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Origins: How many versions of Geordie

DigiTrad:
GEORDIE
GEORDIE (2)
GEORDIE (3)
GEORGEY
GIGHT'S LADYE


Related threads:
(origins) Lyr Req: Anathea (from Judy Collins) (79)
Lyr Req: Geordie (from Sam Russell) (14)
Lyr Req: Anathea (25)
searching for song-ManDiesToSaveWifeFromJudge (9)
Tune/Chords Req: Geordie (6)
(origins) Origin: Anna Thea / Anathea (11)
Lyr/Tune Add: Geordie (13) (closed)
Lyr Req: Georgie (Child #209, from Baring-Gould) (11)
Lyr Req: Laszlo Feher (Dave & Toni Arthur) (12)
Lyr Req: Roy Bailey's Geordie (4)
Geordie song - who's Charlie Hay? (8)
Lyr Add: Song V on George Stoole (3)
Parodies (using FS for Dummies) (1)


GUEST 31 Dec 00 - 01:56 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 31 Dec 00 - 02:22 PM
Malcolm Douglas 31 Dec 00 - 02:51 PM
Suffet 31 Dec 00 - 04:48 PM
Malcolm Douglas 01 Jan 01 - 11:12 AM
Sorcha 01 Jan 01 - 12:27 PM
Suffet 01 Jan 01 - 01:15 PM
GeorgeH 02 Jan 01 - 12:43 PM
Susanne (skw) 02 Jan 01 - 07:20 PM
Barry Finn 02 Jan 01 - 08:38 PM
GUEST 02 Jan 01 - 08:56 PM
Malcolm Douglas 02 Jan 01 - 09:20 PM
GUEST 02 Jan 01 - 09:25 PM
Garry Gillard 02 Jan 01 - 09:55 PM
Haruo 02 Jan 01 - 10:09 PM
GUEST,tom h, melbourne 30 Jan 01 - 10:39 PM
Stewie 31 Jan 01 - 02:26 AM
Rev 31 Jan 01 - 12:09 PM
mousethief 31 Jan 01 - 12:17 PM
Haruo 01 Feb 01 - 01:36 PM
Ian HP 01 Feb 01 - 02:14 PM
GUEST,Vittorio 01 Feb 04 - 06:20 AM
Alex.S 01 Feb 04 - 12:30 PM
GUEST,fulero91@hotmail.com 20 May 04 - 09:04 AM
Amos 20 May 04 - 01:47 PM
Roberto 21 May 04 - 04:31 AM
Roberto 21 May 04 - 04:52 AM
GUEST,elisa 20 Oct 04 - 11:46 PM
padgett 21 Oct 04 - 05:39 AM
Reiver 2 21 Oct 04 - 06:03 PM
Malcolm Douglas 21 Oct 04 - 07:59 PM
Jim Dixon 03 Sep 09 - 09:06 AM
IanC 03 Sep 09 - 09:19 AM
Tradsinger 03 Sep 09 - 03:58 PM
GUEST,Helmer 05 Feb 11 - 07:32 AM
Joe Offer 27 Apr 11 - 02:08 AM
Tradsinger 27 Apr 11 - 04:03 AM
GUEST,Eric Smee 21 Dec 12 - 08:40 AM
Jack Campin 21 Dec 12 - 09:30 AM
DMcG 22 Dec 12 - 03:44 AM
GUEST,Richie 21 Feb 13 - 01:46 PM
Rumncoke 21 Feb 13 - 03:42 PM
GUEST,Richie 23 Feb 13 - 02:06 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 23 Feb 13 - 09:18 AM
GUEST,Semiotic 23 Feb 13 - 09:53 AM
GUEST,Richie 23 Feb 13 - 03:37 PM
GUEST,Richie 24 Feb 13 - 01:24 AM
Richard Mellish 25 Feb 13 - 05:38 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 25 Feb 13 - 06:21 AM
GUEST,Nightingaol 24 Jun 13 - 04:25 PM
dick greenhaus 24 Jun 13 - 04:46 PM
dick greenhaus 24 Jun 13 - 06:07 PM
GUEST,AE 26 Mar 16 - 12:15 AM
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Subject: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST
Date: 31 Dec 00 - 01:56 PM

Hi All;

I am new to mudcat and am really enjoying it. I have been collecting versions of Geordie and I wonder if you could tell me what versions you kbow of and who the artist is. Also, Does it go by other names.

Thanks Geordie


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 31 Dec 00 - 02:22 PM

There are 37 versions of more than one verse with music in Bronson's 'The Traditional Tunes of the Child Ballads', #209, and 21 more tunes with one verse or less. The two 17th century copies can be found at ZC209 (ZC is the code for Child ballads) in the broadside ballad index on my website. www.erols.com/olsonw


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 31 Dec 00 - 02:51 PM

If you have a look at this thread:  Geordie,  you will find a version collected in Somerset in 1908, together with links to a number of other versions both here and at other sites, including some broadside texts at the Bodleian Library.  Note that the song was often called "Georgie" in England.  Of course a great many revival performers have recorded various sets of the song, some reasonably faithful arrangements of traditional variants, some less so; I have no idea how many of them there might be, but most of them are likely to be based on the best-known traditional examples.

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Suffet
Date: 31 Dec 00 - 04:48 PM

I sang Geordie at a pub in Sligo, Ireland, in 1987. Everything was at it usually is, except in one verse:

My Geordie never stole a cow nor a calf,
He never murdered any,
But he stole sixteen of the King's royal deer,
And sold them in Kilkenny.

The reaction of the audience was exactly what I had hoped: "Damn that English judge!"

Anyway, I have no idea where Bohenny is. The closest I could find on a map of the UK was Bo'ness or something like that. At least I know where Kilkenny is.

Please add one more version to the tally!

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 01 Jan 01 - 11:12 AM

Ah, we can always rely on the old knee-jerk reaction!  Although the most usual placename is Bohenny (Bohemia) and variations thereon, similar-sounding local names were often substituted.   Lucy Broadwood commented in English Traditional Songs and Carols (1908): "In the many versions Georgie is said to have sold the King's horses or deer to "Bohemia", "Bohenny", "Bevany", "Bennavie", and "Gory".  Possibly "Germanie" may be nearer the original, which is usually meant to rhyme with the word "any" ("money" in the Sussex version."

To that list I can add "in Boeny", "to Lord Navey", "in a hurry", "in the army", "in Virginny (or Virginia)", "to bold Henry", "to Broad Hambury (or Hembury)", "down under the valley", "Which grieves me most of any" "All for to feed his family" and..."in Kilkenny".  The last appears in a broadside at the Bodleian Library, printed in Liverpool around 1820, so I'm afraid you don't get to claim your own version on that score...

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Sorcha
Date: 01 Jan 01 - 12:27 PM

As Carl Sagan said he didn't say "billions and billions...."


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Suffet
Date: 01 Jan 01 - 01:15 PM

OK, Malcolm, don't add one more version to the tally!

In any case, "Geordie" shows how enduring are double standards in the criminal justice system. Poaching the King's royal deer was quite obviously a capital offense, but what about the final purchasers of the ill gotten venison. I understand there was a ready market for such meat, but it was only the poor shnook of a poacher who got his neck stretched, not the nobilty who feasted on the stolen deer.

Geordie was at least lucky enough to be born to the King's royal breed -- a cousin who has fallen on hard times no doubt -- for he faced a relatively quick death. The execution of a commoner, by comparison, would be a long and torturous affair.

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GeorgeH
Date: 02 Jan 01 - 12:43 PM

At some point ANY theft of livestock was a capital offence - hence the saying "as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb". There are numerous other folk-song references to this.

And as for the original question . . I guess the answer is "too many . . " (no, I'm NOT suggesting that one version is one too many . . )

G.


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 02 Jan 01 - 07:20 PM

I only know the versions by Joan Baez and Martin Carthy. As to the place name, there is a village by the name of Bohenie near Pitlochry in Scotland (Baez sings Bohenny or Bohenie), but seeing what Malcolm has come up with it seems unlikely this is definitive. Pity!


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Barry Finn
Date: 02 Jan 01 - 08:38 PM

There's also a great one that the Silly Sisters sing which you'll most likely run across in the above collections, the tune is the same as the ones where Geordie' a deer thief. Anyway, the 1st verse goes something like this so you'll recognize it:

There was a battle in the North
And of Lords there many
And they have killed Sir Charles Hays
And laid the blame on Geordie

His sweetie rides to Edinborough (sorry about the spelling) bargins for his release while making plans to make "the blood would've flowed apon the green before I'd lost my Geordie. Barry


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Jan 01 - 08:56 PM

There are 143 versions of this song.

Anyone who dares to deviate from these is wrong

These 143 versions should be treated with sanctity. Any other version amounts to sacrilege.

These versions may be sung with impunity, but don't dare to put a word wrong outside of the canon.


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 02 Jan 01 - 09:20 PM

Which versions would those be, then?


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Jan 01 - 09:25 PM

do you want all 143, Malcolm?


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Garry Gillard
Date: 02 Jan 01 - 09:55 PM

Martin Carthy has recorded both Geordie AND Georgie.

Garry


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Haruo
Date: 02 Jan 01 - 10:09 PM

William Auld's Esperanto version is in Floroj sen kompar', I think, and was done (covered? ;-) see I lurk a bit, too) by Margaret Hill on the LP of the same title. It'll probably make it onto my website sooner than the Frozen Logger.

Liland


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,tom h, melbourne
Date: 30 Jan 01 - 10:39 PM

re english versions, and further to the cecil sharp ref in the geordie thread above

there are 10 versions collected by cecil sharp in Cecil Sharp's collection of English folk songs / edited by Maud Karpeles. Published London ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1974.

nb surely guest was joking about 'the canon'? -the tune rightlly evolves even today i'd say, depite being nailed down on cds, or to lesser extent, in transcriptions.


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Stewie
Date: 31 Jan 01 - 02:26 AM

There's a fine American version on Various Artists 'Virginia Traditions: Ballads from British Tradition' Global Village CD1002 under the title 'As I Walked Out on London Bridge'. The singer is S.S. 'Sam' Russell. Russell was recorded in Marion, Virginia, on 13 November 1936. The recording is a bit noisy and 'cavernous', but the voice is clear and the performance wonderful.

--Stewie.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GEORDIE (from Peggy Seeger)
From: Rev
Date: 31 Jan 01 - 12:09 PM

Hi

Last year I won a prize in the singing competition at the Goleta Old Time Fiddler's Convention here in California with a rendition of Geordie. I like to sing it because my brother is named Geordie. I sang a version I picked up from a Peggy Seeger recording, I think it was on one of the "Blood and Roses" records she made with Ewan MacColl. She sings a very American variant with a very evocative tune. I especially like the verse about the lawyers and the money.
Here are the words to that version:

GEORDIE
(from Peggy Seeger)

As I walked over old London's Bridge
It was in the morning early
There I espied a pretty fair maid
Lamenting for her Geordie

She said "now saddle me my bly,
go bridle him right gaily,
and I will ride this live long night
and beg for the life of Geordie."

She rode, she rode until she came there
It was in the morning early
And on bended knee she fell
Saying "spare the life of Geordie."

Then she pulled out her purse of gold
crying "Lawyers money aplenty!
Just fee yourself and think on me
and plea for the life of Geordie."

Then Geordie's lawyer he rose up
saying "I've nothing at all against him
By his own confession he must die
and the Lord have mercy on him."

The Judge looked over his left shoulder,
and he looked both sad and sorry,
"My pretty fair maid you have come too late
Geordie's going to be hanged tomorrow."

Geordie he walked up and down the hall
bidding adieu to many
but when he came to his own true love
it grieved him worse than any.

Geordie was hanged with a golden chain
such chains you don't see many
he was born of a noble race
and he loved a virtuous lady.

Geordie is buried in Harlan state
and over him grows a willow
with a marble slab at his head and feet
and his true love's arm for a pillow


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: mousethief
Date: 31 Jan 01 - 12:17 PM

The only version I've ever heard is the Silly Sisters one, but it's such a delight to listen to. Very bouncy, with delightful flips in the melody (not to mention those two women can SING!).

Some gave her marks, some gave her crowns
Some gave her dollars many
She's counted out five thousand pounds
And got her back her dearie

Alex


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Haruo
Date: 01 Feb 01 - 01:36 PM

As promised earlier in this thread, I have now installed the Auld/Hill Esperanto Geordie (which is the first version of it I ever heard, as sung by Margaret Hill, lo these many (28?!) years ago) on my website.

Liland


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Ian HP
Date: 01 Feb 01 - 02:14 PM

I've just recorded a version of Geordie. Love the song, and the mystery about its origins. Here's what I say in the liner notes:

GEORDIE is an English song about a disproportionate punishment for a crime which evolved from a Scottish song about a frame-up. The historical basis of the ballad is much disputed. Some suggest it is based on the life of George Gordon (1512-1562), fourth Earl of Huntly and son of Margaret Stewart, an "illegitimate" daughter of James IV. George Gordon was imprisoned in 1554 for failing to execute a commission against a Highland robber. He was threatened with death but was fined and freed. However, according to James Kinsley's second edition of *The Oxford Book of Ballads*, Geordie may have been the sixth Earl of Huntly who rose against James VI in 1589, was imprisoned as a traitor, and later freed. But a blackletter broadside (a 17th or early 18th century ballad sheet in Old English/Gothic type) names Geordie as George Stoole of Northumberland who was executed in 1610. Whatever the origin may be, the song has gone through the inevitable 'Chinese whispers' oral process to reach its current forms. Geordie is now found guilty of stealing either sixteen of the king's white steeds or sixteen of his wild, white, fat or royal deer or indeed the lord judge's deer or five pearls, he sold them either in Bohenny or in the army or in a hurry, and his true love has an alarming variation in the number of pretty babies that she has got, though she always has a bun in the oven.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GEORDIE (Fabrizio de Andrè)
From: GUEST,Vittorio
Date: 01 Feb 04 - 06:20 AM

There is an Italian version of Geordie by Fabrizio de Andrè. It's the last song of b side in Nuvole Barocche (1969). Here are the lyrics:

Mentre attraversavo London Bridge
un giorno senza sole
vidi una donna pianger d'amore,
piangeva per il suo Geordie.

Impiccheranno Geordie con una corda d'oro,
è un privilegio raro.
Rubò sei cervi nel parco del re
vendendoli per denaro.

Sellate il suo cavallo dalla bianca criniera
sellatele il suo pony
cavalcherà fino a Londra stasera
ad implorare per Geordie

Geordie non rubò mai neppure per me
un frutto o un fiore raro.
Rubò sei cervi nel parco del re
vendendoli per denaro.

Salvate le sue labbra, salvate il suo sorriso,
non ha vent'anni ancora
cadrà l'inverno anche sopra il suo viso,
potrete impiccarlo allora

Nè il cuore degli inglesi nè lo scettro del re
Geordie potran salvare,
anche se piangeran con te
la legge non può cambiare.

Così lo impiccheranno con una corda d'oro,
è un privilegio raro.

Rubò sei cervi nel parco del re
vendendoli per denaro.


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Alex.S
Date: 01 Feb 04 - 12:30 PM

Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger sing a beautiful version of "Geordie" in which 16 white steeds are stolen.


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,fulero91@hotmail.com
Date: 20 May 04 - 09:04 AM


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Amos
Date: 20 May 04 - 01:47 PM

Amazing to see it in Italian -- how old is that?

A


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Roberto
Date: 21 May 04 - 04:31 AM

Geordie in Italian is not an original italian version of the ballad, but a translation. Fabrizio De André recorded it. There are also Italian versions of the Child Ballads, the most widespread of them being L'Avvelenato, that is Lord Randall. Costantino Nigra, who knew Francis James Child's work, collected these ballads in XIX Century.


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Roberto
Date: 21 May 04 - 04:52 AM

16 recordings of Geordie available on CD or LP, plus 3 recordings of the Geordie that starts with "there was a battle in the North", plus MacColl's version of the bog o' Gight's type, all with the transcription of the first stanza.

Georgie
Harry Cox, The Bonny Labouring Boy, Traditional songs & tunes from a Norfolk farm worker, Topic TSCD5120, ballad recorded 1958
As I walked over London Bridge
One midsummer's morning early
There I beheld a fair lady
Lamenting for her Georgie

Georgie
Peter Bellamy, Mainly Norfolk, XTRA 1060, 1968
As I walked over London Bridge
One misty morning early
There I overheard some fair lady
Lamenting for her Georgie

Georgie
A. L. Lloyd, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads (The Child Ballads) sung by Ewan MacColl and A. L. Lloyd, vol. IV, Washington 718; The English and Scottish Popular Ballads (The Child Ballads) sung by Ewan MacColl and A. L. Lloyd, vol. II, Riverside RLP 12-623/624
Come bridle me my milk-white steed
Come bridle me my pony
That I may ride to London town
To plead for my Georgie

Georgie
Ewan MacColl, The Manchester Angel, Tradition 2059, LP (196?), from the version sung by Henry Hughes
Once I had such a purty little boy
As good a little boy as any
That would run five miles in one half-an-hour
With a letter to me Georgie

Geordie
Martin Carthy, Crown of Horn, Topic TSCD300, first lp release, 1976
Now as I rode out over London Bridge
On a misty morning early
I overheard a fair pretty maid
A-cry for the life of her Geordie

Georgie
Levi Smith, on My father's the king of the gypsies, Music of English & Welsh travellers & gypsies, The Voice of the People vol.11, Topic TSCD 661, ballad recorded 1974, originally released on Topic 12T25
What did Georgie done on Shooter's Hill?
Did he stoled or murder by many?
Yes, he stoled sixteen of the Lord Judge's deers
And we sold them down under the valley

Georgie
Jasper Smith, on Here's Luck to a Man... – Gypsy Songs and Music from South-East England, Musical Traditions Records, MTCD320, ballad recorded 1974
Come saddle to me, said, my lily-white breast
Come saddle to me, said, my pony
I'm willing to ride all before the Lord Judge
But I'll fight for the life of my Georgie

Georgie
Martin Carthy, Signs of Life, Topic TSCD503, 1998
Once I had such a good little boy
A pretty boy quick as any
He would run five miles in one half an hour
A letter to pardon my Georgie

Geordie
Jo Freya, Traditional Songs of England, Saydisc CD-SDL 402, 1993
As I came over London Bridge
One misty morning early
I overheard a fair pretty maid
Lamenting for her Geordie

Spare Me The Life Of Geordie
Rod Bailey, New Bell Wake, Roy Bailey. 1976. Digitally Remastered, Fuse Records, Fuse CFCD 262
As I rode over London Bridge
'T was on one morning early
There I espied a fair lady
Lamenting for her Georgie

As I Walked Over London's Bridge
Sam Russell, Virginia Tradition, Ballads from British tradition, Global Village Music CD1002; ballad recorded 1936
As I walked over London Bridge
So early in the morning
I overheard some fair one say:
Lord, spare me the life of Georgie
I overheard some fair one say:
Lord, spare me the life of Georgie

Georgie
Doc Watson, on Songcatcher II, The tradition that inspired the movie, Vanguard 79716, 2002
As I walked over London Bridge
One misty morning early
I heard some fair young maiden say -
Lord, spare me the life of Georgie

Georgie
Martin Simpson, Righteousness & Humidity, Topic TSCD540, 2003
As I rode over London Bridge
So early in the morning
I overheard a fair bonnie maid
Saying – Spare me the life of my Georgie
I overheard a fair bonnie maid
Saying – Spare me the life of my Georgie

Geordie
Paul Clayton, British Broadside Ballads in Popular Tradition, Folkways FW 8708, 1957
My Geordie shall be hanged in a golden chain
That's a chain of many
He stole sixteen of the king's wild deers
And he sold them in Bohenny
He stole sixteen of the king's wild deers
And he sold them in Bohenny

Geordie
Peggy Seeger, on Blood and Roses vol.3, Traditional ballads from Scotland and North America, sung by Ewan MacColl & Peggy Seeger, Blackthorn Records ESB 81, 1982 (ballad from the singing of Mrs. Evelyn Skaggs of Wayton, Arkansas
As I walked over old London's Bridge
It was in the morning early
There I espied a most pretty fair maid
Lamenting for her Georgie

Geordie
Joan Baez, In Concert, Vanguard 79598-2, frst released in 1962
As I walked out over London bridge
One misty morning early
I overheard a fair pretty maid
Was lamenting for her Geordie

Geordie
June Tabor, on Maddy Prior & June Tabor, Silly Sisters, Shanachie SH 79040, 1988
There was a battle in the north
And nobles there were many
And they have killed Sir Charlie Hay
And laid the blame on Geordie

Geordie
Alistair Hulett, on The Complete Songs of Robert Burns, vol.7, Linn Records CKD 107, 1999
There was a battle in the north
And nobles they were many
And they hae kill'd Sir Charlie Hay
And pit the wyte on Geordie

Geordie Gordon
Robin Williamson, A Job Of Journey Work, Pig's Whisker Music PWMD5010, 1998
Oh there was a battle in the North
Nobles there were many
There was killed the King's good friend
And they laid the blame on Geordie

Geordie (The Bog o' Gight)
Ewan MacColl, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads Vol.2, Folkways FG 3510, 1964
Will ye gang tae the Hielands, my bonnie, bonnie love?
Will ye gang tae the Hielands wi' Geordie?
And I'll tak' the high road and ye'll tak' the low
And I'll be in the Hielands afore ye


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,elisa
Date: 20 Oct 04 - 11:46 PM

There is a beautiful version of this by either pentangle or the trees. very rare. In my opinion the best version. better than joan baez


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: padgett
Date: 21 Oct 04 - 05:39 AM

A fairly recent edition of Living Tradition carried a researched article by Nick Caffery of T'Antiques, wherein he took a close look at Geordie and the different songs under this title, well worth a look, as too is a subscription to Living Tradition!
Ray Padgett


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Subject: Lyr Add: GEORDIE (from Maddy Prior/June Tabor)
From: Reiver 2
Date: 21 Oct 04 - 06:03 PM

I have the song Geordie from the Joan Baez Songbook, but never tried to sing it. Reiver 1 and I sang the version we learned from listening to The Silly Sisters. They look to me like two entirely different songs, that just happen to be named "Geordie." Do the two actually have any common root? And is the tune really the same? I'd be very much interested in the historical (if they are historical) events related in the Maddy Prior/June Tabor version which are:

GEORDIE

There was a battle in the north and nobles there were many
And they have killed Sir Charlie Hay and laid the blame on Geordie.
Oh he has written a long letter and sent it to his lady,
"You must come to Edinb'ro Town to see wha' kens o'Geordie."

When first she looked the letter on, she looked both red and rosy.
She had not read a word or twa, she grew pale as the lily.
"Gae fetch tae me my good grey steed, fine men shall a' go wi' me,
For I shall neither eat nor drink 'til Ed'nb'ro Town shall see me."

She's mounted on her good grey steed, her men they all went wi' her,
And she did neither eat nor drink 'till Edinb'ro Town did see her.
And first appeared the fatal block and then the axe tae head him,
And Geordie comin' doon the stairs wi' bands of iron upon him.

Tho' he was chained in fetters strang, of iron and steel sae heavy
Oh, not a one in a' the court was sae fine a man as Geordie.
Oh, she's doon on her bended knee, and sure she's pale and weary,
"Oh, pardon, pardon noble King, and gie me back my dearie."

"Go tell the headin' man make haste" oor King replied full lordly.
"Oh noble King, tak a' that's mine, but gie me back my Geordie."
The Gordons cam and the Gordons ran, and they were stark and steady
And, aye, the word amang them a' was "Gordons keep ye ready."

Then an aged lord at the Kings right hand says "Noble King but hear me.
Let her count out five-thousand pounds and gie her back her dearie."
Some gave her marks, some gave her crowns, some gave her dollars many
She's counted oot five-thousand pounds an' she's gotten agin' her dearie.

She blinket blythe then at Geordie's face, says, "Dear I've bought thee, Geordie,
But the blood would ha' flowed upon the green before I lost my laddie."
He clasped her by the middle sma' and he kissed her lips sae rosy,
"The fairest floor o' womankind is my sweet bonnie Lady."

**************
I've always wondered where the people who cotributed to Geordie's ransom were able to obtain the "dollars many", but other than that I think it's a great song! Of course, hearing it sung by Maddie and June makes it nearly impossible NOT to like.

Reiver 2


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 Oct 04 - 07:59 PM

Received wisdom in the past was that the Scottish song was the earlier, but the more I learn, the more I am inclined to doubt that. The tunes are not related, though Frank Kidson printed an English tune with a Scottish text set to it (Traditional Tunes, 1891, 24-26) which may have confused matters.

"Silly Sisters" recorded a slightly Anglicised arrangement of the set supplied by Robert Burns for the Scots Musical Museum; the SMM set is in the DT (see links above). "Dollar" (from thaler) was a well-known term for currency long before the USA was thought of, of course.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GEORDIE (Cunningham, 1825)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Sep 09 - 09:06 AM

From The Songs of Scotland, Ancient and Modern, Vol. II, by Allan Cunningham (London: John Taylor, 1825), page 186:


GEORDIE.

There was a battle in the north,
And it was fought right proudlie;
And they have slain Sir Charlie Hay,
And laid the wyte on Geordie.
Now he has written a lang letter—
O busk my bonnie ladie;
And haste, and come to Edinbrugh town,
And see what comes o' Geordie.

Whan first she looked the letter on,
She grew baith red and rosie;
But when she read a word or twa,
She wallow't like a lilie:
O saddle to me my gude gray steed—
My Gordons all come wi' me;
For I shall neither eat nor drink
Till my gude lord shall see me.

And soon she came to the water broad,
Nor boat nor barge was ready;
She turned her horse's head to the flood,
And swam through at Queensferry:
But when she to the presence came,
'Mang earls, high and lordlie;
There hat on head sat every man—
While hat in hand stood Geordie.

And there it stood, the fatal block;
The axe was sharp and ready:
Nor did the colour quit his cheek,
Nor was his step unsteady.
Though he was chained in fetters strang,
He looked both bold and lordlie:
O monie a gallant earl I've seen,
But neer a ane like Geordie.

That lady knelt low on her knee—
I wot both pale and wearie:—
O pardon, pardon, noble king,
And gie me back my dearie!
I have borne seven sons to my gude lord—
The seventh ne'er saw his daddie:—
O pity, pity, thou noble king!
O pity a woeful lady!

Gae bid the heading-man make haste,
The king said, stern and lordlie.
O noble king, take all that's mine—
But gie me back my Geordie.
The Gordons gude came gathering round—
A stark band and a steady;
And ay the word among them a'
Was, Gordons keep you ready.

An old lord at the king's right hand
Says, noble king, but hear me:—
Gar her pay down five thousand pound,
And gie her back her dearie.
Some gae her merks, some gae her crowns,
And bonnet pieces many;
And she's told down five thousand pounds,
And gotten again her dearie.

She blinkit blythe in her Geordie's face,
Says, dear I've bought thee, Geordie;
But there should been bloody sarks in the court
Ere I had tint my laddie.
He claspet her by the middle sae sma,
And he kist her lips fu' ready—
The fairest flower of womankind
Is my sweet bonnie lady.

This genuine old song relates to some forgotten feud between the powerful Gordons and Hays. The third verse is restored from the recitation of Mrs. Cunningham, and is one of the finest verses in the song. The courage of the lady in braving the flood, and the appearance of her lord abiding the judgment of his peers and his king, are briefly and naturally told. The concluding verse, too, is very characteristic. The lady was alike prepared to purchase her husband's freedom by silver or by sword; and like a prudent heroine, she chose the safest way and the best. It was first printed in the Museum, from a copy supplied by Burns, which, perhaps, accounts for the excellence of the concluding verse.


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: IanC
Date: 03 Sep 09 - 09:19 AM

Interesting ...

I'm not sure Allan Cunningham would have known what a genuine old song was even if he'd been strangled by one.

It's certain that the particular book from which this one comes was literally full of forgeries by Cunningham (he later confessed to quite a few of them).

I particularly like the idea of the 3rd verse being restored from the recitation of Mrs. Cunningham.

;-)


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Tradsinger
Date: 03 Sep 09 - 03:58 PM

I recorded a Hampshire version. collected by Alice Gillington from New Forest gypsies which she called "The Warminster Song" for some reason. See http://www.cmarge.demon.co.uk/gwilym/Stepaway.html. In this version, Geordie becomes Georgie.

Tradsinger


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,Helmer
Date: 05 Feb 11 - 07:32 AM

There is a danish version made by Gasolin called "Langebro(the name of a danish bridge)".... It is very popular i Denmark and is sees as one of the band biggest hits..


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Apr 11 - 02:08 AM

I'm a little behind on Jon Boden's "A Folk Song a Day" project. It's been a busy month. The song for April 27 is Geordie. Jon Boden's version is quite different from the ones I'm familiar with. I identified this song with several winsome distaff singers, who all sing this song in a way that "arouses my sensitivities." I find that Martin Carthy and Paul Clayton and Bert Lloyd use the same tune as the winsome women. It's with some relief that I find that Frank Hamilton used a different tune on Frank Hamilton Sings Folk Songs, since I'm not sure I want to have my sensitivities aroused by Frank Hamilton....
Anyhow Frank's version is quite different, and I like it. Where's you get your version, Frank?
...and I like Jon Boden's version, too - but I don't mind having my sensitivities aroused by the winsome women. The version by Baez is sexy as hell. The Silly Sisters version is very different - I wonder where that one comes from.

-Joe-


Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

Geordie [Child 209]

DESCRIPTION: Geordie is taken (for killing a man or the king's deer). When word comes to his lady, she sets out to do all possible to save his life. In most accounts she raises his ransom, though in others Geordie is executed
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1792 (Scots Musical Museum)
KEYWORDS: execution hunting punishment rescue wife
FOUND IN: Britain(Scotland(Aber,Bord),England(All)) US(Ap,MA,MW,NE,NW,SE,So) Canada(Mar,Newf)
REFERENCES (46 citations):
Child 209, "Geordie" (15 texts)
Bronson 209, "Geordie" (58 versions)
GlenbuchatBallads, pp. 180-182, "The Lady O Gight" (1 text)
Greig #75, p. 1, "Gight's Lady" (1 text)
GreigDuncan2 249, "Gightie's Lady" (11 texts, 6 tunes) {A=Bronson's #3, C=#37?, D=#34}
Lyle-Crawfurd2 197, "The Stealing of the King's Deer" (1 text)
Kidson-Tunes, pp. 24-26, "Geordie" (1 text, 1 tune)
Reeves-Circle 49, "Georgie" (2 texts)
BroadwoodCarols, pp. 32-33, "Georgie or Banstead Downs" (1 text, 1 tune)
Palmer-ECS, #42, "Spare Me the Life of Georgie" (1 text, 1 tune)
OShaughnessy-Grainger 8, "Georgie" (1 text, 1 tune)
BarryEckstormSmyth p. 475, "Geordie" (notes only)
Flanders-Ancient3, pp. 231-235, "Geordie" (2 texts, 1 tune)
Belden, pp. 76-78, "Geordie" (3 texts)
Randolph 28, "The Life of Georgie" (3 texts plus 1 excerpt, 2 tunes) {Randolph's A=Bronson's #36, D=#40}
Randolph/Cohen, pp. 52-53, "The Life of Georgie" (1 text, 1 tune -- Randolph's 28D) {Bronson's #40}
Davis-Ballads 39, "Geordie" (3 texts plus a fragment, 1 tune entitled "Georgie") {Bronson's #30}
Davis-More 34, pp. 262-266, "Geordie" (1 text, 1 tune)
BrownII 38, "Geordie" (1 text, in which the condemned man is "Georgia"!)
BrownSchinhanIV 38, "Geordie" (2 texts plus 3 excerpts, 5 tunes)
Scarborough-SongCatcher, pp. 213-215, "Geordie" (1 text, with local title "Georgy-O," plus an excerpt from Christie; 1 tune on p.411) {Bronson's #5}
Chappell-FSRA 17, "Johnny Wedlock" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #49}
Moore-Southwest 40, "Georgie" (1 text, 1 tune)
Flanders/Brown, pp. 241-242, "Charley's Escape" (1 text from the Green Mountain Songster)
Greenleaf/Mansfield 17, "Lovely Georgie" (1 text)
Creighton-Maritime, p. 27, "Geordie" (1 text, 1 tune)
Creighton/Senior, pp. 73-75, "Geordie" (2 texts plus 1 fragment, 1 tune) {Bronson's #23}
Gardner/Chickering 128, "Georgie" (1 fragment)
Musick-Larkin 41, "Georgia" (1 text)
Leach, pp. 554-559, "Geordie" (3 texts)
Sharp-100E 9, "Geordie" (1 text, 1 tune)
Niles 53, "Geordie" (1 text, 1 tune)
SharpAp 34, "Geordie" (4 short texts plus 2 fragments, 6 tunes){Bronson's #50, #31, #51, #30, #55, #41}
Sharp/Karpeles-80E 24, "Georgie" (1 text, 1 tune -- a composite version) {Bronson's #30}
Wells, pp. 118-119, "Georgie" (1 text, 1 tune) {
Vaughan Williams/Lloyd, pp. 42-43, "Geordie" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #27}
Hodgart, p. 135, "Geordie" (1 text)
JHCox 23, "Geordie" (1 text)
Ord, pp. 408-410, "Gight's Ladye"; pp. 456-457, "My Geordie, O, My Geordie O" (2 texts, 1 tune) {Bronson's #4}
MacSeegTrav 16, "Geordie" (2 texts, 2 tunes)
Whitelaw-Ballads, pp. 567-568, "Geordie" (2 texts)
Silber-FSWB, p. 220, "Geordie" (1 text)
BBI, ZN279, "As I went over London Bridge"
DT 209, GEORDI GEORDI2* GEORDI4*
ADDITIONAL: James Johnson, The Scots Musical Museum (Edinburgh: Johnson & Co, 1792 ("Digitized by Internet Archive for NLS")), Vol. IV, #346 (second text) pp. 356-357, "Geordie - An Old Ballad") (1 text, 1 tune [of "A Country Life"]) {Bronson's #1}
James Kinsley, editor, Burns: Complete Poems and Songs (shorter edition, Oxford, 1969) #358, pp. 491-492, "Geordie -- An old Ballad" (1 text, 1 tune, from 1792)

Roud #90
RECORDINGS:
Harry Cox, "Georgie (Geordie)" (on FSB5, FSBBAL2) {Bronson's #24}
Paul Joines, "The Hanging of Georgie" (on Persis1)
Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, "Georgie" (on ENMacCollSeeger02)
Levi Smith, "Georgie" (on Voice11)

BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Harding B 11(1797), "The Life of Georgey," H. Such (London), 1849-1862; also Harding B 25(488), "Death of Georgy", W. Armstrong (Liverpool), 1820-1824; also Firth c.21(20), Harding B 11(2297), "Maid's Lamentation for her Georgy"
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "The Prisoner at the Bar (The Judge and Jury)" (plot)
cf. "Young Johnson" (theme of ransoming condemned prisoner)
cf. "George of Oxford" (theme and some lines) and source/stemmatic discussion there
cf. "The Death of George Stoole" (theme and some lines)
ALTERNATE TITLES:
The Death of Geordie
The Bog o' Gight
The Braes o' Gight
The Lady o' Gight
NOTES: The historical antecedents of this ballad are disputed. Some suggest that it is based on the life of George Gordon (1512-1562), Fourth Earl of Huntley, the son of Margaret Stewart, she being an illegitimate daughter of James IV. A blackletter ballad cited by Lloyd names Geordie as George Stoole of Northumberland, executed in 1610, but Lloyd suggests the ballad itself predates the 17th century. - PJS, RBW
To the above list of possibilities, I'm going to add one other possibility, though it is later than Lloyd's broadside. But it might have caused the song to be reshaped. According to Susan Maclean Kybett, Bonnie Prince Charlie, Dodd Mead, 1988, pp. 16-17, after the 1715 Jacobite rebellion, several peers (including, e.g., Lord Derwentwater) were condemned to death. One of them was William Maxwell of Nithsdale. His wife Winifred begged before George I for his life. Her request was refused, but she was granted a last visit -- and managed to help him escape.
I must admit to sometimes wondering if this is really a single ballad. In most texts, of course, Geordie is charged with murder. But in a few texts, such as Child's "H" and Ord's version "Gight's Ladye," the charge is poaching, and the whole feeling of the song (as well as the lyrics) is different. Coffin's notes in Flanders-Ancient3 observes that there are two endings, one with Geordie ransomed, one with him executed, and that these seem to form distinct family groups. I wouldn't be surprised if two separate songs were mixed.
On this point, see now Ben Schwartz's note below and, especially, his analysis filed under "George of Oxford." - RBW
Kidson-Tunes prints eleven of the Johnson Scot's Museum fourteen verse text (Child 209A). I believe only the Scottish ballad should be classified as Child 209 and that all others, English and North American, and Bodleian broadsides, are versions of "George of Oxford." I think the argument is futile because "George of Oxford" and its descendants are widely -- though not universally -- accepted as Child 209. See the discussion at "George of Oxford." - BS
Last updated in version 3.7
File: C209

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The Ballad Index Copyright 2015 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Tradsinger
Date: 27 Apr 11 - 04:03 AM

I recorded a Hampshire version. See http://www.cmarge.demon.co.uk/gwilym/Stepaway.html.

Tradsinger


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,Eric Smee
Date: 21 Dec 12 - 08:40 AM

I always assumed Bohenny was a slight but typical, change of spelling for Bohenie surely that's more likely than Bohemia?
I realise this posting is a bit late but I just came across this page by accident

Bohenie is near Pitlochry. Scotland. so just the sort of place a London Judge fell he had jurisdiction over


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Jack Campin
Date: 21 Dec 12 - 09:30 AM

One thing to check for historical plausibility: the Scottish version quoted here has Geordie accused of murder. Fine. But you wouldn't expect any Scottish version to have him accused of stealing, since unlike in England, that wasn't a capital offence. (Early modern Scotland executed surprisingly few people).


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: DMcG
Date: 22 Dec 12 - 03:44 AM

I always assumed Bohenny was a slight but typical, change of spelling for Bohenie surely that's more likely than Bohemia?

In a literal sense, maybe, but maybe not in a figurative sense.   Here's a clip from the ever-reliable (*smile*) Wikipedia:

----
Bohemianism is the practice of an unconventional lifestyle, often in the company of like-minded people, with few permanent ties, involving musical, artistic, or literary pursuits. In this context, Bohemians may be wanderers, adventurers, or vagabonds.[citation needed]

This use of the word bohemian first appeared in the English language in the nineteenth century

The term Bohemianism emerged in France in the early nineteenth century when artists and creators began to concentrate in the lower-rent, lower class, gypsy neighborhoods. Bohémien was a common term for the Romani people of France, who had reached Western Europe via Bohemia.
----

Now, Child's versions are listed from 1792, so it is at least possible that selling them in Bohemia was understood to be analogous to buying something from 'a man in a pub': a sort of no-questions-asked deal. It needs someone much more knowledgable than me to say whether there is any merit in this idea (Malcolm Douglas, RIP: sorely missed)


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,Richie
Date: 21 Feb 13 - 01:46 PM

Does anyone know the source of Peggy Seeger's US version or Geordie. On Blood and Roses, third CD. It's posted above it begins:

As I walked over old London's Bridge
It was in the morning early
There I espied a pretty fair maid
Lamenting for her Geordie

She said "now saddle me my bly,
go bridle him right gaily,
and I will ride this live long night
and beg for the life of Geordie."

TY

R-


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Rumncoke
Date: 21 Feb 13 - 03:42 PM

I sing a version which I believe comes from the Oxford book of Ballads and is quite like the Scottish ones.

The line I use is 'there'd been bluidy bouick on the green had I tint my laddie' - that is blood stained corpses - but it is not something I sing often as most people get about 50 percent of the words and very little of the meaning.

The lady sallowed like a lily - not wallow't, her mesnie (household) went with her - but it varies in only small ways.

I think that dollars were Spanish coins, of gold.


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,Richie
Date: 23 Feb 13 - 02:06 AM

The DT version with music from Canada, it begins:

As I walked over London bridge
Oh so early in the morning,
It was there I met a pretty fair maid
All lamenting for her Geordie.

What has he done? Who has he killed?
Has he murdered anybody?"
"No, he stole five pearls from the royal king
And he sold them in a hurry."


Attributed to Folk Songs of Canada, Fowkes. I have the 1954 book and Geordie is not in there. Where is it from? Who was the informant?

Richie


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 23 Feb 13 - 09:18 AM

Richie - according to the Roud index it's in Fowke & Johnston, Folk Songs of Canada 2 pp.26-27 (1967 edition). It was collected by Helen Creighton, May 52 at Middle River, NS from Nathan Hatt. It's the version in Creighton's Maritime Folk Songs (p27 in my copy)

Mick


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,Semiotic
Date: 23 Feb 13 - 09:53 AM

Strange no one mentioned (unless I have missed it) the version that Frankie Armstrong used to sing that was collected under the title of Georgie, along with other songs, in 1967 from Janie Butcher in Brentford Middlesex.


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,Richie
Date: 23 Feb 13 - 03:37 PM

Hi,

Thanks Mick, Perhaps you or someone else can verify teh date and source of this version also in the DT:

GEORGEY- Contentment, or, The compleat Nutmeg-State songster - Page 93
Jim Douglas - 1987

As I walk'd over London Bridge;
'Twas in the morning early
'Twas there I met with this Good Lady
Pleading for the Life of Georgey.

Come saddle to me your milk white steed,
And bridle him so neatly,
That I may away to my Good Lord Judge,
And Plead for the life of Georgey.


From Thomas Fanning's "Notebook, 1779-1780. Thomas Fanning served in Samuel Blachley Webb's Connecticut Regiment until 1780.

Is this version from c. 1779? Connecticut?

R-


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,Richie
Date: 24 Feb 13 - 01:24 AM

Here's the US/Canada versions I've put on:

Charley's Escape- (VT) pre1823 Green Mountian Songster
Georgia- Larkin (IL) 1868 Musick JOAFL
The Life of Georgia- Ashby (MO) c.1870 Belden A
George E. Wedlock- Dusenbury (AR) 1875 Randolph C
Georgie- Jencks (MI) c. 1876 Gardner
Georgie- Chandler (OK) 1896 Moore
Georgie- Dunaway (AR) c 1897 Randolph D
Go Saddle Me- Wormser (MO) 1909 Belden B
Georgia- Shibley (MO) 1911 Belden C
Charlie Condemned- Williams (KY) 1911 Thomas
Geordie- (NE) pre1915 Pound BK
Charlie (Geordie)- Wells (NC) 1916 Sharp A
Charlie (Geordie)- Gentry (NC) 1916 Sharp B
Charlie (Geordie)- Buckner (NC) 1916 Sharp C
Georgie- McAtee (WV) pre1917 Richardson-Cox
Go Saddle Up- McAtee (WV) 1918 JOAFL
Georgie (Geordie)- Donald (VA) 1918 Sharp D
Charlie and Sallie- Elliott (PA) 1919 Shoemaker
Georgie (Geordie)- Bowyer (VA) 1918 Sharp E
Georgie (Geordie)- Boone (NC) 1918 Sharp F
Georgie- McNeill (NC) c. 1921 Brown No. 38(4)
Georgie- Hart (VA) 1921 Davis A
Geordie- Mulleins (VA) 1921 Davis C
   Geordie- (VA) 1921 Davis D
Johnny Wedlock- Tillett (NC) 1924 Chappell
The Life of Georgie- Underwood (MO) 1928 Randolph A
Georgie- Waddell (MO) 1930 Randolph B
Georgie- Stikeleather (NC) 1925 Gordon
Lovely Georgie- Simmonds (NL) 1930 Greenleaf
The Death of Geordie- Russell (VA) 1932 Niles
London's Bridge- Russell (VA) Davis 1932
Georgie (Geordie)- McAllister (VA) 1935 Wilkinson
As I Walked Out on London Bridge- Russell (VA) 1936
Georgie- Devlin (NJ) c.1938 Lomax REC; BK
Georgia- York (NC) 1939 Brown Collection
Geordie- Webb (NC) pre1940 Brown Collection
The Life of Georgie- Richards (NH) 1942 Flanders
Geordie- Bray (NS) pre1950 Creighton A
Geordie- Dodson (NS) pre1950 Creighton B
Geordie- Kennedy (NS) pre1950 Creighton C
Georgie- Mehrten (CA) 1952 Cowell
Georgie- Mehrten, Dorothy (CA) 1952 Cowell
Geordie- Hatt (NS) 1952 Fowkes BK
Georgie- Gaunt (RI) c.1954 Leach
Georgie- Skaggs (AR) 1954 Parler B
Georgie- Sigmund (AR) 1955 Parler A
Geordie- Pease (WV-MA) pre1957 Musick
Geordie- Hackler (KY) pre1957 Roberts
Georgie- McAllister (VA) 1959 Clayton and Foss
Georgie- O'Bryant (KS) c.1959 Hunter B
The Hanging of Georgie- Joines (NC) pre1968 REC
Georgie- Hayes (TX) 1969 Hunter A
Georgie- Watson (NC) pre1970 Rinzler
Georgie and Sally- Ayers (WV) pre1975 Gainer
Georgey- Fanning (CT) c.1779 Douglas

You can access the individual version here:

http://bluegrassmessengers.com/us--canada-versions-209-geordie.aspx

I'm missing a few versions listed on the page,

Richie


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 25 Feb 13 - 05:38 AM

It is arguable whether the ballad concerning the Scottish lord who is ransomed by his wife and that concerning the English poacher who hangs are variants of the same ballad or two different ballads with some elements in common. Child consigned the latter to an appendix, which seems reasonable. He considered the first two stanzas of his F to have crept into the former from the latter, which seems plausible.

The latter seems to have been more widely collected and has certainly been more widely sung in the Revival, but the opening (which is fairly consistent in most versions) is confused. The lady's calling for a horse, to take her to plead with the judge, surely ought to happen before the narrator encounters her on London Bridge.

Richard


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 25 Feb 13 - 06:21 AM

Richie - re the Fanning version. I can't see any previews of the Compleat... but if Fanning was the source (as stated), then I'd assume the lyrics are from that time. I can't find out anything about the notebook, so it's not possible to tell what period the notebook spanned. There is a version of Lowlands of Holland on site here from his notebook and the tune is taken from elsewhere, so I presume the songs appear without tunes in the notebook.

It really could do with someone getting a look at the Compleat Nutmeg-State Songster! (As far as I can see it's not listed in Roud - not under Georgey from USA or any Georgie-title from Connecticut. So there's no independent corroboration there).

Mick


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Subject: RE: versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,Nightingaol
Date: 24 Jun 13 - 04:25 PM

I recently heard Pete Coe sing a version of Geordie where there is only one deer stolen - to feed the children. This appeals to me but I cannot find it!! Help please -I need to learn it for September!!
Cheers everyone


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 24 Jun 13 - 04:46 PM

Peggy Seeger's version was from the singing of Evelyn Skaggs, Wayton, Arkansas


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 24 Jun 13 - 06:07 PM

For what it's worth, Sharp collected 6 versions in Appalachia.


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Subject: RE: How many versions of Geordie
From: GUEST,AE
Date: 26 Mar 16 - 12:15 AM

Richard Dawson - 2014/15
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nIPOJbRwhE


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