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BS: The other recipe thread is too long

Related thread:
BS: Recipes - what are we eating? (2562)


Mrrzy 15 Feb 22 - 11:38 PM
Steve Shaw 16 Feb 22 - 12:23 PM
Steve Shaw 16 Feb 22 - 12:25 PM
Stilly River Sage 16 Feb 22 - 12:46 PM
Steve Shaw 16 Feb 22 - 12:59 PM
Mrrzy 16 Feb 22 - 08:10 PM
Steve Shaw 16 Feb 22 - 08:59 PM
Mrrzy 19 Feb 22 - 11:01 AM
Stilly River Sage 19 Feb 22 - 11:44 AM
Mrrzy 19 Feb 22 - 02:15 PM
Steve Shaw 15 Mar 22 - 09:51 PM
Jon Freeman 15 Mar 22 - 10:09 PM
Steve Shaw 15 Mar 22 - 10:14 PM
Jon Freeman 15 Mar 22 - 10:31 PM
Mrrzy 16 Mar 22 - 04:25 PM
Mrrzy 16 Mar 22 - 05:29 PM
Stilly River Sage 16 Mar 22 - 05:53 PM
Steve Shaw 17 Mar 22 - 06:54 AM
Steve Shaw 26 Apr 22 - 04:01 PM
Steve Shaw 26 Apr 22 - 05:30 PM
Mrrzy 01 May 22 - 01:54 PM
Charmion 01 May 22 - 07:34 PM
Steve Shaw 01 May 22 - 08:00 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 May 22 - 11:32 PM
Steve Shaw 02 May 22 - 05:25 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 17 May 22 - 01:31 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 17 May 22 - 01:56 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 May 22 - 11:56 AM
Stilly River Sage 18 May 22 - 12:46 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 May 22 - 12:57 PM
Steve Shaw 18 May 22 - 04:11 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 May 22 - 04:17 PM
Stilly River Sage 18 May 22 - 05:21 PM
Steve Shaw 18 May 22 - 06:49 PM
Mrrzy 23 May 22 - 10:46 AM
Stilly River Sage 23 May 22 - 11:08 AM
Stanron 23 May 22 - 11:41 AM
Steve Shaw 23 May 22 - 11:49 AM
Steve Shaw 23 May 22 - 11:54 AM
Stanron 23 May 22 - 02:02 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 23 May 22 - 03:12 PM
Stanron 23 May 22 - 03:42 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 23 May 22 - 03:53 PM
Steve Shaw 23 May 22 - 04:57 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 23 May 22 - 05:08 PM
Steve Shaw 23 May 22 - 06:02 PM
Stanron 23 May 22 - 06:33 PM
Steve Shaw 23 May 22 - 07:33 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 30 May 22 - 05:06 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Jun 22 - 10:51 AM

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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 15 Feb 22 - 11:38 PM

Hey, hobo packet ideas? [Food in foil packets cooked on campfire]


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 16 Feb 22 - 12:23 PM

Get a nice big sheet of strong foil (could double it up). Scrub some waxy potatoes. Don't peel them but cut them into bite-size lumps. In a bowl, toss them in olive oil and seasoning. You could add some smoked paprika. Maybe a little pinch of dried oregano. Break a bulb of garlic into cloves but leave the skins on. Toss them in with the oily spuds. Wrap them securely in the foil (not too many together: could use more than one packet...). They can go in the embers or on the barbie (or even in the oven). Timing can be tricky but a good half-hour should do it. You might want to support the foil packs on an old oven tray or on a grill to stop them from accidentally coming open.

They're great, and sucking the soft, sweet middles out of the garlic cloves is a joy. I do a similar thing on a big tray in the oven, but with smaller pieces of spud uncovered and with a sprig or two of rosemary. I've been known to use Cajun seasoning for a change instead of the herbs and paprika. Don't leave out the garlic!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 16 Feb 22 - 12:25 PM

I should have said that the garlic cloves can be added in after about 15 minutes. They don't need as long as the spuds.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 16 Feb 22 - 12:46 PM

The halibut I had last night could be fixed in one of those "hobo packets." Double the foil, as Steve suggests.

I put a little dab of olive oil in the bottom of a Pyrex personal-size baking container (substitute the foil) then place a thawed piece of wild-caught Costco halibut (you can't get it fresh enough in Texas to make it worth trying to buy fresh instead of frozen). Slice a few strips of onion (I always seem to have a partial onion in a container in the fridge, so this is slicing a from one side of a half, creating strips, but you could do a whole round slice and break it up). A quick grind of black pepper, then apply a couple of tablespoons of sour cream (drop it around in spots on top of the onion) then sprinkle over some dried dill. Bake it about 20 minutes until it's finished (I put it in a toaster oven at 350o and let it rest in that oven for another 10 minutes or so after it finished baking.) I add a little salt after it is finished baking.

If you've spread out the onion pieces enough and the dabs of sour cream enough you can pick up a bit of everything in each flaky bite. Mmmmm!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 16 Feb 22 - 12:59 PM

I've cooked fish in foil lots of times, mostly skinless fillets, and this year I intend to try it on the barbie. Last year I bought up, in a sale, a supply of special foil bags with little windows in, big enough to fit enough fish for two. The fish goes in with some butter, seasoning, a sprig of lemon thyme and a squeeze of lemon juice, maybe a hint of fresh garlic (you could steep a bashed clove in a spoonful of olive oil and just put the oil in the bag, though I still want the fat to be mostly butter), then you fold the bag shut. It's about 20 minutes in the oven but it should be a bit less on the barbie. I've cooked tuna steaks on the bars but most other fish tends to fall through. I have a cast iron plate that fits over half of the grill on my Weber 2200 barbecue, but it's the devil to clean after cooking fish on it.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Feb 22 - 08:10 PM

Can't do taters, but hmmm, fish sounds yummy.

I worried that fish would be too delicate but feel reassured about that now.

I worry that the ground meat ideas I've been reading about, without the taters most recipes have but I can't, will make grease rather than gravy.

Speaking of taters, ever heard of mille-fries? Mandoline-thin taters layered like pommes anna but baked, *then* pressed while cooling, then the cooled cake is sliced, and the slices are deep-fried.

Drooling like Homer, now...

Homer Simpson, that is.

Back to hobo packets: recipes recommend against double foil, glad y'all think that's rubbish.

The idea as I read is bottom is a grease, then your protein, then your veg on top, seal well but leave room for steam? I would also dollop butter on top of the veg? Would that be bad?

Thanks!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 16 Feb 22 - 08:59 PM

Just bloody eat taters...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 19 Feb 22 - 11:01 AM

Steve, you know I can't. If I eat carbs, my mental health goes out the window.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Feb 22 - 11:44 AM

There are many substitutes of cauliflower for potatoes (mashed, etc.) but I can't see it as a regular thing. But maybe it would work for you?

And there are lots of types of potatoes. I wonder if some of the waxier ones might be better than a Russet, for example?

The double foil is just because. It seems more secure.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 19 Feb 22 - 02:15 PM

I am going to try ground yak, zucchini, cherry tomatoes and mushrooms. It is a hobo pack party, I will report back.

Dithering between snail [garlic parsley] butter and goose fat for the grease. Will add salt, pepper, and if I opt for goose grease, thyme and marjoram...


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Subject: RE: FITNESS & Declutter 2022 - Pandemic redux
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 15 Mar 22 - 09:51 PM

Gosh, I've never removed seeds from tomatoes...

In Italy they grow San Marzano tomatoes, big plum-shaped ones, that have hardly any seediness in the middle, for making sauce. I tried growing them here last summer but they caught every blight, wilt and rot under the sun (unlike my Sungold cherry toms, which get the blight but fight through it really well). We don't really have a great climate for tomatoes in Cornwall, what with cool summers, occasional windiness and high humidity. Many years ago I grew tomatoes successfully outdoors just outside London, where it's a bit drier and warmer than Cornwall.   

We're on covid-19 tenterhooks here, due to a friend-of-a-friend being with the friend and the friend then being with us, all unbeknowns. We are testing every day and keeping away from people if we can, though we spent several days in blissful unawareness. We reckon to be safe by Friday if the tests are all negative. I've looked all the timings up today.


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Subject: RE: FITNESS & Declutter 2022 - Pandemic redux
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 15 Mar 22 - 10:09 PM

After a couple of bumper crops of suitable tomatoes, I got a food mill to try to help processing. I've never had similar crops since to put it to much use.

I want well ripened plum tomatoes (I usually try Roma VF but San Marzano would be an alternative) for this. I love the salad varieties (eg. Ailsa Craig) I also try but, for me, they don't have the right taste for a worthwhile sauce or soup.


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Subject: RE: FITNESS & Declutter 2022 - Pandemic redux
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 15 Mar 22 - 10:14 PM

Tell you what, Jon. I use cans of Waitrose Essentials plum tomatoes to make tomato sauce and they make superb sauce. They're grown in southern Italy where they can get them much riper than we can here. Cheap too!


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Subject: RE: FITNESS & Declutter 2022 - Pandemic redux
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 15 Mar 22 - 10:31 PM

Interesting idea. I'll have to give canned plum ones a try some time.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Mar 22 - 04:25 PM

Bon courage, Steve Shaw.

Looked up ideas for swordfish and asparagus and ended up with another hobo packet. Snail butter and halved cherry tomatoes. Cooking from frozen, so will get lots of juice.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Mar 22 - 05:29 PM

Reporting: yummy but took *much* longer to cook than not packaging it.

I'd'a thought the extra pressure would make it cook faster, but the foil probably kept it from the heat source.

Toaster oven.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 16 Mar 22 - 05:53 PM

When foods are wrapped or covered you bake them at a higher temperature; the cover or wrap keeps them from burning or drying out. It's a tradeoff from baking uncovered lower. If you bake chicken in just a pan, I'd use 350o but covered, at 400o.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 Mar 22 - 06:54 AM

This is not a recipe but a heads-up to all Brits who love the best things in life. Waitrose are selling boxes of six pastéis de nata (Portuguese custard tarts). They come frozen, they cost four quid and they are of the Unearthed brand. You just heat them from frozen in the oven for 20 minutes and let them cool down. In our 'umble they are the best example of this heavenly little confection that we've found in this country, and begod we've looked hard. We scoffed them obsessively a few years ago during a week in Madeira (which is a bit of Portugal, of course), which started a lifetime's love affair. We haven't found them cheaper either.

I understand that they are the very devil to make from scratch, so here's my answer!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 26 Apr 22 - 04:01 PM

Sometimes, simple is beautiful. It's peak Jersey Royal season and they are in tip-top condition. A quick scrub, a 25-minute boil in salted water, drown in butter... We had them tonight with rashers of streaky bacon, grilled to just short of crisp, and my organic spring greens, coming to the end now but infinitely superior to those scruffy bags of supermarket greens, cut into strips and steamed for a few minutes. Do not go easy on the butter. Mrs Steve doused hers with Heinz tommy-k, but I like my bacon pristine...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 26 Apr 22 - 05:30 PM

I've just found out that you can't buy Jersey Royal potatoes outside Jersey and the UK. In m'humble they are by far the finest new potatoes you can buy. I remember an occasion in Bury, gotta be forty or fifty years ago. We'd rolled out of the pub after a jolly fine piss-up, and there in Kay Gardens was a chap selling hot potatoes in paper bags from his little wagon. They were Jerseys, all hot and salty. Bejaysus, I can taste them still. Only three things in life are certain: birth, death and the fact that that chap is now sitting at the right hand of his Father in heaven...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 01 May 22 - 01:54 PM

Ok, salmon soup:

Frozen salmon fillets, rinsed and dried.

Preheated toaster oven to 450F. Foil on oven thingie, twice as big as needed. Make edges with the foil. Lots of olive oil on bottom. Salmon filets, skin side up. Peeled and pithed lime sliced, small onion sliced, and a whole buncha plum tomatoes yellow and orange, cut in half. Pile on top, add marjoram, garlic powder, hot pepper sprinkles, fold extra foil over, in oven 20mn. Flip fish onto top of everything, another 20 mn with foil covering then a last 10 without.

Put fish in bowl. Remove lime slices and squeeze juice into bowl, then toss what is left of the lime. Use foil to pour rest into bowl onto fish.

Eat before cleaning up the mess the attempt to move everything in the foil made.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 01 May 22 - 07:34 PM

Mrrzy, that salmon dish looks boffo.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 May 22 - 08:00 PM

Well if I have a piece of really good salmon I want to fry it in butter for about six or seven minutes and have it with new potatoes, steamed greens and a simple sauce. In fact, we've had that this very week.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 May 22 - 11:32 PM

I can't tell you how long the salmon sautés, but it is in butter with a little granulated garlic and a grind of black pepper. Fry fish slide down first, then turn and finish on the skin side. Maybe 5 minutes. Salmon, like beef, doesn't need to be cooked till it's dry.

I've been playing with onion bagels and dry salami lately - toasting the bagel halves then putting a layer of sausage around one half and a slice of provolone and some thin slices of onion on the other. It put it under the broiler to melt the cheese and heat the rest. I need to figure out a good sauce to go with it. Maybe something like thousand island?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 May 22 - 05:25 AM

My favourite fish of all is red mullet. It's a small fish and the fillets aren't big, so we allow for three each minimum. The recipe I use comes from the BBC programme "Rick Stein's Cornwall" and was in episode 11 in series one. We have the fish on top of a pile of "confit potatoes" with some dabs of black olive tapenade.

The potatoes need to be waxy ones that won't fall to pieces: I used Jersey Royals this time but you can use Nicola, Charlotte or something like that. No need to peel. The spuds are cut into very thin rounds. I haven't got a mandoline but a sharp knife does the trick very well. I put them in a bowl with a goodly amount of extra virgin olive oil, salt and pepper, chopped garlic (not minced) and fresh thyme leaves. I got my hands in there to get the slices thoroughly coated, then spread them out in a single layer, or as near to a single layer as possible, on a big oven tray. If you haven't got a non-stick tray they'll stick like mad, so I suppose they could go on to greaseproof paper. I ease the pain by using more than one tray. The potatoes go into a hot oven (200C) for about 15 minutes.

The fish takes a scant five minutes. Get extra virgin olive oil in a frying pan hot. Dip the skin side only in plain flour, put the fillets in the pan skin side down (they do need to sizzle), season lightly on top and fry for three minutes, by which time the skin should be bubbling up golden and crispy. They need just a very quick fry on the top side, then they are served on top of a pile of the potato slices, skin side up. Just a few little dabs of the tapenade dotted around, and voila. A little sprinkling of freshly-chopped parsley on top adds a touch of class.

It's easy to make the tapenade by blitzing some black olives with extra virgin olive oil, seasoning and some chives, but to be honest the little pots that M&S sell are just as good.

I might try this with other fish that comes in thin fillets. I have some wild sea bass fillets in the freezer or I could try some dabs. I'm fussy about sea bass because most of what's caught is either farmed (and very inferior) or trawled, which damages the sea bed and results in a lot of by-catch. We're lucky to have a chap round here who catches the bass in his small boat with rod and line, who then supplies it to our fishmonger. It's superb fish.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 17 May 22 - 01:31 PM

I think one disadvantage of being single is that I can only have a limited variety of fresh vegetables in the fridge - otherwise, I don't get through them in time and hate to waste. Thus, weekly, I always buy large flat/Portobello mushrooms & iceberg lettuce (one "leaf" per day and a bit of cold water before going back in the fridge and they last for quite a while); then, for variety, I'll choose a different third veggie - radish, celery, pak choi, cauliflower, etc.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 17 May 22 - 01:56 PM

...not sure if I could afford a leggy blond veggie lover, these days?!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 May 22 - 11:56 AM

And a new one for me on my last shop - crispy seaweed thins; having read on the packet that they contain vitamin B12 (often lacking in vegan fare). I've cut it up with scissors and fried it with the above mushrooms and some soy sauce - on toast...a nice taste of the sea without any fish.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 May 22 - 12:46 PM

In order to lose some weight in the leadup to knee surgery I've started eating mostly fruits and vegetables, with occasional lean proteins like scrambled eggs, skinless chicken breast, etc. Wild caught salmon. Small amounts of cheese. I find that if I use a sharper flavored on like one in the Parmesan family (there are several cheeses that are hard and sharp and grated over food) I can get more bang for my cheese buck. Spooning some homemade Italian tomato sauce over a slice of chicken breast and topping it with Parmesan is keeping me on track (alternate day fasting). The goal is to take weight off of the knees and losing weight is also recommended to solve hip bursitis.

For now I've taken the wine out of my dinners, and I've eliminated most of the bread from my diet. On those alternate eating days I'll have a bagel or a slice of pizza, but keep it there.

This isn't permanent, but it is an acknowledgement that as I get older my diet has to change. And though it might be counterintuitive, I took some of the extra supplements out of my diet and find I have more interest in the fruits and vegetables. I find I reach for them first. Supplements apparently quash the cravings for foods that are sources of natural vitamins and minerals (see the writings of Mark Schatzker, a science writer for the Harvard medical community.)


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 May 22 - 12:57 PM

Agree, SRS, on losing weight for, in your case knee surgery (hope that goes well), and in my case, last year, long-lasting metatarsal pain in my club-foot.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 May 22 - 04:11 PM

My mum might have imposed cod liver oil capsules on me when I was a little lad. Other than that, I've never taken any supplement. I want to get all I need from a mixed diet of the best ingredients I can afford, and I'll eat everything (except apple sauce: yuk). I'm wary of going short of Vitamin D in winter but the fortified cereals I eat, the oat milk and the countless eggs I consume, maybe, do the trick...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 May 22 - 04:17 PM

Apple sauce is okay...but I think I'd rather a cider; to eat an apple these days, I must have a knife as the bottom teeth are a tad loose.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 May 22 - 05:21 PM

Those my doctor wants me to take are vitamins D and B-12. I have a low dose of iron along with a couple of prescriptions. I take fiber capsules and a probiotic (inexpensive acidophilous). The surgeon's list includes a couple of others, and when this is through I'll drop the extra ones.

I'm aiming at fruits and vegetables of different colors to help get a spectrum of micronutrients.

My brother recently told me about how he had a blood test showing a low level so decided to cut his cholesterol medication in half. After the next test showed it still low, he dropped it completely, and has been about to stay off of it. But he was rather deliberate in his approach.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 May 22 - 06:49 PM

First things first, I would never ridicule or criticise anyone who chooses to use supplements. But looking at the current wisdom on daily vitamin/mineral requirements, as far as I can see it there is some difficulty in obtaining vitamin B12 for SOME people, depending on what they choose to exclude from their diets. That would apply mostly to vegetarians or vegans. There is an issue with vitamin D for people who can't or won't expose their skin for a few minutes a day to the sun in spring, summer and autumn. The winter months could be a problem, but many cereals and non-milk milks are fortified, and there are always eggs and mushrooms. Older women with reduced bone density must, obviously, consider their position. Folic acid could be an issue for people who rely on ready meals and who don't eat greens.

If you eat a varied diet and avoid faddy ideas, you are going to get all the vitamins and minerals you need with a typical western diet (make that Mediterranean and you've definitely cracked it). And the rather inconvenient fact is that the supplements industry is ruthless and cynical and will sell you for many dollars/pounds what it costs them pennies to make. To my mind, we need a lot more regulation to prevent companies from promoting as health-giving useless rubbish such as glucosamine, chondroitin and "probiotics" (sorry, Maggie, but the evidence simply isn't there...)


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 May 22 - 10:46 AM

Misread that tapenade recipe as having M&Ms in it. Ewww.

Tried a savory pie with almond flour crust. Worth the try. Not doing it again soon.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 May 22 - 11:08 AM

As an older woman with bone density issues, vitamins B-12 and D3 are on my list of "must take" from my doctors, and they do blood tests to be sure the levels are high enough. The rest of it is subjective (the only other one you mentioned I take is probiotics - I take a simple lactobacillus because I don't eat yogurt every day.)

My elderly Labrador retriever gets a daily dose of glucosamine and chondroitin because the vet's Rx dogfood that contains extra is way expensive. I give him a good quality OTC dogfood for elderly dogs and supplement to bring it up to the level in the vet food. A lot of things we know about human health was initially tested by vets in our pets. I don't know if vets were ahead of the curve with the arthritis treatments, but it is of interest to a lot of people. You may be skeptical of their efficacy, but there is a lot of ongoing research looking into it.

Many American foods have supplements added, and in some instances, it is overkill. And I can't think of the last time I ate a box of commercial cereal. I don't eat many processed foods that have extra vitamins added. I use a little bit of milk, that has vitamin D, but that's about it.

This is a recipe thread, and one recipe for poor health is too much processed food.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stanron
Date: 23 May 22 - 11:41 AM

Does anyone here add dried chilli flakes to a pot of black coffee? Just a few. Maybe half a dozen to ten for a pot for three cups. Too much would be a disaster and too few and you wont notice.

It's not actually sweet to taste but it does add some of the 'notes' of sugar, but none of the carbs and none of the chemical worries of artificial sweeteners.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 May 22 - 11:49 AM

OK, I'll just say this, then I'll stick to recipes. Before that last post I did a lot of delving into the evidence, making doubly sure that I avoided websites that might have hidden connections with the supplements industry. It was not off the top of my head. Tonight, I have leftover cooked new potatoes from yesterday. I may incorporate them into a tortilla or I may make a cheese omelette and just have the spuds sautéed in butter on the side. There will be a nice salad alongside, whichever I do. Tried, tested and trusted!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 May 22 - 11:54 AM

I never take sugar in tea or coffee. I use dried chilli flakes a lot but I've never thought of putting some in coffee. I'll drink espressos or lungos unadorned, or I'll froth up some full-cream milk to make a cappuccino or a flat white. Our bean-to-cup machine went bang a few months ago so we replaced it with a Sage Creatista Nespresso machine which has a steam wand. Life is good!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stanron
Date: 23 May 22 - 02:02 PM

Milk, cream and other white stuff sort of soften the bitterness in coffee. Sugar kind of brightens it. A small amount of chilli brightens it in a different way. I seem to remember reading that the Aztecs, or was it the Mayans, added chilli to coffee way back then. I can't claim to have invented it.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 23 May 22 - 03:12 PM

Cocoa maybe Stanron - coffee originates in Ethiopia, where they have a formal coffee ceremony, similar to the Japanese with chado (the way of tea).

I think timely given Roland Garros is on, just the other day I tried heating half a cup of soya in a pan, then adding it to half a cup of boiled water, with my usual amount of coffee and tea - au lait (sort of, anyway)!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stanron
Date: 23 May 22 - 03:42 PM

Oops, well I might have invented it then.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 23 May 22 - 03:53 PM

...anyone game to try Stanron's choffee? I do have some mild chilli powder on my spice shelf...maybe tomorrow?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 May 22 - 04:57 PM

Chilli powder and chilli flakes are not the same thing. The powder has all sorts of other spicy things as well as the ground chilli. Good luck with that!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 23 May 22 - 05:08 PM

...that's true, Steve, but then Indians are not shy when it comes to spicing their tea/chai!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 May 22 - 06:02 PM

I'm a simple man. I want big mugs of builders' tea and I want a simple cup of decent coffee, with or without milk as the fancy takes me. Instant coffee, to me, is the vomit of satan, and big bags of stale ready-ground aren't much better. No sugar, no chilli, no weird additives. I see no point in decaffeinated anything. Same with reduced-fat food. I want to be polluted. Chacun à son goût...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stanron
Date: 23 May 22 - 06:33 PM

I'm not using chilli powder. The ones I use are Birds Eye Chilli Flakes. Birds Eye chillis are are on the hot side, hence the caution. I also add a few, just a few, to a pot of red lentils. . Also recommended.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 May 22 - 07:33 PM

I use chilli powder only for my inauthentic chili con carne. I use chilli flakes a lot in Italian dishes such as arrabbiata and puttanesca and spaghetti with prawns, lemon and rocket. Mostly it's the bog standard Schwartz dried chilli flakes, typically sautéed gently with sliced (not minced) garlic in extra virgin olive oil, but I use dried ancho chillies too which I like to crumble in my hands! I find shop-bought fresh chillies to be unreliable in terms of how perky they are and I regularly underdo it. I'm thinking of growing some this year and I'll see how I get on. Half a green one goes into my roughly-chopped guacamole. They are greenhouse crops in Cornwall. In the last few years, cheap boxes of padron peppers have appeared in shops more and more. I love them fried in hot olive oil until they blister then liberally sprinkled with coarse salt (white wine optional but strongly recommended). These days I cook them outdoors on my little camping stove as they are the world's worst spitty spatterers.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 30 May 22 - 05:06 PM

With the options for vegans getting better by the year (if not by the weekly shop), been enjoying mini plant-based savoury pies from the supermarket - simply heated in the oven while I pan fry mushrooms and spring onions.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Jun 22 - 10:51 AM

The French after a two-hour lunch, with a bottle of Bordeaux, & a café au lait, at Roland Garros: "Anyone for tennis?" :-)


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