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Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi

Felipa 02 Apr 24 - 04:12 PM
leeneia 01 Apr 24 - 09:03 PM
Felipa 29 Mar 24 - 07:18 PM
Felipa 28 Mar 24 - 10:38 PM
Felipa 28 Mar 24 - 10:03 PM
leeneia 28 Mar 24 - 04:50 PM
GUEST,Rory 25 Mar 24 - 10:17 PM
GUEST,Rory 25 Mar 24 - 10:11 PM
Felipa 21 May 03 - 03:55 PM
Felipa 21 May 03 - 10:20 AM
GUEST,Fiosrach 23 Nov 02 - 03:48 PM
GUEST,Willa 03 Jul 01 - 05:35 PM
Brían 03 Jul 01 - 05:06 PM
Áine 13 Jun 01 - 06:05 PM
GUEST,WoodyBuk 13 Jun 01 - 05:48 PM
Fergie 13 Jun 01 - 05:31 PM
Brían 13 Jun 01 - 05:16 PM
Áine 13 Jun 01 - 03:58 PM
MMario 13 Jun 01 - 02:07 PM
Fergie 13 Jun 01 - 01:49 PM
Fergie 13 Jun 01 - 01:46 PM
GUEST,WoodyBuk 13 Jun 01 - 11:53 AM
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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: Felipa
Date: 02 Apr 24 - 04:12 PM

Leenia, it matters because it was absurdly wrong


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: leeneia
Date: 01 Apr 24 - 09:03 PM

Where did I get the definition "sister"? The site is long gone. What does it matter?

Thanks for the translation. I've seen the melody for this in O'Neill's, and now I know what it's about.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dearthairin Og Mo Chroi
From: Felipa
Date: 29 Mar 24 - 07:18 PM

I think for the translation I should say "beloved young brother" rather than "dear young brother" to get a better sense of "deárthairin ...mo chroí", "brother of my heart"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthairin Og mo Chroi
From: Felipa
Date: 28 Mar 24 - 10:38 PM

https://seannos.tg4.ie/baile/amhranaithe/eibhlin-ni-chonghaile/dearthairin-og-mo-chroi-sean-nos/

Deartháirín Óg Mo Chroí (little young brother of my heart)

Is cuimhneoidh mé chúns mhairfeas beo
Ar an mbaile i Ros a’ Mhíl
Is ar mo bhealach soir ag an scoil úd thall
Is an cúinne a mbínn i mo shuí
Ní raibh bróig ná stoca ar mo dhá choisín
Ach mo mhála ar mo dhroim
Is mé ag cuimhniú theacht abhaile arís
Ag deartháirín óg mo chroí.

Is nach iomaí oíche fhada bhreá
A chaith mé i Ros a’ Mhíl
Ar bheagán céille ar bharr na céibhe
Ag damhsa ‘s ag gabháil fhoinn
Bhíodar ann as Bearna siar go Carna
‘s as chuile cheard den tír
Is bhí an chlann uilig in éineacht ann
Agus deartháirín óg mo chroí.

Is nár bhocht an scéal ag mo Mháithrín é
An lá ar fhág mé an teachín tuí
Bhí an obair gann ‘s ní raibh a ghalún ann
Ach mo bhádóir i measc na n-imircigh
‘S nár bheag a cheap mé an mhaidin úd
Nach bhfillfinn ar ais arís
Ach mé ag fágáil slán ag an talamh bán
‘s ag mo deartháirín óg mo chroí.

Sa gcurachín bheag chanbháis
A chaith mé tús mo shaoil
Ag tabhairt móin go hÁrainn is ar ais anall
‘S as sin soir go Bleá ’n Rí
Bhíodh mo Dheaide bocht is é báite fliuch
Ag láib ‘s an fheamainn bhuí
‘s mo Mháithrín thiar ag fanacht linn
Is le deartháirín óg mo chroí.

------
As long as I live, I will remember that town of Ros a' Mhíl, and going over to school, and the corner where I sat. There were no shoes or socks on my two little feet, just the pack on my back, And I'm remembering coming home again to my dear little young brother.

And isn't it many a fine long night I spent in Ros a' Mhíl (Rossaveel), With little sense at the top of quay/pierhead
Dancing and playing tunes, They were there from Bearna to Carna, and from every part of the land, And all the children were together there, And my dear little young brother

Wasn't it a sad day for my dear mother, when I left the little thatched house. Work was scarce and his boat was not there[?], but my boatman in the midst of the emigrants. It's little I thought on that morning that I wouldn't return again, As I said goodbye to the fair land and to my dear little young brother.

I spent the first part of my life in the little canvas currach (rowboat), going back and forth to Arann island delivering turf (peat), and from there east to Bleá ’n Rí (Baile an Rí, Kingstown),
My poor daddy soaking wet from the mud and the yellow seaweed/knotted wrack
And my dear mother waiting for for us, with my dear little young brother.

-- People with good Irish are most welcome to improve on this hasty translation


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Subject: RE: Dearthrairin O mo Chroi
From: Felipa
Date: 28 Mar 24 - 10:03 PM

Leenia - where did you get the definition "sister"? Deartháir means brother. Deartháirín means "little brother" or "dear brother". Yes it's true that the diminutive "ín" can be added to names to give a feminine version (Pádraig for a boy, Pádraigín for a girl/ Gearóid for a boy, Gearóidín for a girl) but that isn't the case here.
sound file for "dearthair" https://www.teanglann.ie/ga/fuaim/dearth%c3%a1ir   (the "ín" adds an "een" sound)

I don't know how a translation site came up with "detected". Bleachtaireacht is the word I know of for detection. And a detective is a "bleachtaire"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: leeneia
Date: 28 Mar 24 - 04:50 PM

One translation site says Dearthairín means "detected". Another says it means "sister." Does anybody know for sure and certain what it means?

I know that mo chroi means "my heart."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: GUEST,Rory
Date: 25 Mar 24 - 10:17 PM

Michael Hogan -"The Bard Of Thomond” (1828 - 1899), was not the author of this song.
He did however write his own version which is a different song, and printed in his publication.

Draherin O Machree
(Little Brother of my heart)
Lays and legends of Thomond, by Michael Hogan, Vol 1,1865, p.8
First edition 1861

I grieve when I think on the dear happy days of my youth
When all the bright dreams of this faithless world seem'd truth;
When I stray'd thro' the green wood as gay as a midsummer-bee,
In brotherly love with my Draherin O Machree.

Together we lay in the sweet-scented meadows to rest,
Together we watch'd the gay lark as he sung o'er his nest,
Together we pluck'd the red fruit of the fragrant hawtree,
And I loved as a sweet-heart my Draherin O Machree.

His form was straight as the hazel that grows in the glen,
His manners were courteous, and social, and gay among men;
His bosom was white as the lily on summer's green lea-
His God's brightest image was Draherin O Machree.

Oh! sweet were his words as the honey that falls in the night,
And his young smiling face like the May-bloom was fresh and as bright;
His eyes were like dew on the flower of the sweet apple-tree;
My heart's spring and summer was Draherin O Machree.

He went to the wars when proud England united with France,
His regiment was first in the red battle-charge to advance;
But when night drew its veil o'er the gory and life wasting fray,
Pale, bleeding and cold lay my Draherin O Machree.

Oh! if I were there I'd watch over my darling's last breath,
I'd wipe his cold brow and I'd soften his pillow of death;
I'd pour the hot tears of my heart's melting anguish o'er thee,
Oh! blossom of beauty! my Draherin O Machree.

Perhaps in his death-pangs he wish'd that his loved one was near
To clasp his cold hand, with a fond-breathing prayer and a tear!
As he he gasp'd gas all neglected, with none but his Maker to see
And pity my poor dying Draherin O Machree.

But I'm left to weep like the sorrowful bird of the night,
This earth and its pleasures no more shall afford me delight;
The dark narrow grave is the only sad refuge for me,
Since I lost my heart's darling-my Draherin O Machree.

My soul has exhausted its treasure of tears for my love,
He comes to my dreams from his home in the regions above;
I long for the hour when my grief-worn spirit is free,
To meet in those regions my Draherin O Machree.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: GUEST,Rory
Date: 25 Mar 24 - 10:11 PM

Earliest printings of this song can be found in broadsides from the 1840's.

These from the Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads

"Drecharain O'Machree"
Printer: Wm. Wright (Birmingham)
Between 1842 and 1855

I am a young fellow that always lov’d rural sport
To the towns and cities of Erin I used to resort,
Where the true sons of Bacchus were chiefly my company,
Until I was deprived of my Drecharian O’Machree.

In Dublin's fair city my brother was first press’d away,
On board of the tender to cross o’er the raging sea
Where the cannons do rattle, and bullets came rolling by.
Perhaps in that battle my Diecbarian O, does lie

When we liv’d together we did each other adore
This green little island we rambled o’er and o’er.
We work’d at our trade, and our earnings we spent quite free,
Until I was deprived of my Drecharian O'Machiee

The womb turn’d to earth that birth gave to my brother and me,
And also my father is gone to eternity !
Like babes in the forest poor forlorn orphans are we,
Which mikes me lament for my Drecharian O'Machree.

Great measures of treasures be with him wherever he be,
Dispersion of pleasure and human felicity,
Where gold is their God, and the copper eternity
Which makes me lament for my Drecharian O’Machree.

If Providence would aid me and send me wherever he lie.
My life and existence I would venture to set him free,
Like a true loyal brother I’d fight for him manfuly
Anil die in the arms of my Dreiharian O’Machree

The name of a nymph that Jupiter did admire,
The head and tail of a fowl you must inquire,
The name of a beast exchang'd in a letter or three
Will tell you the name of my Drecbarian O 'Machree


"Drahareen O ma chree"
Printer: Haly (Cork)
Before 1850

I am a young fellow,
That always loved rural sport,
The fairs and the patrons of Erin,
I often used to resort,
Where the true sons of Bacchus,
Were chiefly my company
Until I was deprived of
My Drahareen O ma Chree

From the Cove of Cork City,
My brother he first sailed away,
On board of a steamer,
To cross o’er to Spain by sea
Where cannons do rattle,
And bullets like lightning fly,
Perhaps in the battle
My Drahareen O did die.

When we both lived together,
We did each other adore.
This lovely green Isle
We rambled it o’er and o’er;
We worked at our trade
And our earnings we spent in glee
Until I was deprived of
My Drahareen O ma Chree.

The womb turned to earth
That gave birth to my brother and me,
And likewise my good father
Is gone to eternity:
Like the babes in the forest,
Poor forlorn orphans are we,
Which makes me lament for
My Drahareen O ma Chree.

If providence should aid me
And send to me Spain where he be
My life and existence I’d venture
To set him at liberty;
like a true loyal brother
I would fight for him manfully
and die in the arms of
My Drahareen O ma Chree.

The name of a nymph
That Jupiter did admire
the head and tail of a fowl
You must next inquire;
the name of a beast
Exchanged in a letter of three
Will give you the name of -
My Drahareen O ma Chree.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DEARTHÁIRÍN-Ó MO CHROÍ / LITTLE BROTHER..
From: Felipa
Date: 21 May 03 - 03:55 PM

source: P W Joyce, Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909)
The first and last verses are essentially the same as in the version above and verse 2 is like verse 4, but set in Cork rather than Dublin.
The AA in the title is not a typo, but Joyce's way of representing Á.

DRAHAAREEN-O MOCHREE (DEARTHÁIRÍN-Ó MO CHROÍ): LITTLE BROTHER OF MY HEART

I am a young fellow that always loved rural sport;
The fairs and the patterns of Erin I used to resort;
Where true pleasant comrades were always my company;
Until I was deprived of my deartháirín-ó mo chroí.

From the cove [Cobh] of Cork my brother he sailed away,
On board of a warship to cross to Spain by sea.
Where cannon roar loudly and bullets like lightning fly,
Perhaps in the battle my deartháirín-ó does lie.

The womb turned to earth that gave birth to my brother and me,
My father and sisters are gone to eternity;
My brother enlisted and went o'er the raging sea
And he left me here lonely - my deartháirín-ó mo chroí.

If Heaven would aid me and send me to Spain where he be,
My life I would venture to set him at liberty;
Like a true loyal brother I'd fight for him manfully,
And die in the arms of my deartháirín-ó mo chroí.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthairin mo Chroi
From: Felipa
Date: 21 May 03 - 10:20 AM

Lyrics in English with the same first verse are given in PW Joyce, "Old Irish Folk Music and Songs", 1909. He writes of "Drahaareen-o Mochree: Little Brother of My Heart" that "This song, sung to the same air, was perhaps more familiar in Munster than Jemmy mo veela sthore. I have many copies of it on ballad-sheets, printed by 'Haly, Printer, Cork.'"

I must see about getting the well-known tune added to the Jimmy Mo Mhíle Stór thread

Haly published many ballad sheets, circa 1840 as I recall -- see the Origins of Carrickfergus thread


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthairín mo Chroí
From: GUEST,Fiosrach
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 03:48 PM

refresh


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: GUEST,Willa
Date: 03 Jul 01 - 05:35 PM

I too have the Maggie Boyle Gweebarra CD. She says she learned the song after hearing a version by Alan Burke. My attempt at pronunciation would be droth (as in broth)-ar-een oh ma (short a as in map)kree. Hopefully one of Mudcat's Gaelic experts will give you a definite answer.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: Brían
Date: 03 Jul 01 - 05:06 PM

To correct my earlier post. The singer's name is Nóra Ghriallais. She is from Muicneamh idir Dhá Sháile, Reputedly the longest place name in Ireland. I think the name of the recording is Traditional Connemara Singing. The Irish Gaelic version seems to be a recent composition. Except for the refrain, the words seem to be completely different. I am trying to transcribe it now, but there are gaps, partly because of my comprehension, partly because the producer,apologetically added accordions ans whistles to otherwise singing of a quality that pales about any other singer I have ever heard.
Brían.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: Áine
Date: 13 Jun 01 - 06:05 PM

Sure, WoodyBuk --

The closest phonetic spelling I can think of at the moment is:

jar-ah-rihn oh mah kree

It's impossible to type the 'real' pronunciation, but that's the best I can do for you now. Oh, and emphasis on the first word should be on the first syllable.

And thanks for the headsup on Maggie Boyle's CD! And thanks to Fergie for the headsup on Frank and Donal's CD, too.

-- Áine


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: GUEST,WoodyBuk
Date: 13 Jun 01 - 05:48 PM

Dear Fergie,

Many thanks for your speedy reply and for taking the time to send it to me.

Aine, I have just come back from the Gower Folk Festival where I heard it sung by Maggie Boyle, accompanied on guitar by Clive Carroll. I bought her CD which it's on. It's called 'Gweebarra' and is on Pure Records, (1998). The version she sings is actually a little different from the one supplied by Fergie although it's obviously the same song.

Could you perhaps help me learn how to pronounce the title properly for singing, ideally could you provide a phonetic spelling for English? Many thanks if you can

WoodyBuk


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: Fergie
Date: 13 Jun 01 - 05:31 PM

Frank Hart & Donal Lunny have just releasd a double CD called "My Name Is Napoleon Bonaparte" on Hummingbird Records 'Deartháirín ó mo chroí' is on it, it's a brilliant collection of Napeolionic songs from the Irish tradition well well worth listening to. By the way Frank is an enthusiastic Mudcatter.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: Brían
Date: 13 Jun 01 - 05:16 PM

There is one on the CD Idir Dhá Sháile by Sarah Ghriallais, however, the words aren't with the CD. I'm hoping someone comes up with them. The CD is out of print, but there is one copy in our public library. I can understand about half of it. I just called a friend of mine who seems to have an endless resource of obscure songs. I am hoping he might come up with something.

Brían.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: Áine
Date: 13 Jun 01 - 03:58 PM

Dear Fergie,

Is there a version of this song in Irish? And if you happen to have it, could you share it with us, please?

WoodyBuk - Can you tell us where you heard this song? Has it been recorded; and if so, who by?

Thanks, Áine


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: MMario
Date: 13 Jun 01 - 02:07 PM

Fergie - check out our "newcomers guide" and FAQ - the first thread listed on the forum.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: Fergie
Date: 13 Jun 01 - 01:49 PM

Sorry about the line spacings, I would love if somebody could explain to me how to do it right.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DEARTHÁIRÍN Ó MO CHROÍ
From: Fergie
Date: 13 Jun 01 - 01:46 PM

Deartháirín ó mo Chroí.

I am a young fellow who has always loved rural sport-
The fairs and the patterns of Erin I used to resort,-
The true sons of Bacchus were always in my company,-
Till I was deprived of my deartháirín ó mo chroí.-

The womb's turned to earth that gave birth to my brother and me,-
My father and mother have gone to eternity,-
We worked at our trade and our money we spent it quite free,-
Which makes me lament for my deartháirín ó mo chroí.-

When we were children we did each other adore,-
This lovely green island we wandered it o'er and o'er,-
My brother was taken and sent o'er the dark rolling sea,-
And I am left lonely for deartháirín ó mo chroí.-

In Dublin's fair city my brother he was pressed away-
On board of a warship to Spain o'er the wild rolling sea.-
Where cannons roar loudly and bullets like lightening do fly,-
Perhaps in some battle my deartháirín ó might die.-

He was sent to the wars for to fight against Boney and France,-
His regiment was first in the red battle ranks to advance,-
But when night cast it's gloom on that gory and life wasting lea,-
Pale, bleeding and cold lay my deartháirín ó mo chroí.-

If heaven would aid me and send me to Spain where he be,-
My life I would venture to set him at liberty,-
Like a true loyal brother I would fight for him manfully,-
Or I'd die in the arms of my deartháirín ó mo chroí.-

But now I'm alone like the desolate bird of the night,-
The world and it's beauties no longer afford me delight,
The dark narrow grave is the only sad refuge for me,-
Since I lost my heart's treasure my deartháirín ó mo chroí.-

deartháirín ó mo chroí = Little brother of my heart. Author Michael Hogan The Bard of Thomond.

line breaks fixed by mudelf ;-)


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Subject: Dearthrain O mo Chroi
From: GUEST,WoodyBuk
Date: 13 Jun 01 - 11:53 AM

Can anybody help with the lyrics to the above song? Many thanks if you can.


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