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Traditional songs about disabilities

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NINE GOLD MEDALS
WALKIN ON MY WHEELS
YOU WOULDN'T KNOW IT TO LOOK AT ME


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Phil Cooper 15 Jun 18 - 02:10 PM
Dave Hanson 15 Jun 18 - 03:12 PM
Jim Carroll 15 Jun 18 - 03:35 PM
oldhippie 15 Jun 18 - 03:58 PM
GUEST,Rigby 15 Jun 18 - 05:00 PM
Steve Gardham 15 Jun 18 - 05:04 PM
Georgiansilver 15 Jun 18 - 06:49 PM
GUEST 15 Jun 18 - 07:30 PM
Phil Cooper 15 Jun 18 - 11:12 PM
Jim Carroll 16 Jun 18 - 03:22 AM
Jim Carroll 16 Jun 18 - 03:38 AM
Jim Carroll 16 Jun 18 - 04:03 AM
Jim Carroll 16 Jun 18 - 04:03 AM
GUEST 16 Jun 18 - 10:53 AM
Jim Carroll 16 Jun 18 - 11:19 AM
Brian Peters 16 Jun 18 - 11:59 AM
Jim Carroll 16 Jun 18 - 12:09 PM
gillymor 16 Jun 18 - 12:16 PM
GUEST,JW 16 Jun 18 - 12:25 PM
GUEST 16 Jun 18 - 12:28 PM
Jim Carroll 16 Jun 18 - 12:29 PM
gillymor 16 Jun 18 - 12:35 PM
GUEST,CupOfTea, no cookies at work 16 Jun 18 - 12:57 PM
Rob Naylor 16 Jun 18 - 01:37 PM
Phil Cooper 16 Jun 18 - 01:44 PM
Jim Carroll 17 Jun 18 - 03:00 AM
GUEST,Nick Dow 17 Jun 18 - 04:25 AM
Jim Carroll 17 Jun 18 - 05:37 AM
GUEST,Nick Dow 17 Jun 18 - 07:00 AM
Joe Offer 18 Jun 18 - 07:27 PM
banjoman 19 Jun 18 - 05:24 AM
FreddyHeadey 19 Jun 18 - 11:22 AM
Jim Carroll 19 Jun 18 - 11:56 AM
Dave Sutherland 19 Jun 18 - 11:57 AM
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Subject: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Phil Cooper
Date: 15 Jun 18 - 02:10 PM

We're doing a UU music based UU service about triumphing through disabilities. I like to see if there is a traditional song to include on the topic if possible. We are probably already using Si Kahn's What you do With What You Got. I'm thinking of taking a closer look at Blind Fiddler (I'm most familiar with Eric Andersen's re-write but plan on checking out some other versions). Any insights would be appreciated.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 15 Jun 18 - 03:12 PM

Martin Carthy recorded a song called ' Three Cripples ' it's on the album ' Because it's There '

Dave H


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 15 Jun 18 - 03:35 PM

WOMAN on WHEELS Peggy Seeger
She makes a pretty good job of John J Curtis (the blind miner)
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: oldhippie
Date: 15 Jun 18 - 03:58 PM

"Talking Wheelchair Blues" by Fred Small


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: GUEST,Rigby
Date: 15 Jun 18 - 05:00 PM

There's the Blind Harper of Lochmaben of course.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 15 Jun 18 - 05:04 PM

Lots of blind boys and blind girls in the Music Hall canon and earlier.
Lots of comic songs but I'm guessing you don't want those.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 15 Jun 18 - 06:49 PM

Are wasting our time~?
It's a quarter past nine.
I think it is bedtime don't you.
So she rose from the chair,
Took off her false hair,
Her white pearly teeth came out too.
One leg made of wood,
One eye was a dud,
Her nose she began to unscrew,
I cried with dismay,
As her bust fell away,
Am I wasting my time on you~??


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Jun 18 - 07:30 PM

Crooked jack
Johnny I hardly knew you


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Phil Cooper
Date: 15 Jun 18 - 11:12 PM

Thanks, everyone. Great suggestions. Susan really liked Talking Wheel Chair Blues. We also are doing the Alliota, Haynes, Jeremiah song, For Eddy. He was a one armed janitor at a Chicago folk venue, The Quiet Knight. He played piano and made posters for the shows. He mostly played piano after hours, so few people knew that. He lost his arm in the Spanish Civil War. Here's a youtube link you can copy and paste if the blicky doesn't work:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Spf2ELsO-A


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 03:22 AM

One of the most powerful and influential songs about blindness in Ireland was oriinally written as an inducement noot to join the British Army in the latter half of the 19th century - it ended up changing the laws regarding the treatment of wounded veterans

Patrick Sheehan
Patrick Sheehan (Laws J11; Roud 983)
Tom Lenihan Knockbrack, Miltown Malbay Recorded 1977
Carroll Mackenzie Collection        

My name is Patrick Sheehan, and my years are thirty-four;
Tipperary is my native place, not far from Galtymore;
I came of honest parents but now they are laid low
And many a pleasant day I spent in the Glen of Aherlow.

My father died, he closed his eyes outside our cabin door;
The landlord and the sheriff, too, were there the day before;
And then my loving mother, and sisters three also,
Were forced to go with broken hearts from the Glen of Aherlow.

For three long months, in search of work, I wandered far and near;
I went into the poorhouse to see my mother dear.
The news I heard near broke my heart; but still, in all my woe,
I blessed the friends that made their graves in the Glen of Aherlow.

Bereft of home, and kith and kin with plenty all around;
I stayed within my cabin, and slept upon the ground.
But cruel as my lot was, I ne'er did hardship know
Till I joined the English army, far away from Aherlow.

‘Rise up there,’ says the corporal, ‘you lazy Irish hound,
Why don’t you see, you sleepy dog, the call to arms sound?’
Alas I had been dreaming of days long, long ago.
I awoke before Sebastopol, but not in Aherlow.

I grouped [groped] to find my rifle, how dark I thought the night;
Oh, blessed God, it was not dark; it was the broad daylight;
And when I found that I was blind, my tears began to flow;
I longed for even a pauper’s grave in the Glen of Aherlow.

Oh, Blessed Virgin Mary, mine is a mournful tale,
A poor blind prisoner here I am in England’s dreary jail;
Struck blind within the trenches where I never feared the foe,
And now I'll never see again my own sweet Aherlow.

Dear Irish youths, dear countrymen, take heed in what I say,
And if you join the English ranks you'll surely rue the day,
Whenever you are tempted a-soldiering to go,
Remember poor blind Sheehan from the Glen of Aherlow.


Conversation after the song between Tom Lenihan, Pat Mackenzie and Jim Carroll:
Tom: Patrick Sheehan is a ballad I bought from Bully Nevin years ago.
Jim: Yeah, so it was on the ballads?
Tom: It was on the ballads.


“‘Patrick Sheehan’ was written by author Charles Kickham (1826-1882) under the pseudonym Darby Ryan Junior, and was printed in 'The Kilkenny Journal' in October 1857. Its purpose was to protest the arrest in Dublin of a veteran soldier of that name who had been blinded in the trenches before Sebastopol and had been discharged on a pension of sixpence a day; at the time of his arrest the pension had expired. The song became very popular and was soon to be heard all over Ireland. It was said to have shamed the authorities into awarding Sheehan a life pension of a shilling a day. It has been found in America and as far afield as Australia. There appears to have been only one English version, got from a singer in Portsmouth Workhouse in 1907, taken down by George Gardiner. We recorded incomplete sets from several Travellers and full versions from Vincie Boyle and Martin Reidy."

Reference:
Songs of Irish Rebellion, Georges-Denis Zimmerman.
The Constant Lovers; Selections from the Hammond and Gardiner collection , Frank Purslow (ed).

LISTEN HERE
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 03:38 AM

The subject also occurs in folk-tales
We recorded this story from a Clareman, a neighbour of the above singer, a fisherman/farmer named Mikey Kelleher who had moved from Clare to England in the late 1940s and had never returned
We recorded him in Deptford, South East London

"A Quilty man was working in the fields when he jagged his leg on a piece of barbed wire
He didn't do anything about it for weeks until at last it got so sore the was forced to go to Ennis Hospital
The doctor look at it and told him the cut had become so bad that his leg would have to be removed.
The day after the operation, he was visited by a neighbour who asked him how he was.
"Good news and bad news" he replied
"What's the bad news" he asked
"Well, they operated yesterday and they cut the wrong leg off"
"God, Michael, that's terrible"
"Not too bad" he said, "the other one's getting better"

Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 04:03 AM

Mikey also told us a story of a young woman married to a blind man
She was having a affair with a young neighbour and the couple used to meet in a clump of trees near to their home
The husband got word of it so, after having been told where the lovers regularly met, he went out, found the tree they met under and climbed it, waiting for them to turn up.
He heard them below, and, after a little while began to clamber down the tree; on the way down, he was struck in the face by a branch which miraculously restored his sight.
He saw the couple on the ground, half-undressed, and demanded to know what was going on
The wife told him that a local wise-woman had told her that doing this was the only way to get the sight of his eyes back

Like a number of Mikey's tales, this is an extremely ancient one, It can be found in Chaucer's 'Canterbury Tales' and occurs partially in song form in Yorkshire singer, Frank Hinchliff's 'The Pear Tree' (with the blindness element missing)
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 04:03 AM

Mikey also told us a story of a young woman married to a blind man
She was having a affair with a young neighbour and the couple used to meet in a clump of trees near to their home
The husband got word of it so, after having been told where the lovers regularly met, he went out, found the tree they met under and climbed it, waiting for them to turn up.
He heard them below, and, after a little while began to clamber down the tree; on the way down, he was struck in the face by a branch which miraculously restored his sight.
He saw the couple on the ground, half-undressed, and demanded to know what was going on
The wife told him that a local wise-woman had told her that doing this was the only way to get the sight of his eyes back

Like a number of Mikey's tales, this is an extremely ancient one, It can be found in Chaucer's 'Canterbury Tales' and occurs partially in song form in Yorkshire singer, Frank Hinchliff's 'The Pear Tree' (with the blindness element missing)
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 10:53 AM

Eggs and Marrowbones (can make your old man blind)
there's one about feigned deafness, "madam, I can't hear you"
To the begging I will go
Injuries from war - Mrs McGrath, Johnny I hardly knew ye

as an aside, I've been wondering about the positive view of Barnum freak show as portrayed in the film "The Greatest Showman" and whether it has a grounding in fact?


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 11:19 AM

A folktale from Lancashire
Jim Carroll

DICKIE BITHELL AND THE KICKING MATCH
Jack Oakes Bolton, Lancashire, England
Years ago there used to be kicking matches and they used stand up and put their 'ands on their shoulders, 'bout a yard apart, and they used kick at then-shins wi' clogs on. And, er .... owd Dickie Bithell was the champion of Wigan.
And this stranger came, came in this pub this 'ere day. So they had a game of dominoes and then they started talking about these kicking matches. So me dad says, "Well, owd Dickie Bithell's the champion of Lancashire." So this feller kept quiet. So me dad said again, "Owd Dickie Bithell's the champion of Lancashire."
So this feller's turned round to me dad, he says: "If you'll give me the first kickin', I'll have a go at owd Dickie."
Owd Dickie says, "Right, put your two pound down." So this stranger puts two pound down. So they go outside in a field and they stand up together and bate of one another's shoulders, arm's length. So this stranger takes the first kick -1 wish I could show you - and he kicks owd Dickie. Well owd Dickie goes rigid hisself to take the strain. So owd Dickie had his kick; so he kicks the stranger and the stranger did the same; take the strain.
So he carried on four or five times. So owd Dickie turned round to me dad, he said, "This stranger's no mug; he's a fair 'un."
"Go on, cany on Dickie", me dad said. So he carried on three or four more times.
Owd Dickie says, "I'm finished; he's too good. Give him the money." So me dad, looking at owd Dickie's legs, there were blood, snot and 'air hanging down his leg, he were in a bad way, you know.
So he says, "All right, give him the money."
So they said to t'other feller, "Let's have a look at your leg." When they looked at his leg, he'd a wooden leg. So they took the two pound off him and clear him out of pub.

Recorded by Denis Turner, 1966.
The ’sport’ of kicking appears to have been popular throughout England until comparatively recent times. We have been told that, in Norfolk, contestants would sit on opposite sides of a pub table and take turns at kicking each other's shins until one gave up. The contest is all the more vicious in Jack Oakes' story as the clogs the combatants wore would have been metal tipped. Dickie Bithell would seem to have been a local character; Mr. Oakes had a number of stories about him.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Brian Peters
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 11:59 AM

The singer Beckett Whitehead of Delph described kicking matches at school, in his unpublished autobiography.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 12:09 PM

Tkanks Brian
Walter Paardon described them as taking place in pubs, where men took turns at kicking eeach other under the table
A bit less sophisticated than the Northern version

Is Becket's autobiography available on-line
His grandson posted to this forum a few years ago ?
Jim


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: gillymor
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 12:16 PM

Not exactly traditional but a lesson in perseverance. -

Three-Legged Man performed by Steve Goodman.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: GUEST,JW
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 12:25 PM

Interesting discussion... How about 'My Son John' about a soldier who returns from battle having lost his legs?
The Jones Boys sing a version of this song that you can listen to on Bandcamp - https://thejonesboys1.bandcamp.com/album/like-the-sun-a-glittering
And they've got some writing about the tune and posted the lyrics on their own website here https://thejonesboys.org/lyrics/my-son-john/


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 12:28 PM

Oops my links didn't work - second try....

Interesting discussion... How about 'My Son John' about a soldier who returns from battle having lost his legs?
The Jones Boys sing a version of this song that you can listen to on Bandcamp - here
And they've got some writing about the tune and posted the lyrics on their own website here


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 12:29 PM

Video not available Gilly

We used to have a somewhat disreputable musician around here nick-named 'Timber Tony' who used to horrify visitors by placing his foot on the next bar-stool to where he was sitting amd stabbing himself in the leg with a penknife
THose who didn't realise his leg was wooden were horified
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: gillymor
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 12:35 PM

U.S. to U.K. YT links seem to be failing more and more frequently, Jim. Copyright issues I guess.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: GUEST,CupOfTea, no cookies at work
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 12:57 PM

If yer willing to jump to contemporary folks who write "in the Tradition" Loretta Simonett's "Will you take me home" is a poignant tale of overwhelming love used in dealing with Alzheimers.

Charlie Mosbrook's written several songs relating to his mobility problems.

Craig Johnson's "Damed Old Piney Mountains" about a fiddler loosing his fingers in the mills.

Debra Cowan sings one about Carpal Tunnel - not as dramatic a disability, but highly relatable.

Interesting to see what you can come up with from the very trad, tho.

love,
Joanne


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Rob Naylor
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 01:37 PM

Another contemporary song about dealing with Alzheimers is Gilmore and Roberts' "Travelling in Time":

Travelling in Time


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Phil Cooper
Date: 16 Jun 18 - 01:44 PM

Thanks for all the suggestions. Once the songs were mentioned, I was able to recall what many of them were about, so the refresher is greatly appreciated.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 17 Jun 18 - 03:00 AM

"Thanks for all the suggestions."
Thanks for the opportunity to dig out the songs and stories

There was a Liverpool children's chant I heard as a child not long after the war - it never made the printed collections because of it's vulgarity, I suppose - (I must have been one of the Opie's "ogre children")

I lost my arm in the army,
I lost my leg in the navy
I lost my cock in the butcher's shop
And they found it in the gravy

They don't make 'em like that any more
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: GUEST,Nick Dow
Date: 17 Jun 18 - 04:25 AM

I don't know how relevant this is but Jack Barnard (Sharp's informant from Bridgewater) was disabled. A very intelligent neat and tidy man he was as well. His voice may be heard on wax cylinder at the British Library. Despite never having attended school he was able to act as a collector for Sharp as well as an informant. He was unable to walk very far. How about that for overcoming disabilities?
Just a thought.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 17 Jun 18 - 05:37 AM

The only Irish version of 'The Crafty farmer' was sung by a man dying of throat cancer
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: GUEST,Nick Dow
Date: 17 Jun 18 - 07:00 AM

Robert Barratt the man who sang 'I live not where I love' to the Hammond brothers in 1906 also had throat cancer but managed to sing another 40 odd songs. When you have the love of the songs, what ever disability you have that love will come out one way or another.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about ailments
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Jun 18 - 07:27 PM

This song is called "This 45 Years." Jim Carroll sent it as an MP3 for posting. Jim, do you have a transcription of the lyrics, and can you tell us a bit about the song?
-Joe-

Click to play (joeweb)


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: banjoman
Date: 19 Jun 18 - 05:24 AM

My wife sings a song called "Do the dance now Davy" about disabled ex soldiers performing on the streets trying to earn enough to eat.
I also thought about "Mrs McGrath" as its about her son returning from war minus legs.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: FreddyHeadey
Date: 19 Jun 18 - 11:22 AM

gillymor's suggestion

Three-Legged Man performed by Steve Goodman

https://youtu.be/PfRp0-4XVZ8
(played ok, UK)


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 19 Jun 18 - 11:56 AM

Forgot this one - from Walter Pardon
Jim Carroll

The Steam Arm

Such a curious tale I’m about to unfold
To one and all, what I’ve been told,
About a soldier stout and bold,
Whose wife ‘he had such a terrible scold.

Right toora loora loory addity, right to loora dear,
Right toora loora loory addity, right to loora dear.

At Waterloo he lost an arm,
Which caused him pain and quite alarm,
In length of time he grew quite calm,
For a shilling a day was a sort of a balm.

Right toora loora……………            

The story goes that every night
His wife would bang him left and right,
He thought in time, just out of spite
He’d have an arm, cost what it might.

Right toora loora……………..         

All at once he hit upon a scheme,
He’d have an arm that’d go by steam,
A ray of hope began to gleam,
That the force of arms would bring esteem.

Right toora loora……………..         

The arm was made and fixed on to,
A stump of his shoulder both neat and true,
You’d think it there by nature grew,
For it stuck in its place as tight as glue.

Right toora loora………………                  

In coming home, he reached the door,
His wife abuse began to pour,
He pulled a small peg and before
He’d time to think, she lay flat on the floor.

Right toora loora…………………….            

And soon the house with police was filled,
And half of them he damn near killed,
The arm it was so very well drilled,
That once in action, could not be stilled.

Right toora loora……………            

They took him up before the mayor,
The arm kept going all the while there,
The mayor said, shake your fist if you dare,
The steam arm knocked him right out of the chair.

Right toora loora………………..               

They shut him up in Tom Gee’s barn,
Thinking there he’d do no harm,
And all at once they had an alarm,
Down came the wall and out popped his arm.

Right toora loora…………………..        

Now he wanders about all in a fright, He can’t get rest neither day nor night, The arm keep going with all its might, a cutting away from left to right.

Right toora loora………………..        


“That’s Harry Sexton’s Steam Arm”.


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Subject: RE: Traditional songs about disabilities
From: Dave Sutherland
Date: 19 Jun 18 - 11:57 AM

The central character in "On Board a 98" "only" lost an arm at Trafalgar.


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