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BS: Same As Slang

Azizi 02 Aug 06 - 10:18 PM
Azizi 02 Aug 06 - 10:21 PM
Amergin 02 Aug 06 - 10:28 PM
Azizi 02 Aug 06 - 10:29 PM
Azizi 02 Aug 06 - 10:31 PM
Azizi 02 Aug 06 - 10:35 PM
GUEST,Sorch on IE 02 Aug 06 - 10:59 PM
GUEST,Sorch again... 02 Aug 06 - 11:16 PM
Sorcha 02 Aug 06 - 11:20 PM
Sorcha 02 Aug 06 - 11:28 PM
Sorcha 02 Aug 06 - 11:30 PM
katlaughing 03 Aug 06 - 12:01 AM
Matt_R 03 Aug 06 - 12:10 AM
Bert 03 Aug 06 - 12:51 AM
Azizi 03 Aug 06 - 02:19 AM
Azizi 03 Aug 06 - 02:44 AM
Azizi 03 Aug 06 - 03:17 AM
Azizi 03 Aug 06 - 03:20 AM
Azizi 03 Aug 06 - 03:22 AM
GUEST,Malc R at work 03 Aug 06 - 07:58 AM
Sorcha 03 Aug 06 - 09:38 AM
Azizi 03 Aug 06 - 10:13 AM
Alba 03 Aug 06 - 10:20 AM
Azizi 03 Aug 06 - 10:29 AM
Sorcha 03 Aug 06 - 01:31 PM
Sorcha 03 Aug 06 - 02:16 PM
Alba 03 Aug 06 - 02:27 PM
Sorcha 03 Aug 06 - 02:28 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 03 Aug 06 - 03:32 PM
Scoville 03 Aug 06 - 04:03 PM
Alba 03 Aug 06 - 04:14 PM
Matt_R 03 Aug 06 - 04:20 PM
Bert 03 Aug 06 - 05:12 PM
Scoville 03 Aug 06 - 05:18 PM
Bert 03 Aug 06 - 08:02 PM
Azizi 04 Aug 06 - 06:29 AM
Azizi 04 Aug 06 - 06:32 AM
Azizi 04 Aug 06 - 06:53 AM
Azizi 04 Aug 06 - 06:57 AM
Azizi 04 Aug 06 - 07:09 AM
Mo the caller 04 Aug 06 - 10:44 AM
Alba 04 Aug 06 - 11:35 AM
Matt_R 04 Aug 06 - 01:13 PM
Azizi 04 Aug 06 - 02:32 PM
Azizi 04 Aug 06 - 02:46 PM
Scoville 04 Aug 06 - 03:11 PM
Bert 04 Aug 06 - 04:02 PM
Matt_R 04 Aug 06 - 04:45 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 Aug 06 - 06:13 PM
Azizi 04 Aug 06 - 06:32 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 Aug 06 - 08:36 PM
Sorcha 07 Aug 06 - 10:54 AM
Matt_R 07 Aug 06 - 01:04 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 07 Aug 06 - 03:15 PM
Azizi 07 Aug 06 - 04:22 PM
The Sandman 07 Aug 06 - 06:04 PM
The Sandman 07 Aug 06 - 06:08 PM
Sorcha 07 Aug 06 - 06:19 PM
The Sandman 08 Aug 06 - 05:55 PM
The Sandman 09 Aug 06 - 12:21 PM
Bert 09 Aug 06 - 05:22 PM
HuwG 09 Aug 06 - 06:27 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Aug 06 - 09:04 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Aug 06 - 09:10 PM
The Walrus 10 Aug 06 - 12:47 PM
Sorcha 10 Aug 06 - 01:41 PM
Azizi 10 Aug 06 - 09:29 PM
Azizi 10 Aug 06 - 09:32 PM
Azizi 10 Aug 06 - 09:35 PM
The Sandman 11 Aug 06 - 09:22 AM
The Sandman 12 Aug 06 - 07:56 AM
Azizi 12 Aug 06 - 08:26 AM
Sorcha 22 Aug 06 - 04:33 PM

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Subject: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 10:18 PM

It's a hot night in the ole town tonight.

And since I'm hot, I decided it would be cool to have some fun with words.

How many words or sayings can you come up with that mean the same thing or a similar thing as a slang term? It's okay to use other slang terms or standard English words or sayings.

You get where I'm comin from? If so, cool. If not, it's no big deal.

I'mma start off in the next post. If you have a mind to, you can join me.

That'll be cool.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 10:21 PM

hook up with {hookin up with}=

connecting up with

hang with

???

I'm sure there must be more....


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Amergin
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 10:28 PM

Fuck

is that one?


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 10:29 PM

It's off the hook!=

It's great!

It's fabulous!

It's fantastic!

It's off the chain!

It's what's happenin!

It's fresh!

It's the bomb!

It's hot!

It's all that-and a bag of chips.

[Judging by urban R&B/Hip-Hop radio stations, the phrase "It's off the hook" or "It was off the hook!" is really hot right now. I think this phrase is a newer version of the saying "It's off the chain". The phrase "It's fresh" is even older. I'm wondering if these three sayings refer to fresh meat hanging on hooks at the butcher shop.

I'm serious. I mean these sayings had to come from somewhere, right?]


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 10:31 PM

Yeah Amergin...so what words or sayings can you come up with that mean the same thing as "f---k?*

[that's how I write it-you may write it anyway you wanna]


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 10:35 PM

Hmmmm

Amergin, was your post was in response to mine about "hookin up with"?

Yeah, okay.

But still there are other words-and some of them are relatively clean-that mean the same as the word you gave.

I can think of some. But I'll let you or others add them to this thread, if you have a mind to.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: GUEST,Sorch on IE
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 10:59 PM

Canadian I think....
'fill yer boots' meaning get it done
Or, in US/Western cowboy lingo, git er done (meaning make a good scoring 8 second ride)


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: GUEST,Sorch again...
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 11:16 PM

Ride or wheels= car/vehicle

Bitch or Mama=US biker slang for girlfriend or wife
T shirt slogan...'If you can read this the bitch fell off'

Homey/Homeboy=friend or neighbor

Busted, several meanings....arrested by the police, no money, caught in the act by the rents

Rents=Parents

Rels-Relatives

Hog=Big motorcycle, usually a Harley Davidson

LOTS of Western cowboy slang, mostly corruptions of Spanish, out of Mexico. Hoolihan (type of rope loop), cayuse (horse),etc

Rodeo can mean any type of brawl...a bar fight can be a real rodeo

Are euphmisims included in slang? Such as Ladies of the Night? (prostitutes)

Saggers=knee length shorts popular among the skateboard crowd...worn so low the 'plumbers crack' and underwear (if any) shows

Boarder=short for skate boarder

Eyes=glasses or sunglasses

Four Eyes=wears glasses

Four Ears=hearing aids

Threads=clothes

Cool, Kewl, and Hot=very nice and wonderful

I could probably go on for a LONG time...slang is the most difficult part of a language to learn...and you don't know that you have made a BAD mistake with a word until you use it.....I've been embarassed more than once.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Sorcha
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 11:20 PM

Cheesecake=nice, scantily clad female,
Beefcake=scantily clad male

Oh, you doin a Chippendale?=Chip N' Dale are a male stripper duo

Pull my chain/string=Stop joking/joshing me around

Pull a train=have sex with more than one human at a time

Trip over my lip=pouting, (lower lip stuck out)

This is FUN!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Sorcha
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 11:28 PM

Dis=disrepect

The F word...
Hump, bang, screw


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Sorcha
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 11:30 PM

Lead in your pencil=a hard on in a male
also, means be a Stand Up person...as in a 'situation' when someone
backs out...git some lead in yer pencil..be a Stand Up person (help out)

OK. I'll stop now


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: katlaughing
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 12:01 AM

Sorcha, I never heard the "git er done" until the Southern comedian, the cable guy(?) who is part of Jeff Foxworthy's crew. I've heard "git it done."**bg**


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Matt_R
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 12:10 AM

Internet is one full of synonyms

own
pwn
0wn
pwnsauce
pwnd
pwndxorz

not to mention it can be added as a suffix to many words, e.g.

Al Cap0WNED
Watermel0WNED

Similarly, look at "LOL" and "ROFL

lol
lollers
lollerskates
lollercaust
lolz

rofl
roffle
rofflecopter
David Rofflehoff


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Bert
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 12:51 AM

Following on sorcha's Threads=clothes

clothes are also gear (sadly she went with her goods and her gear)
and togs and duds.

In London a suit is a Whistle (Whistle and Flute) or a Pinny (Pinafore)

Then there's glad rags.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 02:19 AM

Hey, I'm really lovin this!

Thanks for joining in. Please keep posting more slang synonyms.

Confession: That's the title this thread shoulda had, but I couldn't remember the word "synonyms". So when you see this title, think of that one.

And speaking of titles, I wanna give props * to the person whose thread title and comment got me thinking of the meanings of slang terms and 'synonyms' for those particular terms.

Special thanks to Mudcat newbie Hankus Festus for your thread:
Mudcat: Reference tool or hook up hangout? .

In the initial post to that thread, Hankus Festus {great name btw!} asked this question:

"I'm a starving artist looking for hook ups. I was wondering about this site. Is it mainly a reference tool cyber hang out or can it be used to network with other talents to form songwring partnerships?"

-snip-

So you can see why I had the term "hook-up" on my brain. That term lead to the saying "It's off the hook" and the rest is history. Besides folks answering the question, Hankus Festus asked, there's some fun play on words in that thread.

If you're in to that kinda thing {and since you're reading this thread, you probably are}, don't forget to check it out!


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 02:44 AM

From my last post:

* props=proper respect=public acknowledgements

****

It just occurred to me-did the term "hook-up" come from "hooker"{meaning prostitute}??

I still think that "off the hook" comes from "off the chain" since the latter term was used first {if 'latter' means the chain saying-I always get 'former' and 'latter' mixed up.

****

Hey, Matt_R , thanks for your post, but can ya help a sistah out?
I know that "the Internet is full of synonyms", but what are the meanings of:

own
pwn
0wn
pwnsauce
pwnd
pwndxorz

???

I know "LOL" means "lots of laughs" and "ROFL" means "rolling on the floor laughing". But I didn't know about these being used as prefixes and suffixes.

Thanks, I guess I need to get around [the Internet] more.

****

Special thanks to Sorcha for helping to get this thread going. I'm learning alot from your list, girl friend.

Sorcha, please let me add a bit of background to the "homies" term:

"Homies" {"homeboy"; "homegirl"} started out meaning a person from your "hood" {neighborhood}. It later expanded into a person who grew up in the same city/town you did {or the area near that city/town}. And it also can mean a person who lives in the same city {area}that you live in now.

I suppose if I went overseas {to another country} any 'UnitedStater' would be my "homie". TSo you could say that that term "homie" is relative.

Get it? "Relative" meaning 'having different meanings'. Not relative meaning "being your kin".

Ha! Ha!

[Someone here just mentioned the other day that I haven't got a sense or humor {well, actually the poster said 'humour'}. But if that poster had said that my sense of humor is kinda strange, I woulda agreed with her. But since she doesn't know me, maybe she wasn't aware of that. But, I bet some of you figured that out. Not that this has anything to do with the price of beans in Boston. I'm just sayin.]


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 03:17 AM

Btw, here's some other meanings for "hook-up" from Urban Dictionary

hook up:

1. recieved a good or service as a favor
2. to make out with someone
3. to have sex with someone

1. Jerry gave me the hook up with those backstage passes.
2. Sandra and I hooked up last night and her adams apple was kinda big
3. Hooking up with Derick last night was the biggest mistake in my life.

by Doctor Crayon Dec 30, 2003

-snip-

A poster to that website also mentioned the meaning I gave for "hook up"=to meet up with someone to hang out". But it seems that meaning is 'old school' now and the other meanings are more commonly used {at least by younger folks}.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 03:20 AM

"Sandra's adams apple was big"??!!

Of course, different strokes for different folks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 03:22 AM

What I meant is I don't even wanna go there. But if some people do, that's their own bizness.

I'm leaving that sentence alone...

Starting now.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: GUEST,Malc R at work
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 07:58 AM

The use of the word F--k seems to have entered the world of general use these days, losing it's sexual connotation, as in:

What the F--k = what is it, or what was that.
Don't F with me / don't F me about = don't pull my string/chain = don't mess me about.

I bet Sandra's 'Adams apple' isn't the only big thing about her!


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Sorcha
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 09:38 AM

Dis=disrespect


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 10:13 AM

going to a dance =

goin partyin

goin to a go go

goin 'clubbin

going to a cabaret

[more?]


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Alba
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 10:20 AM

Slang used around me in Recording Studios over the Years, these are some of the more polite terms..lol

All up in my biznezz: when someone is meddling in your affairs or dealings.   
Say word: To swear you're telling the truth.
Peace out: a farewell remark. To say to someone, especially a friend, "good bye."

...and few from my birthplace in Glasgow, Scotland:

"Whit you aw aboot?"
[Please note: this phrase has a few meanings]
Pardon me awfully, but what do you mean/what are you doing/what are you saying?
"It's pure baltic man"
it's frightfully chilly
"Am boltin, see ye the morra"
Cheerio Folks, I'm leaving now. It's been a pleasure and I do hope to see you tomorrow
"Yoor a pure steamer by the way"
Oh dear, you appear to be rather inebriated
"Am gawn intae the toon oan a man-hunt"
I've been feeling terribly lonely lately an….and…..I would dearly like the company of a young gentleman. A nice cup of tea and sociable conversation would be just darling!:>)
"Oot ma face fore a gie ye a doin" (one of my personal favs!)
I'm feeling extremely upset and would like you to leave as I may loose control!
Wain – This is a popular term-of-endearment for infants.
Hen/Doll – (For women) Two very commonly used terms for females.
Ginger - This is the name given to all types of Soda or fizzy drink.

Irie All (Meaning: positive feelings, positive energy, to be one with Creation. )
Jude


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 10:29 AM

recorded music= a "jam"

****
old recorded music="golden oldies"="old school"

****

Southern African American culture="downhome"

****

statement that an concert host or artist makes when he or she publicly favorably recognise someone at a concert= "give a shout out to [person's name]"

****

These may be colloquial expessions rather than slang. I suppose there may be a difference between the two terms...

a command made to an audience to give applause to someone or some group="Show them some love."

****

the minister's formal invitation at the end of his [or her] sermon to non-members to join the church="open the doors of the church"
[non-members who want to "join church" walk to the front of the church and are greeted by the minister and deacons]

****

the activity that is done at the end of a church service or at another specific time during the service; the activity involves greeting persons standing next to you, shaking the hands, or hugging them="extend the right hand of fellowship"


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Sorcha
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 01:31 PM

Another biker term for his wife/woman--old lady
(whether she is old or not!)


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Sorcha
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 02:16 PM

And no Real Man EVER 'rides bitch'....on the pillion seat!


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Alba
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 02:27 PM

Shiney side up! Sorcha..:)


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Sorcha
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 02:28 PM

LOL!


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 03:32 PM

Having once fiddled with radios, I knew all about hook up in its literal sense, since hook-up wire and connecting components with wire was a part of the hobby in the old days. (The mess of cables behind my computer is just as bad- ditto, my 'entertainment' center).

So I went to J. E. Lighter, "Historical Dictionary of American Slang, vol. 2," to see about other meanings. (I think occasionally he posts here at Mudcat)

There are pages of hook words, but looking just at 'HOOK UP', and the first-found dates, these came up.
-To marry or get married- 1902
-To become sexually involved- 1895, Campus slang
-To meet, or join with- 1906
-(Hooked up- well-connected)
-A joining of forces- 1903 (hyphenated in orig. citation)
-To provide, or provide someone with.. 1983 (Hook me up with some bills; What do you need? I'll hook you up).
-To engage in kissing, petting and you know (see above)
-To handcuff 1985. California police slang.
-Hooked-up- 1933 Well-built, well-dressed, intelligent, etc.

I think many of these came from the first days of telephone, telegraph, etc., when wires were visibly strung along streets, tacked to walls inside buildings, etc., and people literally became hooked up.

Hook as slang would take up several threads.

HOOKER- A few of the slang uses-
-A Dutch fishing vessel- 1821 (hoecker-schip)
-A drink of liquor 1833
-A good friend 1827 (English, the whole hook, a reliable fellow)
-A thief (more commonly 'hook'). 18th c. or earlier. An 'angler'.
-A prostitute 1845. North Carolina, in Eliason, "Tarheel Talk."
1859, in Bartlett America, a resident of the 'hook', in other words a sailor's trull or prostitute, in the area of Corlear's Hook, New York City.
-A warrant for arrest 1934
-A stoolie or spy 1937 (labor)
-A trick, a catch, a concealed drawback. 1966 (I think much earlier than this).
-An element or inducement to stimulate interest 1968. (Advertising and entertainment industry).

If you can give references for earlier uses of these, please give me the details.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Scoville
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 04:03 PM

Off the hook = no longer responsible for something ("Well, I'm off the hook for babysitting this weekend--Danny said he'd take the kids to the park instead." Or "Well, I messed up that project at work when I was sick but when I gave my supervisor the doctor's note, she was nice and let me off the hook.")

************************

Skateboarders are just "skaters" around here, and the long, gaudy, shorts they wore in the 1980's were "jammers".

************************

When I was in college, cheap beer was "beast", but I don't know if that's a college-kid term, was specific to our school, or what. I haven't heard it from anyone else (but then I don't know a lot of people who willingly drink bad beer).

************************

Ice house = a semi-outdoor bar. Often has garage-style doors and a big patio. I'm not even sure that counts as slang since I don't know if there's another term; I don't think they have them much up north where you'd freeze your merchandise in the winter.

************************

Kicker = from "shit-kicker". Cowboy, or somebody who wants to look like one.

************************

Church-key = one of those figure-8 shaped bottle openers


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Alba
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 04:14 PM

Another meaning for HOOKER.
A Galway Hooker (18th Century). A Boat built specifically for fishing the unique waters off the west coast of Ireland. These Vessels still sail in Ireland today. An annual event called Cruinniu na Mbad is a great way to see these wpnderful Boats as they race across from the Galway side of the Bay to Kinvara in Co. Clare.
A pic for reference if interested: Galway Hookers in full sail.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Matt_R
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 04:20 PM

Azizi, I believe the best way to understand ownage is here


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Bert
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 05:12 PM

(but then I don't know a lot of people who willingly drink bad beer)... You don't know many Americans then. *GRIN*

Old Lady is not just a biker term Sorkieluv. It was quite common in London when I was a kid, along with Old Gal, Old Dutch (Duchess of Fife - Wife), Old boiler, The Trouble and Strife, The Ball & Chain, and The Missus.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Scoville
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 05:18 PM

Hey, not all American beer is horse-piss. Just the stuff we export . . .


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Bert
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 08:02 PM

You're right Scoville most of it is not that strong.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 06:29 AM

Thanks, Matt_R for posting that link to ownage visuals.

I also found this Wikipedia entry helpful in understanding what 'ownage' means:

"Owned, often typed as own3d, 0wned, 0wn3d, pwned, pwnd, ()vvn3d, pwn3d or pwnt, is an internet slang word used commonly in gaming circles to acknowledge a form of superiority through the downfall of another group, be it another gaming clan, or a single user. This can be in the context of winning an online game, a debate on a forum, or attaining a successful hacking, as well as the signature to a rebuttal, such as "You got 0wned!" to announce the defeat of another user on the internet in the form of a debate or flame war. It signifies defeat and humiliation, often through the dominance or superiority of another party."

-snip-


There's more here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owned


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 06:32 AM

For those who are on dial up or don't like to visit links, I think these additional excerpts of that Wikipedia entry on "owned" are warranted:

The slang use of the term originated in computer security, as a reference to illicitly obtaining full control of a computer system, thus figuratively compromising its ownership. This was expressed in phrases such as, "I own your computer." The origins of "owned" and derivative expressions (e.g. own3d, 0wned, powned, pwned, pwnd, pwn3d, pooned, pawned,pwnz0r3d, etc.) cannot be traced back to any single person, but it has a history of being used as a form of graffiti left by crackers on compromised systems, as in "Owned by so-and-so". The popular variant "pwned" is a typo that has achieved its own level of popularity, particularly in the online gaming community.

[edit]
Other Examples and Usages
"Owned" is also commonly used in a context when one person has decisively finished an argument and the other arguing party(ies) are at complete lack of words.

"Owned" can also be used to signify self-contradiction, when someone has been injured in a comical/funny way, or when someone has fallen victim to a practical joke. For example, someone may be "owned" if they base their knowledge on a source, but then are contradicted by the very source on which they 'based' their knowledge upon.

"Owned" is most commonly used in England to signify being outwitted by a person or object in a usually competitive situation.

"Owned" can also be used to signify being defeated in a way that shows dominance, by a person in reality and in internet gaming, eg if someone talking about someone behind their back is confronted, and knocked out in one punch it could be said they just got "owned" by their opponenet. As said is most often used in internet gaming, as a form of insult.

"Pwned" or "P0wned" has the same meaining as "Owned" but is generally used as a more aggresive expression..."

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owned


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 06:53 AM

One of the definitions for the term [got]'owned'=when someone has been injured in a comical/funny way, or when someone has fallen victim to a practical joke.

This is similar or the same as one of the http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=played definitions for "played":

Played:
Made a fool of, chumped, taken advantage of.

The Urban Dictionary has another widely used definition of 'played' is "Outdated, obsolete, overused. Often refers to an idiom or colloquialism."

The http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_slang_used_in_hip_hop_music entry for "played" agrees with the Yrban Dictionary. Here's its entry for "Played/Played out/Played yourself: (1) Something no longer popular or a current trend (as in a "played out" pair of jeans). (2) to be made a fool of (you got "played") or to make a fool of yourself ("played yourself"). Primarily used in the Northeast (NY, NJ, PA, etc), United States but also used on the Westcoast"

-snip-

Btw, these two online resouces aren't the only ones on hip-hop terminology, but these two sites have a pretty comprehensive listing of terms.

I find it interesting to compare and contrast the terms and definitions found in these two sites, along with listings found in print resources and other sites on this subject, especially resources that are more than 5 years old since words in hip-hop cultures change over time as do words in other cultures.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 06:57 AM

Sorry. "Yrban" was meant to be typed as "Urban".

This is a typo and not some reference for Young urban residents of any race or ethnicity

But if someone wants to pick it up and use it as such a reference or another reference, hey, what the heck!


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 07:09 AM

Also, btw, neither the Urban Dictionary nor the Wikipidia hip-hop list has any entry for "owned".

Hip-hop originated in and is still largely associated with African American culture {actually I think it's more accurate to say Jamaican culture and African American culture}. And "Urban" as used in that "Urban Dictionary" site is another term for "Black Americans who live in urban areas".

If the term 'got owned' really isn't used as a slang term by urban African Americans, it's probably because that term would hit too many raw nerves given our [African American]history of slavery.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Mo the caller
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 10:44 AM

From: Azizi - PM
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 10:29 AM
old recorded music="golden oldies"="old school"

Golden Oldies also is used (in our dance club) to refer to well known dances that we used to dance a lot and still like to dance now and then. So anything familiar and slightly out dated I suppose.
If it was old recorded music that noone had heard of it might be an 'Oldie' but not 'Golden' surely?


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Alba
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 11:35 AM

From: Azizi - PM
Date: 03 Aug 06 - 10:29 AM

"recorded music= a "jam"

I personally have never heard the term "jam" used to describe recorded Music other than in the name of the recording Label 'Def Jam'

I have heard it used in these ways:

Jam = Musicians improvising (a Jam session)

Jamming = a Musican or Band improvising onstage.

Jammin (Jamaican patoi) = celebration, dancing.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Matt_R
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 01:13 PM

"For example, someone may be "owned" if they base their knowledge on a source, but then are contradicted by the very source on which they 'based' their knowledge upon."

This is what is commonly known as self-ownage.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 02:32 PM

I agree that one widely used slang meaning of "jam" is:          Playing (hot). (Usually: to Improvise.)
Ex: That band was "jamming" tonight.

Source: A Jazz Lexicon: Swing Era and Modern Colloquialisms

However, I have also heard young people say "That's my jam!" when they hear a song they like on the tv or radio.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 02:46 PM

"Def" as in "Def Jams" may have come from the word "definitely", though some may disagree. If so, "def" is "short" for "Definitely great" {or some other superlative}.

See these entries from http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=def:

"def /def/ adj. to describe a person, thing, or event that is cool. archaic, circa 1981 *

"yo, mah pizzles, I got da hook-up at this def new club. It's suppose ta be off da hizzy"

-snip-

****

"Def ain't short for Deffinitly.

Def means cool, ill, dope. You know.

Yo man Bone Thugs N Harmony are one of the most def groups of all time."


-snip-

*"Archiac" means that this word isn't used anymore.

Note that in this context, "cool", "ill", and "dope" mean...."fresh", "bad", "what's happenin", "the bomb", and "off the hook".


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Scoville
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 03:11 PM

I don't know what to say, Bert, since I'm not actually a connoisseur of horse urine. I'll take your word for it, though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Bert
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 04:02 PM

LOL Scoville.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Matt_R
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 04:45 PM

It's funny to hear modern slang that I hear every day explained in such a way haha.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 06:13 PM

Def was college slang for definitive- the last word, the best, etc.

Almost no urban slang here. Very few African-Americans, and they are business or ranch people, 3 or more generations here. Ethiopians, Somalis, West Indians, etc. have their own slang or have abandoned it. Some 300 Congolese, but their language is French.

Owned pretty much is used in the English or UK sense here. Owned in the sense of controlled goes way back before computers (17th c.). It is not considered slang.
Ownage goes back to the 16th c. -the fact of owning.

Urban dictionary (at least to this non-eastern city person) looks like it makes a good try at keeping up with kids' slang.
Wikipedia is a notorious source of mis-information.

Dis, of course, is abbreviated disparage. Few seem to use it in its older sense of disconnected, or mentally feeble.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 06:32 PM

Q,

In your post when you say "here", I assume that you are talking about where you live in Canada, right?

Also, I think that you might be right about def coming from definitive, but I'm not definite about that.

LOL!

And I'm not trying to dis you, but I'm not sure about "dis" coming from "disparage". There's a lot of credible print material including Hip-Hop magazines which indicate that 'dis' came from "disrespect". And needless to say when you dis a person, you're disrespecting them. And yes, it's true that when you dis a person, you might be disparaging them. But you could also dis a person by igging them {ignoring them}.

And besides, that word "disparage" is kinda old school. I thought it meant "talk about a person bad" meaning "put a person down". I didn't even know about those other meanings you say disparage means.
Well, if I were a betting person {which I'm not}, I'd bet the farm {which I don't own} on "dis" coming from "disrespect" and not "disparage".

I'm just sayin....


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Aug 06 - 08:36 PM

Dis-
Lighter ("Historical Dictionary of American Slang") states its origin is Black, earliest citation found is 1982, an interview with "Crash Crew" in Rap, defined as "to disparage, to belittle." It appeared in television in "Miami Vice" in 1984, where it (dissed) clearly was used as 'disrespect'. By 1989, it appeared in "Village Voice."
By 1990, it appears in print as a noun- "It's a "dis."
(Many examples quoted, vol. 1 p. 605)

Just speculating, no evidence- It could come from the old use of 'dis' (OED, 1925) as a word for disconnected - not with it, feeble-minded- when applied to someone, it certainly is a disparaging way of speaking of him; most disrespectful.
A few students of language would not regard 'dis' as slang but as an abbreviated form.

Roget's Thesaurus, under synonyms for disrespect, lists disparage. Under synonyms for contempt appears disparage. Etc., etc.

To an old time printer, 'dis' meant unsorted (with regard to type).


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Sorcha
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 10:54 AM

Another US military term for information=skinny and low down
So, give us the skinny (or lowdown) on this situation.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Matt_R
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 01:04 PM

And if it's information you don't want to get out, it's lowdown on the down low.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 03:15 PM

Origin of 'skinny' uncertain. Noted in print in 1959 in an article on slang, but probably WW2 or earlier. Perhaps originally meant a 'brief summary' or the 'naked truth'. Appeared in "Gentleman's Quarterly," but I don't have the date.
Also used to mean "What's Up?"
(Oxford English Dictionary)
Sadly, vol. 3 of J. E. Lighter's "Historical Dictionary of American Slang," entries after 'O', has not yet been printed.

Low down- Probably first used in lower class slang, U. S.
1907- Robinson "Comics," "The Lowdown Kid."
1908, Fisher, "A. Mutt." "I can give you the low down on A. Mutt."
1915, T. A. Dorgon- "Aw, give us the low down on them, Bill."
(Incorrect attribution in the OED).
1920, "Colliers Mag." - "He calls me back and in about twenty minutes I have the low down on Monsieur Kane Halliday."
By 1924, P. G. Wodehouse (English) used it in one of his novels.
References from J. E. Lighter, "Historical Dictionary of American Slang, vol, II."
Low down (now lowdown) in common usage before WW1. Not originally a military term.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 04:22 PM

In addition to the definition Matt gave, "[being] on the "down low" also has the meaning "being homosexual but keeping that fact hidden from your wife or your girlfriend and other heterosexual {"straight"}people".

Another way of saying "on the down low" is "on tha low"

See this online article:

Tips for Those Affected by Men on The Down Low


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: The Sandman
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 06:04 PM

PLATES OF MEAT =FEET. hampstead heath =teeth , barnet fair = hair jack jones = on your own. vera lynn = gin. sky rocket and lucy    locket are both pocket .suffin cold[suffolk]=f====ing cold khyber pass = a=se .watch the scales [ backslangbutchers slang]chaw et selacs. mutton pies =eyes.apples and pears= stairs.joy= w=nk. dog and bone = phone.rosie lee =tea ,mudcat = prat


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: The Sandman
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 06:08 PM

I just made mudcat = prat, up ,an example of living rhyming slang. EG shambles is not a mudcat


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Sorcha
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 06:19 PM

LOL! Good One, Cap'n Birdseye!
(ps...do you have frozen peas???)


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: The Sandman
Date: 08 Aug 06 - 05:55 PM

jimmy =to urinatejimmy riddle = piddle.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: The Sandman
Date: 09 Aug 06 - 12:21 PM

door= rory. rory o moore


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Bert
Date: 09 Aug 06 - 05:22 PM

A British military term for information is Bumpf or Bumf. Usually used for excess information or paperwork which civilians know as Red Tape or BS. Ordinary amounts of information are also known as Gen or Jen.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: HuwG
Date: 09 Aug 06 - 06:27 PM

"Bumf" derives from "bum fodder". It probably derives from the Armed Forces.

The Services had a delightful way with hyperbole. Cutlery is referred to as "eating irons" or "gobbling rods". A spanner is a "nut strangler". The British Army especially has a habit of acquiring Hindi, Malaysian or Arabic words and putting them indirectly into the English language. Examples are: "ulu" (Malay "forest"), "shufti" (Arabic "look").

I don't know how the pacifist and left-wing Ben Elton, Tony Robinson and the other writers and actors of the anti-war "Blackadder goes forth" felt, when catch phrases from that marvellous series were picked up wholesale by the British forces deployed to the Gulf in 1991. Troops were accomodated in "Blackadder Lines" and "Baldric Lines", Iraqi airspace or territory was referred to as "sausage side", and a Nimrod patrol aircraft was named "Nursie". And of course, Operation Desert Sabre was "the cunning plan".

This doesn't seem to have carried over to the Second Gulf War and subsequent occupation.

My favourite services acronym? You've all heard of TEWTs (Tactical Exercises without troops)? The British Army has been known to conduct JEWTS (Jungle Exercises without Trees) and NEWDS (Night Exercises without Dark).


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Aug 06 - 09:04 PM

We have had bumf (bumff)in threads before, but I can't find them.
First appeared in 1889 in Barrere and Leland, "Dictionary of Slang"- bum fodder as noted by HuwG; originally applied to schoolboy papers, now applied to everything from toilet paper to govermment and company memos and reports and tourist blurbs. A useful word!


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Aug 06 - 09:10 PM

Reminded me of bumly- 1908. Feeling sad, kind of bummed out.
In Lighter.

One heck of a lot of bum- slang words. Many not suitable for posting in a family site like Mudcat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: The Walrus
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 12:47 PM

"...A spanner is a "nut strangler"..."
I'll add that a tin opener is a "can spanner"

"...The British Army especially has a habit of acquiring Hindi, Malaysian or Arabic words and putting them indirectly into the English language. Examples are: "ulu" (Malay "forest"), "shufti" (Arabic "look")..."
Some of these phrases brought in from the hay-day of Empire have entered 'regular' slang usage to such an extent that many people don't realise that they came from other languages:
"Dekko": Look or Watch - from the Hindi dekhna
"Pukka": Real, genuine or 'proper' (correct) - from the Hindi pakkha
"Jungle" comes from the Hindi and Maharatta term jangal
"Blighty" for Britain (sometimes still heard) comes from either bilaik(Hindi: foreign county); Arabic beladi (my own counrtry); or from the Persian Vilayat (strange or foreign, through the Urdu belait
and of course "Cushy" which comes from the Hindi and, thanks to "Only Fools and Horses" has, somehow mutated to "cushty" (not a good move IMHO)
The Peninsula War gave us "Khasi"/"Karsy" (lavatory) from the Spanish Casa and "Vamoose" (go quickly) from vamos
"Pal" apparently comes from Romany.
Then of course there are combinations of languages to give pidgin terms - a simple one An Indian laundryman was the Dhobi, (from the Sanskrit dhond - to wash) this was extended to Dhobi-wallah, by further extension washing powder is now "dhobi-dust".

Any use

W


(Sorry, I've been hitting Brophey & Partridge and Hobson-Jobson)


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Sorcha
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 01:41 PM

'hung me up'......got me in trouble, prob. from hung out to dry.


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 09:29 PM

I'm refreshing this thread because I don't like the number 66. For some reason [probably religious leftovers] it seems bad to me.

That's bad 'bad', and not bad 'good'.

Someone who shall remain nameless in another thread on colloquialisms posted that he didn't like the term "My bad".

And that's kool and the gang and all that. It's all good. Everybody don't have to like every thing.

But, just for the record, I thought I would hip those not in the know to the fact that fact that "My bad" is contemporary hip-hop African American lingo for "My fault". If someone [in a certain age group and cultural group and setting] unintentionally does something to another person or to a group, in order to avert any repercussions, if he or she knows what's good for him or her, he or she better say "My bad" to that person or group. And hopefully the response is a slight but cool nod of the head, or some clipped statement like "Fine" or "No biggie" or "[It aint] No big deal" that signals that that potential crisis has passed.

So that's what I was going to write about...and I did. I hope you get my drift. But if you don't "My bad".


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 09:32 PM

Hmmm...preview could be my friend if I let it be. {there's a song in that]...

All that to say that this sentence has too many facts in it [or maybe or another level not enough facts]:

"But, just for the record, I thought I would hip those not in the know to the fact that fact that "My bad" is contemporary hip-hop African American lingo for "My fault"."

You can take out one of the facts..whichever one you choose. It's all good. And...

My bad.

:o)


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 09:35 PM

Yeah I know. I made another typo.

What's it to ya? [said with attitude]

Nothin, right?

After all, it's no biggie....

Oh alright alright. I'll say it.

"My bad".

;o}


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: The Sandman
Date: 11 Aug 06 - 09:22 AM

TITFER=TIT FOR TAT = HAT


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: The Sandman
Date: 12 Aug 06 - 07:56 AM

porkies = pork pies = lies


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Azizi
Date: 12 Aug 06 - 08:26 AM

"Lies" is the insider term for the tall tales that storytellers tell. See this use of the term from Zora Neale Hurston's now classic book "Mules To Men", a collection of African American Folklore from the author's hometown of Eatonville, Florida:

"Hurston announces upon her arrival, "'... Ah come to collect some old stories and tales and Ah know y'all know plenty of 'em and that's why Ah headed straight for home,'" to which the inhabitants of Eatonville respond, "'What you mean, Zora, them big old lies we tell when we're just sittin' here on the store porch doin' nothin'?'"
Source: Reading Hurston writing


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Subject: RE: BS: Same As Slang
From: Sorcha
Date: 22 Aug 06 - 04:33 PM

Odd uses of the word 'to'
She's to be buried in Jay Em
It's to rain soon
Will you be to the fair?
Is this primarily a US Southern thing?


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