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Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'

MGM·Lion 06 Sep 11 - 03:46 PM
Smokey. 06 Sep 11 - 04:09 PM
Noreen 06 Sep 11 - 04:47 PM
Smokey. 06 Sep 11 - 05:12 PM
Smokey. 06 Sep 11 - 05:59 PM
Doug Chadwick 07 Sep 11 - 02:09 AM
JennieG 07 Sep 11 - 03:09 AM
GUEST,CrazyEddie 07 Sep 11 - 03:23 AM
MartinRyan 07 Oct 11 - 04:11 AM
MGM·Lion 07 Oct 11 - 04:26 AM
McGrath of Harlow 07 Oct 11 - 02:54 PM
Mo the caller 08 Oct 11 - 06:18 AM
McGrath of Harlow 08 Oct 11 - 09:38 AM
Kevin Sheils 08 Oct 11 - 09:47 AM
GUEST 14 Sep 15 - 05:04 AM
Jim Carroll 15 Sep 15 - 03:42 AM
GUEST,Peter Laban 15 Sep 15 - 05:06 AM
Jim Carroll 15 Sep 15 - 06:52 AM
akenaton 16 Sep 15 - 05:21 AM
GUEST 08 Apr 17 - 05:38 AM
Thompson 08 Apr 17 - 01:38 PM
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Subject: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 03:46 PM

"My God: 11 o'clock already and not a whore in the house dressed" ~

Used particularly by women behind time, according to Nigel Rees and Eric Partridge; to which, Rees reports, correspondents added such locutions as, "and not a po emptied, and the street full of [Spanish/Swedish] sailors."

Neither can give an origin of this formulaic catchphrase-complaint. I bet someone on Mudcat will know. And has anyone any significant variants from above version[s]?

~Michael~


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: Smokey.
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 04:09 PM

My mother used to say "...and not a pot washed".


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: Noreen
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 04:47 PM

My mother used to say "...and not a child in the house washed".

I think it was an Irish expression.



Don't know anything more on it than that, though.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: Smokey.
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 05:12 PM

I had always assumed it was a quotation, either literary or music-hall. It would be interesting to hear any other variations.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: Smokey.
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 05:59 PM

I remember another, though more generally indicating procrastination: "...and this won't knit the baby a bonnet".


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 02:09 AM

..... and not a dish washed.


DC


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: JennieG
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 03:09 AM

Smokey, my late FIL used to say "this won't buy the baby a new frock".

Cheers
JennieG


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: GUEST,CrazyEddie
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 03:23 AM

"What? Six O'Clock, and not a child in the house washed yet!"

Occasionally "And the last bus gone, and no-one on it!" would be added, (often by another speaker).


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: MartinRyan
Date: 07 Oct 11 - 04:11 AM

".... , not a child in the house washed and the sailors on the town"


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 07 Oct 11 - 04:26 AM

Glad to see this thread of mine refreshed after a month away. I would point out that my OP asked ~~

"Neither {Rees or Partridge] can give an origin of this formulaic catchphrase-complaint. I bet someone on Mudcat will know. And has anyone any significant variants from above version[s]?" ~~

and the result above has been many interesting variants {pt 2 of my query}, for which thanks to all posters; but no suggestions as to origins, my main enquiry.

Anyone?

~M~


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 07 Oct 11 - 02:54 PM

You'll never find an origin - even if you found it was in a book somewhere, you can be sure someone will find an earlier variant...


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: Mo the caller
Date: 08 Oct 11 - 06:18 AM

If Mudcat can't find an origin how about asking Susie Dent on Countdown (which is a UK tv game show with letters and numbers. Susie gives us an 'origin of words' in spot each show).


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 08 Oct 11 - 09:38 AM

Terry Wogan is wont to use "not a child in the house washed", and that's probably given it wider provenance. I suspect if you looked around you'd find it cropping up in some 19th century novel, but I would suspect any author using it as quoting it from having heard it. Probably started up as "not a child in the cave..."


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: Kevin Sheils
Date: 08 Oct 11 - 09:47 AM

I recall various pantomime variants.

"6 o'clock and still no Dick"

"Nine months gone and no sign of Aladdin"

Although how widespread, old or genuine I can't say.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Sep 15 - 05:04 AM

I recall another variant 'Eleven o'clock; not a whore in the house dressed and the Russian cavalry in the courtyard'. I have no idea of the source but would love to know.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 15 Sep 15 - 03:42 AM

"I think it was an Irish expression."
I think it was too - a regular saying during my childhood
The term 'whore' is common in Ireland today as one of grudging admiration; such as referring to politicians during the Celtic Tiger years who practiced 'cute whoreism' - Taoiseach, Charles Haughey was proud long-running holder of the title - "A cute whore, that one".
More of a term of abuse, now that the Tiger has lost its teeth.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: GUEST,Peter Laban
Date: 15 Sep 15 - 05:06 AM

Hoors, Jim. Hoors.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 15 Sep 15 - 06:52 AM

I think that's the Irish spelling Peter!!!
Another sying my mother had whan I was taking my time doing what I was asked - "Stop messing about like a whore (hoor?) with a hat on"
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: akenaton
Date: 16 Sep 15 - 05:21 AM

Guest.... That saying, "Eight o'clock an' no' a hoor in the hoose washed" was common in my youth in Scotland, it referred to Late starting at work, a state of un-readiness.

I think it pertained to "hoors" in a brothel being washed and ready to attend their customers.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: GUEST
Date: 08 Apr 17 - 05:38 AM

A marine engineer who sailed with me used to say, "The street full of masters and mates and not a whore in the house washed." He was native of an Irish seaport and had no idea of the origin of the expression. It must have been handed down.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: 'Not a whore in the house...'
From: Thompson
Date: 08 Apr 17 - 01:38 PM

"…not a child in the house washed" is universal in Ireland; I'd guess that this is a daring/alcoholic variant.

Cute hoors (whores) are certainly politicians, developers, bankers, etc in Ireland; the term used to have a grudging admiration, and as Jim Carroll says the admiration waned when the Celtic Tiger lost its teeth. Even now that it's growing a new set of teeth and claws, there's a certain amount of jaw-clamping when the term is used nowadays.


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