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Lyr Req: On Board of a Man-of-War

DigiTrad:
PRESS GANG


Related threads:
Req: The Press Gang (as sung by Ewan MacColl) (4)
(origins) Origins: Aboard a Man o' War (23)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
Press Gang (near equivalent text was noted by E.J. Moeran from James Sutton of Winterton, Norfolk, in 1915; midi made from the notation given in the Journal of the Folk Song Society, Vol. 7, No. 26 (1922).)


Abby Sale 28 Oct 00 - 04:48 PM
Naemanson 28 Oct 00 - 05:50 PM
GUEST,Mark Cohen, at the hospital 28 Oct 00 - 06:18 PM
Liz the Squeak 28 Oct 00 - 06:37 PM
jacko@nz 28 Oct 00 - 07:08 PM
okthen 28 Oct 00 - 08:02 PM
GUEST,Gene 28 Oct 00 - 08:26 PM
raredance 28 Oct 00 - 09:54 PM
Malcolm Douglas 28 Oct 00 - 10:43 PM
raredance 28 Oct 00 - 10:51 PM
raredance 28 Oct 00 - 11:17 PM
Naemanson 28 Oct 00 - 11:29 PM
Malcolm Douglas 29 Oct 00 - 12:13 AM
Abby Sale 29 Oct 00 - 12:38 AM
Garry Gillard 29 Oct 00 - 04:37 AM
Abby Sale 29 Oct 00 - 02:53 PM
Malcolm Douglas 29 Oct 00 - 03:08 PM
Barry Finn 14 Mar 07 - 01:23 AM
Betsy 14 Mar 07 - 11:43 AM
BB 14 Mar 07 - 05:34 PM
GUEST,Edthefolkie 15 Mar 07 - 06:46 AM
GUEST,sqeezeboxhp 15 Mar 07 - 03:44 PM
GUEST,MFer 01 Oct 07 - 01:15 PM
GUEST 01 Oct 07 - 03:29 PM
GUEST,Eoin O'Buadhaigh 16 Nov 16 - 04:05 PM
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Subject: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: Abby Sale
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 04:48 PM

I have the wonderful new Bellamy 3-CD from Camsco records. I think it will take me a long time to go through it but for now, he does one called "The Death Of Nelson."

I feel sure this is a version of "On Board Of A Man-of-war" and find to my dismay that I can't find any text or tune for the latter in my own collection, in DT or other sites. I can only remember the single phrase. At DT, it's only circumstantially referred to as having the same tune as: this message (click) - which is a reference to "A STITCH IN TIME." That song is unharvested and has no tune.

Can any please advise if the two are versions of the same song and of a text for "On Board Of A Man-of-war?"

I thank you.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: Naemanson
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 05:50 PM

Is this the same as Sam's Gone Away:

I wish I was the captain on board a man o' war HEY!
Sam's gone away on board a man o' war

Pretty work, brave boys, pretty work I say,
Sam's gone away on board a man o' war

The "HEY!" is shouted and generally startles the audience the first time through. The actual job changes with each verse. We do it once through straight with traditional verses and each person singing a verse. Then on the second sing through the rest of the group fool around with making up oddball verses. As the leader of the song I pretend to get angry as each foolish verse surfaces.

I finally end it with the traditional verse

I wish there was no use for this bloody man o' war,
Sam's gone away on board a man o' war

Pretty work, brave boys, pretty work I say,
Sam's gone away on board a man o' war


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: GUEST,Mark Cohen, at the hospital
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 06:18 PM

What a fun song that one is to do. Ah, you make me long for my days singing shanties in Portland and Seattle...that's one of the prices of living in Paradise, I guess.

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 06:37 PM

I might have it, I'm too relaxed as a newt to remember where though, sorry.

LTS


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Subject: Lyr Add: ON BOARD A MAN-OF-WAR (from Danny Spooner
From: jacko@nz
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 07:08 PM

ON BOARD A MAN-OF-WAR

Well as I were a-walking a London street
A press gang there I chanced to meet
They asked me if I'd join the fleet
On board a Man-of-War boys

Said I brother shipmates, tell me true
What kind of treatment they gives to you
That I may know before I go
On board a Man-of-War, boys

Well the first thing they did they took me in 'and
They flogged me with the tar of a strand
They flogged me till I could not stand
On board a Man-of-War, boys

Then they 'ung me up by my two thumbs
Then they flogged me till the blood did run
And that's the usage they gave to me
On board a Man-of-War,boys

Well I 'ad a wife and 'er name was Grey
'T were 'er that led me to shocking delay
'T were 'er that caused me to go away
On board a Man-o-War, boys

Ah but if ever I get me feet on shore
To see them London girls once more
I'll never go to sea anymore
On board a Man-o-War, boys

from the singing of Danny Spooner


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: okthen
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 08:02 PM

Abby is this a peter Bellamy song?

I would be interested for personal reasons

cheers

bill


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE PRESSGANG (Cliff Haslam & John Millar
From: GUEST,Gene
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 08:26 PM

Another version

THE PRESSGANG
By Cliff Haslam & John Millar

As I walked down on London street
A pressgang there I chanced to meet
They asked me if I'd join the fleet
On board of a Man-of-War

Come brother shipmates, tell me true
What kind of treatment they give you
So I may know before I go
On board of a Man-of-War

When I got there to my surprise
All that they'd told me was shocking lies
There was a row and some jolly old fights
On board of a Man-of-War

The first thing they done when they took me in hand
They lashed me with a tar of a strand
They flogged me till I could not stand
On board of a Man-of-War

Now I was married and me wife's name was Kate
'Twas she that drive me to this bad state
She that caused me to go away
On board of a Man-of-War

When next I get my foot on shore
To see them London girls once more
I'll never go to sea no more
On board of a Man-o-War

SOURCE: FOLKWAYS RECORDS FH 5275
SEA SONGS & CHANTEYS
SUNG at SEAPORT '76


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE MAN-OF-WAR'S GARLAND
From: raredance
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 09:54 PM

Abbey, it might help to have the "Death of Nelson" lyric that set you (and us) on this quest. In the absence of something more to go on, I will take the shotgun approach and suggest several things that could be way off target. In the DT is a a song called "ON Board the Victory" which ends each verse with that line, and that line is at least superficially similar to "on board a man-of war". The song also mentions a pressgang and includes reference to Nelson. The DT comments say the tune somewhat resembles "Banks of the Sweet Dundee"

Next is a song from "the Oxford Book of Sea Songs" by Roy Palmer. Palmer says it was printed in 1796 but suspects that may have been a reprint from the time of the American revolution.

THE MAN-OF-WAR'S GARLAND

Come all ye valiant seamen,
And each jolly tar,
And let us try our fortune
On board a man-of-war;
For the Yankees broke our peace boys,
In the lands of Virginia,
But royal George of England
Is govenor by sea.

Though both the French and Spaniards
They seem to join in league
For to assist the Americans,
And rob us of our trade;
But we will show them play, boys,
As we have done before,
And we'll makd the dogs to tremble
On board a man-of-war.

Ther's many in our nation
Who dare not show their face,
But lurks among the skulkers,
Which proves to their disgrace;
But if any jolly sailor
Will enter volunteer,
He now may be advanc-ed
On board a man-of-war.

There's riches to be got, boys,
While we are on the main,
And many a rich prize
From the Spaniards we have ta'en;
We strip them of their Indian gold,
Which they do bring from far,
And we'll make the dogs to tremble
On board a man-of-war.

The Dutch are so deceitful,
'Tis them we will not trust,
For by their cowardly action
Many brave men are lost.
The Dutch we will not trust, boys,
Lesst they should us ensnare,
But we'll boldly face our enemies
On board a man-of-war.

We always are a terror,
Wherever we do come,
Likewise the French and Spaniards,
They tremble at our name.
The Dutch, the Swedes, the Portuguese,
With us they have no share,
For we sweep the seas where'er we come
On board a man-of-war.

We make our trumpets sound, boys,
OUr colors we do hoise;
We make our great guns rattle
In the taking of a prize.
We make our great guns rattle,
And the smoke it turns to air;
We boldly face our enemies
On board a man-of-war.

But when our action's over
We drink both beer and wine,
And on our enemy's plunder
We sumptiously do dine.
Our prizes them we do divide,
To every man a share;
Thus live we jolly seamen
On board a man-of-war.

But when the war is ended,
And we get safe on shore,
We make the trumpets sound, boys,
And the cannons they do roar.
OUr colors then we do hoist up,
And pendant in the air,
To show the Britain has gained the day
On board a man-of-war.

Here's to a health unto King George, boys
To him that wears the crown,
Likewise to British tars, boys,
That put the rebels down.
Here's a health unto all mariners
And each brave jolly tar
That boldly faced their enemies
In the time of the war.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE DEATH OF LORD NELSON (from T Hughes)
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 10:43 PM

I haven't yet heard the Bellamy record, but I can do this much:

This is the version of The Death of Nelson that Thomas Hughes gave in The Scouring of the White Horse (1859) -without a tune, unfortunately:


THE DEATH OF LORD NELSON

Come all you gallant seamen as unites a meeting,
Attend to these lines I be going to relate,
And when you have heard them 'twill move you with pity
To think how Lord Nelson he met with his fate.
For he was a bold and undaunted commander
As ever did sail on the ocean so wide;
He made both the French and the Spaniard surrender
By always a-pouring into them a broadside.

One hundred engagements 'twas he had been into,
And ne'er in his life was he known to be beat,
Though he'd lost an arm, likewise a right eye, boys;
No power upon earth ever could him defeat.
His age at his death it was forty and seven;
And as long as I breathe, his great praises I'll sing;
The whole navigation was given up to him,
Because he was loyal and true to his king.

Then up steps the doctor in a very great hurry,
And unto Lord Nelson these words did he say
"Indeed, then, my Lord, it is I'm very sorry,
To see you here lying and bleeding this way."
"No matter, no matter whatever about me,
My time it is come, I'm almost at the worst;
But here's my gallant seamen a-fighting so boldly,
Discharge off your duty to all of them first."

Then with a loud voice, he calls out to his captain,
"Pray let me, sir, hear how the battle does go,
For I think our great guns do continue to rattle,
Though death is approaching I firmly do know."
"The antagonist's ship has gone down to the bottom,
Eighteen we have captive and brought them on board,
Four more we have blown quite out of the ocean,
And that is the news I have brought you, my Lord."

Come all you gallant seamen as unites a meeting,
Always let Lord Nelson's memory go round,
For it is your duty, when you unites a meeting,
Because he was loyal and true to the crown'd.
And now to conclude and finish these verses,
"My time it is come; kiss me, Hardy", he cried.
Now thousands go with you, and ten thousand blessings
For gallant Lord Nelson in battle who died.

Mourn, England, mourn, mourn and complain,
For the loss of Lord Nelson, who died on the main.

Malcolm


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE MAN-OF-WAR PIECE (from E B Greenleaf)
From: raredance
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 10:51 PM

This is probably getting further adrift but it does contain the magic phrase of this thread.

THE MAN-OF-WAR PIECE

O the lad that I love dearly,
He's proper tall and thin;
He's well-formed in features,
Well-shaped in every limb.
He is both tall an thin withal,
He's no de lod at all.
He's a lover to my behavior,
And I am a girl so young.

I have kept my true love company
For better than three year;
He promised that he'd marry me
. . . . . .
But now he's gone and leaved me,
I can not tell how far;
He has gone to serve his misery
On board a man-of war.

He gived me his black ribbon
To mourn for him so far,
But like a loyal lover
The bunch of blue I wear.
If in the wars he will be slain,
HIs face I never shall see,
But in heaven I hope his soul will shine
Through all eternity.

sung by Tom White, Sandy Cove, Newfoundland, 1929. Printed in "Ballads And Sea Songs of Newfoundland" by E B Greenleaf (1933).

rich r


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Subject: Lyr Add: NELSON'S DEATH AND VICTORY (from R Palmer
From: raredance
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 11:17 PM

Good one, Malcolm. I'll see your one "Death of Nelson" and raise you one "Death of Nelson"

NELSON'S DEATH AND VICTORY

Ye sons of Britain in chorus join and sing;
Great and joyful news is come to our royal king.
An engagement we have had by sea
With France and Spain our enemy,
And we've gained the glorious victory
b Again, my brave boys.

On the twenty-first of October at the rising of the sun
We formed the line for action, at twelve o'clock begun.
Brave Nelson to his men did say:
"The Lord will posper us this day.
Give them a broadside, fire away,
My true British boys."

Broadside and broadside our cannon balls did fly,
And small shot like hailstones on the deck did lie.
Their masts and rigging were shot away;
Besides, some thousand on that day
Were killed and wounded in the fray
On both sides, brave boys.

Heaven reward Lord Nelson and protect his men.
Ninteen sail of the combined fleet was sunk and taken in.
The Achille blew up amongst them all,
Which made the French for mercy call.
Nelson was slain by a cannon ball;
Mourn, England, mourn.

Many a brave commander in tears he shook his head,
But yet their grief was no relief for Nelson he lay dead.
It was a fatal musket ball
Which caused our hero for to fall.
He cried: "Fight on. God bless you all,
My brave British tars."

Huzza, valiant seamen, huzza, we've gained the day,
Though lost a bold commander who on the deck did lay;
With joy we've gained the victory,
Before me dead I now do see.
"I die in peace, bless God," said he,
"the victory is won."

Let's hope this glorious battle will bring a peace,
That our trade in England may prosper and increase;
And our ships from port to port go free.
As before let us with them agree,
May this turn the heart of our enemy.
Huzza, my brave boys.


from "Oxford Book of Sea Songs" by Roy Palmer. Note the size of the lethal projectile varies from a cannonball in one verse to a musket ball in the next.

rich r


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: Naemanson
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 11:29 PM

Abbey? Are you there? Who is right?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 29 Oct 00 - 12:13 AM

And there's a whole bunch of "Death of Nelson" broadsides at  Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads.  Here are some of the more legible ones (the first one is the one you quoted, Rich, and the third is -more or less- the one I gave):

Nelson's death and victory  Printer & date unknown.
Nelson's Glory, Death and Victory. A new song  Printed by Bence of Wotton (date unknown).
Death of Nelson!  Printed between 1840 and 1866 by John Harkness, Church Street, Preston.
The hero of Trafalgar or, The death of Nelson  Printed between 1828 and 1829 by T. Birt, No. 10, Great St. Andrew Street, Seven Dials.
The death of Nelson  W. Oxlade, Printer, 174, Queen Street, Portsea.
The death of Nelson  Written by Samuel James Arnold and printed between 1819 and 1844 by J. Pitts, of 6, Great St. Andrew Street, Seven Dials.


Malcolm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: Abby Sale
Date: 29 Oct 00 - 12:38 AM

Geez! Thanks fellers! It's "The Pressgang" that I was thinking of. I have Haslem and MacColl doing it. Great!

The Bellamy (Yes, Peter) song is reputed in its booklet to be the same as "On Board of a..." but I'll have to have a look. It's a same "Death of Nelson" that's in "The Oxford Book of Sea Songs" by Roy Palmer. (different page from (or to) "THE MAN-OF-WAR'S GARLAND"

(There's alaw BTW, "The British Man of War" that's not relevant.)

Naemanson: No, clearly now, it's not "Sam's Gone Away" but I think I'll sing that at the club tomorrow - I like it.

I'll put this all together tomorrow. I'm still not sure the two are the same but now youse guys have certainly given me all the info I need to tell. I'll post the result.

Thank you.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MAN OF WAR (from Mike Waterson)
From: Garry Gillard
Date: 29 Oct 00 - 04:37 AM

Here is Mike Waterson's "Man of war":

As I rode up of a London street
A bold press gang I chanced to meet
Why they asked me I'd join the fleet
On board of a man of war, boys

Why pray brother sailors and tell me true
What kind of usage they give you
That I may know before I go
On board of a man of war, boys

But when I got there to my surprise
All that they told me was shocking lies
And it's there was a row a bloody good row
On board of a man of war, boys

Oh the first thing they done why they took me in hand
They've lashed me with a tarry strand
Why they've whipped me till I couldn't stand
On board of a man of war, boys

They hung me up by my two thumbs
And they've whipped me till the blood did run
And it's that was the usage they gave me
On board of a man of war, boys

I was married and me wife's name was Grace
Twas her that I blame for this shocking affray
Because it was from her I run away
On board of a man of war, boys

But when I set me foot on shore
And I see the girls we all adore
Why I'll never go to sea anymore
On board of a man of war, boys

The song is from this album/CD.

Garry


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: Abby Sale
Date: 29 Oct 00 - 02:53 PM

ok. Bellamy is certainly singing "Death of Nelson" and it bears no relation to "Press Gang"/"Aboard a Man-of-War" whatsoever. What he does is mearly use the "On board the Man-of-War" refrain at the end of each verse. The notes give that it's a collated version between a 3-verse contemporary broadside and that sung by Harry Cox. I don't yet know whence the tune comes. Maybe Cox. It begins with the verse beginning: 'On the twenty-first of October at the rising of the sun' which, of course, is the reason the song jumped out and bit me & I had to find out more.

MacColl/Haslem "Press Gang" version is as in the database - filename[ PRSSGANG. These are nearly the same as Jacko's "ABOARD A MAN-OF-WAR" as posted. (Almost exactly as Gene's above.) They all leave out Jacko's comic- relief verse:

Well the first thing they did they took me in 'and
They flogged me with the tar of a strand
They flogged me till I could not stand
On board a Man-of-War, boys



Although the English seemed to get a hell of a kick out of writing songs about Nelson dying, most seem to be versions of each other. Well, the facts are pretty much the same, anyway.
Malcolm - lot of work there... Do you have a secret method of going straight to the enlarged version at the Bodley? I always get the Reduced version & have to wait to go to enlarged. I wish they'd start on a middle one.
Thank you very much All.
It's a good record set altogether.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 29 Oct 00 - 03:08 PM

Unfortunately, there isn't a shortcut!  I find I can usually tell from the small images which ones will be worth looking at more closely, though, which saves a bit of time.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ON BOARD OF A NINETY-EIGHT
From: Barry Finn
Date: 14 Mar 07 - 01:23 AM

To add to the list of Belamy's On Board songs here's another. The words are traditional but the tune is Peter's. At least the tune I know it by. I'm sure there was an earlier one but hell if I know it.

ON BOARD OF A NINETY-EIGHT

When I was young and scarce eighteen, I drove a roaring trade,
And many a sly trick I have played with many a pretty maid.
My parents found that would not do; I soon should spend their store,
So they resolved that I should go on board of a man-of-war.
Fol de rol, &c.

A bold press-gang surrounded me. Their warrant they did show.
They swore that I should go to sea and face the daring foe.
Then off they lugged me to the boat. O how I cursed my fate!
'Twas then I found that I must float on board of a ninety-eight.

When first I put my foot on board, how I began to stare!
Our Admiral he gave the word: "There is no time to spare".
They weighed their anchor, shook out sail, and off they bore me straight
To watch the foe in storm and gale on board of a ninety-eight.

Before we reached America, they gave me many a drill.
They soon learnt me a nimble way to handle an iron pill.
In course of time, a fight begun when bold Jack-tars laid straight.
What would I give if I could run from on board of a ninety-eight!

But as time flew, I bolder grew, and hardened was to war.
I'd run aloft with my ship's crew and valued not a scar.
So well I did my duty do, till I got Boatswain's mate,
And damn me, soon got Boatswain too, on board of a ninety-eight.

So years rolled by. At Trafalgar, brave Nelson fought and fell.
As they capsized that hardy tar, I caught a rap as well.
To Greenwich College I then came because I saved my pate.
They only knocked one wing off Jack on board of a ninety-eight.

So now my cocoa I can take, my pouch with 'bacco stored.
With my blue clothes and three-cocked hat, I'm as happy as a Lord.
I have done my duty, served my King, and now I bless my fate;
But damn me, I'm too old to sing. I'm nearly ninety-eight!

I still remember him jumping around the stage like a jack rabbit in his bright red suit singing this & "Walk Around Me Brave Boys" (or is it simply "Roll Down"), Jesus, that was a great concert!

Barry


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: Betsy
Date: 14 Mar 07 - 11:43 AM

I don't think I saw reference in the thread to the Song I associate with the Wilson family in which the refrain goes something like .....Let him die in Peace , God bless you all , on board a Man of War

Cheers

Betsy


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: BB
Date: 14 Mar 07 - 05:34 PM

Re the Wilsons's song, I believe that refrain was added, as was a tune, by Richard Grainger to a broadside version of 'The Death of Nelson'.

Barbara


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: GUEST,Edthefolkie
Date: 15 Mar 07 - 06:46 AM

Thanks very much Barry Finn for posting the lyrics of "On Board a Ninety Eight". The last verse is an absolute belter. When I first heard Pete Bellamy perform the song he said that the old tune was "a bit crap" so he'd written a new one.

The first time I encountered Peter was with the Young Tradition on a John Peel programme - I remember thinking "what in God's name is THAT?" I was subsequently lucky enough to see him both with Heather and Royston, and also solo. I treasure the memory of him performing a large proportion of "The Transports" (I think with the original lyric book on a music stand) before the LP had been recorded.

What a loss it was when Pete died. Steve Ashley wrote a lovely song about him (and Royston Wood,Sandy Denny, and others) called "Over There In Paradise" - check it out. And Pete, wherever you are, keep on Kipling.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'On Board Of A Man-of-war'
From: GUEST,sqeezeboxhp
Date: 15 Mar 07 - 03:44 PM

look up Kimbers Men on the Web there is a very good version with john Bromley leading it


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: On Board of a Man-of-War
From: GUEST,MFer
Date: 01 Oct 07 - 01:15 PM

What is a "Man-of-War" as related to these?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: On Board of a Man-of-War
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Oct 07 - 03:29 PM

"What is a "Man-of-War" as related to these?"

A 'man-o-war' (usual pronunciation) was a wooden battleship. Nelson's flagship 'Victory' was a 'man-o-war' - as was the 'Temeraire' as depicted in a broken-down state in Turner's famous painting 'The Fighting Temeraire'.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ON BOARD OF A MAN-OF-WAR
From: GUEST,Eoin O'Buadhaigh
Date: 16 Nov 16 - 04:05 PM

ON BOARD OF A MAN-OF-WAR

Young Susan was a blooming maid, so valiant, stout and bold,
And when her sailor went to sea, young Susan, we are told,
Put on a jolly sailor's dress, and daubed her hands with tar,
To cross the raging seas for love, on board of a man-of-war.

It was in Portsmouth harbour this gallant ship was moored,
And when young Susan shipped there were nine hundred men on board;
'Twas then she was contented, all daubed with pitch and tar,
To be with her sweet William on board of a man-of-war.

When in the Bay of Biscay, she aloft like lightening flew,
Respected by the officers and all the jovial crew;
In battle she would boldly run, not fearing wound or scar,
And did her duty by her gun, on board of a man-of-war.

She faced the walls of China, were her life was not insured,
And little did young William think his Susan was onboard;
But by a cruel cannon ball she did receive a scar,
And she got slightly wounded, on board of a man-of-war.

When on the deck young Susan fell, of all the whole ship's crew,
Her William was the very first who to her assistance flew;
She said, "My jolly sailor, I've for you received a scar,
Behold your faithful Susan bold, on board of a man-of-war."

Then William on his Susan gazed with wonder and surprise,
He stood some moments motionless, while tears stood in his eyes,
He cried,"I wish instead of you I had received that scar,
O, love, why did you venture on board of a man-of-war?"

At length to England they returned, and quickly married were,
The bells did ring, and they did sing, and banished every care!
They often think upon that day when she received that scar,
When Susan followed her true love on board of a man-of war.


Would this be the one mentioned? From 'Traditional Tunes: A Collection of Ballad Airs' by Frank Kidson, 1891.

Eoin


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Mudcat time: 16 December 12:57 PM EST

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