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Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'

Shogun 15 Jun 21 - 04:49 AM
GUEST 11 Jun 21 - 06:01 AM
Shogun 08 Jun 21 - 09:05 AM
Shogun 04 Jun 21 - 07:50 AM
Shogun 01 Jun 21 - 03:19 AM
Shogun 28 May 21 - 04:46 AM
Shogun 25 May 21 - 02:44 AM
Shogun 22 May 21 - 04:25 AM
Shogun 18 May 21 - 09:04 AM
Shogun 14 May 21 - 09:43 AM
Shogun 11 May 21 - 04:07 AM
Shogun 07 May 21 - 03:36 PM
Shogun 04 May 21 - 05:42 AM
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Shogun 27 Apr 21 - 03:45 AM
Shogun 23 Apr 21 - 01:51 AM
Shogun 20 Apr 21 - 07:17 AM
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Shogun 16 Apr 21 - 01:21 AM
Shogun 13 Apr 21 - 06:47 AM
Shogun 09 Apr 21 - 10:52 AM
Shogun 07 Apr 21 - 07:01 AM
Shogun 01 Apr 21 - 12:01 PM
Lighter 26 Mar 21 - 01:15 PM
Shogun 26 Mar 21 - 12:34 PM
Steve Gardham 26 Mar 21 - 08:32 AM
Lighter 26 Mar 21 - 08:00 AM
GUEST 26 Mar 21 - 06:51 AM
Steve Gardham 23 Mar 21 - 03:28 PM
Shogun 23 Mar 21 - 09:00 AM
Shogun 19 Mar 21 - 11:10 AM
Steve Gardham 17 Mar 21 - 10:41 AM
Gibb Sahib 16 Mar 21 - 08:30 PM
Steve Gardham 16 Mar 21 - 10:31 AM
Shogun 16 Mar 21 - 06:59 AM
Shogun 12 Mar 21 - 07:07 AM
Lighter 12 Mar 21 - 06:54 AM
Gibb Sahib 12 Mar 21 - 04:26 AM
Shogun 12 Mar 21 - 03:23 AM
Steve Gardham 09 Mar 21 - 04:47 PM
Lighter 09 Mar 21 - 02:43 PM
Shogun 09 Mar 21 - 08:37 AM
Steve Gardham 09 Mar 21 - 07:36 AM
Shogun 09 Mar 21 - 03:43 AM
Gibb Sahib 07 Mar 21 - 10:01 PM
Gibb Sahib 07 Mar 21 - 09:38 PM
Lighter 07 Mar 21 - 04:44 PM
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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 15 Jun 21 - 04:49 AM

097 - Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah! (Wat we doht)


Here is the "Gangspill" or capstan shanty, very popular on german crew ships. A couple of words worth describe from the text: David Straat was well known in Hamburg "Sailortown", where seamen used to congregate at the end of the voyage; The Groote Freiheit is an adjacent street off the Ripabahn.
Stan Hugill took text from "Knurrahan,Seemanslieder und Shanties Musikverlag" Hans Sikorski (1936). After review of text i found couple spelling diferences, for reconstruction i used text from "Knurrahan,Seemanslieder und Shanties Musikverlag".
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 138).




Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah!


Un wenn wi nu na Hamborg Kamt, Denn went wi, wat wi doht,
denn kopt wi een for fiv Penn an'ne, Eck von'ne David-Straat,
   - Hurrah! Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah!
denn kopt wi een for fiv Pennan'ne, Eck von'ne Davidstraat.

               *2*
Un ok de luttje Mary, dat is ne fixe Deern,
Kriegst du de mol det Obends fot, denn kannst di nich besweern.
   - Hurrah! Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah!
denn kopt wi een for fiv Penn An'ne, Eck von'ne David Straat.

               *3*
Un ok de dicke Anna, dat is ne feine Popp,
Kummt Janmaat von lang' Reis' torug, denn passt se em gliks op.
   - Hurrah! Hurrah...


               *4*
Denn goht wi no St. Pauli rop, dor geiht dat lusting her.
Wenn se di seet, denn schreet se all: Du, Fitje, kumm mol her!

               *5*
Un op de Groote Freiheit, wat is di dor en Larm,
Ear du di dat versehn deist, hest gliks ne Deern in'n Arm.

               *6*
Un wenn de Huer verjuchheit is, denn weet ik wat ik do,
Ji kont mi alltosom mol fix, ik go no See hento.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Jun 21 - 06:01 AM

096 - Hourra, Mes Boués, Hourra!



Two french "Hourra" shanty gives us Stan Hugill, this one "Hourra, Mes Boues, Hurra!", can be found in several french collections, Hayet, Bernard Roy, etc..., but Stan Hugill seems to favored Captain Hayet, and decided to give credit of saving this fantastic shanty from oblivion. Jean Loro, one of the friends of Stan Hugill teaches him to sing the second refrain often sung as: "Hourra, mes boues, hourra!". This is a hauling shanty (chanson a hisser).
In comparing to the original text from Captain Hayet "Chansons De Bord"(1934), Stan Hugill gives nine verses instead of the original eleven, also the melody is a little bit different, but keeps the same dynamics of course. Due to the involvement of Jean Loro, I decided to reconstruct Stan Hugill's melody and version, to keep the uniqueness of the song which seems to be known from the personal experience of Stan Hugill.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 137).


Hourra, Mes Boués, Hourra!


Derrière chez nous y'a un petit bois
   - HourRA, mes boues, hourRA!
Cueillis deux fraises, en mangis trois
   - TRA la, la la, la la LA, la la!

                  *2*
Avec une fillett' de quinze ans.
Sa mere arrive au meme instant,

                  *3*
Que faites-vous a mon enfant?
J'suis en train d' lui compter les dents.

                  *4*
Il lui en manqu' une sur le d'vant
Il lui en manqu' une sur le d'vant

                  *5*
Que je lui pose bellement.
Que je lui pose bellement

                  *6*
Il m'en manqu'une egalement!
Il m'en manqu'une egalement!

                  *7*
Donnez-moi z'en, marin galant.
Donnez-moi z'en, marin galant

                  *8*
J'les pose qu'a cells de quinze ans.
J'les pose qu'a cells de quinze ans

                  *9*
Le vieilles pour le commandant!
Le vieilles pour le commandant!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 09:05 AM

095 - Drunken Sailor (B)


This shanty is a very well-known shanty, a typical example of the stamp-'n'-go song or walkaway or runaway shanty, and was the only type of work-song allowed in the King's Navee.
In latter days, in bigger ships with smaller crews, it was mainly used at braces when 'going about' or to hand aloft a light sail such as stays'l - in this latter case it would then be used as a hand-over-hand song.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 135).

Drunken Sailor B


What shall we do with'a drunken sailor?   x3
   - Earleye in the mornin!
   - Way, hay 'n' up she rises!                   x3
   - Earlye in the mornin!

                *2*
Put him in the long-boat till he gets sober.

               *3*
Keep him there an' make him bale her.

               *4*
Trice him up in a runnin' bowline.

               *5*
Tie him to the taffrail when she's yard-arm under.

               *6*
Put him in the scuppers with a hose-pipe on him.

               *7*
Take him an' shake 'im, an' try an' wake 'im.

               *8*
Give him a dose o' salt an' water.

               *9*
Give him a taste o' the bosun's rope-end.

               *10*
Stick on his back a mustard plaster.

               *11*
What'll we do with a Limejuice Skipper?

               *12*
Soak him in oil till he sprouts a flipper.

               *13*
Scrape the hair off his chest with a hoop-iron razor.

               *14*
What shall we do with a drunken solider?

               *15*
Put him in the guard room till he gets sober.

               *16*
What shall we do with the Queen o' Sheba?


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 04 Jun 21 - 07:50 AM

094 - Drunken Sailor (A)

This shanty is a very well-known shanty, a typical example of the stamp-'n'-go song or walkaway or runaway shanty, and was the only type of work song allowed in the King's Navee. This shanty was very popular in ships with big crews when at halyards; the crowd would seize the fall and stamp the sail up.
It is a very old shanty, having been sung in the Indiamen of the John Company. Olmstead gives a version with its tune in his book "Incidents of a Whaling Voyage"(1839) differing very little from the modern accepted one.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 134, 135).



Drunken Sailor (A)

   - Way, hay an' up she rises!
   - Patent blocks o' diff'rent sizes,
   - Way, hay 'n' up she rises!
   - Earlye in the mornin!

What shall we do wi'a drunken sailor? x3
   - Earlye in the mornin!

                *2*
Put him in the long-boat till he gets sober.

                *3*
Keep him there an' make him bale her.

                *4*
Trice him up in a runnin' bowline.

                *5*
Tie him to the taffrail when she's yard-arm under.

                *6*
Put him in the scuppers with a hose-pipe on him.

                *7*
Take him an' shake 'im, an' try an' wake 'im.

                *8*
Give him a dose o' salt an' water.

                *9*
Give him a taste o' the bosun's rope-end.

                *10*
Stick on his back a mustard plaster.

                *11*
What'll we do with a Limejuice Skipper?

                *12*
Soak him in oil till he sprouts a flipper.

                *13*
Scrape the hair off his chest with a hoop-iron razor.

                *14*
What shall we do with a drunken solider?

                *15*
Put him in the guard room till he gets sober.

                *16*
What shall we do with the Queen o' Sheba?


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 01 Jun 21 - 03:19 AM

093 - Horraw For The Blackball Line (solo variations)


This shanty was sung at the capstan or windlass. Stan Hugill in his book apart of the two versions of this spectacular song gives us also additional, three variations of the first solo and refrains. Here they are.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 133).



Horraw For The Blackball Line (variation A)

In the Black-ball Line I served me time,
    - To me way - ay - ay - hay - ho!



Horraw For The Blackball Line (variation B)

In the Black-ball Line I served me time,
    - A.. ah - way - ay - ay, hoo - ray - ya!



Horraw For The Blackball Line (variation C)

In the Black-ball Line I served me time,
    - To me way - ay - ay, hoo, ro, ya!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 28 May 21 - 04:46 AM

092 - Horraw For The Blackball Line (Liverpool Jacks Tune)


This shanty was sung at the capstan or windlass. The Blackball Line of packet ships started in 1816, an American line running between New York and Liverpool. The ships were small roughly 300 to 400 tons. After 1850 was added ships over a thousand tonnes. Here version with the melody a very popular tune with Liverpool Jacks. For this version, I will utilize the first verse from music notation, and verses from page 132 of the first edition from "Shanties From The Seven Seas".
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 133).


Horraw For The Blackball Line (Liverpool Jacks Tune)


I served me time in the Blackball Line,
   - Timme way, hay, a-way, yah!
In the Blackball Line I served me time,
   - Hurraw for the Blackball Line!

                      *2*
Oh, around Cape Horn with a mainskys'l set,
Around Cape Stiff an' we're all wringing wet.

                      *3*
Oh, around Cape Stiff in the month o' May,
Oh, around Cape Horn is a very long way.

                      *4*
It's when the Blackballer is ready for sea,
The sights in the fo'c'sle is funny to see.

                      *5*
There's tinkers and sogers an' fakirs an' all
All ship for prime sailors aboard the Blackball.

                      *6*
Now the packet ship she is crowdin' on sail,
The wind from the south'ard is blowin' a gale.

                      *7*
An' when we git to ol' New York Town,
We'll meet ol' Patrick an' drink till we drown.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 25 May 21 - 02:44 AM

091 - Horraw For The Blackball Line


This shanty was sung at the capstan or windlass. All those shanties with words "Hurrah", "Horray", or "Horraw" in the refrain or chorus were known by sailors as "horraw choruses" and very often was said that "our wild horraw chorus soon raised the mud hook (or hoisted the tops'l)". Here one of the best "horraw horuses" shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 131).


Horraw For The Blackball Line


In the Blackball Line I served me time,
   - To me way, hay, hoo, ro, yah
In the Blackball Line I served me time,
   - Hooraw for the Blackball Line!

             *2*
Blackball ships are good an' true
They are the ships for me an' you

             *3*
That's the Line where ye can shine
That's the Line where I wasted me prime.

             *4*
If yer wish to find a real goldmine,
Just take a trip on a Blackball ship

             *5*
Just take a trip to Liverpool,
To Liverpool that Yankee school

             *6*
Yankee sailors ye'll see there,
With red-topped boots an' short-cut hair.

             *7*
There's Liverpool Pat with his tarpaulin hat,
An' Paddy Magee the Packet Rat

             *8*
There was once a Blackball ship,
That fourteen knots an hour could slip.

             *9*
They'll carry ye along through the ice an' snow,
They'll thake ye where the winds don't blow.

             *10*
I've seen the Line both rise an' shine,
An' crossed the line in 'em many a time.

             *11*
Oh, drink a health to the Blackball Line,
Their ships are stout an' their men are fine.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 22 May 21 - 04:25 AM

090 - Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso


Here another French hauling shanty originally comes from Captain A. Hayet's version (Chansons de Board; 1927). Fortunately, I found the book by A. Hayet mentioned by Stan Hugill. This song is the combination of "Goodbye, Fare-ye-well" and "Blow The Man Down". Unusually consist of four solos and for refrains. H. Jacques says that this shanty was a traditional one among the seamen of the sailing ships which loaded saltpeter in Chilean ports, but the song is much older, potentially beginning of the nineteenth century, sang by whalers of the south seas.
In the comparison process, I did discover some of the musical notations were different than in Stan Hugill's book, so I took precedence of older sources, and for reconstruction used original notes from "Chansons de Board". This shanty I will try to reconstruct in the original version from Captain A. Hayet's "Chansons de Board".

"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 129).




Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso

Hardi! les gars, vire au guindeau
   - Good bye, farewell!
   - Good bye, farewell!
Hardi! les gars, adieu Bordeaux!
   - Hourra! oh! Mexico!
   - Oh! oh! oh!
Au Cap Horn il ne fera pas chaud
   - Haul away, he!
   - Oula tchalez!
A faire la peche au cachalot
   - Hal' matelot
   - He! ho! hisse he! ho!

       *2*
Plus d'un y laissere sa peau
   - Good bye, farewell!
   - Good bye, farewell!
Adieu misere, adieu bateau!
   - Hourra! oh! Mexico!
   - Oh! oh! oh!
Et nous irons a Valparaiso
   - Haul away, he!
   - Oula tchalez!
Ou d'autres laisseront leurs os
   - Hal' matelot
   - He! ho! hisse he! ho!

       *3*
Ceux qui r'viendront pavillon haut
   - Good bye, farewell!
   - Good bye, farewell!
C'est premier brin de matelot
   - Hourra! oh! Mexico!
   - Oh! oh! oh!
Pour la bordee ils seront a flot
   - Haul away, he!
   - Oula tchalez!
Bons pour le rack, la fille, le couteau
   - Hal' matelot
   - He! ho! hisse he! ho!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 18 May 21 - 09:04 AM

089 - As-Tu-Connu Le Per' Lanc'lot


A French version, Stan Hugill learned from Jean Loro, a fine French "matelot" who had sailed in many of the "Borde" Vessels. Mentioned French matelot, Johan Halvorsen sang this shanty at halyards. Stan Hugill added to his version several verses from Captain A. Hayet's version (Chansons de Board; 1927). Fortunately, I found the book by A. Hayet mentioned by Stan Hugill, so I can inform you, that, verses: 1, 4, 6, 7, and 8 come from "Chansons de Board". What is really interesting to many people is why in French shanties (taking into account French cultural independence ), is the English refrain sung? This was because, during the American War of Independence (1775), many of New England's whale ports were blocked by English ships. As a result, many New Bedford whaling families have asked to be moved to Milford Haven and Dunkirk, where they have formed the nucleus of the whaling industry of England and France. This was the reason why many French shanties, especially those sung on whalers, have English choruses.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 127).




As-Tu-Connu Le Per' Lanc'lot


As tu conu le Pere Lancelot?
   - GoodBYE, fa-re-well! goodBYE, fa-re-well!
Qui fail la peche aux cachalots,
   - HourRA! oh, MexiCO-o-o-o!

                      *2*
Il a trois filles qui font la peau,
Il a trois filles qui font la peau,

                      *3*
L'une a Lorient, l'autre a Bordeaux,
La troisieme est a Colombo,

                      *4*
Il donne la goutte a ses mat'lots,
A coups de barre et de guindeau.

                      *5*
Il mange la viande, nous laiss' les os,
Il boit du vin et toi de l'eau.

                      *6*
A la manoeuvre le bosco
Te dresse a coups de cabillot.

                      *7*
Le lieutnant t'envoie la-haut.
A coups de bottes dans le dos.

                      *8*
Et son second qu'est le plus beau,
Si tu groumes te fout a l'eau!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 14 May 21 - 09:43 AM

088 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Norwegian)



This shanty it was sung at the windlass or capstan when raising the anchor. A Norwegian version from Henrik Wergeland "Opsang". This shanty Stan Hugill learned from seamen Johan Halvorsen in port Bergen.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 124).



Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Norwegian)


Maria vet du nu hvorden?
   - Goodbye, fare-ye-well! goodbye, fare-ye-well!
Du nu skal vende din stavn igjen?
   - Horraw, me boys, we're homeward bound!

               *2*
Naar Kanalen vi passet har,
Og Goodvin Sand vi da blir klar.

               *3*
Nu skal vi gaa mot kolde nord,
Og hlem til vores gamle mor.

               *4*
Hun sitter bak de norske fjeld,
Og venter der den lange kveld.

               *5*
Hun venter paa den elskte søn,
Som kommer hjem saa traet av sjøn.

               *6*
Med frisk sydvest det gar galant,
Naar alle seil er sat i kant.

               *7*
Med godt humør og med stor lyst,
Snart ser vi gamle Norgest kyst.

               *8*
Vor Kaptein han befaler saa;
En mand paa utkik straks at gaa.

               *9*
Han alt fra merset roper ned:
'Vi har en lods forut i lae!

               *10*
'Bras forre mersseil bak med hast!
Staa klar, et taug til lodsen kast!'

               *11*
Saa gjør vi godt fast lodsbaaten
'Nu lods, tag I kommandoen!'

               *12*
Nu har vi faat vor lods, vor ven,
Hal forre mersseil fuldt igjen!

               *13*
Nu har vi ombord vor lods
Nu kan vi seile glad vor ko's.

               *14*
Saa seiler vi langs laden frem,
Til Bergen der er vores hjem.

               *15*
Og naar vi er av sjøen kjed,
Vi anker glad paa Bergens red.

               *16*
Lad styrbords anker gaa med hast,
Og gjør saa vores seil godt fast.

               *17*
Den sjette mai vi kom derind,
Vi kom for en sydvestlig vind.

               *18*
Vi haler ind i nummer tre,
Saa faar vi se, hvor det staar te.

               *19*
Paa Tolboden stod piger fem,
De hilste os velkommen hjem.

               *20*
Vor styrmand han befaler saa:
'Vor kjetting agter bringes maa!"

               *21*
I havnen vi nu tørnet er,
Og snart vi hjem til pigerne ser.

               *22*
Men først vi lens i pumpen slaar,
Og dertil vi en shanti faar.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 11 May 21 - 04:07 AM

087 - Ved Ankerhioning

This version of the "Goodbye Fare-ye-well" is mentioned by Stan Hugill on page 124, he says, is this is version which Laura Alexandrine Smith gives us in her "The Music of The Waters" (1888). Usual it is sang as a capstan anchor shanty. L. A. Smith gives also an English translation:

Solo.--" And the kaiser he sat in his castle so high.
Chorus.--Good-bye, fare you well; good-bye, fare you well.
Solo.--His crimson, my boys! we are homeward bound.
Chorus.--Hurra, my boys, We are homeward bound."

I want to make a special thanks to Pawel Paco Kalicinski, who helped me with pronunciation to make it possible to sing this beautiful shanty in the Norwegian language.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 124).



Ved Ankerhioning

Og Keiseren sad paasit Noje Stot.
   - Goodbye, fare you well, goodbye, fare you well.
Hans hoirode Kjole den klarham saa goot.
   - Hurra, my boys, we are homeward bound!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 07 May 21 - 03:36 PM

086 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Singurd Sternvall version)


This version of the "Goodbye Fare-ye-well" is mentioned by Stan Hugill on page 124, he says is this is a Swedish version in "Sang under Segel", and gives us one verse without chorus lines. In big effort and great luck I found this original mentioned book: Singuard Sternvall's "Sang under Segel" (1935), so now I can sing this mentioned shanty in full 5 verses length. Also, I will use the original music took from this beautiful book. The original comment to this song in "Sang under Segel" says:

"A very old gang song: sing in my time mostly as a halyard shanty".

So here we go, this version different from than previous five versions from Stan Hugill's book will be not a capstan shanty only a halyard shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 124).



Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Singurd Sternvall version)



Oh, fare you well, I wish you well.
   - Good-BYE, fare you well, good-BYE, fare you well.
Oh, fare you well, my bonny young lass.
   - HooRAY, my boys, we are HOMEward bound!

                *2*
Oh, don't you hear the Old Man say:
"We are homeward bound this very day".

                *3*
We are homeward bound and I hear the sound.
So have on the windlass and make it come round.

                *4*
Our anchors aweigh and our sails they are set,
and the girls we are leaving, we leave with regret.

                *5*
She is a flash clipper packet and bound for to go,
with all boys on the towrope she cannot say no.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 04 May 21 - 05:42 AM

085 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (odd verses collection)

This shanty it was sung at the windlass or capstan when raising the anchor. Collection of the culled odd verses to this version are from other shantymen - mainly German and Scandinavian. I think their enough verses to sing them together as a separate version. I used a slightly different melody mentioned by Stan Hugill, after version D.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 123, 124).



Goodbye Fare-ye-well (odd verses collection)


At home there waits mother, an' Susie an' Flo,
   - Goodbye, fare-ye-well! goodbye, fare-ye-well!
With all o' them pulling she's sure to go.
   - Horraw, me boys, we're homeward bound!

                  *2*
We're loaded down with sugar and rum,
The sails they are set and the wind she has come.

                  *3*
Our ropes are now taut and our sails they are full,
She spreads out her wings like a herring-back gull.

                  *4*
We're homeward bound with a roaring breeze,
We're homeward bound, so the Old Man says.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Apr 21 - 03:15 AM

084 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (D)


This shanty was sung at the windlass or capstan when raising the anchor. Verses to this version are the version from "The Dreadnought". I used a slightly different melody mentioned by Stan Hugill, after this version (version D), in the text, he mentioned, is that some of the seamen sang the first few bars this way.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 122, 123).



Goodbye Fare-ye-well (D)

'Tis of a flash packet - a packet o' fame,
   - Goodbye, fare-ye-well! goodbye, fare-ye-well!
She's a rorty flash packet an' the "Dreadnought's" her name.
   - Horraw, me boys, we're homeward bound!

                  *2*
She's bound to the west'ard where the salty winds blow,
Bound away in the "Dreadnought" to the Pierhead do flock.

                  *3*
It's now we are leavin' the sweet salthouse Dock,
Where the boys an' the girls on the Pierhead do flock.

                  *4*
They give three loud cheers while the tears freely flow,
Bound away in the Dreadnought to the west'ard we'll go.

                  *5*
It's now we are sailin' on the wild Irish shore,
Our passangers all sick, and our new mates all sore.

                  *6*
Oh, it's now we've arrived on the Banks o' Newf'n'land,
Where the bottom's all fishes an' fine yeller sand.

                  *7*
Where the fishes they sing as they swim to an' fro,
She's a Liverpool packet--O Lord let 'er go!

                  *8*
Now we're a-runnin' down the Long Island shore,
Where the Pilot will board us as he's done oft before.

                  *9*
Then back yer main tops'l raise yer main tack also,
Bound away to the west'ard in the Dreadnought we go.

                  *10*
It's now we've arrived in ol' New York once more,
Where I'll see my dear Sal, oh, the gal I adore.

                  *11*
I'll call for strong liquors an' married we'll be,
Here's a health to the Dreadnought where'er she may be.

                  *12*
Here's a health to her Ol' Man an' officers too,
Here's a health to the Dreadnought, to the west'ard we'll go!

                  *13*
This song was composed when the watch went below,
Bound away in the Dreadnought, to the west'ard we'll go!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Apr 21 - 03:45 AM

083 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (C)


This shanty was sung at the windlass or capstan when raising the anchor. Verses to this version are the 'Milkmaid' theme (see 'Blow the Man Down' page 210, first edition, of the "Shanties from the Seven Seas"). Is worth mentioning, that Stan Hugill disagreed with collectors and writers who hold a theory that homeward-bound songs were never debased by sailors. This version is an example of excerption from this theory (the "Milkmaid" version was entirely obscene). To recreate this song, I will use melody, heard on Stan Hugill's record, from the album "Chants des Marins Anglais" (1992), with Stormalong John.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 122).



Goodbye Fare-ye-well   (C)


Oh, as I wuz a-rollin' down Ratcliffe Highway,
   - Goodbye, fare-ye-well! goodbye, fare-ye-well!
A pretty young maiden I chanct for to see.
   - Horraw, me boys, we're homeward bound!

                *2*
Oh, where are ye goin' to, my pretty maid?
I'm going a milkin', kind sir, she said.

                *3*
Oh, have ye a sweatheart, my pretty maid?
'I'm lookin' for one, kind sir,' she said.

                *4*
Then may I come wid ye, my pretty maid?
'Well, yes, since ye axed me, sir,' she said.

                *5*
'But I guess yer a bad one, kind sir,' she said.
'Ye want for to love me, but yer don't want ter wed,'

                *6*
Jack took her in tow, an' away they did go,
The bulls did a grunt, an' the cows did a low.

                *7*
They came to a haystack but the maid she wuz shy,
They backed and they filled an' heaved many a sigh.

                *8*
The haystack capsized an' Jack got all bent,
With hay in his gaff-tops'l, his breeches all rent.

                *9*
So he left her a-sittin' a-lookin' forlorn,
An' shipped to the south'ard away round Cape Horn.

                *10*
Now, all ye young sailors that round the Horn sail,
Don't take a young milkmaid away from her pail.

                *11*
Or else ye'll regret it an' wish ye were dead,
So don't go a-courtin' in a haystack for a bed.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 23 Apr 21 - 01:51 AM

082 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (B)


This shanty was sung at the windlass or capstan when raising the anchor. Verses to this version have been taken from the old forebitter "Homeward Bound". To recreate this song, I will use melody, heard on Stan Hugill's record, from the album "Chants des Marins Anglais" (1992), with Stormalong John.
Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 121, 122).


Goodbye Fare-ye-well   (B)


Wer're homeward bound I heard them say,
   - Goodbye, fare-ye-well! goodbye, fare-ye-well!
Wer're homeward bound to Liverpool Bay
   - Horraw, me boys, we're homeward bound!

                   *2*
Wer're homeward bound to Liverpool Town,
Where them gals they will come down.

                   *3*
An' when we gits to the Salthouse Dock,
Them pretty young gals on the pierhead will flock.

                   *4*
An' one to the other ye'll hear them say,
Here comes Johnny with his tree years' pay.

                   *5*
Then we haul to the 'Bull an' the Bell',
Where good liquor they do sell.

                   *6*
In comes the landlord with a smile,
Saying, 'Drink up, lads, while it's worth yer while!'

                   *7*
But when the money's all spent an' gone,
Not even a cent for to call yer own,

                   *8*
In comes the landlord with a hell o' a frown,
It's 'Get up, Jack--let John sit down.'

                   *9*
Then poor ol' Jack must understand,
There's ships in port all wanting hands.

                   *10*
An' he'll pack up his sea-chest and get under way,
The gals he has left they can take his half-pay.

                   *11*
We're homeward bound don't ye hear the Mate say?
We're homeward bound--the anchor's aweigh!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 20 Apr 21 - 07:17 AM

Here Link to the above song, (please if admin can replace it)

081 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (A)


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 20 Apr 21 - 07:15 AM

081 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (A)

EN
Here the most popular homeward-bound shanty of them all, with, perhaps, the exception of "Rolling Home" - "Goodbye Fare-ye-well".It was sung at the windlass or capstan when raising the anchor. Stan Hugill knows and publishes four versions of this song. This version is about usual homeward-bound sentiments. I try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill's version from the album "Chants des Marins Anglais" (1992), with Stormalong John.
Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 120, 121).


Goodbye Fare-ye-well (A)


Oh, don't yiz hear the Old Man say?
   - Goodbye, fare-ye-well! goodbye, fare-ye-well!
Oh, don't yiz hear the Old Man say?
   - Horraw, me boys, we're homeward bound!

                               *2*
We're homeward bound to Liverpool Town,
Where them judies they will come down,

                              *3*
An, when we gits to the Wallsey Gates,
Sally an' Polly for their flash men do wait.

                              *4*
An' one to the other ye'll hear them say,
Here comes Johnny with his fourteen months' pay!

                              *5*
Them gals there on Lime Street we soon hope to meet,
Soon we'll be a-rollin' both sides o' the street.

                              *6*
We'll meet these fly gals an' we'll ring the ol' bell,
With them judies we'll meet there we'll raise merry hell,

                              *7*
I'll tell me old mammy when I gets back home,
The gals there on Lime Street won't leave me alone.

                              *8*
We're homeward bound to the gals o' the town,
Stamp up me bullies an' heave it around.

                              *9*
An' when we gits home, boys, oh won't we fly round,
We'll heave up the anchor to this bully sound.

                              *10*
We're fine flashy packet an' bound for to go,
With the gals on the towrope we cannot say no!

                              *11*
We're all homeward bound for the old backyard,
Then heave, me bullies, we're all bound homeward.

                              *12*
I wrote to my Kitty, she sez she is well,
She rooms at the 'Astor' and dines at the 'Bell'.

                              *13*
Heave with a will, boys, oh, heave long an' strong,
Sing a good chorus for 'tis a good song.

                *14*
We're homeward bound, we'll have yiz to know,
An' over the water to England must go!

                *15*
Oh, the anchor we'll weigh and the sails we will set,
The gals we are leaving we'll never forget.

                *16*
An' when we git to the old Mersey Bar,
The girls'll be flockin' from near an' from far.

                *17*
We're homeward bound don't ye hear the Mate say.
Hook on the ol' catfall an' rum her away.

                *18*
We'll spend all our money in one week a shore,
An' then pack our bags--go to sea for some more.

                *19*
We're homeward bound don't ye hear the sound?
Man the good capstan an' run 'er around.

                *20*
We're homeward bound an' the wind's blowin' fair,
Our friends will be waiting to spend our pay-day.

                *21*
We're homeward bound for home, sweet, home,
Our sails are set, the wind has come.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 01:21 AM

080 - Hurrah, Sing Fare Ye Well - (WITH PRESENTATION)


Here the hauling song resembling this latter somewhat is "Hurrah, Sing Fare Ye Well!" Whall calls it "O Fare Ye Well, My Bonnie Young Girl". Stan Hugill's version, with perhaps a few more regular verses than usual, obtained from an old Liverpool seaman. Normally there was one pull in the refrain on the second syllable of "Hurrah".
Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 119).


Hurrah, Sing Fare Ye Well

Sing fare ye well me bonny young gal,
   - HurRAH! Sing fare ye well!
Sing fare ye well, oh, fare ye well,
   - HurRAH! Sing fare ye well!

               *2*
We're bound away to Callyo,
Oh, fare ye well, me Liverpool gal,

               *3*
I may cime back th ye some day,
With a spanking' big fat pay-day.

               *4*
But when we get to Callyo,
I'll git me a nice bit o' Dago,

               *5*
As I walked out one mornin' fair,
I met a puta standin' there.

               *6*
She winked at me I do declare,
Black as night was her raven hair.

               *7*
She was a Spanish beauty bold.
Her name was Carmen, so I'm told.

               *8*
Oh, fare ye well, we're bound away,
We're bound away this sailing day.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 13 Apr 21 - 06:47 AM

079 - Goodbye, My Love, Goodbye

Here the hauling shanty. Tozer and Colcord give a version, the former giving a set of very sentimental verses which Stan Hugill, he fell sure to have been made up. C. F. Smith sees in it a resemblance to "Shallow Brown”.
Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 118).


Goodbye, My Love, Goodbye


I,m bound away to leave yer,
   - GoodBYE my love, goodBYE!
I never will deceiver yer,
   - GoodBYE my love, goodBYE!

            *2*
I'll leave you my half pay, Sue,
White-stocking Day soon will be due.

            *3*
Have a drink on me, my dearie,
For waiting's mighty weary.

            *4*
We're bound away to 'Frisco,
Oh, cut her strings an' let 'er go!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 09 Apr 21 - 10:52 AM

078 - Bound To California

EN
This is capstan shanty of the Gold Rush Period, of which Miss C. F. Smith has found and published in her "A Book of Shanties" (1927). She mentions, that Captain J. L. Vivian Millett, from whom she had it, remembers hearing it sung at Algoa Bay, in the days when anchorage off that port was still crowded with sailing ships.
" ...A big vessel was just getting up her anchor; she had a good shanty crowd, and the chorus roared out by a score of voices came over the waters of the open roadstead with an unforgettable effect".
Unfortunately, Captain Millett could only give to Miss Smith the chorus of this shanty.
Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 118).



Bound To California


Good-bye, my lads, good-bye,
No one can tell me why
I am bound to California
To reap the shining gold!

Good-bye, my lads, good-bye,
No one can tell me why
I am bound to California
To reap the shining gold


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 07 Apr 21 - 07:01 AM

077 - Susannavisan (Stan Hugill Translation)


EN
In the case of this song, Stan Hugill again mentioned the source "Sang under Segel", Sigurd's Sternwall's Swedish shanty book (Reference to its being sung at the capstan is to be found in the Preface, page 12). From this book, Stan Hugill gives us two verses and melody to this beautiful song, the construction of the verses is really close to Stephen Foster's version of "Oh Susanna".
Additionally, worth noting this version is a personal translation of Stan Hugill, so I think it deserves to singing it.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 117).


Susannavisan (Stan Hugill Translation)

Oh, I was born on Sweden's Coast,
Where the fine ships sail along,
And a fine ship was my heart's desire,
Since I was very young.

But the first time that he went aboard,
He kissed me tenderly,
And unto me he said these words,
'You are all the word to me.'

   - Oh, Susanna, now don't ye cry for me,
   - Be faithful to your sailor boy
   - Till I come home from sea.

             *2*
On a long voyage he went away,
I sat alone and sighed.
And when the wind was howling wild,
'Tis oft at night I cried.

But when the tears ran down my cheecks,
My sailor boy came home.
He sang to me in deep content,
From these arms I'll never roam.

   - Oh, Susanna, oh, don't ye cry for me,
   - I'm homeward bound to you at last,
   - And now I'm safe with thee.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 01 Apr 21 - 12:01 PM

076 - Susannavisan

EN
In the case of this song, Stan Hugill again mentioned the source: "Sang under Segel", Sigurd's Sternwall's Swedish shanty book (Reference to its being sung at the capstan is to be found in the Preface, page 12). From this book, Stan Hugill gives us two verses and melody to this beautiful song, the construction of the verses is really close to Stephen Foster's version of "Oh Susanna". Unfortunately, I couldn't find the "Sang under Segel", but what I do found is another book "Flottans Män Malmö visbok" (1942). In this book, I found another two verses of this great song, so my reconstruction will contain four verses. In „Flottans Män Malmö visbok”, I found another two verses of this great song, so my reconstruction will contain four verses.
I want to make a special thanks to Kim Hansson, Pontus Wallgren and Steve Simpson who helped me with pronunciation to make it possible to sing this beautiful forebitter in the Swedish language.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 116).


Susannavisan


Jag är född vid gamla Sveriges kust,
där den stolta skutan går,
och den stolta skutan, var min lust
från jag blott var sjutton år.

Men den första gång han gick ombord,
kysste han mig ven och huld,
och han sade vänligt dessa ord:
"Du är allt mitt hjärtas guld".

   - O Susanna, gråt inte för din vän,
   - men bli mig alltid städse tro,
   - tills jag kommer hem igen!

               *2*
På den långa resan drog han bort,
jag satt ensam. O, min skatt!
Och när vädret det var riktigt hårt,
låg jag vaken mången natt.

Men när tåren bittert flöt på kind,
kom min sjöman hem i hamn
och så sjöng han med ett nöjsamt sinn´,
då han tryckte mig i famn:

   - O Susanna, gråt inte för din vän!
   - Jag gungat har uppå böljan blå,
   - och här har du mig igen.

               *3*
Och så talte vi så månget ord,
Vi förglömde storm och blåst,
Men en dag han sa: "Min tös, jag tror,
Vi behöver snart en präst.

Jag får ta en tur på två års tid,
Men är lyckan med din vän,
Kommer jag med rik'dom åter hit,
Och vi går till prästen hän.

   - 0, Susanna, gråt dock ej för mig!
   - Jag till Kalifornien far
   - Och gräver guld för dig."

               *4*
I ett litet hus vid kusten bor
Vi som lyckligt äkta par.
Han kom hem igen, han höll sitt ord.
Fyra raska barn vi har.

Han går icke mer på resor, nej!
Men när stormen rasar vild,
Han till barmen älskligt trycker mej
Och så säger han så mild:

   - "O, Susanna, mitt allt, min fröjd och lust,
   - Där finns ej man så glad som jag
   - På hela Sveriges kust!"


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Lighter
Date: 26 Mar 21 - 01:15 PM

Shogun, feel free. Just spell my name right.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 26 Mar 21 - 12:34 PM

I do apologise, everyone, that my Oh, Susanna was posted when I'm not logged in, but I'm sure everybody recognized my routines :)

Lighter
If you not mind I will include your comment in the description of this beautiful Forebitter.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 26 Mar 21 - 08:32 AM

Along with Titanic and a few naval ships, all good examples of 'The bigger they come, the harder they fall.'


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Lighter
Date: 26 Mar 21 - 08:00 AM

New York Daily Herald (June 24, 1852):

"Boston, June 22...The new clipper ship Sovereign of the Seas, now lying in your port, is the largest merchant ship in the world."

So begins an extended advertising description of the vessel.

"Sovereign" was wrecked August 6, 1859, on the Pyramid Shoals in the Straits of Malacca.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Mar 21 - 06:51 AM

075 - Oh, Susanna

EN
Another song from the time when the Gold Rush of 1849 happens was "Oh, Susanna". Stan Hugill says, is that this song never been in print, with exception of Miss Colcord's fragmentary version listed in her book as a fo'c'sle song.

So this what Joanna C. Colcord gives us in her book (Songs of American Sailormen" - 1938, in the "Roll & Go" - 1924, in both books we can find, the same amount of verses):
"It was singular that with all the vast pride and delight of the sailor in his ship, so few songs were sung in celebration of the qualities of individual vessels. There was about California clipper "Sovereign of the Seas", which went to the same tune as the 'forty-niners' song"...
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 116).



Oh, Susanna



Holystone the cabin,
And get down on your knees,
None of your limejuice touches,
In the Sovereign of the Seas!


   Oh, Susanna,
   Darling, take your ease,
   For we have beat the clipper fleet,
   The Sovereign of the Seas!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 23 Mar 21 - 03:28 PM

Unfortunately there appears to be no evidence whatsoever that it was written by a sailor. Going by what we now know of the likely origins of the bulk of the chanties the greater likelihood is that the song was put together on a Mississippi steamboat and found its way on board ships by way of the Gulf ports, along with the other 'fireman' chanties.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 23 Mar 21 - 09:00 AM

074 - The Sailor Fireman

EN
This song was already in print in 1950 in a book called "Nigger Melodies; being The Only Entire and Complete Work of Ethiopian Songs Extant" (Cornish Lamport & Co., New York, 1850, 2488., illustrated frontis, VG).

Stan Hugill states are that this song may be the key to the origin of the verse of "Sacramento" and Foster's "Camptown Races". The original title of this song is "I'LL FIRE DIS TRIP", and according to Stan Hugill's research, originally has been written by a sailor who for the first, and probably the last time, tried the hard work of a fireman.

The version of this song in Stan Hugill's book comes from Sigurd Sternvall's "Sang under Segel" (1935). I decided to sing the original text of this song from "Nigger Melodies; being The Only Entire and Complete Work of Ethiopian Songs Extant", printed over one hundred and seventy years ago (page 168, 169), it has slightly different lyrics, compared to this, what Stan Hugill's gives to us. "Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 115).



The Sailor Fireman (I'll Fire Dis Trip)

I'll fire dis trip but I'll fire no more,
   - Oho. oho, oh!
Oh, pay me my money, and I'll go on shore,
   - Fire down below

             *2*
Miss Fanny Bell, oh, fare you well,
I'm going away p'r'aps to -----

             *3*
A bully-boat, and a bully crew,
And a bully-raggin' captain too,

             *4*
De posom jump and de panther roar,
I woke dis morning at half-past four.

             *5*
I creep out safely from my hive,
And took a dram at half-past five.

             *6*
Says I, ole boat, let's have no tricks,
Her biler bust,—at half-past six.

             *7*
So now we trabel under sail,
'Cause Jonah's de man dat swallow'd de whale.

             *8*
I'll fire dis trip, but I'll fire no more,
Pay me my money and I'll go on shore.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 11:10 AM

073 - Heisevise (Norvegian Wergland version)


This song was sung as a capstan anchor shanty, especially when raising the "mud-hook".
Stan Hugill has given us a funny story about an uncensored, Norwegian version of this song. It is a conversation of old Norwegian sailors:
'Do you remember how the Norwegian version of this shanty went?'
'I do, but... it is too horrible! What we sang is now better forgotten!'
'yes, that is so, ... Let's give Wergland's bowdlerized version instead ...'
Stan Hugill mentioned about seventeen verses of the original Wergland's version, in fact, I found actually was 25 of them. I found the full version of this great capstan shanty on Henrik Wergland's "Folkeviser"(1849). Special thanks to Arne B Petersen, to help with the learning of the ancient Norwegian dialect pronunciation.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 112).



Heisevise (Norvegian Wergland version)


Overt Land af Godt og ondt har Sit.
   - Ota Hayti, Ota Hayti!
Jeg holder nu paa Norge mit.
   - In the Ota Hayti, ho!

   - Blow, boys, blow for Californio,
   - There is plenty of gold, so I am told,
   - On the banks of Sacramento.

             *2*
Om Sjelland flød som Grød i Smør -
Jeg meer af mager Frihed gjor.

             *3*
Var Jylland selv en Fleskeskank,
den kjøber jeg for Norges Bank.

             *4*
Ja heller Frihed uden Fleft!
En feed og smørret Trældom best !

             *5*
I Sverrig var jeg og til Gjæst.
Hver finder sig nok hjemme bedst.

             *6*
I Stockholms Borg boer Kongen godt.
I Norge er hver Barm hans Slot.

             *7*
I Ruøland Kneijer Byg og Rug ;
men Slaven kryber paa fin Bug.

             *8*
I Polen vorer Hampen svær.
Gud hjælpe Den, som klager der !

             *9*
Hollaenderen har guld endnu
Menei en nordmands muntre hu.

             *10*
Han sidder over Glasset stur .
Sligt stemmer ci med vor Natur.

             *11*
Og aldrig stjænker han sin Ven.
Med ham jeg deler Skillingen.

             *12*
St. Paul gjør Engelskmanden krij.
Snehættend Top gaaer heit i Sky.

             *13*
Den Londong Luft er mørk og tæt.
Men hjemme aander jeg saa let .

             *14*
Hurra for Britten ! Han er fri,
og dygtig Sømand jo som Vi.

             *15*
I Frankrig fode Druer groe.
Vi drikke hjemme bem iro.

             *16*
En Franskmand har fit hvide Bred .
Mit sorte gie'r mig Marv og Kjod.

             *17*
For Republiken flod hans Blod.
Men Thronen staaer dog hvor den stod.

             *18*
Han frister vel endnu engang.
Da skal han faae en Æressang.

             *19*
I Spanien Laurbær groe som Lyng.
Men pas dig der for Dolkesting !

             *20*
Der vorer gylden Appelsin.
Den bringer jeg Allerkjæresten min.

             *21*
Og hvor jeg foer dybt i Levant,
min norske Hjemvce dog mig fandt.

             *22*
J.Torreviz og Setuval
Jeg mindedes min Fædredal.

             *23*
Jeg mindedes min Faders Huus,
og tog iland et Glædeßruus.

             *24*
Og hvorsomhelst dets Frihedédag
laae Skuden stolt med Norges Flag.

             *25*
Og Portugis og Spaniol
Singsallijoh!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 17 Mar 21 - 10:41 AM

Sorry yes, I did.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 16 Mar 21 - 08:30 PM

"or thereabouts"

Do you mean Tahiti? ;)

Here's a Norwegian group's rendition.

Ota Haiti


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 16 Mar 21 - 10:31 AM

I think Otaheite was the old name for Hawaii or thereabouts. I wonder if there is some connection.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 16 Mar 21 - 06:59 AM

072 - Sacramento (Norvegian English worded version)

EN
This song was sung as a capstan anchor shanty, especially when raising the "mud-hook".
Stan Hugill has given us a funny story about an uncensored, Norwegian version of this song. It is a conversation of old Norwegian sailors:
'Do you remember how the Norwegian version of this shanty went?'
'I do, but... it is too horrible! What we sang is now better forgotten!'
'yes, that is so, ... Let's give Wergland's bowdlerized version instead ...'
Unfortunately, Stan Hugill Did not provide more verses, to this great song.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 112).



Sacramento (Norvegian English worded version)


Now we are leaving here, shipmate,
   - Ota Hayti, Ota Hayti!
Soon shall we see the Golden Gate,
   - In the Ota Hayti, ho!

   - Blow, boys, blow for Californio,
   - There is plenty of gold, so I am told,
   - On the banks of Sacramento.

             *2*
Oh, heave and weigh the anchor light!
The flying-fish is swimming tight.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 12 Mar 21 - 07:07 AM

Gibb Sahib

"Der ...", it is interesting because He didn't this mistake on "De Hoffnung", but, I just did follow the title from the book, but you know me, I will be careful with German titles in the future.

I never tried kööm, but in Scotland, it is really hard to refuse Single Malt and any other stuff, is not really much comparable :)

Lighter

It is very possible the next books that take my attention after I do finish with "Shanties From the Seven Seas", will be Harlow ones.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Lighter
Date: 12 Mar 21 - 06:54 AM

Steve, I've checked Harlow, and I must say that's it difficult to tell whether his comment refers to what he calls "Barnacle [sic] Bill" or to the succeeding "Priest and the Nuns." The part about "painting the town red" better fits "BB," but the paragraph structure seems to direct attention to what follows.

He does identify The P&N, however, as used at the "pumps." And indeed it had never been in print before.

Harlow's posthumous book is sort of a hodgepodge and clearly in unfinished condition.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 12 Mar 21 - 04:26 AM

"Kööm gev dat blots an Wiehnachtsobend." hehe :)

Hugill has
"Kööm geev bloss an'n Wihnachtsabend."

kööm* - gives - only - on-a - Christmas-eve

Admittedly, Hugill's spelling are haphazard, as Platt is not standardized.

I think he is mistaken by giving the title as "DER Hamborger Veermaster" when it should be "DE Hamborger Veermaster." I don't think "Der" exists in Platt.




*Hugill freely translates kööm as "rum," but it's a terrible, terrible liquor (IN MY HUMBLE OPINION) which is famous in Hamborg. I still have some on my shelf because I could not bring myself to finish it!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 12 Mar 21 - 03:23 AM

071 - Der Hamborger Veermaster

This song was sung as a capstan anchor shanty, especially when raising the "mud-hook".
The low German version, very popular from known to every German sailing-ship man, was sung aboard the German four-masted barque Pamir as late as1951. Thanks to Gunnar Weigant, to help with the learning of the "Platt Deutsche" dialect pronunciation.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 112).



Der Hamborger Veermaster


Ick heff mol en Hamborger Veermaster sehn,
   - To my hoodah, to my hoodah!
De Masten so scheef as den Schipper sien Been.
   - To my hoodah, hoodah, ho!


   - Blow, boys, blow for Californio,
   - There is plenty of gold, so I am told,
   - On the banks of Sacramento.


                            *2*
Dat Deck weer von Isen, vull Schiet un vull Smeer,
Dat weer de Schietgäng eer schönstes Pläseer.

                            *3*
Dat Logis weer vull Wanzen, de Kombüs weur vull Dreck,
De Beschüten, de leupen von sülven all weg.

                            *4*
Dat Soltfleesch weer gröön, un de Speck weer vull Maden,
Kööm gev dat blots an Wiehnachtsobend.

                            *5*
Un wulln wi mol seil'n, ik segg dat jo nur,
Denn lööp he dree vörut und veer wedder retur.

                            *6*
As dat Schipp, so weer ok de Kaptain,
De Lüd for dat Schipp weern ok blots schanghait.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 04:47 PM

Hi Jon,
Those comments appear to be referring to the previous chanty, 'Abel Brown'. I can't find any comment on 'The Priest and the Nuns'. I would remember if I'd seen the story somewhere as the plot is obviously sexual euphmism, of which I collect examples.

The chorus does seem to be more continental, and again it is too much like a ballad to have been used as a genuine chanty.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Lighter
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 02:43 PM

Steve, Harlow gives the text and tune of a unique ribald song called "The Priest and the Nuns," which is set in Austria and has a very German-sounding tune and lyrics that may have been translated from some Continental source. I haven't seen it elsewhere.

He notes that he doubts "very much whether *this* song was ever in print, but it was a popular pumping chantey in early days."

That seems to imply that he heard it himself aboard Akbar in 1876-77, but his information is just as likely to be second-hand.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 08:37 AM

Steve Gardham

Maybe somebody from Mudcat Caffe seen this song in full somewhere, so I can sing it in full! So if anyone can help, please, please do it.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 07:36 AM

The couplet looks like the start of some bawdy ballad, but the refrain looks like something from an 18th century broadside. Either way, hardly chanty material.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 03:43 AM

070 - Sacramento (Version from German barque Gustav)

This song was sung as a capstan anchor shanty, especially when raising the "mud-hook".
A Rabelaisian German version that we sang aboard the four-masted barque Gustav. So unfortunate is that Stan Hugill did not give us more stanzas and it is the only English translation of the German origin, but refrain parts are really rare and beautiful.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 112).



Sacramento (Version from German barque Gustav)


Oh, a monk one day from his monastery went,
   - To me fal-la, to me fal-la!
His head all shaven and his gown all rent,
   - To me fal-lal, lal-lal, la!

   - Blow, boys, blow for Californio,
   - There is plenty of gold, so I am told,
   - On the banks of Sacramento.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 10:01 PM

Sorry for my confusion!: I see now that it was Patterson's "hauling" one that Hugill gave. I thought, from what Shogun was saying, that Hugill gave the capstan one. I misread / misinterpreted.

"If Stan Hugill gave this song as another version of "Sacramento", the usual capstan shanty, why he didn't provide the first matched type example? And he gave another "Hauling one instead. "

Because the strange hauling version was precisely what was notable / weird in Patterson, which Hugill wanted to note. He had already given capstan versions, and he wanted, for the record, to also note that it was possible there had also been a hauling version, based on Patterson. Though as Lighter notes, he expressed skepticism, too. (My preference would have been he just ignored it since it is so suspect. I mean, I would certainly note it in a discussion, but in a published work I would not include it... these days, reviewers/editirs would probably compel me to be more concise and leave out such tangential things, or I'd just put a footnote: "It's possible there was a hauling version, based on one source, but the issue with this source is XYZ.")

Also adding here: Colcord cites Patterson in her bibliography. So I, for one, am convinced that Colcord took the "cocktail flows" line from Patterson.

Maybe if I'm free later I'll try to find where else I've seen the "cocktail" line...


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 09:38 PM

I don't have the inclination to go on a hunt to solve the mystery of Patterson, and I hope people will forgive that, as a disclaimer. My bias is that I think Patterson is not a helpful source for documenting the history of chanties. While I was certainly familiar with the Patterson source, I believe I excluded it from my _Boxing the Compass_ because I thought it was too tangential to the story of writing about chanties.

Having made that disclaimer, I *have* noticed that Patterson's random (IMO) verse about "where the cocktail flows" turns up in writing elsewhere. Colcord is one place, but I know there is another. Because, again in my opinion, this is a random (extemporized) sounding verse, which I would doubt had currency with many singers, I suspect there were some shenanigans going on, of writers copying from other publications. "Who copied whom?" is not the question I'm inclined to research (there are bigger fish to fry). But I mention it in reaction to what Lighter said about verses not being good. And to say: I'm less inclined to speculate that Patterson made up verses and more inclined to believe he copied them from print sources. I find it very hard to believe, in light of all other data about chanties, that Patterson's "hauling chanty" was something that was sung, but all I can speculate as an alternative is that he read somewhere that "Sacramento" could also be a hauling chanty and he tried to imagine how that might be. (Why it wouldn't just be the usual song minus the grand chorus is puzzling.) At least Hugill knew not to put Patterson's "hauling" version in his book!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Lighter
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 04:44 PM

In one place Hugill actually expressed skepticism of Patterson's versions, even though he quoted them.

I've no doubt at all that Patterson, who did spend some time on shipboard, randomly "improved" some of his texts, though some of the lyrics are senseless enough to be real, if extemporized.

Why he did so, I don't know, since the extra choruses aren't even interesting! (Davis did a much better job of prettifying!)


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 04:02 PM

Gibb Sahib

Yes, I had more issues with this shanty. The first issue was, is that Stan Hugill gives a description of this song and the first verse, but he seems to treat this shanty for capstan. So I did found the original book, and... My very eyes were even bigger when I discovered not one only two, songs one described as: "this song as 'Capstan.'", and another labeled: "The same: as a hauling chanty'". My question is:
If Stan Hugill gave this song as another version of "Sacramento", the usual capstan shanty, why he didn't provide the first matched type example? And he gave another "Hauling one instead.

About the type of hauling, well I did approach the other way round, probably will be harder if I knew Patterson was a poet. So my approach was: here shanty, you figure out how it works, and in first thought was must be halyard. So option, in this case, was, one pulse a chorus line, or one in first and two in second, and this option with tweaked of accent was work, and kinda match intuitively for me. The funny story I called to my mentor and friend Simon Spalding, and in the first thought, He has exact same intuition :)

What I also discover in Stan Hugill's book, he sometimes gives not exact titles of reference books, so sometimes it complicates things for me.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 06 Mar 21 - 10:59 PM

Shogun,

That seems like a very unlikely halyard song, ha! Good job trying to figure something out! I have no idea how I would know to work (haul) with that. It's so complicated. My thinking is: 99 or so percent of "halyard" chanties have the same form, so why would we have these kind of outliers? The other 1% are "short drag" or "hand over hand" form used at halyards, or else, theoretically, the regular halyard form yet with only 1 (rather than 2) pulls per chorus.

I figured Patterson was just a poet, who was including some chanty texts in his anthology of sea-themed poetry. It doesn't look like he really knew chanties or else, if he did, he changed what he knew to appear as "literature" for readers.

Here is one of many places where I think Hugill had no business quoting a source. Hugill, I think, should have been more critical of sources like this instead of saying (as it seems) "I found some verses in a book and I'll just accept them to be a quality representation of chanty tradition."

Hugill threw in "everything but the kitchen sink," as if to try to be thorough, but in actuality (my opinion) creating confusion by not being more judicious.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 06 Mar 21 - 04:54 PM

069 - Banks Of Sacramento (Patterson Halyard version) - (WITH PRESENTATION)

EN
Patterson's version is like Patterson's shanties, unusual. The first difficulty is that Patterson in his book doesn't give us music. In almost every his shanty he inserts short refrains where usually no refrain existed. Stan Hugill says that Patterson called his shanty 'hauling song', and gives us one stanza, but is not entirely true, because Patterson (J. E. Patterson "The Sea's Anthology" 1913) labeled this song as 'Capstan.' and give three verses, and after these three verses, he gives another 4 verses under the label "The same: as a hauling chanty'". So this song will be 'hauling song', particularly the Halyard shanty Capstan version I will sing separately.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 112).



Banks Of Sacramento (Patterson Halyard version)


Now, my lads, get your beds and lie down
    - With a HOOdah!
Now, my lads, get your beds and lie down
    - With a HOOdah, hoodah-DAY!

Blow, boys, blow, for Californi-O
    - With a HOOdah!
There's plenty of gold, so I've been told,
   - On the BANks of Sacramen-TO!

                     *2*
We came to a land where the cocktail flows
    - With a hoodah!
We came to a land where the cocktail flows
    - With a hoodah, hoodah-DAY!

Blow, boys, blow, for Californi-O
    - With a hoodah!
There's plenty of gold, so I've been told,
   - On the BANks of Sacramen-TO!

                     *3*
We came to a river where we couldn't get across
    - With a hoodah!
And the plenty of gold, as I'll have you told, Was a bully, bully loss
    - With a hoodah, hoodah-DAY!

Blow, boys, blow, for Californi-O
    - With a hoodah!
There's plenty of gold, so I've been told,
   - On the BANks of Sacramen-TO!


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