don't ask people about them as long as they are sober, for you won't get honest statements.


@ Mysha
Wow. Just wow. Your translation is absolutely brilliant! Since its brilliancy renders me almost speechless, I'll just sit here in awe :) Do you want to have your real name mentioned with it if I ever find myself in the situation to provide an English version of that song? I doubt that you will rise to fame, at least not with this song, but one has to give credit where credit is due. It really amazes me how well it works! This can impossibly be your first try to translate a text? I find it extremely difficult to translate a text and always choose the words bearing the right connotations, especially when humour is in play - let alone keeping the rhyming!

OT: You know, there is this hilarious song in the computer game "Monkey Island III" called "A Pirate I Was Meant To Be" (starting about 2:46). They didn't include it in the translated versions, probably due to pressure of time. I've always wondered how a German version of it could possibly look like? So far no attempt is known to me, and I'm not good at this, but you seem to have the talent for it. If you might spare the time for a try? You would be rewarded with admiration from countless nostalgic nerds!


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküst
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 07 Feb 10 - 07:44 PM

Go on enjoying yourselves! I consider the discussion closed. None of the sometimes rather twisted arguments since 14 Dec have been able to change my mind.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseeküste
From: GUEST,just a little help on the song
Date: 20 May 11 - 11:23 PM

Hi Susanne:

well just trying to shed some light here as i was living at the most Frissisch place in Germany, called Wittmund. The first verse has sofar been translated very well.

the second verse, well someone misstook Dünen(dunes) and Dänen(Danes). this part talks about the Danes walking along the shore from Greenland down to Belgium. Which they did a few centuries back while traveling, the easiest way was to go from the north sea, also crossing the Netherlands.

And the third verse is as good a guess as any about the Seals(which if you think bout them always being on their bellies, could make you think as to why they can´t fan themselves with their tales, or move their "Schwanz" around.
While the last verse talks bout sheep gazing stupidly and leaving their droppings around, there is also a game i think it´s called Bossel, or something that sound very similar, which is only known in that part of germany, which consists of throwing around the dikes and brush, balls of various colors, but most noticeably(pardon my grammar), black and green ones, in order to make the harder by being unable to find them once you loose your ball. so they might be talking about the same Frissian people who decorate the dikes with their green/black balls while staring stupidly for them.

hope this was of some help at all, and quite funny to remember such songs


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseekueste
From: eddie1
Date: 21 May 11 - 03:14 AM

And there was me, in my innocence, thinking it was written for a TV commercial for "Nordsee", a chain of fish retailers/cafes in Germany!

Nordsee did have one UK outlet in Reading but it only lasted a couple of years. Guess the Readingensians didn't take to cold fishcakes on rolls although I quite like them!

Eddie


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseekueste
From: GUEST,Desi C
Date: 21 May 11 - 02:49 PM

It's an old theory and like most theories has no real evidence other than some German song has a similar melody which sounds anything but a German melody. Either as often happens some German writer was influenced by or borrowed the Wild Rover tune, as happens with numerous tunes ans is all part of the Folk process to quote Pete Seeger in 'Rise Up singing' as an Irish singer I feel sure it's an original Irish tune


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseekueste
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 21 May 11 - 06:19 PM

Guten tag, Guest.

Vielen Dank for the explanation about the Danes and the green and black balls.

It's nice to hear from someone who's been there.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseekueste
From: michaelr
Date: 21 May 11 - 06:57 PM

well someone misstook Dünen(dunes) and Dänen(Danes). this part talks about the Danes walking along the shore from Greenland down to Belgium.

I think that's nonsense. The line is clearly about dunes.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseekueste
From: Jack Campin
Date: 21 May 11 - 07:32 PM

If "Muss i denn" worked for Elvis, maybe this one will work for Rebecca Black?


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseekueste
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 22 May 11 - 12:35 AM

Now Jack. It says:

The dunes, they all wander, on the strand, to and fro
From Greenland to Flanders, or more or less so

Dunes can migrate inshore and offshore, but they can't migrate across the deep ocean between Greenland and Flanders.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseekueste
From: Mysha
Date: 23 May 11 - 04:30 AM

Hi,

Traveler - Thanks for the compliment. No, "Mysha" would probably do, should that ever come to pass.

Leeneia - You too: Thanks for the compliment, in your case of quoting my translation, rather than the German original lyrics. My line translates what was given in this thread, but on the Internet in general as well the word is commonly quoted as "Dünen" (Dunes), and only rarely as "Dänen" (Danes). The location "on the strand" - "on the beach" if you prefer - matches the German "am Strand". It does not mean "along the beach", so the dunes are migrating locally, rather than starting in Greenland and ending in Flanders. (And note there's a qualification behind it about its preciseness.)

The sport that Just doesn't quite recall is called "Bosseln", which is similar to Road Bowling. I don't think I've ever seen it played along a dike. I would expect, if played there the bright coloured balls would be at rather large risk of deviating regularly from the intended course. I'm willing to learn, however.

Bye,
                                                                Mysha


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseekueste
From: GUEST,Alan Whittle
Date: 23 May 11 - 06:19 AM

If the Germans want to adopt this song, lets get the adoption papers in the post quickly - before they change their mind.


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseekueste
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 23 May 11 - 11:47 PM

Ah, Alan.

Do you, too, think that "No it's nay, nay, never, nay, never no more!" is a feeble attempt to make a short song fit a long tune?


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Subject: RE: Wild Rover a German song? - an der Nordseekueste
From: GUEST,Alan Whittle
Date: 24 May 11 - 02:16 AM

I think its a great song. Wonderful even. Ron Kavana used to do a lovely version of it. Where is that guy?

You can't blame the Germans for being inspired to tinker with it.


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