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Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You

DigiTrad:
ALL I WANT IS A HANDSOME MAN or RIPEST APPLES
CHESTER CITY
OH, NO JOHN


Related threads:
Lyr/Chords Req: On a mountain stands a lady (22)
Lyr Req: Laurie of the Duram (6)
Lyr Req: Urgent need help -found- No John No (10)
Lyr Add: No Sir, No Sir (3)
Lyr Req: Oh No John Parody (8)
(origins) Lyr Add: No, John, No (8)
No Sir (4)


Steve Gardham 18 Nov 17 - 03:32 PM
Richie 17 Nov 17 - 09:00 PM
Richie 17 Nov 17 - 08:49 PM
Richie 22 Oct 17 - 12:03 AM
Richie 21 Oct 17 - 01:11 PM
Steve Gardham 21 Oct 17 - 12:52 PM
Richie 21 Oct 17 - 12:42 PM
Richie 16 Oct 17 - 09:53 AM
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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Nov 17 - 03:32 PM

Great stuff, Richie!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 17 Nov 17 - 09:00 PM

Hi,

British (Aussie) versions are here: http://bluegrassmessengers.com/british-versions-8c-on-a-mountain-stands-a-lady.aspx

The US/ Canada versions are here: http://bluegrassmessengers.com/us--canada-vers-8c-on-a-mountain-stands-a-lady.aspx

The article, "The Lady on the Mountain: A Century of Play Rhyme Tradition" by Nigel G.N. Kelsey (1985) is on my Recordings & Info page,

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 17 Nov 17 - 08:49 PM

Hi,

Long time, no post :) Here is the finished study of "On the Mountain Stands a Lady": http://bluegrassmessengers.com/8c-on-a-mountain-stands-a-lady.aspx I've rewritten it.

These are the versions and how they are organized:

8C. On a Mountain Stands a Lady (Children's game song variants) Roud 2603; "There Stands a Lady" (Sharp); "There Stands a Lady on the Mountain;" "Yonder Stands a Lovely Lady;" "There She Stands a Lovely Creature;" "Lady on the Mountain" (Opie); "Lady on Yonder Hill;"

A. Nursery songs (stanzas of "Madam" sung by children)
a. "Madam I Am Come to Court You," published by Halliwell-Phillips in a number of books of nursery rhymes including the 1846 book, "The Nursery Rhymes of England, obtained principally from oral tradition."
b. "There She Stands, a Lovely Creature" from New York Games and songs of American children, collected and compared by W.W. Newell by American children, 1883.

B. Nursery songs texts (stanzas of "Madam" with game instructions)
a. "Here she stands, a lovely creature," sung by Washington children. From Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, Volume 37, 1886; "Song Games and Myth Dramas at Washington," by W. H. Babcock.
b. "Here Stands a Lovely Creature," from "Singing games," a 1890 book of children's game songs, by Josephine Pollard (1834-1892) and Ferdinand Schuyler Matthews (1854-1938). Published in New York by McLoughlin Bros.
c. "A Spanish Lady." A Cornwall informant quotes (Dec. 11, 1909) a version formerly heard at Colborne, Ont., which he supposes to be Irish. From Journal of American Folklore, Volume 31, 1917; "Canadian Folk-Lore from Ontario" by F. W. Waugh.
d. "Here Stands a Lovely Creature" hybrid collected in Australia before 1972 by Ian Turne- see Cinderella Dressed in Yella, New York, 1972; reprinted in The Bulletin of Sydney (December, 1998).

C. Children's game songs with standard "Here Stands a Lady" opening
a. "Yonder stands a lovely lady" (my title) collected by Robert Charles Hope from a Derbyshire servant-girl. From: The Folk-lore Journal, Volume 1 - Page 387, 1883 by Folklore Society (Great Britain).
b. "Here Stands a Lady," from Burne, "Shropshire Folk-Lore II" (1885) p.509 (see also Gomme III)
c. "Stands a lady" from Miss R. L. Husk, "Notes and Queries" 1892, collected in Shipley, Horsham (see also Gomme IV)
d. "The Lady On The Mountain" From "Old Berkshire School Games" by Emma Elizabeth Thofts published in The Antiquary: A Magazine Devoted to the Study of the Past, Volume 27; edited by Edward Walford, George Latimer Apperson, 1893. Reprinted in Gomme as VII.
e. "There's a Lady on the Mountain." From Children's Games communicated by Miss Nina Layard of Ipswich in Suffolk Folk-lore, Issue 37, Part 2 edited by Lady Eveline Camilla Gurdon, 1893.
f. "There Lives a Lady" collected by Miss G. M. Frances of Colchester, Essex, Gomme B. From Dictionary of British Folk-lore, Volume 1, edited by G. Laurence Gomme, 1894.
g. "There Stands a Lady" collected by Miss D. Kimball of Wrotham, Kent, Gomme E. From Dictionary of British Folk-lore, Volume 1, edited by G. Laurence Gomme, 1894.
h. "Lady on the Ocean," collected by(from) Miss Chase of Deptford, Gomme F, from Dictionary of British Folk-lore, Volume 1; edited by G. Laurence Gomme, 1894.
i. "There Stands a Lady." From "Children's Singing-Games"published in the Monthly Packet edited by Colreidge and Innes (London)- page 345, 1897 dated circa May 1896 from a paper compiled by Lucy Finch on the games played at Wing, Rutlandshire. Reprinted in Hinkson's "Victorian Singing Games" (1991) p.37.
j. "There Stands a Lady on the Mountain." Collected by Judge Udal in Dorset, published in Folk-Lore Journal Vol. 7, 1897. See also reprint in "Dorset Children's Doggerel Rhymes" by Herbert Pentin, 1918 Proceedings- Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society.
k. "There Stands a Lady. " From the chapter "Courting Songs" in "The Study of Man" by Alfred Cort Haddon of Inisfail, Cambridge; 1898.
l. "There's a Lady Over Yonder" sung by Miss Jeannie Brown, c. 1907, Greig-Duncan 8 p.143.

D. Children's game songs with standard "Here Stands a Lady" opening which are similar to folk (Mummers) plays
a. "Lady on Yonder Hill" sung by Suffolk children. Gomme's title. From "Children's Games communicated by Miss Nina Layard Ipswich" in Suffolk Folk-lore, Issue 37, Part 2 edited by Lady Eveline Camilla Gurdon, 1893. Reprinted by Gomme in her book, Dictionary of British Folk-lore, Volume 1 as one of two versions of the game song, "Lady on Yonder Hill."
b. "Yonder Stands a Lovely Lady," collected by Robert Charles Hope from a Derbyshire servant-girl. From: The Folk-lore Journal, Volume 1 - Page 387, 1883 by Folklore Society (Great Britain).

E. Children's game songs with standard "Here Stands a Lady" opening that are composites of "Madam Will you Walk (Keys of Heaven)."
a. "There Stands A Lady" (Keys of Heaven) from John Barnett of Bridgwater, Somerset on 12 April, 1906. From: Cecil Sharp Manuscript Collection (at Clare College, Cambridge) (CJS2/10/874) (Singing Game)
b. "There Stands a Lady" (The Keys of Heaven) from Gillington's " Old Surrey Singing Games and Skipping Rope Rhymes" 1909.
c. "There Stands a Lady," collected from girls at Littleport Town Girls' School by Cecil Sharp. 8 Sept 1911 at Littleport, Cambridgeshire.
d. "There Stands a Lady." From Norman Douglas, "London Street Games" (1st edition, 1916) pp. 85-87.
e. "There Stands a Lady." from the TV sitcom series "Liver Birds" set in Liverpool that aired from 1969 to 1979.

F. Children's skipping or jump rope game versions with "On the mountain stands a lady" standard opening followed by invitations for new participants to enter and leave the game.
a. "On a Mountain Stands a Lady," John Hornby, "The Joyous Book of Singing Games." Collected and Arranged with Pianoforte Accompaniments, New York: The Macmillan Co., 1914.
b. "Lady on the Mountain," dated c.1916. From "Clog Clatters in Old Sutton" by Frank Bamber, 1995. Recollection of a childhood spent in Sutton in borough of St. Helens, Merseyside in Lancashire.
c. "On a Hillside Stands a Lady" dated c.1940. From: Southern California Jump-Rope Rhymes: A Study in Variants by Ray B. Browne from Western Folklore, Vol. 14, No. 1 (Jan., 1955), pp. 3-22.
d. "On The Mountain Stands a Lady," c.1945. From: "Childhood Memories of Huyton." Huyton is a borough of Knowsley in Merseyside, Liverpoool.
e. "On the Mountain Stands a Lady," recalled from Cribbs School, Michigan about 1945. From Recollecting the Forties - page 60 by Carol L. Stone, 2000.
f. "On a Mountain Stands a Lady" sung by London girls c. 1948. From Mudcat Discussion Forum as posted by by Desideratum1731 on 23 April, 2011. "We girls sang it when skipping in the 40s and 50s in London."
g. "On a Hill There Lives a Lady," collected by Sue Shanks from Lola Kennedy of Monongalia County, West Virginia before 1948. From: Musick: Hoosier Folklore 7:1 (1948) pp. 11-12.
h. "On the Mountain." From a film of children singing in 1950 at Norton Park School in Edinburgh, Scotland (released 1951). From the short film, "The Singing Street," made in 1950 at Norton Park School in Edinburgh, Scotland by by Nigel McIsaac, Raymond Townsend andf James T. Ritchie.
i. "On the Corner Stands a Lady," c.1950 Roud A. No informant named from Hamphire, 1950s. Taken from Roud's "The Lore of the Playground: One hundred years of children's games" 2010.
j. "On a Mountain Stands a Lady" sung by school children from Edinburgh recorded August, 1954 by Hamlish Henderson; from School of Scottish Studies; SA1954.103.
k. "On a Mountain" from East York Children (Toronto, Ontario) 1959 as collected by Edith Fowke. From Canadian folklore - page 85 by Edith Fowke - 1988 see also "Sally Go Round the Sun: Three Hundred Children's Songs, Rhymes and Games," by Edith Fowke - 1969.
l. "On the Mountain Stands a Lady" No location or date collected given. From Growth Through Play by Albert M. Farina published by Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1959.
m. "On a Mountain Stands a Lad," sung by Lucy Stewart of Old Deer, Aberdeenshire, recorded June, 1960 by Prof. Kenneth Goldstein; From School of Scottish Studies; SA1960.171.
n. "On a Mountain Stands a Lady" sung by Pete Elliot and family of Co. Durham, Birtley. Recorded by MacColl and Seeger. From "The Elliots of Birtley" a 1962 Folkways recording.
o. "On a Mountain Stands a Lady," c.1965 from Mudcat Discussion Forum, 2010 from Guest from Canada.
p. "On a Mountain Stands a Lady," 1968 Callow A, From The James T. Callow Folklore Archive of Detroit Michigan.
q. "On a Mountain," collected in Grand Rapids, Michigan in September, 196, Callow B. From The James T. Callow Folklore Archive.
r. "Jump-Rope Rhyme," Callow C. From The James T. Callow Folklore Archive, collected in Detroit, Michigan in September, 10-15, 1969.
s. "On the Mountain Stands a Lady," dated 1971 Opie B. From Children's games with things: marbles, fivestones, throwing and Catching, Gambling, Hopscotch, Chucking and Pitching, Ball-Bouncing, Skipping, Tops and Tipcat by Iona Archibald Opie and ‎Peter Opie - 1997.
t. "On the Mountain Stands a Castle," from Scotland, 1974 Opie C. From "Children's games with things: marbles, fivestones, throwing and Catching, Gambling, Hopscotch, Chucking and Pitching, Ball-Bouncing, Skipping, Tops and Tipcat" by Iona Archibald Opie, ‎Peter Opie - 1997.
u. "There's a Lady On the Mountain," from Norfolk 1975 Opie D. From Children's games with things: marbles, fivestones, throwing and Catching, Gambling, Hopscotch, Chucking and Pitching, Ball-Bouncing, Skipping, Tops and Tipcat by Iona Archibald Opie, ‎Peter Opie - 1997.
v. "On a Mountain," from Paddy resident of Liverpool, 2008. Posted by Paddy on Skipping songs from the past - YO! Liverpool.

G. Children's skipping or jump rope versions with the "On the mountain stands a lady" standard opening combined with stanzas of other songs (see also C).
a. "Happy Hooligan" Unknown informant. From The New Yorker: Nov 13, 1937. Reprinted in A Treasury Of American Folklore, Botkin- page 801, 1944.
b. "On the Mountain Stands a Lady," collected from children by Andrew D. Miller in Edinburgh, Scotland. From "Golden City: Scottish Children's Street Games & Songs" page 165, by James T. R. Ritchie- 1965.
c. "On a Mountain Stands a Lady," sung by children of S. London in 1974, Roud B. From "The Lore of the Playground: One hundred years of children's games, by Steve Roud - 2010.
d. "On a Hillside Stands a Lady," recording as schoolgirls from Huish Episcopi, Somerset, continue to demonstrate and perform playground games and songs for Iona Opie. The tape was recorded in August, 1978. From Opie collection of children's games & songs C898-76-02.
e. "On the Hillside," girls from Belfast, 2000. From Mudcat Discussion Forum, 2000 posted by Jimmy C. This version is nearly identical to the Liverpool version in Hope Place by Michael Wynne.
f. "On the Mountain." Posted by Jean from SW Scotland in 2004 on TalkingScot discussion board.
g. "On a Hillside Stands a Lady" from Newry, County Down. From anon post in "Newry Journal History and Reminiesence" from Newry, Ireland (no. 20); February 1, 2006

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 22 Oct 17 - 12:03 AM

Steve,

If you look at the seven types of children's songs that use text from "Madam" in my post before last-- it's clear that the nursery songs and the nursery ring-game songs are different than the "On the Mountain" game songs of Roud 2603 which are the focus of the study.

As far as I know there are only two type 1 versions-- nursery songs by Halliwell and Newell. Type 1 are shortened versions of Madam. All the other children's songs with the nursery song texts have ring-game instructions and there are at least four of these. Type 2 are also shortened versions of Madam.

The other five types 3-7 are variants of the "On the Mountain" game songs of Roud 2603. I think it's clear that they are different. I just thought it prudent to include all the children's songs in the study.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 21 Oct 17 - 01:11 PM

Hi,

TY Steve. The nursery rhymes are also used as singing games in multiple examples. Clearly the nursery rhymes are shortened versions of Madam with game instructions and are different than the standard children's games and skipping games which is the focus of the study. The standard identifying stanza for types 3-7 is:

On the mountain stands a lady,
Who she is I do not know;
All she wants is gold and silver,
And a nice young man.

The study is too long to put here (I posted the first page or two)-- and it's not completed until I put the individual versions on.

I realize in general the two are different/separate, so thank you-- I'll try and make that clear.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 21 Oct 17 - 12:52 PM

Though one may derive from the other, obviously nursery rhymes are not the same thing as children's singing games and there need not be any overlap. They could easily have derived separately from adult versions. Unless there is definite evidence of overlap I would keep the 2 separate.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 21 Oct 17 - 12:42 PM

Hi,

Here is my study of 8C. On a Mountain Stands a Lady (Children's game song variants) Roud 2603 online: http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/8c-on-a-mountain-stands-a-lady.aspx

The versions of children's songs with text from "Madam, I Have Come to court You" may be thus categorized as:

1) nursery songs; see those by Haliwell and Newell which are shortened versions of "Madam."
2) ring game songs; see those by Babcock and Waugh which are also shortened versions of "Madam." They include game instructions.
3) ring game songs which use the standard opening: "On the mountain stands a lady/Who she is I do not know/All she wants is gold and silver/All she wants is a nice young man," which is a composite of two stanza of Madam with changes (mountain- nice young man).
4) ring game songs which use the "On the mountain stands a lady" standard opening but have additional dialogue and characters resembling "wooing" folk plays.
5) ring game songs which use the "On the mountain stands a lady" standard opening combined with "Madam will you walk" chorus (Keys of Heaven/Keys of Canterbury; see Sharp's 1911 version) and additional stanzas offering various gifts in exchange for marriage (Keys of Heaven). The ending has stanzas about going to the church and eating various meals.
6) skipping or jump rope versions which consist of the "On the mountain stands a lady" standard opening followed by invitations for new participants to enter and leave the game.
7) skipping or jump rope versions which consist of the "On the mountain stands a lady" standard opening combined with stanzas of other songs.

Here is an rough draft excerpt of my headnotes so far:

8C. On a Mountain Stands a Lady (Children's game song variants) Roud 2603. "There Stands a Lady" (Sharp); Yonder Stands a Lovely Lady; 'There She Stands a Lovely Creature; Lady on the Mountain (Opie); Lady on Yonder Hill

[Some lines and stanzas of the text of "Madam, I Am Come To Court You" has been adapted as nursery songs and children's game songs[1] in a variety of ways in both North America and the UK. Published versions of game songs began cropping up in the latter part of the 1800s. The North American versions appear to be closer to the original broadside texts but shortened while the UK texts use a modified opening stanza wed to other children's lyrics.

The theory that children's game song texts are similar to, or based on, courting texts associated with Mummer's plays and Plough plays found in The East Midland has been suggested by Baskervill and others who have written about the English wooing plays of the East Midlands[2]. Baskervill mentions "Lady on Yonder Hill," published by Mrs. Gomme [Traditional Games, I, 323-24]. The two "Madam, I have gold and silver" stanzas found in the plough plays bear the brunt of this association while the opening stanzas of "Madam" common in the UK children's games are not usually found in the Plough Play dialogues.

According to Baskervill[3], "Two versions of a children's game which are apparently mummers' wooing plays in the last stages of decay were naturally not taken into account, though they at least suggest the former currency of the type in other parts of England, since one came from Derbyshire and one from Suffolk."

In a footnote to the above paragraph Baskervill adds,"In the Derbyshire version, with an opening "Yonder stands a lovely lady," like a line in the Bassingham plays printed below, the rebuffed wooer falls on the ground and is revived by the Good Fairy. In the Suffolk version the Gentleman stabs the Lady and then revives her, calling her out of her trance with lines similar to the corresponding lines in the Bassingham, Cropwell, and Axholme plays."

The original Mummer's plays, now called "Quack Doctor Plays" by Peter Millington are much older[4] but evidence of the use of "Madam" text with its identifying "Madam I have gold and silver" stanza has been wanting until the later part of the 1800s and early 1900s. Millington also suggests the plays text was "added to pre-existing house-visiting customs, and that this took place sometime during the early to mid 18th century, as an extension of the entertainments that these customs already possessed." This would mean that the "gold and silver" stanzas of Madam found in the plays would be in circulation in that area at the time of the plays creation.

The children's games would also have been created during the same general time period, mid-1800s and adapted from local versions of "Madam." These games would be developed from, and along with, the nursery rhymes sung by children during that period. The first two lines of the first stanza of "Madam" has been used as the first two lines of the standard children's game identifying stanza by modifying the first line. It appears in a variety of ways:

    There stands a lady on the mountain,
    Who she is I do not know:
    Oh! she wants such gold and silver!
    Oh! she wants such a nice young man!

or,

    There stands a lady on a mountain,
    Who she is I do not know;
    All she wants is gold and silver,
    All she wants is a nice young man.

It also appears with the text reversed: "On a mountain stands a lady." The image of a lady on a "mountain" or "hillside" makes the stanza easily identified. It's derived from the first two lines of the opening stanza of "Madam[5]":

Yonder sits a lovely creature,
Who is she? I do not know,
I'll go court her for her features,
Whether her answer be "Ay" or "no."

The source of "mountain" is unknown and only one reference is given to a mountain in the related "Madam" songs (see: The Dumb Lady-- 1672). The two lines are combined with a two-line variation of the last "gold and silver" stanza of "Madam" (the woman's response):

What care I for gold and silver,
What care I for house and land
What care I for rings and jewels,
If I had but a handsome man."

In the text used for the children's game song based on "Madam," a "handsome man" is now a "nice young man" and the young lady who eschewed the "gold and silver" for a "handsome man" now wants "gold and silver." The two "gold and silver" stanzas from "Madam" are substantially the only text borrowed from "Madam" in the various wooing plays. The date these ring games and children's songs appeared in the UK is unknown but the empirical evidence points to the later half of the 1800s although they could have appeared shortly after the printed broadsides (c.1760).

The nursery rhymes and children's game songs are not the same texts-- in general the nursery rhymes are shortened texts of "Madam" with little variation. The first evidence that "Madam" was used as a nursery rhyme was a version published by Halliwell-Phillips in a number of books[6] of nursery rhymes including the 1846 book, "The Nursery Rhymes of England, obtained principally from oral tradition." Halliwell gives this English version:

?MADAM, I am come to court you,
If your favour I can gain.?
?Ah, ah!? said she, ?you are a bold fellow,
If I e'er see your face again!"

?Madam, I have rings and diamonds,
Madam, I have houses and land,
Madam, I have a world of treasure,
All shall be at your command.?

?I care not for rings and diamonds,
I care not for houses and lands,
I care not for a world of treasure,
So that I have but a handsome man.?

?Madam, you think much of beauty,
Beauty hasteneth to decay,
For the fairest of flowers that grow in summer
Will decay and fade away

Haliwell gives no source of the nursery rhyme although the book notes claim it was taken from tradition. Despite missing the opening stanza usually associated with the game/skipping songs, this short version has the core "gold and silver" stanzas. It's an indication that the broadside stanzas were known in tradition at that time (see 8. Madam, I Have Come to Court You for the mid-1700s texts). In his 1875 book, "Around the Tea-table," Thomas De Witt Talmage says:

After tea the parlour is full of romp. The children are playing ' Ugly Mug,' and 'Mrs Wiggins,' and 'Stage Coach/ and 'Bear/ and 'Tag/ and 'Yonder stands a lovely creature.'

Clearly the nursery rhymes published by Halliwell and others were not just sung but were also children's games. Although Talmage does not describe the game, variants of "Madam" were used a singing game in a variety of ways in both North America and the UK. An article by W. H. Babcock was published in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, Volume 37, 1886 titled, "Song games and Myth Dramas at Washington." Part of the first stanzas and two other core stanzas were included along with a description of the game:

There are other ring?games in which love does not divide the interest with death, but forms the sole subject-matter. In one of these what must have been originally a dialogue is blended into a continuous song, in which all join:

Here she stands, a lovely creature;
Who she is I do not know.

Madam, I have gold and silver,
Madam, I have ships on the ocean,
Madam, I have house and land.

What care I for your gold and silver?
What care I for ships on the ocean?
What care I for house and land?
All I want is a fine young man.

Then a member of the ring is selected by the one in the middle to take his or her place.
* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 16 Oct 17 - 09:53 AM

TY Steve,

I agree that the print versions supplied by Baskervill are not antecedents but rather are examples of the rejected suitor.

I'm contacting Peter Millington about the Plough Plays (Wooing Plays) to see if perchance there are earlier examples of "Madam" in these plays.

The obvious connection with the children's songs has been pointed out by Baekervill and others. The differences are significant enough that a separate study of "Madam" as found in plough plays should be made.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 15 Oct 17 - 04:21 PM

Like the songs these plays were constantly evolving and being brought up-to-date so the inclusion of a few well-known songs would not be surprising. Just like the song 'Drink Old England Dry' which is part of the Haxey Hood Game (N. Lincolnshire) which has been updated several times to suit a succession of wars. Even the characters in the plays evolve St George becomes King George etc. The term 'antecedents' can be quite misleading; just because 2 items are on the same theme, in song terms, we wouldn't categorise them together unless we were only looking at themes.

It is very likely the mummers plays were inspired by earlier more sophisticated pieces but otherwise it is difficult to show relationship between them. The St George play was very likely inspired by The Seven Champions of Christendom but not directly based on it.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 15 Oct 17 - 03:37 PM

Hi,

Clearly the standard opening stanza (above) published in Gomme's children's game versions (late 1800s) is a reworking of text of "Madam."

This excerpt sung by the Sergeant, a character in a Plough play for Lincolnshire in 1923, is directly taken from "Madam" except in the lady's response "handsome man" has been changed to "nice young man."

The "Plough Jacks?" Play from Kirmington, Lincs. - R.J.E.Tiddy (1923) pp.254-257 (excerpt).

{Sergeant's Song.}

Sergeant

    Madam, I've got gold and silver
    Madam I've got house and land
    Madam I've got world and treasure,
    Everything at thy command--

Lady

    What care I for your gold and silver
    What care I for your house and land
    What care I for your world and treasure
    All I want is a nice young man.

Among the cast of characters in this "wooing play" are the Fool (Bold Tom/Tom Fool), Sergeant or Recruiting Sergeant, the Lady (Lady Bright and Gay).

In his "Mummers' Wooing Plays in England," Charles Read Baskervill presents a number of related antecedents from the early 1800s, which in theme are similar to Madam and the wooing or plough plays. Common text, as above, is not found.

The common theme is: A maid is wooed by an older man (sometimes the leader of the play) who offers her a variety of gifts. She rejects his advances. In "The Scornful Maid" upon her continued refusal he breaks out: "Then fare you well, thou scornful Dame." This is reminiscent of "Madam" and also 8b. "Courting Case."

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 15 Oct 17 - 02:59 PM

More likely the village shows where dialogues of this sort were common, performed in rustic costume.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 15 Oct 17 - 01:05 PM

Hi,

I'm on 8C. On a Mountain Stands a Lady (Children's game song variants) Roud 2649; "There Stands a Lady" (Sharp); "Yonder Stands a Lovely Lady;" "There She Stands a Lovely Creature;" "Lady on the Mountain" (Opie);

This is one fundamental stanza from Berrington (Shropshire Folk-lore, pp. 509, 510):

Here stands a lady on a mountain,
Who she is I do not know;
All she wants is gold and silver,
All she wants is a nice young man.

I was wondering if these late 1800s game and play songs can be compared to the Plough Plays found in UK and US. Anyone think that the children's songs evolved from the similar Plough Plays?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 14 Oct 17 - 12:29 PM

Hi,

TY Steve. I find no record of it in the UK either. I've finished for now Courting Case/Cage. The study is here: http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/8b-the-courting-case.aspx Here are the primary versions and some of the study:

8B. The Courting Case (The Courting Cage); Roud 361; "The Drunkard's Courtship" (Chappell/Foss); "The Gambling Suitor" (Shifflett from Clayton & Ritchie); "Kind Sir, I See You've Come Again"; "Kind Miss" "O Miss, I Have A Very Fine Farm," "If You Will Only Be My Bride," "The Wooing," "Gordonsville"

A. "The Wooing" sung in 1934 by Mr. E. W. Harns, Greenville, who learned the song in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, about 1860. From Ballads & Songs of Southern Michigan, 1939, version A.
B. "The Courting Cage" sung Mrs. Judy Jane Whitaker of Anderson, Missouri learned from her mother about 1865. From Randolph, Ozark Folk Songs, (1946) collected May 10, 1928.
C. "Madam, I Have a Very Fine Cow." My date. No informant or place named. From I.G. Greer Folksong Collection; Lyric Variant 01(handwritten) and 02 (typed).
D. "Courting Case." Sung by Mrs. Fanny Coffey at White Rock, Nelson Co., Va., May 8th, 1918.
E. "Gordonville." Sung by Mrs. Lawson Gray, of Montvale, VA on June 6, 1918.
F. "I See You Come Again." Sung by Mary Gibson, of Marion, North Carolina on Sept. 9, 1918.
G. "If You Will Only Be My Bride." Contributed by J. B. Midgett of Wanchese, Roanoke Island, probably in 1920. With the tune. From Brown Collection vol. III, 1952, version B.
H. "Gordonsville" unknown singer published November 16, 1922 in the The Union Republican from Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
I. "Kind Sir, I See You've Come Again." Taken from Miss Jewel Robhins of Pekin, Montgomery County, in 1922. From Brown Collection vol. III, 1952, version A.
J. "Kind Sir" Mr. Austen (VA) before 1931 from Dorothy Scarborough "A Song Catcher" 1938.
K. "Bachelor's Song." Duet sung by Jamie Williams and Emmaline Gullett of Ashland, Kentucky, 1933. Collector: Jean Thomas. From: Thomas & Leeder, Singin' Gatherin' pp. 4-5, 1939.
L. "Madam, I Have a Very Fine Field," voice performance by A R Blake at White River Jun (Vt.). recorded 1935. Two stanza fragment. From a digitized archival cassette in the Helen Hartness Flanders Ballad Collection at Middlebury College Special Collections.
M. "O Madam, I Have a Fine Little Horse" sung by Mrs. Flora Stafford Swetnam of Vaiden, MS before 1936. From Hudson Folksongs of Mississippi.
N. "Madam, I Have a Very Fine Horse." From copy of Mr. W. S. Harrison, Fayette, MS who obtained it from the singing of Mr. T. D. Clark, Louisville. From Hudson, "Folksongs of Mississippi," 1936.
O. "Madam, I Have A Very Fine Farm" sung by by Theophilus G.Hoskins, from Leslie Co., Hyden, Kentucky. LOC, publication date 10-03-1937; as recorded by Alan Lomax.
P. "Madam, I Have a Very Fine Farm," sung by Vernon "Shorty" Allen at Shafter (California) FSA Camp, August 4, 1940. From Voices from the Dust Bowl: The Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection, 1940 to 1941 (533).
Q. "Kind Sir, I see you've come Again," sung by Texas Gladden of Salem, Virginia 1941. Recorded by Alan Lomax.
R. "The Drunkard's Courtship." Sung by Mrs. Zona Baker of Zack, Arkansas, in July, 1942. From The Native American Influence in Folk Songs of North Arkansas, by Theodore Garrison; The Arkansas Historical Quarterly, Vol. 6, No. 2 (Summer, 1947), pp. 165-179.
S. "I'll Have No Drunkard to Please," sung by Mrs. Myrtle Love Hester of Florence, Alabama on 8 June, 1947. Collector: Byron Arnold. From: Halli, An Alabama Songbook (2004) pp.128-129.
T. "Kind Madam." Sung Mrs. Frances Oxford of Spring Valley, Arkansas on March 9, 1951. Ozark Folk Song Collection; Reel 100, Item 3. Collected by Irene Carlisle and Mrs. Rachel Henry. Transcribed by Mary C. Parler.
U. "The Gambling Suitor." Sung by Miss Ella Shifflett who lives on a mountain in Greene County, VA. No date given. From Richard Chase, "American Folk Tales and Songs," 1956; recorded on Tradition, TLP 1011 by Jean Ritchie & Paul Clayton.
V. "Sir, I See You Comin' Again" from the singing of Marybird McAllister, Brown's Cove, Virginia, 11-5-58. Collected by Roger   Abrahams, and George Foss. From Anglo-American Folksong Style.
W. "Courting Song" sung by Otis Williams, Wesley, Arkansas in 1958. From Max Hunter Folk Song Collection, no date given. Cat. #1429 (MFH #473).
X. "O Miss, I Have a Very Fine Farm," sung by Mrs. Lizzie Maguire, Fayettville, Arkansas on June 23, 1959. From Max Hunter Folk Song Collection; Cat. #0360 (MFH #473).
Y. "The Lovers' Quarrel." Collected by Cansler in Dallas County from a man known since childhood. Adapted and arranged by Loman D. Cansler; recorded in 1959. From the recording Missouri Folk Songs by Cansler on Smithsonian Folkways PH5324.
Z. "Courtin' Song" vocal duet sung by Pleaz & Olive Mobley of Clay County, KY about 1960 released on Folkways FA 2358 of 'American Folk Song Festival' performance.
AA. "Drunkard's Courtship." Recorded from Horton Barker of Virginia for Folkways in Beech Creek, North Carolina, by Sandy Paton, 1962.
BB. "Miss, I Have a Very Fine Horse," from the singing of Deana Crumpler and Susan Harriet Snyder of Columbia, South Carolina on May 14, 1963. Collected by Mrs. Robert Snyder; published by McNeil, "Southern Folk Ballads," 1987, Volume 1, page 12.
CC. "Madam, I Have Come to Court," sung by LaRena Clark of Toronto, Ontario in 1964 (Aug). Collected by Edith Fowke and published in her "Ring around the Moon," 1977 p. 120-121.
DD. "The Courting Case," sung by Lena Armstrong and Etta Jones on Beech Mountain Vol II, 1965. From: The Traditional Music of Beech Mountain, recording.
EE. "Courtin' Song." Sung by Margaret and Harold Winters, October 1966; from Folksongs I, Burton & Manning, 1967.

* * * *

["The Courting Case" also "The Courting Cage" is a courting song that begins similarly to "Madam I Have Come to Court You" and seems to be based on "Madam" but the suitor offers instead of "gold and silver"-- a farm and farm animals. In the ensuing dialogue the lady reveals that she knows the suitor is a ne'er-do-well man who gambles and drinks. After the suitor fails to win over the lady he responds bitterly[1]:

When you get old and the weather gets cold
I hope to God you'll freeze [as sung by Fanny Coffey, Virginia, 1918].

This humorous song has many titles but is generally known by two: "The Courting Case" by Sharp, while Randolph and Brown call it, "The Courting Cage." Both "Courting Case" and "Courting Cage" are mondegreens[2]. Several suggestions as to the meaning have been offered with no satisfactory solution[3]. In my opinion it could be a mishearing of "a-courting come." However, in Randolph's version[4], the "cage" is a physical object:

Madam I have a courtin' cage
It stands in yonder town,
And my estate I'll give to you,
If it be ten thousand pounds,
If it be ten thousand pounds.

Sharp's master title is taken from an 1918 version by Fanny Coffey[5] with a similar stanza:

O madam, I am a courting case,
For you I've lain in woon[6],
For you I'd give up all my store,
If it was ten thousand pounds.

The use of the denomination of currency as "pounds" in these two versions and others is evidence of the songs British or early American origin. Yet so far, no British antecedent or similar version has been found. Lacking evidence of the ballad's pedigree, "The Courting Case" is currently categorized as "early American origin" even though its suspected British roots may someday be revealed. The unique variants with the words "Courting Case" and "Courting Cage" have been only found in Virginia and Missouri suggesting these titles are an aberration, not the norm. Since the texts from Canada to New England, to Michigan, to the Appalachians are remarkably consistent, it implies an earlier origin from print. This missing print version would have been influenced by "Madam, I Have Come To Court You" and published either in the UK or the US before or by the early 1800s. No print version, however, has been found.

The mystery of the origin combined with the enigmatic titles, "the courting cage" and "courting case" have piqued an interest in this little ballad. Vance Randolph, for one, vainly searched for the meaning of "courting cage" and even enlisted the aid of fellow collector Dorothy Scarborough who published Randolph's version in her "A Songcatcher"-- published posthumously in 1938. The Traditional Ballad Index has speculated that lyric was a "courting cake" while Randolph[7] writes that a Professor Almack of Stanford University says it's "a court engaged." The truth may never be learned until an antecedent is discovered either in the US or UK which discloses the original text.

It's interesting to note that at least two versions refer to the wooed lady as a "hard case" in one of the latter stanzas:

"Miss I find you a very hard case,
Perhaps too hard to please, [McNeil, 1963]

"NOW, madam, you're a hard old case,
And just a little too hard to please; [Horton Barker, VA 1962]

The possible implication being the "case" was somehow transferred or similarly used in the opening stanza. Courting "case" would be some archaic use of the noun, "case" where case= wooer. One version[8] by Pleaz Mobley of Kentucky has "I am a courtin' man" in which "man" replaces "case." A number of versions with different titles have been collected in the North America where it is also found in Canada, Michigan, the Midwest, Southwest, the Appalachians and even New England and California. Other titles include: "The Drunkard's Courtship," "The Gamboling Suitor," "Courting Cage," "Oh, Miss, I Have a Very Fine Farm," "Root, Poor Hoggie," "Kind Miss" and "The Wooing." A version from Ontario[9] has the "Madam" opening line and is titled "Madam I Have Come to Court." Lomax says in the note to "The Gambling Suitor" that it was "From the singing of Jean Ritchie and Paul Clayton, as published in American Folk Tales and [Folk] Songs, compiled by Richard Chase..." (The Folk Songs of North America, p. 104). Chase, however, writes of the source as: "This song came from Miss Ella Shiflett, who lived on a mountain in Greene County, Virginia" (p. 146). Here's the text to "Courting case," a version collected by Cecil Sharp in his Virginia collecting jaunt of 1918:

THE COURTING CASE. Sung by Mrs. Fanny Coffey at White Rock, Nelson Co., Va., May 8th, 1918.

O madam, I am a courting case,
For you I've lain in woon,
For you I'd give up all my store,
If it was ten thousand pounds. (bis)

O yes, you are a courting case
Like many I have seen,
But if you think you're courting me,
I think you're very green.

O madam, I've a very fine farm,
Full sixty acres wide,
And it shall be at your command
If you will be my bride.

O yes, you have a very fine farm
And a piece of woods to boot,
But when I get in that fine farm
I'll hang you on a root.

O madam, I've a very fine house
And it's plastered white inside,
And it shall be at your command
If you will be my bride.

O yes, you have a very fine house
And it's plastered white inside,
But when I get in that fine house
I'll soon shut you outside.

O madam, you're a silly jade
And very hard to please;
When you get old and the weather gets cold
I hope to God you'll freeze.

While I am young with a flattering tongue
I keep myself from harm.
When I get old and the weather gets cold
My clothes will keep me warm.

From this version Sharp created a master title of Courting Case and named all the versions he collected, Courting Case, even though the words "courting case" did not appear in them. The earliest extant version, "The Wooing," was sung in 1934 by Mr. E. W. Harns, Greenville, who learned the song in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, about 1860. Here's the text from Ballads & Songs of Southern Michigan, 1939, version A[10]:
   
1 "Madam, I have come to marry you
And settle in this town;
My whole estate is worth
Ten thousand pounds.
Which I will will to you,
If you will be my bride."

2 "O that's enough for me,
I don't desire you."

3 "O madam, I have a very fine house,
All neat and rectified,
Which you may have at your command
If you'll but be my bride."

4 "I know you have a very fine house
Besides a clever barn,
But you're too old to think to hold
A bird with a single yarn."

5 "O madam, I have a very fine horse,
Whose face is like the tide,
Which you may have at your command
If you'll but be my bride."

6 "I know you have a very fine horse,
Which you keep in yonders barn,
But his master likes a glass of wine
For fear his horse might learn."

7 "O madam, I have a very fine field,
Full fifty acres wide,
Which you may have at your command
If you'll but be my bride."

8 "I know you have a very fine field
And a pasture at the foot,
And if I had you, I'd turn you in,
For I'm sure a hog would root."

9 "O madam, you are a scornful dame
And very hard to please,
And when you get old and pinched with cold,
I swear I hope you'll freeze."

10 "And when I get old and pinched with cold,
'Twon't be you'll keep me warm;
I'll be single and be free
And stay as I was born."

Stanza 4 of this early version is unique. It shows the wooer to be an older man who's courting a young maid. This echoes the theme of "Madam, I am Come to Court You" as well as the other American courting relative "Quaker's Wooing." The other early version of Courting Case is Randolph's "The Courting Cage" which he collected in Missouri in 1928 but was learned about 1865:

"The Courting Cage"

Madam I have a courtin' cage
It stands in yonder town,
And my estate I'll give to you,
If it be ten thousand pounds,
If it be ten thousand pounds.

I know you have a courtin' cage
It stands in yonder town,
And your estate I do not want,
If it be ten thousand pounds,
If it be ten thousand pounds.

O madam, I've a very fine house
Just newly erectified,
And you shall have it at your command
Whenever you'll be my bride
Whenever you'll be my bride.

I know you have a very fine house
Likewise a fine yard,
But who would stay at home with me,
When you're out playing cards
When you're out playing cards.

Madam, I do not do that way,
I do not think it right.
If you'll consent to marry me
I'll stay home every night
I'll stay home every night.

Madam, I have a very fine horse,
He paces like the tide,
An' you may have him at your command,
Whenever you'll be my bride,
Whenever you'll be my bride.

I know you have a very fine horse,
He stands in yonder barn,
His master likes a glass of wine,
I fear the horse might learn,
I fear the horse might learn.

Madam, I have a very fine farm,
Full sixty acres wide,
An' you may have it at your command,
Whenever you'll be my bride,
Whenever you'll be my bride.

I know you have a very fine farm,
A pasture at the foot,
If you'll get me you'll turn me out,
I know a hog will root,
I know a hog will root.

Madam, I think you're a silly jade
Perhaps too hard to please;
When you git old an' chill with cold,
I swear I hope you'll freeze,
I swear I hope you'll freeze.

Your sassy wishes I disregard,
You caint do me no harm
When I git old an' chill with cold,
It won't be you that'll keep me warm,
It won't be you that'll keep me warm!

Randolph, of course, knew of Sharp's versions titled "Courting Case" published in the 1932 edition of EFSSA. His version was first printed by Scarborough in 1938.

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 09 Oct 17 - 03:37 PM

I have no record of 'Courting case/cage' in Britain. It seems closest in style to 'The Keys of Heaven' Roud 573. I have come across unrelated songs 'The Courting Coat', 'The Courting Gate'. It may relate to the custom of bundling, which amongst poor families was a method of letting a couple sleep together before marriage but wrapped up in a blanket.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 08 Oct 17 - 09:21 PM

Hi,

The most unusual version of "Courting Case" is this modern analogue from Douglas Gilbert in "Lost Chords: The Diverting Story of American Popular Songs" published by Doubleday, Doran and Company, Incorporated, 1942. No information was provided about this song which appears in the chapter on "The Hearth ? and the Tavern":

"The Girl Who Never Would Wed"

I courted a round-bottomed lass one spring
The birds were mating free,
The sheep and the goats
Were feeling their oats?
But she would have none of me.

When summer came and fields were filled
With scent of new mown hay,
The weather was hot, but she was not,
For still she said me nay,
For still she said me nay.

The summer went and autumn came,
And when the nights were chill,
We sat beside the fire in
Her house behind the hill.
'Twas then I said,
Two in a bed
Could warm and cozy be.
I pinched her rump, but up she jumped?
Says she, young man you're too free,
Says she, young man you're too free.

When winter came said I, why do
You choose to sleep alone;
And in single bed
Lay like one dead
As cold as any stone?

I offered her my house and lands
And all my worldly self
With arms so strong to keep her warm-
Says she, keep your arms to yourself.

For years and years I roamed about
And when I had my fill,
I found this girl a woman grown,
But she refused me still.
So when you are old and gray,
And shattery in the knees,
When the wintry blast wintry blast rolls round your rump,
I hope by Jesus you freeze,
I hope by Jesus you freeze.

* * * *

This modern recreation, clearly based on Courting Cage, may have been penned by the author, Douglas Gilbert. Unfortunately I have no information of its pedigree. Anyone know about this version? The book is online at Internet Archive.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 08 Oct 17 - 01:46 PM

Hi,

I'm nearly through with "Courting Case" although I've not carefully examined all the versions. Several words and phrases (measurements of money in "pounds" and "grog shop," a place where the wooer drinks, "rectified" etc.) indicated either an early America origin or a British origin. So far no British versions or antecedents have been found. It's origin is a mystery much as the two main titles, "Courting Case" and "Courting Cage" are mondegreens for unknown words from the original missing print.

Here are the two versions:

THE COURTING CASE. Sung by Mrs. Fanny Coffery at White Rock, Nelso Co., Va., May 8th 1918.

O madam, I am a courting case,
For you I've lain in woon,
For you I'd give up all my store,
If it was ten thousand pounds. (bis)

O yes, you are a courting case
Like many I have seen,
But if you think you're courting me,
I think you're very green.

O madam, I've a very fine farm,
Full sixty acres wide,
And it shall be at your command
If you will be my bride.

O yes, you have a very fine farm
And a piece of woods to boot,
But when I get in that fine farm
I'll hang you on a root.

O madam, I've a very fine house
And it's plastered white inside,
And it shall be at your command
If you will be my bride.

O yes, you have a very fine house
And it's plastered white inside,
But when I get in that fine house
I'll soon shut you outside.

O madam, you're a silly jade
And very hard to please;
When you get old and the weather gets cold
I hope to God you'll freeze.

While I am young with a flattering tongue
I keep myself from harm.
When I get old and the weather gets cold
My clothes will keep me warm.

* * * *

The other title is Randolph's "The Courting Cage" which he collected in Missouri in 1928 but was learned about 1865. Here's the text:

Madam I have a courtin' cage
It stands in yonder town,
And my estate I'll give to you,
If it be ten thousand pounds,
If it be ten thousand pounds.

I know you have a courtin' cage
It stands in yonder town,
And your estate I do not want,
If it be ten thousand pounds,
If it be ten thousand pounds.

O madam, I've a very fine house
Just newly erectified,
And you shall have it at your command
Whenever you'll be my bride
Whenever you'll be my bride.

I know you have a very fine house
Likewise a fine yard,
But who would stay at home with me,
When you're out playing cards
When you're out playing cards.

Madam, I do not do that way,
I do not think it right.
If you'll consent to marry me
I'll stay home every night
I'll stay home every night.

Madam, I have a very fine horse,
He paces like the tide,
An' you may have him at your command,
Whenever you'll be my bride,
Whenever you'll be my bride.

I know you have a very fine horse,
He stands in yonder barn,
His master likes a glass of wine,
I fear the horse might learn,
I fear the horse might learn.

Madam, I have a very fine farm,
Full sixty acres wide,
An' you may have it at your command,
Whenever you'll be my bride,
Whenever you'll be my bride.

I know you have a very fine farm,
A pasture at the foot,
If you'll get me you'll turn me out,
I know a hog will root,
I know a hog will root.

Madam, I think you're a silly jade
Perhaps too hard to please;
When you git old an' chill with cold,
I swear I hope you'll freeze,
I swear I hope you'll freeze.

Your sassy wishes I disregard,
You caint do me no harm
When I git old an' chill with cold,
It won't be you that'll keep me warm,
It won't be you that'll keep me warm!

Randolph, of course, knew of Sharp's versions titled "Courting Case" published in the 1932 edition of EFSSA. His version was first printed by Scarborough in 1938. It's important to note that these two versions are the exception and that "Courting Case" and "Courting Cage" are not normally found in the standard versions.

* * * *

Anyone that can find a British antecedent or version will be the first person to do so. Any suggestions about what "Courting Case" and "Courting Cage" are?

I think this is from an early (about late 1700s) print that is missing. Can anyone speculate about its origin or date?

TY

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 03 Oct 17 - 07:58 PM

Hi,

TY Stevebury, I'll use that information for Quaker's Courting which I'll be working on soon.

Here are the links for versions of 8A. Oh No John; No Sir; Spanish Merchant:

Main Meadnotes
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/8a-oh-no-john-or-no-sir-.aspx

British Versions:
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/british-versions-8a-oh-no-john---no-sir.aspx

US and Canada Versions:
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/us--canada-versions-8a-oh-no-john-no-sir.aspx

Now it's on to the "Courting Cage"-- the question is: What is a "courting cage"?

Madam I have a courtin' cage
It stands in yonder town,
And my estate I'll give to you,
If it be ten thousand pounds,
If it be ten thousand pounds.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: GUEST,Stevebury
Date: 03 Oct 17 - 05:19 PM

(1) Roud lists "The Quqker's Wooing" or "the Quaker's Courtship" under Roud # 716 (in addition to the listings cited under R # 146 and R # 542). I don't know whether this adds to the already impressive accumulations of versions in this thread.

(2) Let me add one correction, and some background, to the August 2nd post about the Allen family "Family Songs". This collection of twelve songs is not a manuscript, but a published booklet with twelve songs (with tunes!) from the Allen family. It was privately published by the family in 1899. At family reunions, the older members of the family knew and sang the traditional family songs. But, as explained in the introduction, "it is to be regretted that the later generations do not know them as well; and on that account, the compiler has undertaken this little book."

The collection was reprinted in 1976 by the Newton [MA] Bicentennial Committee, The Jackson Homestead [which owns a copy], and the Newton Recreation Department, with an introduction and notes by Tony Saletan. I am working with Historic Newton on issuing a new reprint of this collection.

Stevebury


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 03 Oct 17 - 11:34 AM

Hi,

Here are my current updated versions of the "she answered No," songs:

8A. "Oh No, John," "No Sir," "Spanish Merchant's Daughter," and the "She answered No" songs. Roud 146 ("Spanish Captain," "Spanish Lady," "Scottish Merchant's Daughter")

Aa. "Lady why doth love torment you" from "a manuscript version of about 1635-40, in Bodleian MS Ashmole 38 (a collection of single sheets from various sources bound together)." ref. Bruce Olson.
   b. "Consent at Last" from Pills to Purge Melancholy, commencing in 1700; (III, p. 82, 1719), with a tune.
   c. "To a Lady" Janck Horntip Collection, no date given, no chorus. See in Supplemental versions below.
B. "A Warning for Maides," attributed to Richard Crimsal and "printed at London for John Wright, the younger, dwelling at the upper end of the Old-Bayley," dated circa 1636.
C. "The Dumb Lady; Or, NO, no, not I; Ile Answer," a broadside in the British Library- Roxburghe 2.111. It was printed for P. Brooksy at the Golden-Ball in Pye-Corner between 1672-84.
D. "The Denying Lady," a broadside printed by A. Milbourn, at the Stationers-Arms in Green-Arbor about 1684.
E. "Shall I? Shall I? No No," a broadside by Tobias Bowne printed by Phillip Brooksby, London c. 1684.
Fa. "Tom and Doll; or, the Modest Maid's Delight" written by Tom D'Urfey, printed among his 'Choice Songs,' p. 16, in 1684. Reprinted with music not only in the ' 180 Loyal Songs' of 1685 and 1694, p. 252, but aleo in the second volume of 'Pills to Purge Melancholy,' 1719 edition, p. 27.
   b. Song 1154. [Tom and Dolly] published in "The Aviary: Or, Magazine of British Melody. Consisting of a Collection of one thousand three hundred and forty-four songs," London, 1745.
   c. "Tom and Dolly" from a Dublin songbook; "A collection of songs: With some originals," 1769.
   d. "No Tom No" from Gardham's broadside collection M85738- single sheet, no imprint, mid-1800s
G. "No, No" sung by Mrs. Wrighten at Vauxhall in the 1770s. It's printed in "The Choice Spirit's Chaplet: Or, a Poesy from Parnassus" by George Alexander Stevens, 1771 as Song 144.
H. "No! No! The celebrated duet" which was "sung by Mr. Sinclair and Mrs. Rowbotham." It was published in a variety of music collections in the 1830s including "The American Minstrel: A Choice Collection of the Most Popular Songs, Glees, Choruses, Extravaganzas, &c." 1837.
I. Songs with the "No Sir" chorus. The UK versions in general are stanzas of "Oh No John" with a "No Sir chorus.
   a1. "No Sir." Words and Music Arr. by A. M. Wakefield, from: "The Peterson magazine," Volumes 79-80, Philadelphia, 1881. Also "Songs and Ballads: 96 Songs - words and music, W. F. Shaw," 1882 and Shaw's "Gems of Minstrel Song" dated 1882 and later in Delaney's Song Book (New York). Arranged from American tradition by Englishwoman Mary Wakefield.
   a2. "No Sir," sung by Mrs. Holmes' mother who learned the song about 1900 in Barren County, Kentucky. From: Roberts & Agey, In the Pine (1978) pp.217-218. Recorded in 1958. Cf. 1881 version arranged by A. M. Wakefield.
   a3. "No Sir" from Mrs. T. N. Underwood of Correct, Ind. printed in The play-party in Indiana by Leah Jackson Wolford, 1916.
   a4. "No, Sir." From the manuscript songbook of Miss Lura Wagoner of Vox, Alleghany county, lent to Dr. Brown in 1936. (Brown Collection Vol. III); the entries in the book were probably made some twenty or more years earlier.
   a5. "No, Sir, No" sung by Mrs. Louisa Moses of Kentucky by 1930. From Harvey Fuson, Ballads of the Kentucky Highlands (1930) p. 81.
   a6. Scottish Merchant's Daughter- sung by Susie Evans Daley, of Tulsa (OK) c.1935. From Ethel & Chauncey Moore's "Ballads and Folk Songs of the Southwest," Univ. of Okla, Bk (1964).
   a7. "No Sir, No" contributed by Belle Plains High Scool as sung by Oren bewck sometimes of Belle Plains. Stout, Folklore from Iowa, 1936.
   a8. "My Father Was a Spanish Merchant," sung by Jennie Devlin (1865-1952), who worked and lived along the New York-Pennsylvania border. Collected Newman about 1937. From Never without a Song: The Years and Songs of Jennie Devlin, 1865-1952, by Katharine D. Newman.
   a9. "No, Sir, No" sung by Mrs. Grace Longino of Huntsville, Texas, May 13, 1939. From John and Ruby Lomax 1939 Southern States Recording Trip (AFC 1939/001).
   a10. "No Sir, No Sir." Sung by Mrs. Maggie Morgan of Springdale, Arkansas on Feb. 9, 1942. From: Randolph, Ozark Folksongs, Volume III, 1946. This is the text from Wakefield's 1881 arrangement.
   a11. "No Sir, No Sir" sung by Beryl Walker and Peter Diprose October 16, 1942 at Temora, a town in the north-east of the Riverina area of New South Wales, 418 kilometres south-west of the state capital, Sydney, Australia.
   a12. "Yes Sir, No Sir" sung by by Perkins Flint at Braintree Vermont, dated 11-20-1944. From: D41A - archival cassette dub, Track 06b; the Helen Hartness Flanders Ballad Collection at Middlebury College
   a13. "No Sir, No Sir." Sung by Mrs. Robert Weare and Mary Jo Davis at DeValls Bluff, Arkansas on June 15, 1954. Ozark Folksong Collection Reel 195 Item 3. Collected by Mary Jo Davis for M.C. Parler. This is Wakefield's 1881 text.
   a14. "No Sir." Sung by Oleavia Houser of Fayetteville, Arkansas on December 7, 1958. From Ozark Folksong Collection, Reel 278, Item 9. Collected by Merlyn B. Page and James R. Hayes. This is Wakefield's 1881 text.
   a15. "No, Sir." Sung by Bessie Atchley of Green Forest, on Arkansas July 7, 1960. Ozark Folksong Collection Reel 388, Item 3. Collected by M.C. Parler. Transcribed by Bessie Atchley. This is Wakefield's 1881 text.
   a16. "No Sir," sung by Jean Ritchie of Viper, Kentucky in 1961 who learned from her sister Edna Ritchie who in turn got it from a friend at Lothair Kentucky. From the Folkways Recording: "Precious Memories."
   b. "No Sir" sung by Lucy White and Louie Hooper of Hambridge on Dec. 23, 1903; collected by Cecil J. Sharp. Has stanzas of "Oh No John" with "No Sir" chorus.
   c. "No Sir, No," composite with first two stanzas from John Greening of Cuckold's Corner, Dorset in May 1906, verse 3 is from "Madam." The chorus, tune and 4-7 verses are from Mrs. Bowring of Cerne Abbas, Dorset in December 1907. Greening from Hammond Collection.
   d. "No, Sir! No" sung by Mrs. Bowring of Cerne Abbas, Dorset in Sept 1907. From Henry Hammond Manuscript Collection (HAM/5/35/15). Primarily stanzas of "Oh No John" with "No Sir" chorus.
   e. "No Sir!" Sung by Alfred Emery, Othery, Somerset on 6 April, 1908. From: Cecil Sharp Manuscript Collection (at Clare College, Cambridge) (CJS2/10/1604). Two versions of "Oh No John" text taken down by Cecil Sharp on the same day- three stanzas.
   f. "No Sir No," sung by Joseph Read of Trowbridge Workhouse, Wiltshire on 19 August, 1909. Single stanza with music from George Gardiner Manuscript Collection (GG/1/21/1427).
   g. "No Sir" sung by Lucy Garrison of Manchester, Kentucky on 11 August, 1917 as collected by Cecil J. Sharp. Stanzas of Madam and then "No Sir."
   h. "The Spanish Merchant's Daughter" performed by The Stoneman Family. "Vocal duet by Hattie and Ernest Stoneman with harmonica, violin, guitar." Recorded in Bristol, Tennessee on October 31, 1928. Original issue Victor V-40206.
  i. "No Sir, No," was sung by Mrs. W. V. Henderson of Fayetteville, Arkansas on February 23, 1950. From Ozark Folksong Collection; Reel 20 Item 6. Collected by Merlin Mitchell and transcribed by Kyle Perrin.
   j. No Sir- sung by Emily Bishop of Bromsberrow Heath, Gloucestershire, 1952. From Kennedy, Folksongs of Britain & Ireland (1975) p. 315 by Peter Kennedy. The text begins similarly to Wakefield's print version but has the extra stanza at the end from tradition.
   k. "No Sir." Sung by Mrs. W.N. Osborne. Recorded in Cord, AR, 8/21/57. Recorded by John Quincy Wolf, Jr. for The John Quincy Wolf Folklore Collection.
   l. "No Sir, No Sir," sung by Sam Larner, The Norfolk fisherman Sam Larner; recorded by Ewan McColl and Peggy Seeger about 1958. From "Now is the Time for Fishing", Topic TSCD511 and Smithsonian Folkways, 1961. Larner's version uses the somewhat bawdy "Oh No John" text with a No Sir Chorus.
J. Songs with the "Oh No John" chorus/text
   a. "Oh No John" sung by William Wooley of Bincombe in 1907, collected Sharp
   b. "No John No" sung by James Beale of Warehome, Kent on September 23, 1908. Cecil Sharp Manuscript Collection (at Clare College, Cambridge) (CJS2/9/1777).
   c1. "Oh No John" composite arranged by Sharp, published in 1911. Also One Hundred English Folksongs (1916) pp.154-155 with a new end stanza.
   c2. "Oh No John." From "Song Ballads & Other Songs of the Pine Mountain Settlement School," Kentucky, 1923; Sharp's text with one additional penultimate stanza from 1916 version.
   c3. "Oh No John." As sung by the Fuller Sisters, 1928; from "More Pious Friends and Drunken Companions: Songs and Ballads of Conviviality" by Frank Shay. Cover of Sharp's composite with extra stanza from the 1916 version.
   c4. "O No, John." From the manuscripts of Obadiah Johnson of Crossnore. Avery county, NC about 1939; Brown Collection III. Cover of Sharp's composite.
   c5. "Oh No John" sung by Paul Robeson; Recorded c. 1953. Cover of Sharp's composite.
   c6. "No John, No." As sung by the Archer Goode of Cheltenham, Gloucestershire on January 6, 1975. From: Gwilym Davies Collection, sent to me by Gwilym, attributed to Sam Bennett but this is a cover of Sharp's composite text.
   d. "No Sir, John." Sung by Mrs. Hezeltine of Cambone, Cornwall on May 12, 1913. Collected by Cecil Sharp. Composite with music from Cecil Sharp Manuscript Collection (at Clare College, Cambridge) (CJS2/10/2848). This is a composite of three songs, the first is Madam with the "No Sir" chorus.
   e. "No, John No," as sung by Bob and Ron Copper of Rottingdean, Sussex, known before 1950. Recording: The Folk Songs of Britain Volume 1; Caedmon 1961; Topic 1968-- Bob and Ron Copper sang No, John, No, recording by Peter Kennedy. Also on "Songs of Courtship" Topic Records 12T157 and Copper Family's Leader album A Song for Every Season. Printed in Early to rise: a Sussex boyhood by Bob Copper/Heinemann, 1976.
K. Songs with the "she answered No" chorus.
   a. "Haselbury Girl" fragment sung by Mrs. Balsh of Ubley Somerset on 23 April 1906. Collector: Cecil J.Sharp.
   b1. "Uh, uh No," sung by Lannis Sutton of Doxy, Oklahoma, collected by Sam Eskin in 1951. From Lomax, Folk-Songs of North America, 1960.
   b2. "All of her answers to me were No," recording by Peggy Seeger, Folk Songs of Courting & complaint; Folkways 1955. Similar to "Uh, uh No," sung by Lannis Sutton of Doxy, Oklahoma.
L. Songs with stanzas primarily of "Madam" and the "No Sir" or "she answered No" chorus
   a1. "No Sir, No" (Yonder is a comely flower) c. 1919 from "Kentucky Mountain Songs" by Wyman and Brockway.
   a2. "No Sir, No" (Yonder is a comely flower) 1928 Bradley Kincaid, "My Favorite Mountain Ballads and Songs" with stanzas from Wakefield.
   b. "Oh No, No Sir, No" sung by Mrs. Mary Brown of Greene County, PA. Collected by Bayard in 1929; from Pennsylvania Songs and Legends, Korson.
   c. "Yonder Comes a Heavenly Creature" sung by O.B. Campbell of Medford, OK, 1934. Recorded later by Max Hunter.
   d. "Madam I Have Come A-Courting" vocal performance by Jonathan Moses at Orford (New Hampshire); recorded by Helen Flanders on 08-24-1951. Learned in North Haven, Maine.
M. Songs with primarily Spanish Lady text and the "she answered No" chorus
   a. "Spanish Lady' sung by Bell Robertson of Pitsligo, Aberdeenshire; colelcted about 1906 by Gavin Greg; Greig Duncan I.
   b. "Spanish Lady" sung by Andrew Hawes of Pittsburg, New Hampshire June 18, 1943. Collected by Helen Hartness Flanders.
N. Version of "No Sir" from Tristan de Cuna
   a. "No Sir" sung by Frances Repetto of Tristan da Cunha in 1938. From Peter Munch, "Song Tradition of Tristan da Cunha" (1970) pp. 90-93 (version C).

After studying the modern versions it's clear that there are two types, The 1881 Wakefield arrangement and those that are obviously different. Some stanzas have floated to the UK and are mixed with Oh No John. In the UK "No Sir" is used for a chorus interchangeably with O No John. I still consider "O No John" and "No Sir" to be different songs possibly form a similar unknown antecedent --since they both have the Spanish merchant stanza.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 23 Sep 17 - 10:42 PM

Hi,

Here's more on 8A. "Oh No, John," "No Sir," "Spanish Merchant's Daughter," "She answered No" songs. Below are several excerpts and one conclusion. The "Spanish Merchant's Daughter" by the Stonemans is a variant of No Sir.

Here's a general conclusion: The inevitable blending of "Madam, I Am Come to Court You" and "Spanish Lady" variants with the "she answered No" songs has caused confusion and made classification difficult. Since the choruses have been somewhat interchangeable it should be noted that the texts of both "Oh No John" and "No Sir" have certain characteristics and are represented by stanzas usually unique to each. They share in common the Spanish merchant stanza and have blended in later versions.

* * * *

Here are four basic types of chorus in US:

1. The "No Sir" type: No sir! No sir! No sir! No-- sir!
No sir! No sir! No sir! No.
2) The "Oh No John" type: Oh, no, John, no, John, no, John, no.
3) The "Spanish Lady" type: Rattle O ding, ding dom, ding dom,
Rattle O ding, dom da.
4) The "her answers were no" type: Uh-uh, no, no sir no,
All of her answers to me were no.

The last Type (her answers were No) usually has "No Sir" in the opening and is often titled "No Sir." The first type is from the Wakefield print version of 1881 which was widely printed and well known both here and abroad. The third type sung to a West Virginia version (see: Cox, 1916) with Spanish Lady replacing "lovely creature" is similarly found in Gypsy Davy. The Spanish Lady versions that are not closely related to Madam sometimes have a "No Sir" chorus (see Bell Roberston's version above). In this rare US version of Spanish Lady (No Sir) by Andrew Hawes at Pittsburg, NH in 1943 he sang the type 4 chorus "her answer it was No";

As I rode out to McCloud city
At twelve o'clock the other night
Twas there I spied a Spanish lady
Washing her scarves in pale moonlight.
CHORUS: She said No, no sir no
Still her answer it was No.

The first type may be used to identify the Wakefield print versions. Since the Wakefield version is from American tradition it makes categorization difficult since Wakefield's version entered tradition and her text also appears with type 4 chorus.

* * * *

The "No Sir" songs were English then American-- see also the version from Tristan de Cuna, originally a British colony[]. "No Sir" has a wider degree of variety and is closer to the "she answered No" songs. There's is occasional borrowing from "Oh No John" (see Copper version) but in general is associated with the two garden stanzas found similarly in the print version:

3. If I was walking in the garden,
Plucking flow'rs all wet with dew,
Tell me will you be offended,
If I walk and talk with you?
CHORUS

4. If when walking in the garden,
I should ask you to be mine,
and should tell you that I loved you,
would you then my heart decline?

There are also two basic types of versions of "No Sir." Type A is the popular print version, "No Sir," which was arranged from an American governess by Mary Wakefield and published in 1881, entered tradition and has been collected both here and abroad. Type B are the traditional versions from whence Type A was born. Examples of this older tradition can be seen above in both the Bell Robertson version and the MS version collected by Sharp in Kentucky in 1917. The conclusion is "No Sir" usually has these characteristics:

1. has the two "garden" stanzas
2. has a wider variety of chorus variations and is sometimes mixed with "she answered No" choruses.
3. has the "tell me truly/why you scorn me" stanza usually before the Spanish captain stanza.
4. has the Spanish merchant/Captain stanza in common with Oh No John.
5. has "chickens crowed for day" or "We lay there till the cocks did crow" ending stanza found in the US and UK.

Some rare versions of "Madam" use the "No Sir" or "she answered No" choruses.

* * * *

"Oh No John" is English and has two specific types. The best known, Type A, is the composite by Sharp. The other variants are Type B, made up of the traditional versions. Both types sometimes use the opening first and possibly second stanzas of Madam. Type B has variants of these three stanzas as found in Woolsey's original text:

On her bosom were bunches of posies,
On her breast where flowers grow,
If I've a chance to touch that posy
She must answer Yes or No.
O No John! No John! No John! No!

"Madam, shall I tie your garter?
Tie it a little above your knee,
If my hand should slip a little farther
Would you think it amiss of me?"
O No John! No John! No John! No!

One night they went to bed we together
There they lay till cocks did crow
Then they sport till the daylight was breaking
Now it's time for us to go.
O No John! No John! No John! No!

Clearly The White and Hopper version is "Oh No John" with a "No sir" Chorus. Stanza 2 of the White version is another bawdy type stanza that belongs to the "Oh No John" ur-ballad[]. The conclusion is "Oh No John" usually has these characteristics:

1. evolved from a bawdy English "she answered No" song.
2. used the opening stanza or stanzas from "Madam, I Have Come to Court You." Does not have the "Madam I have gold and Silver" stanzas or other stanzas of "Madam."
3. was sanitized by Sharp to become the popular "Oh No John" type A.
4. was not widely known outside of England and was not brought to America.
5. does not usually have the "garden" stanzas found in print and traditional versions of No Sir.
6. has the Spanish merchant/sailor/Captain stanza which also is found in No Sir.

Oh No John was not widely known and few traditional versions were collected. Cecil Sharp collected four but the total of original traditional versions is less than a dozen with most just fragments.

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 19 Sep 17 - 09:13 PM

Hi,

Here are the versions of 8A. "Oh No, John," "No Sir," "Spanish Merchant's Daughter," "She answered No" listed so far:

Aa. "Lady why doth love torment you" from "a manuscript version of about 1635-40, in Bodleian MS Ashmole 38 (a collection of single sheets from various sources bound together)." ref. Bruce Olson.
  b. "Consent at Last" from Pills to Purge Melancholy, commencing in 1700; (III, p. 82, 1719), with a tune.
  c. "To a Lady" Jack Horntip Collection, no date given, no chorus. See in Supplemental versions below.
B. "A Warning for Maides," attributed to Richard Crimsal and "printed at London for John Wright, the younger, dwelling at the upper end of the Old-Bayley," dated circa 1636.
C. "The Dumb Lady; Or, NO, no, not I; Ile Answer," a broadside in the British Library- Roxburghe 2.111. It was printed for P. Brooksy at the Golden-Ball in Pye-Corner between 1672-84.
D. "The Denying Lady," a broadside printed by A. Milbourn, at the Stationers-Arms in Green-Arbor about 1684.
E. "Shall I? Shall I? No No," a broadside by Tobias Bowne printed by Phillip Brooksby, London c. 1684.
Fa. Song 1154. [Tom and Dolly] published in "The Aviary: Or, Magazine of British Melody. Consisting of a Collection of one thousand three hundred and forty-four songs," London, 1745.
   b. "Tom and Dolly" from a Dublin songbook; "A collection of songs: With some originals," 1769.
G. "No, No" sung by Mrs. Wrighten at Vauxhall in the 1770s. It's printed in "The Choice Spirit's Chaplet: Or, a Poesy from Parnassus" by George Alexander Stevens, 1771 as Song 144.
H. "No! No! The celebrated duet" which was "sung by Mr. Sinclair and Mrs. Rowbotham." It was published in a variety of music collections in the 1830s including "The American Minstrel: A Choice Collection of the Most Popular Songs, Glees, Choruses, Extravaganzas, &c." 1837.
I. Songs with the "No Sir" chorus.
  a1. "No Sir." Words and Music Arr. by A. M. Wakefield, from: "Songs and Ballads: 96 Songs - words and music, W. F. Shaw," c. 1881, dated 1882. It's also found in Shaw's "Gems of Minstrel Song" also dated 1882 and later in Delaney's Song Book (New York).
  a2. "No Sir" from The play-party in Indiana by Leah Jackson Wolford, 1916.
  a3. "No, Sir." From the manuscript songbook of Miss Lura Wagoner of Vox, Alleghany county, lent to Dr. Brown in 1936 (Brown Collection Vol. III); the entries in the book were probably made some twenty or more years earlier.
  b. "No Sir" sung by Lucy White and Louie Hooper of Hambridge on Dec. 23, 1903; collected by Cecil J. Sharp.
  c. "No Sir" sung by Lucy Garrison of Manchester, Kentucky on 11 August, 1917 as collected by Cecil J. Sharp.
  d. "The Spanish Merchant's Daughter" performed by The Stoneman Family. "Vocal duet by Hattie and Ernest Stoneman with harmonica, violin, guitar." Recorded in Bristol, Tennessee on October 31, 1928. Original issue Victor V-40206.

J. Songs with the "Oh No John" chorus/text
  a. "Oh No John" sung by William Wooley of Bincombe in 1907, collected Sharp
  b. "No John No" sung by James Beale of Warehome, Kent on September 23, 1908. Cecil Sharp Manuscript Collection (at Clare College, Cambridge) (CJS2/9/1777).
   c1. "Oh No John" composite arranged by Sharp, published in 1911.
   c2. "O No, John." From the manuscripts of Obadiah Johnson of Crossnore. Avery county, NC about 1939; Brown Collection III. Cover of Sharp composite.
    c3. "Oh No John." As sung by the Fuller Sisters, 1928; from "More Pious Friends and Drunken Companions: Songs and Ballads of Conviviality" by Frank Shay.
K. Songs with the "she answered No" chorus.
L. Songs with stanzas of "Madam" and the "she answered No" chorus
  a. "No Sir, No" (Yonder is a comely flower) c. 1919 from "Kentucky Mountain Songs" by Wyman and Brockway.
  b. "Oh No, No Sir, No" sung by Mrs. Mary Brown of Greene County, PA. Collected by Bayard in 1929; from Pennsylvania Songs and Legends, Korson.
  c. "Yonder Comes a Heavenly Creature" sung by O.B. Campbell Medford, OK 1934
 d. "Madam I Have Come A-Courting" vocal performance by Jonathan Moses at Orford (New Hampshire); recorded by Helen Flanders on 08-24-1951. Learned in North Haven, Maine.
  e1. "Uh, uh No," sung by Lannis Sutton of Doxy, Oklahoma, collected by Sam Eskin in 1951. From Lomax, Folk-Songs of North America, 1960.
  e2. "All of her answers to me were No," recording by Peggy Seeger, Folk Songs of Courting & complaint; Folkways 1955. Similar to "Uh, uh No," sung by Lannis Sutton of Doxy, Oklahoma.

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 19 Sep 17 - 09:04 PM

Hi,

I've started 8A. "Oh No, John," "No Sir," "Spanish Merchant's Daughter," "She answered No." The headnotes (15 pages so far) are here: http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/8a-oh-no-john-or-no-sir-.aspx Anyone with additional versions please post them.

Here's a sketch of opening text so far:

["Oh No, John," "No Sir," "Spanish Merchant's Daughter" and the "she answered No" songs are a series of songs[1] where the maid, confronted by a wooer, answers "No" to his advances. The "trick" to the "No" songs is that the wooer eventually asks questions expecting a "No" answer so that he wins over the maid. The humorous "No" courting songs evolved out of a broadsides and print versions from the 1600s and 1700s which eventually became, by the mid-to-late 1800s, the well-known songs "Oh No, John," and "No Sir."

No attempt has been made to include every version[2] of every song or ballad where the maid answers "No." Both Baskervill and Kittredge have provided some older analogs and variants-- but there are more. A number of additional "she answered No" songs are found in the Supplemental Versions Section at the end of these headnotes. A-H are all versions where the maid answers "No" but none are close antecedents of "No Sir," or "Oh No, John." Both A, "Consent at Last[3]" and G, "No, No" sung by Mrs. Wrighten at Vauxhall in the 1770s, are closer to "No Sir," and "Oh No, John" than some of the other "she answered No" songs. The purpose of this study is to show some of the underlying older versions and provide some guidance to differentiate between the more modern versions of the late 1800s and 1900s. That guidance is lacking in Roud 146 which lumps a number of versions of "Madam" with the "No" songs-- a problem complicated in part by past collectors titles[4] and the interchangeability of the choruses. Another important resource, the Traditional Ballad Index, like Roud, does not differentiate between "Oh No John" and "No Sir" and gives no background on the development of the "she answered No" songs. The Brown Collection versions are almost all from recent print, yet no mention of print versions is made in the Brown notes. So into the darkness we go without a torch.

Although listed as an appendix to 8. Madam I Have Come to Court You (Yonder Sits a Lovely Creature), versions of songs where the maid answers "No" to her wooer clearly predate known print versions of "Madam, I Have Come to Court You" which were rooted in the mid-1700s[5]. The end of the first stanza of the earliest version of "Madam" (c.1760), which is titled "Lovely Creature," expects a response of "No" or at least an answer to his intention to court her[6]:

Yonder sits a lovely creature,
Who is she? I do not know,
I'll go court her for her features,
Whether her answer be "Ay" or "no."

There a number early versions from the 1600s with the "No" response to the suitor's inquiries. The first, my Aa, is given by Bruce Olson from "a manuscript version of about 1635-40, in Bodleian MS Ashmole 38 (a collection of single sheets from various sources bound together), is so badly waterstained that most of it is unreadable. Only the first stanza of seven is legible:

"Lady why doth love torment you
May not I your grief remove?
Have I nothing will content you
With the sweet delights of Love."
"Oh, no, no, alas, no."

The lady's answer as a repeated chorus is "Oh, no, no, alas, no." This c.1635 MS is the antecedent of my Ab, "Consent at Last," which appears in Pills to Purge Melancholy, a series commencing in 1700 in Volume III, p. 82, dated 1719, with a tune. It goes as follows (original text):

Consent at Last.

Ladys, why doth Love torment you?
Cannot I your Grief remove?
Is there none that can content you
With the sweet delights of Love
O No, no, no, no, no: O, No, no, no, no, no, no, no.

Beauty in a perfect Measure,
Hath the Love and wish of all:
Dear, then shall I wait the Pleasure,
That commands my Heart and all:
O No, &c.

If I grieve, and you can ease me,
With you be so fiercely bent,
Having wherewithal to please me,
Must I still be Discontent?
O No, &c.

If I am your faithful Servant,
And my Love does still remain;
Will you think it ill deserved,
To be favour'd for my pain?
O No, &c.

If I should then crave a Favour,
Which your Lips invite me to,
Will you think it ill Behaviour,
Thus to steal a Kiss or two?
O No, &c.

All Amazing Beauty's Wonder,
May I presume your Breast to touch?
Or to feel a little under,
Will you think I do too much?
O No, &c.

Once more fairest, let me try ye[6]
Now my wish is fully sped,
If all Night, I would lye by ye,
Shall I be refus'd your Bed?
O No, &c.

In this version the suitor has adeptly figured out how to have his way with the lass even with a "No" answer. "Consent at Last" was called the original of the "she answered No" songs by early music authority Bruce Olson[7].

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 15 Sep 17 - 12:03 PM

Hi,

The US/Canada versions of Madam are here: http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/us--canada-versions-8-madam-i-have-come.aspx

The British and Other versions of Madam are here: http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/british-versions-8-madam-i-havetwenty-eighteen.aspx

Both headnotes in rough form are finished.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 13 Sep 17 - 05:38 PM

Hi Steve,

In order to separate the various versions based on, or similar to, "Madam" which are clearly different, a number of appendices have been created:

8A. "Oh No, John," "No Sir" and the "she answered No" songs.

8B. The Courting Case (Courting Cage); "O Miss, I Have A Very Fine Farm," etc.

8C. On a Mountain Stands a Lady (Children's game songs, Plough Plays; Skipping songs)

8D. The Quaker's Courtship, or, Quaker's Wooing

8E. The Spanish Lady ("Dublin City" "Madam, I'm a Darling" or "Chester City,") All Spanish Lady variants (Five basic types).

8F. Come My Little Roving Sailor ("Roving Sailor") Play-party song found in the US.

There are a few (see last post) versions of "she answered No" which are primarily stanzas of Madam-- most are not and are Roud 126. However, many of the "she answered No" songs are different from each other but I've grouped then under 8A.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 13 Sep 17 - 05:04 PM

Great stuff, Richie. As an addendum have you considered including all of those songs that use the 'oh, no, no' motif?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 13 Sep 17 - 04:23 PM

Hi,

Made it through Hurricane Irma and my power is on!! There are some good things about living in South Florida but hurricanes aren't one of them.

I've finished for now 8. Madam, I Have Come to Court You. Below are the list of versions that are made up primarily of 50% of stanzas of Madam. Here is a rough draft of the headnotes: http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/8-madam-i-have-come-to-court-you-.aspx I'll be working on Appendices next after I finish the US/Canada headnotes and the British headnotes. Here is a list of the texts, I've left off some single stanzas texts but they are on the website:

8. Madam, I Have Come to Court You (Madam, I Am Come to Court You); Roud 542 (Madam, I have Gold and Silver; The Lovely Creature; Yonder Stands a Lovely Creature; Spanish Lady I; Ripe is the Apple Love; Twenty-Eighteen; Ripest Apple; The Disdainful Lady; March Away; I Admire a Black-Eyed Man; As I Walked Up Through London City; Ower Yon Hill There Lives a Lassie; Galway City; Ettrick City; Ower Yon Hill There Lives a Lassie)

A. Madam I Am/Have Come to Court You ("Yonder sits/stands a Lovely Creature," "Twenty-Eighteen," "Ripe is the Apple Love," "Rioest Apple" "Spanish Lady IV")
   a. "The Lovely Creature" ("Yonder sits a Lovely Creature"), broadside printed at Aldermary Churchyard by one of the Dicey/Marshall dynasty and is probably about 1760. It comes from British Library 11621 e 6, items 1 to 26.
   b. "A New Song" ("Yonder Sits a Handsome Creature") broadside dated c. 1776. From British Library, item 1346 m 7, Broadsides 1 to 42, this being item 29, 3 songs of which this is the third.
   c. "What care I for your golden treasures?" a single stanza learned c.1780 by John Randolph of Virginia. Taken from a letter written by John Randolph in 1822. Published in "John Randolph of Roanoke, 1773-1833: A Biography. . ." by William Cabell Bruce- 1922.
   d. "Yonder Stands a Handsome Lady" was collected from the journal of the Diana, a ship harbored in New York under Captain Hay in 1819. The text is given in Hungtington's "Songs the Whalemen Sang."
   e. "Madam I Am Come to Court You," from Halliwell's 1846 book, "The Nursery Rhymes of England, obtained principally from oral tradition."
   f. "Twenty, Eighteen" - Sung by a carpenter at Besthorpe, Norfolk, to the Rev. J. T. Howard who learned in in 1871, and it was collected by John Graham for The Musical Herald, September, 1891. Reprinted in English County Songs edited by Lucy Etheldred Broadwood and John Alexander Fuller-Maitland, 1908.
   g. "There She Stands, a Lovely Creature" from New York Games and songs of American children, collected and compared by W.W. Newell by American children, 1883.
   h. "The Disdainful Lady" Sung by Harriet Dowley, of Edgmond, who knew no title to it. From Shropshire Folk-lore, a Sheaf of Gleanings - Part 2, page 552, by Charlotte Sophia Burne, Georgina Frederica Jackson, 1885.
   i. "In Yonder Grove," Taken down from George Cole, quarryman, aged 76, Rundlestone, Dartmoor, 1890. Baring-Gould Ms. Ref. PC 1. 194.
   j. "Here she stands, a lovely creature," sung by Washington children. From Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, Volume 37, 1886; " Song Games and Myth Dramas at Washington," by W. H. Babcock.
   k. "There she stands a lovely creature-," sung by Mrs. Carrie Grover, learned c. 1887 from her mother Eliza Spinney, (born 1840) when she herself was a young girl living in Black River, Nova Scotia. From Carrie Grover's "Heritage of Songs," p.18.
   l. "The Spanish Lady" Wehman Universal Songster, Volume 39 published in New York circa 1893.
   m. "The (Lincolnshire) Handsome Woman" from an unknown singer in Lincolnshire reported as a footnote to another song by Ebsworth, Roxburghe, 1899. It was taken orally by Colonel F. G. Baylay, R.A.(Royal Artillery; Woolwich), and communicated to the Editor by his friend Hubert Roberts, of Boston.
   n. "Madam I have gold and silver," Michigan. "Quite unexpectedly the bride's mother sang to me two verses of a courting song her mother had used to sing to her, about 1902, in the lumber woods." From Hoosier Folklore - Volumes 5-6 - Page 13, 1946.
   o. "Madam I am Come For to Court You," sung by William Smith of Twyford, Hampshire in June, 1905. Collected by G.B. Gardiner; George Gardiner Manuscript Collection (GG/1/2/62)
   p. "Madam, Madam, I Come a Courting," sung by Mrs. Fortey of Walton Dorset in May 1906; Henry Hammond Manuscript Collection (HAM/3/16/10).
   q. "Madam I am Come a-Courting," sung by John Greening of Cuckolds' Corner, North Bridport, Dorset in May 1906. Collector: H.E.D. Hammond, Henry Hammond Manuscript Collection (HAM/3/17/18)
   r. "Madam, Madam, I Come a-Courting" sung by Mrs. Elizabeth Simms, Uploders, Dorset in May 1906. Henry Hammond Manuscript Collection (HAM/3/19/5)
   s. "Ripest Apples," sung by William Davis of Porlock Weir, Somerset on 7 September 1906. Cecil Sharp Manuscript Collection (at Clare College, Cambridge) (CJS2/9/1125).
   t. "Yonder Stands a Lovely Creature"-- sung by Mrs. Cranstone of Billingshurst, Sussex about 1907, collected and transcribed by George Butterworth Manuscript Collection (GB/4/23).
   u. "Yonder Sits a Spanish Lady," sung by William Shepherd of Winchcombe, Gloucestershire on 8 April, 1909. My title. From Cecil Sharp Manuscript Collection (at Clare College, Cambridge) (CJS2/9/2015).
   v. "A Spanish Lady." A Cornwall informant quotes (Dec. 11, 1909) a version formerly heard at Colborne, Ont., which he supposes to be Irish. From Journal of American Folklore, Volume 31, 1917; "Canadian Folk-Lore from Ontario" by F.W. Waugh.
   w. "Ripe is the Apple Love" collected from a Hampshire gypsy by Alice Gillington in her book of gypsy songs titled, "Songs of the Open Road," which was published 1911.
   x. "Madam I have Gold and Silver," communicated in 1911 by G. C. Broadhead of Columbia, Missouri was published in Belden's "Ballads & Songs" pp. 506-507.
   y. "Madam, I have come to court ye" sung by S. C. of Boston, Mass., a native of County Tyrone, Ireland was published with music in the 1912 article "Irish Folk-Song" by Phillips Barry in Journal of American Folklore, Volume 24, page 342.
   z. "Madam I have come to court you" Suffolk version (Colchester) sent to Sharp by Miss Harma, May 1914, incorrectly titled Keys of Heaven. From: Cecil Sharp Manuscript Collection (at Clare College, Cambridge) (CJS2/10/2939).
   aa. "Spanish Lady." Communicated by Miss Violet Noland, Davis, Tucker County, 1916; obtained from Mr. John Raese, who heard it sung when he was a boy. From Cox; "Folk songs of the South," 1925.
   bb. "March Away," sung by David Sawyer of Ogbourne St. Andrew in County Wiltshire published Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard, 22nd January, 1916, p 2, Part 15, No. 2. Collected by Alfred Williams.
   cc. "Yonder sits a pretty little creature" sung by Charles Tanner in County Oxfordshire published Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard, 22nd January, 1916, p 2, Part 15, No. 3. Collected by Alfred Williams.
   dd. "Madam, I Have Gold and Silver," c. 1919. From Henry "Dutch" Gerlach who taught it before he died, during the World War I influenza epidemic, to Mr. Siemsen. 1963 Folkways Records "New York State Songs and Ballads."
   ee. "Kind Miss" sung by Ann Riddell Anderson of the University of Kentucky, from The American Songbag- Carl Sandburg 1927. This is a composite and is listed under composites.
   ff. "Yonder Hill There Is a Widow," sung by Mrs. Alma Kidder of Townshend, Vermont on August 23, 1930 from Vermont Folk-Songs and Ballads by Flanders, Brown, pp. 154-155.
   gg."The Spanish Maiden," sung in 1931 by Mr. Clarence C. Chickering of Belding, Michigan. From: Ballads & Songs of Southern Michigan by Emelyn-Elizabeth Gardner and Geraldine Jencks Chickering, 1939.
   hh. "Yonder Comes a Heavenly Creature" sung by O. B. Campbell of Medford, Grant County, Oklahoma, 1934.
he University Studies - Volumes 32-37 - pages 356-77; 1934. Also as "Madam I Have Gold and Silver" in the Max Hunter Collection Cat. #1177 (MFH #470) as sung by O.B. Campbell, Vinita, Oklahoma on August 9, 1971.
   ii. "Yonder Sits a Humble Creature." Sung by Mrs. Matilda Keene of Newberry, Fla., recorded by Alton C. Morris, 1937. (AFS979B2) From WPA field recordings in Alachua County (1936-1937 recording expedition) (S 1576, reel T86-220)
   jj. "Spanish Lady" sung by Mrs. S. T. Topper, Ashland, Ohio, 1939; from Ballads and Songs from Ohio by Mary Olive Eddy, p. 222.
   kk. "I Admire a Black-Eyed Man," vocal performance by Lena Bourne Fish at East Jaffrey (New Hampshire). Dated 08-26-1943. Recorded by Helen Flanders.
   ll. "I Come You a-Courting" sung by Matt Linehan of Kerry about 1948 collected by Seamus Ennis. My date, title. Text from Mainly Norfolk.
   mm. "Madam, Madam, You Came Courting" sung by William Gilkie, Sambro, NS, September, 1950; from Maritime Folk Songs by Flanders.
   nn. "Ower Yon Hill There Lives a Lassie," sung by Belle Stewart (1906-1997) of Blairgowrie , Perthsire in 1955. Learned from her older brother, who got it from an uncle in Perth. From: Recording Collection at School of Scottish Studies; Track ID - 60117; Original Tape ID - SA1955.036.
   oo. "Twenty, Eighteen," as sung by George Townsend, Lewes, Sussex, in 1960; recorded by Brian Matthews. From: Musical Traditions MT CD 304: Come Hand to me the Glass.
   pp. "Rattle on the Stovepipe," sung by LaRena Clark of Ontario c.1960; collected by Edith Fowke. From: A Family Heritage: The Story and Songs of LaRena Clark by Edith Fowke, Jay Rahn, LaRena LeBarr Clark.
   qq. "Madam, I Have Come A-Courting," sung by Mrs. Arlington Fraser of Lancaster, Ontario, 1961. Collected by Edith Fowke. From Fowke's "Ring Around the Moon" pp. 122-123.
   rr. "Ripest Apples," sung by Joe Jones of St Mary Cray, Kent between 1972-75. Recorded by Mike Yates. From: Musical Traditions anthology of Gypsy songs and music from South-East England, Here's Luck to a Man, 2003.
   ss. "Ripest Apples" sung by Joe Cooper of Biggin Hill, Kent collected by Stephen Sedley in 1966 and Mike Yates in 1970. From: English Dance and Song - Volumes 36-37 - Page 15, 1974 by Yates. Also Stephen Sedley Sound Collection (Vaughan Williams Memorial Library, London) 17 CDA Tape Collection.
   tt. "Ripest Apples," as recorded by Mabs Hall of Billingshurst, Sussex in 1987. From: VT107 Ripest Apples and on VT115CD, As I went down to Horsham. Recorded by Mike Yates.

B. "Spanish Lady" ("Spanish Lady I" also "Galway City" and "Ettrick Lady") first two stanzas rewritten from "SONG LXXXIII" in "The Frisky Songster," 1776 edition. Also titled "The Ride in London" in "The Merry Muses: A Choice Collection of Favourite Songs Gathered by Robert Burns" 1827. Two Irish arrangements without stanzas of "Madam" using the early text rewritten are Joseph Campbell's poem "Spanish Lady" c. 1915 (Spanish Lady II) and Herbert Hughes musical arrangement "Spanish Lady," 1930 (Spanish Lady V). See appendix 8E for these versions. Versions with "Madam" stanzas text date to later half of the 1800s in Greig-Duncan collection.
   a. "As I Walked Up Through London City," sung by Mrs. Margaret Gillespie (1841-1910)   of Glasgow, sister of Rev. Duncan about 1906; collected Duncan, version B from Greig-Duncan Collection.
   b. "Edinburgh City," sung by William Wallace of Leochel-Cushnie collected by Greig about 1907, version D from Greig-Duncan Collection 4.
   c. "London City," sung by John Johnstone of New Deer collected by Greig about 1907 (As I went up thro' London City) Greig-Duncan Collection 4 pp.66-71, version E. Mistitled, with music for version F.
   d. "Spanish Lady." sung by Belle Robertson of New Pitsligo (b.1841), got her songs from her mother and maternal grandmother. This is also variant of "she answered No." Collected Grieg about 1907, version I from Greig-Duncan Collection 4.
   e. "Spanish Lady," sung by Mrs. Longhill Dunbar of Crimond, Aberdeenshire about 1908; b. 1855 married John Dunbar collected by Greig, version A from Greig-Duncan Collection 4.
   f. "Dublin City"- sung by Miss Georgina Reid of Collyford, New Deer, married name Mrs Ironside of Tarriff ; collected by Greig about 1908; version F from Greig-Duncan Collection 4.
   g. "Spanish Lady," sung by Mary Cruickshank of Aberdeenshire; collected by Greig about 1908, published in 1910 in Greig's weekly folk song column. version C from Greig-Duncan Collection 4.
   h. "Twenty-Eighteen." Sung by Fred Yeldam, July 12th, 1911, and on Oct. 5th, 1911 by Mrs. Hollingsworth, Thaxted. Noted by Clive Carey. From Five English Folk Songs taken from Journal of the English Folk Dance and Song Society, Vol. 1, No. 3 (Dec., 1934), pp. 130-137.
   i. "Oh, Dear Oh (Spanish Lady)." Sung by Ethel Findlater of Orkney. Learned about 1914 from her cousin Bella who sang a chorus after every two verses, though Ethel thinks even that is too often. From two recordings at Collection - School of Scottish Studies, 1969.
   j. "Galway City" as sung by Clancy Brothers. Recorded in 1965 and released 1966 on their "Isn't It Grand Boys" album. Tommy Makem got this from Sean O'Boyle of Armahg.
   k. "Ettrick Lady," sung by The Corries from the Album: Live from Scotland Volume 2; 1975. Based on, or similar to, "Galway City" from Sean O'Boyle.

C. "She answered No" songs; versions with stanzas primarily of "Madam" with the "No" chorus.
   a. "No Sir, No" (Yonder is a comely flower) c. 1919 from "Kentucky Mountain Songs" by Wyman and Brockway.
   b. "Oh No, No Sir, No" sung by Mrs. Mary Brown of Greene County, PA. Collected by Bayard in 1929; from Pennsylvania Songs and Legends, Korson.
   c. "Yonder Comes a Heavenly Creature" sung by O.B. Campbvell Medford, OK 1934
   d. "Madam I Have Come A-Courting" vocal performance by Jonathan Moses at Orford (New Hampshire); recorded by Helen Flanders on 08-24-1951. Learned in North Haven, Maine.
   e1. Uh, uh No- sung by Lannis Sutton of Doxy Oklahoma, collected by Sam Esking about 1949. From Lomax, Folk-Songs of North America, 1960.
   e2. "All of her answers to me were No," recording by Peggy Seeger, Folk Songs of Courting & complaint; Folkways 1955.

D. Composite songs, "Vandy, Vandy" and all.
   a. "Seven Long Years." c. 1897. Reported by Mrs. R. D. Blacknall of Durham, with the note: "Sung by a Negro servant, Maria McCauley, presumably ex-slave of the Chapel Hill McCauleys. Heard forty-five years ago." Brown Collection volume 3, 1952.
   b1. "O Hatty Bell." Sung by Mrs. Godfrey of Marion, NC on September 3, 1918 from Sharp MS
   b2 "Hattie Bell" Greer MS http://omeka.library.appstate.edu/items/show/19554; no date c. 1918.
   c. "Yonder Stands a Handsome Creature," sung by Jake Sowder of Callaway, Virginia on August 14, 1918. My title. Composite from Cecil Sharp Manuscript Collection (at Clare College, Cambridge) (CJS2/9/3136).
   d. "Yankee Boys." Recorded from Able Shepherd, Bryson City, N. C about 1923. From: Some Songs and Ballads from Tennessee and North Carolina by Isabel Gordon Carter; The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 46, No. 179 (Jan.- Mar., 1933), pp. 22-50.
   e. "Annie Girl." From Mrs. G. V. Easley of Mississippi, who says that it was one of the most popular songs in her girlhood in Calhoun County. This is a compound of three songs, "The Drowsy Sleeper," "The Spanish Lady" ("No, Sir, No"), and "The Sailor's Return" ("The Broken Token"). From Hudson, Ballads and Songs from Mississippi, JAFL 1926.
   f. "Kind Miss" sung by Ann Riddell Anderson of the University of Kentucky, from The American Songbag- Carl Sandburg 1927. Composite of Drowsy Sleep and Madam.
   g. "Vandy Vandy" collected by Manly Wade Wellman c. 1946 in Moore County, North Carolina, published in 1953; arranged Bob Coltman.

E. English Traditional- Variants from Tristan da Cunha
   a. "Yonder stands a handsome creature," sung by Henry Green of Tristan da Cunha about 1938. From: Munch, "Song Tradition of Tristan da Cunha (1970) pp.90-93 (version A).
   b. "Yonder sits a handsome lady," sung by Frances Repetto of Tristan da Cunha about 1938. From: Munch, Song Tradition of Tristan da Cunha (1970) pp.90-93 (version B).

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 06 Sep 17 - 06:49 PM

Hi,

This is an archaic version from Canada from Carrie Grover's "Heritage of Songs," p.18 (Grover a singer and fiddler was born in 1879 in Black River, Nova Scotia moved to Maine when she was young and later in life to Pennsylvania). Julie Mainstone who sent this to me writes:

Both of these songs however, appear in the "Mother's Songs" section so they were either handed down through her Scotch grandparents/great-grandparents, or learned within the small Nova Scotian community where Grover was raised in the late 1800s. "There She Stands" was learned by Grover's mother, Eliza Spinney, (born 1840) when she herself was a young girl living in the same area where Carrie (Grover) was born/raised.

There she stands a lovely creature- as sung by Mrs. Carrie Grover, learned from her mother c. 1887.

There she stands a lovely creature
Who she is I do not know
I will court her for her beauty
she can only answer, "no".

Madam, I have gold and silver,
Madam, I have houses and land.
Madam, I have ships on the ocean.
All will be at your command.

What care I for gold and silver?
What care I for houses and land?
What care I for ships on the ocean?
All I want is a handsome man.

Handsome man is out of the question,
Handsome man you can not find.
Handsome man is out of the question,
Can not be at your command.

Madam, do not stand on beauty;
Youth and beauty fade away
Like a rose that blooms in the morning
And in the evening dies away.

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 05 Sep 17 - 08:50 PM

Here are two versions from Canada from Fowke's informants:

The first is from Fowke, "Ring Around the Moon" pp. 122-123. The last stanza is from The Courting Case.

Madam I Have Come A-Courting- sung by Mrs. Arlington Fraser of Lancaster, Ontario, 1961. Collected by Edith Fowke.

1. Madam, I have come a-courting,
If your favor I might gain,
If you'll freely entertain me
Oh, perhaps I'll call again.

CHORUS: Da-di-dum, a-derry, a-derry, a-derry,
Da-di-dum a-derry, a-derry, a-day,

2. Blue is a handsome colour,
Till it gets a second dip,
Like young men when they go a-courting
Very often make a slip.
CHORUS:

Madam, I have gold and silver,
Madam, I have houses and land;
Madam, I have a worldly treasure,
All to be at your command.
CHORUS:

What care I for your gold or silver?
What care I for your house and land?
What care I for your worldly treasure?
All I want is a handsome young man.
CHORUS:

The biggest apple soon grow rotten,
The hottest love soon grows cold;
Young men's words are soon forgotten,
Pretty fair maid, don't speak so bold.
CHORUS:

A handsome man I do admire
A handsome man I do adore
A handsome man I mean to marry
Be him rich or be him poor.
CHORUS:

Madam you are very saucy
Madam you are hard to please
Madam you are very saucy--
I hope to the Lord that you will freeze.
CHORUS:

* * * *

The 2nd is from A Family Heritage: The Story and Songs of LaRena Clark by Edith Fowke, Jay Rahn, LaRena LeBarr Clark. There are only two secondary stanzas of Madam in this unusual version.

Rattle on the Stovepipe- sung by LaRena Clark (ON) c.1960 Fowke

CHORUS 1: Rattle on the stovepipe, bootjack, Jew's harp
Rattle on the stovepipe, bootjack, Joe!
Rattle on the stovepipe, bootjack, Jew's harp,
Rattle on the stovepipe, bootjack, Joe!

1. She was kissing; I was wishing
Didn't know what she was about,
Robbed me of my gold and silver,
Then she kicked me threw me out.

CHORUS 2: Rattle on the stovepipe, bootjack, Jew's harp
Rattle on the stovepipe, bootjack, Joe!

2. Blue is a pretty colour,
Before it get a second dip,
Young boys when they go a-courting
Very often get the slip.

CHORUS 2: Rattle on the stovepipe, bootjack, Jew's harp
Rattle on the stovepipe, bootjack, Joe!

3. Ripest apples soon grow rotten,
Hottest love will soon grow cold.
Pretty maids are soon forgotten;
I pray young men don't be so bold.

CHORUS 2: Rattle on the stovepipe, bootjack, Jew's harp
Rattle on the stovepipe, bootjack, Joe!

4. Deepest water running swiftly
Birds a-flying through the air,
Kiss the young men, go a courting,
Kind sir, I don't have a care

Chorus 1

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 04 Sep 17 - 01:03 PM

Hi,

Here's a nice version from Florida.

"Yonder Sits a Humble Creature." Sung by Mrs. Matilda Keene of Newberry, Fla., recorded by Alton C. Morris, 1937. (AFS979B2)
Listen: https://www.floridamemory.com/audio/folk.php

Yonder sits a humble creature,
Lily-white brow as white as snow,
I'll go court her for her beauty,
Make her answer Yes or No.

CHORUS: La la, la la la la,
La la, la la la.

"Madam I will court you for your beauty,
If you'll only entertain,
Please sit down and I'll treat you handsome
If you never come again.
CHORUS

Madam I have gold and silver,
Madam I have house and land,
Madam I have a world of pleasure
You may have at your command.
CHORUS

What cares I for your gold and silver?
What cares I for you house and land?
Nothing cares I for your world of pleasure,
All's I want is a handsome man.
CHORUS

Madam why do you brag on beauty?
Beauty's a flower that will decay,
Pull a red rose in the morning,
By the noon it will fade away.
CHORUS

The ripest apple is the soonest rotten,
The warmest love['s] the soonest cold,
Young man's dreams are so uncertain,
Pray young miss, don't you be so bold.
CHORUS

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 02 Sep 17 - 10:25 AM

Hi,

In May of 1906 H.E. Hammond collected at least four versions in Dorset. This version (Henry Hammond Manuscript Collection; HAM/3/19/5) starts with the a first line resembling Broken Token/Sweetheart in the Army/Fair Maid in the Garden. The last stanza (False Young Man) is found in the Roxburghe version of Madam titled "The Handsom' Woman." See also "As I Walkèd Forth In The Pride Of The Season" where the maid wears the green willow. Cf. John Greening version.

"A Pretty Maiden" sung by Mrs. Elizabeth Simms of Uploders, Dorset in May, 1906. Collected by Henry Hammond.

A pretty fair maid walking in her garden,
But her name I do not know,
I'll go and court her for her beauty,
Let her answer be "Yes" or No."

Madam, Madam, I'm come a-courting,
That my favor I may gain,
Sit you down you're kindly welcome,
Then perhaps you may call again.

"Madam I have gold and silver,
Madam I have house and land
Madam I have a world of pleasure,
I leave it all at your command."

Don't tell me of your gold and treasure,
Don't tell me of your house and land
Don't tell me of your world of pleasure,
All I want is a handsome man.

Handsome men are out of fashion,
Maiden's beauties soon decay.
You pick a flower of a summer's morning,
Before the evening it will fade away.

First comes the oxslip and then the cruel[1],
Then the pink and then the may,
Then comes a new love, then comes a truelove
And so we pass our time away.

Once I lay on a young man's pillow,
Which I thought it was my own,
Now I do so lie under the willow,
All for the sake of a false young man.

1. a smaller form of cowslip

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 31 Aug 17 - 09:31 PM

Hi,

Here's a version of Spanish Lady IV (name is used only) from: Wehman's Universal Songster Volume 39. Published in NY about 1893. The last stanza is from "The Johnson Boys."

THE SPANISH LADY.

Yonder sits a Spanish lady,
Who she is I do not know;
I'll go court her for her beauty,
Let her answer be yea or no.

Chorus. Nedy um a do to dod dum da,
Nedy um a do to du dum da.

Madam, I have come a-courting,
Though your name I do not know;
I will court you for your beauty,
Let your answer be yes or no.- Chorus.

Sir, if you have come a-courting
Some kind pleasure for to win,
I will kindly entertain you
If you will never come again.- Chorus.

Madam, I have gold and silver,
Madam, I have house and land;
Madam, I have a world of treasure,
All to be at your command.- Chorus.

What care I for your gold and silver,
What care I for your house and land;
What care I for your world of treasure,
All I want is a handsome man.- Chorus.

Blue is a pretty color
When it gets a second dip,
Young men when they go a-courting
Very often get the slip.- Chorus.

Ripest apples soonest rotten,
Hottest love soonest cold;
Young men's vows are soon forgotten,
Pray, pretty maids, don't be so bold.- Chorus

Iowa boys are the boys of honor,
To court pretty maids they're not afraid.
Hug them, kiss them, call them honey;
That's the way, boys; don't be afraid. -Chorus.

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 26 Aug 17 - 07:32 PM

Hi,

I'm starting to organize "Madam." I've created the following appendices for versions that are related but lacking the core stanzas or that are related but have different text:

8A. "Oh No, John," or, "No Sir"
8B. The Courting Case
8C. On a Mountain Stands a Lady (children's game songs/skipping songs)
8D. The Quaker's Courtship, or, Quaker's Wooing
8E. The Spanish Lady II, III, IV
8F. Come My Little Roving Sailor (Roving Sailor)

Here's what I have so far for "Madam"- the requirement is the version must have approximately 50% or more of the core stanzas of Madam (all the versions have not been added yet):

8. Madam, I Have Come to Court You (Madam, I Am Come to Court You); Roud 542 (Madam, I have Gold and Silver; The Lovely Creature; Yonder Stands a Lovely Creature; Spanish Lady I; Ripe is the Apple Love; Twenty-Eighteen; Ripest Apple;)

A. Madam I Am/Have Come to Court You ("Yonder sits/stands a Lovely Creature," "Twenty-Eighteen," "Ripe is the Apple Love," "Ripest Apple" )
   a. "The Lovely Creature" ("Yonder sits a Lovely Creature"), broadside printed at Aldermary Churchyard by one of the Dicey/Marshall dynasty and is probably about 1760. It comes from British Library 11621 e 6, items 1 to 26.
   b. "A New Song" ("Yonder Sits a Handsome Creature") broadside dated c. 1776. From British Library, item 1346 m 7, Broadsides 1 to 42, this being item 29, 3 songs of which this is the third.
   c. "What care I for your golden treasures?" a single stanza learned c.1780 by John Randolph of Virginia. Taken from a letter written by John Randolph in 1822. Published in "John Randolph of Roanoke, 1773-1833: A Biography. . ." by William Cabell Bruce- 1922.
   d. "Yonder Stands a Handsome Lady" was collected from the journal of the Diana, a ship harbored in New York under Captain Hay in 1819. The text is given in Hungtington's "Songs the Whalemen Sang."
   e. "Madam I Am Come to Court You," from Halliwell's 1846 book, "The Nursery Rhymes of England, obtained principally from oral tradition."
   f. "There She Stands, a Lovely Creature" from New York Games and songs of American children, collected and compared by W.W. Newell by American children, 1883.
   g. "The Disdainful Lady" Sung by Harriet Dowley, of Edgmond, who knew no title to it. From Shropshire Folk-lore, a Sheaf of Gleanings - Part 2, page 552, by Charlotte Sophia Burne, Georgina Frederica Jackson, 1885.
   h. "In Yonder Grove," Taken down from George Cole, quarryman, aged 76, Rundlestone, Dartmoor, 1890. Baring-Gould Ms. Ref. PC 1. 194.
   i. "Twenty, Eighteen" - Sung by a carpenter at Besthorpe, Norfolk, to the Rev. J. T. Howard, and collected by John Graham for The Musical Herald, September, 1891. Reprinted in English County Songs edited by Lucy Etheldred Broadwood and John Alexander Fuller-Maitland, 1908.
   j. "Here she stands, a lovely creature," sung by Washington children. From Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, Volume 37, 1886; " Song Games and Myth Dramas at Washington," by W. H. Babcock.
   k. "The (Lincolnshire) Handsome Woman" from an unknown singer in Lincolnshire reported as a footnote to another song by Ebsworth, Roxburghe, 1899. It was taken orally by Colonel F. G. Baylay, R.A.(Royal Artillery; Woolwich), and communicated to the Editor by his friend Hubert Roberts, of Boston.
   l. "Madam I have gold and silver," Michigan. "Quite unexpectedly the bride's mother sang to me two verses of a courting song her mother had used to sing to her, about 1902, in the lumber woods." From Hoosier Folklore - Volumes 5-6 - Page 13, 1946.
   l. "Madam I am Come For to Court You," sung by William Smith of Twyford, Hampshire in June, 1905. Collected by G.B. Gardiner; George Gardiner Manuscript Collection (GG/1/2/62)
   m. "Madam, Madam, I Come a Courting," sung by Mrs. Fortey of Walton Dorset in May 1906; Henry Hammond Manuscript Collection (HAM/3/16/10).
   n. "Madam I am Come a-Courting," sung by John Greening of Cuckolds' Corner, North Bridport, Dorset in May 1906. Collector: H.E.D. Hammond, Henry Hammond Manuscript Collection (HAM/3/17/18)
   o. "Madam, Madam, I Come a-Courting" sung by Mrs. Elizabeth Simms, Uploders, Dorset in May 1906. Henry Hammond Manuscript Collection (HAM/3/19/5)
   p. "Ripest Apples," sung by William Davis of Porlock Weir, Somerset on 7 September 1906. Cecil Sharp Manuscript Collection (at Clare College, Cambridge) (CJS2/9/1125).
   q. "Yonder Stands a Lovely Creature"-- sung by Mrs. Cranstone of Billingshurst, Sussex about 1907, collected and transcribed by George Butterworth Manuscript Collection (GB/4/23).
   r. "A Spanish Lady." A Cornwall informant quotes (Dec. 11, 1909) a version formerly heard at Colborne, Ont., which he supposes to be Irish. From Journal of American Folklore, Volume 31, 1917; "Canadian Folk-Lore from Ontario" by F.W. Waugh.
   s. "Ripe is the Apple Love" collected from a Hampshire gypsy by Alice Gillington in her book of gypsy songs titled, "Songs of the Open Road," which was published 1911.
   t. "Madam I have Gold and Silver," communicated in 1911 by G. C. Broadhead of Columbia, Missouri was published in Belden's "Ballads & Songs" pp. 506-507.
   u. "Madam, I have come to court ye" sung by S. C. of Boston, Mass., a native of County Tyrone, Ireland was published with music in the article "Irish Folk-Song" by Phillips Barry in Journal of American Folklore, Volume 24, page 342.
   v. "Spanish Lady." Communicated by Miss Violet Noland, Davis, Tucker County, 1916; obtained from Mr. John Raese, who heard it sung when he was a boy. From Cox; "Folk songs of the South," 1925.
   w. "March Away," sung by David Sawyer of Ogbourne St. Andrew in County Wiltshire published Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard, 22nd January, 1916, p 2, Part 15, No. 2. Collected by Alfred Williams.
   x. "Yonder sits a pretty little creature" sung by Charles Tanner in County Oxfordshire published Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard, 22nd January, 1916, p 2, Part 15, No. 3. Collected by Alfred Williams.
   y. "Madam, I Have Gold and Silver," c. 1919. From Henry "Dutch" Gerlach who taught it before he died, during the World War I influenza epidemic, to Mr. Siemsen. 1963 Folkways Records "New York State Songs and Ballads."
   z. "Kind Miss" sung by Ann Riddell Anderson of the University of Kentucky, from The American Songbag- Carl Sandburg 1927.
   aa. "Yonder Hill There Is a Widow" sung by Mrs. Alma Kidder of Townshend, Vermont on August 23, 1930 from Vermont Folk-Songs and Ballads by Flanders, Brown, pp. 154-155.
   bb."The Spanish Maiden," sung in 1931 by Mr. Clarence C. Chickering, Belding.Ballads & Songs of Southern Michigan by Emelyn-Elizabeth Gardner and Geraldine Jencks Chickering, 1939.
   cc. "Spanish Lady" sung by Mrs. S. T. Topper, Ashland, Ohio, 1939; from Ballads and Songs from Ohio by Mary Olive Eddy, p. 222.
   dd. "I Admire a Black-Eyed Man," vocal performance by Lena Bourne Fish at East Jaffrey (New Hampshire). Dated 08-26-1943. Recorded by Helen Flanders.
   ee. "Madam, Madam, You Came Courting" sung by William Gilkie, Sambro, NS, September, 1950; from Maritime Folk Songs by Flanders.

B. "Spanish Lady I" (Galway City also Ettrick Lady) first two stanzas rewritten from "SONG LXXXIII" in "The Frisky Songster," 1776 edition. Also titled "The Ride in London" in "The Merry Muses: A Choice Collection of Favourite Songs Gathered by Robert Burns" 1827. Two Irish arrangements without stanzas of "Madam" using the early text rewritten are Joseph Campbell's poem "Spanish Lady" c. 1915 and Herbert Hughes musical arrangement "Spanish Lady," 1930. See appendix 8E for these versions. Versions with "Madam" stanzas text date to later half of the 1800s in Greig-Duncan collection.
   a. "As I Walked Up Through London City," sung by Mrs. Margaret Gillespie (1841-1910)   of Glasgow, sister of Rev. Duncan about 1906; collected Duncan, version B from Greig-Duncan Collection.
   b. "Edinburgh City," sung by William Wallace of Leochel-Cushnie collected by Greig about 1907, version D from Greig-Duncan Collection 4.
   c. "London City," sung by John Johnstone of New Deer collected by Greig about 1907 (As I went up thro' London City) Greig-Duncan Collection 4 pp.66-71 (version E). Mistitled, with music and the text for Grieg version F.
   d. "Spanish Lady." sung by Belle Robertson of New Pitsligo (b.1841), got her songs from her mother and maternal grandmother. This is also variant of "she answered No." Collected Grieg about 1907, version I from Greig-Duncan Collection 4.
   e. "Spanish Lady," sung by Mrs. Longhill Dunbar of Crimond, Aberdeenshire about 1908; b. 1855 married John Dunbar collected by Greig, version A from Greig-Duncan Collection 4.
   f. "Dublin City"- sung by Miss Georgina Reid of Collyford, New Deer, married name Mrs Ironside of Tarriff ; collected by Greig about 1908; version F from Greig-Duncan Collection 4.
   g. "Spanish Lady," sung by Mary Cruickshank of Aberdeenshire; collected by Greig about 1908, published in 1910 in Greig's weekly folk song column. version C from Greig-Duncan Collection 4.
   h. "Twenty-Eighteen." Sung by Fred Yeldam, July 12th, 1911, and on Oct. 5th, 1911 by Mrs. Hollingsworth, Thaxted. Noted by Clive Carey. From Five English Folk Songs taken from Journal of the English Folk Dance and Song Society, Vol. 1, No. 3 (Dec., 1934), pp. 130-137.
    i. "Oh, Dear Oh (Spanish Lady)." Sung by Ethel Findlater of Orkney. Learned about 1914 from her cousin Bella who sang a chorus after every two verses, though Ethel thinks even that is too often. From two recordings at Collection - School of Scottish Studies, 1969.

C. "She answered No" songs; versions with stanzas primarily of "Madam" with the "No" chorus.
    a. "No Sir, No" (Yonder is a comely flower) c. 1919 from "Kentucky Mountain Songs" by Wyman and Brockway.
    b. "Oh No, No Sir, No" sung by Mrs. Mary Brown of Greene County, PA. Collected by Bayard in 1929; from Pennsylvania Songs and Legends, Korson.
    c. "Madam I Have Come A-Courting" vocal performance by Jonathan Moses at Orford (New Hampshire); recorded by Helen Flanders on 08-24-1951. Learned in North Haven, Maine.

D. "Roving Sailor." ("Come my little roving sailor"). The opening stanza is Roving Sailor, a play-party, fiddle tune; the rest is Madam.
   a. "Come my little Roving Sailor," sung by Mrs I.T. (Lucy) Cannady at Endicott, Virginia on August 22nd. 1918. From Sharp's "English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians" 1932 edition, edited Karpeles. Sharp A
   b. "Roving Sailor." Sung by Mr. Jacob Sowder at Callaway, Franklin Co., Va., August 14th 1918. From Sharp's "English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians" 1932 edition, edited Karpeles. Sharp C.

E. Composite songs, "Vandy, Vandy" and all.
   a. "Seven Long Years." c. 1897. Reported by Mrs. R. D. Blacknall of Durham, with the note: "Sung by a Negro servant, Maria McCauley, presumably ex-slave of the Chapel Hill McCauleys. Heard forty-five years ago." Brown Collection volume 3, 1952.
   b1. "O Hatty Bell." Sung by Mrs. Godfrey of Marion, NC on September 3, 1918 from Sharp MS
   b2 "Hattie Bell" Greer MS http://omeka.library.appstate.edu/items/show/19554; no date c. 1918.
   c1. "Yankee Boys." Recorded from Able Shepherd, Bryson City, N. C about 1923. From: Some Songs and Ballads from Tennessee and North Carolina by Isabel Gordon Carter; The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 46, No. 179 (Jan.- Mar., 1933), pp. 22-50.
   c2. "All of her answers to me were No," recording by Peggy Seeger, Folk Songs of Courting & complaint; Folkways 1955.
   d. "Annie Girl." From Mrs. G. V. Easley of Mississippi, who says that it was one of the most popular songs in her girlhood in Calhoun County. This is a compound of three songs, "The Drowsy Sleeper," "The Spanish Lady" ("No, Sir, No"), and "The Sailor's Return" ("The Broken Token"). From Hudson, Ballads and Songs from Mississippi, JAFL 1926.
   e. "Kind Miss" sung by Ann Riddell Anderson of the University of Kentucky, from The American Songbag- Carl Sandburg 1927. Composite of Drowsy Sleep and Madam.
   f. "Vandy Vandy" collected by Manly Wade Wellman in Moore County, North Carolina, published in 1953; arranged Bob Coltman.

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 26 Aug 17 - 10:11 AM

Hi,

Here's another "she answered No" song made of primarily from stanzas of Madam:

"Oh No, No Sir, No!" Collected from Mrs. Mary Brown by Bayard in 1929 in Greene County, Pennsylvania.

1. Yonder sits a lovelye creature,
Who she is I do not know;
I'll step up and court her favor,
Let her answer Yes or No.
CHORUS: Oh, no, no, sir, no!
Always to answer the young men no.

2. Madam, I have come a-courting,
And if your favor I can gain,
And if you'll highly entertain me,
Then perhaps I'll come again.
CHORUS:

3. Madam, I have gold and silver,
Madam, I have house and land;
Madam, I have this world's pleasures,
And all shall be at your command.
CHORUS:

4. What care I for gold and silver,
What care I for house and land?
What care I for this world's pleasures?
All I want is a handsome man.
CHORUS:

5. My father was a Spanish merchant,
Where he is I do not know;
Before he left me, he made me promise
To always answer the young men No.
CHORUS:

6. Madam, if you were to live single,
Say, perhaps, one year or two,
Madam, would you be offended
If I should offer my hand to you?
CHORUS (emphatically)

7. As we sit together talking,
The north wind began to blow;
I saw the rising sun approaching
And I said, "Dear madam, I must go."
CHORUS:

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 25 Aug 17 - 09:46 PM

Hi,

There are several versions the "she answers No" chorus with are versions of Madam. This short version is one example.

"Madam I Have Come A-Courting" - voice performance by Jonathan Moses at Orford (New Hampshire); recorded by Helen Flanders on 08-24-1951. Learned in North Haven, Maine. Listen, Track 01: https://archive.org/details/HHFBC_tapes_T07A

Madam, I have come a-courting
Your perfection for to win,
If you'll kindly entertain me,
Perhaps I may return again.
CHORUS: No, no, no no no sir,
All of her answers to me was No.

Oh madam I have gold and silver,
Madam I have houses and lands,
Oh madam I have ships on anchor
All to be at your command.
CHORUS

Don't want some[1] of your gold or silver
Don't want some of your houses and lands,
Don't want some of your ships on anchor
All's I want's a handsome man.
CHORUS

A handsome man that I admire,
A handsome man that I adore,
A handsome man that I will have,
Whether he is rich or poor.
CHORUS

1. Sings: "I want some of" which makes no sense-- this stanza is from Moses 1933 recording with a different chorus.
* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 25 Aug 17 - 09:01 PM

Hi,

This is an unusual version of "Madam":

"I Admire a Black Eyed Man," vocal performance by Lena Bourne Fish at East Jaffrey (New Hampshire). Dated 08-26-1943. Recorded by Helen Flanders. Listen: https://archive.org/details/HHFBC_tapes_D20B [starts about 21:30] Corrections?

Madam I have come a-courting
And your favor I hope to gain,
If you'll kindly entertain me,
Maybe I will come again.
CHORUS: Ladies go you hair up,
Hair up, hair up,
Ladies go you hair up,
Prim and fine.

Madam I am bold and handsome,
I have money houses and land,
If you'll be my wife, my darling,
All of this is at your command.
CHORUS

I do not want your gold and silver,
Nor your fortune, houses and land,
Your fine features do not lure me
For I admire a black-eyed man.
CHORUS

A black-eyed man I do admire,
Raven locks I do adore,
A black-eyed man I'll surely marry,
whether he is rich or poor.
CHORUS

So your gold and silver tinkling
All your fortune houses and land
But I speaks of fiery whiskers,
I will choose a black-eyed man.
CHORUS

Gold would buy me silks and satins,
I could dress like a lady grand,
But I prefer to this a [ ]
With a charming black-eyed man.
CHORUS:

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 23 Aug 17 - 12:05 PM

Hi,

Here's a Scottish composite version of "Spanish Lady" and "lady answered No" sung by Bell Robertson of New Pitsligo (b.1841) which may, through her mother and maternal grandmother of Strichen, date back to the 1700s or early 1800s. It was collected by Grieg about 1907 and is version I from Greig-Duncan Collection, vol. 4.

1. Walking down through London city,
Between twelve and one at night,
There I saw a Spanish lady
Wash herself by candle light.
CHORUS: She said Aye, no, no, no,
She said Aye, no, no, no,
She said Aye, no, no, no,
Still the lady answered No.

2 Wi' a basin full of water
And a towel in her hand.
And a candle on the table,
Like an angel she did stand.
CHORUS

3 Madam, I am come to court you,
If I could your favour gain.
And gin ye mak me kindly welcome
Maybe I come back again.
CHORUS

4. My father he's a wealthy merchant
He has lately gone from home
He left me strict directions
Never to say Aye to none.
CHORUS

5. Saw ye ever a copper kettle,
Marriet with a brazen pan,
Saw ye ever a Spanish Lady,
Would refuse an Englishman?
CHORUS

The Scottish versions of Spanish Lady have the opening stanzas of the bawdy 1776 song rewritten as found Bell's stanza 1 and 2. They are followed by stanzas of "Madam" and in Bell's version there is only one. The Spanish merchant stanza is standard in "Oh No John" and "No Sir," while the last stanza is found in "Galway City" and some other versions of Spanish Lady.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 22 Aug 17 - 03:23 PM

Hi,

"Spanish Lady," sung by Mrs. Longhill Dunbar of Crimond, Aberdeenshire also has a "tarry trousers" stanza. Longhill was born in 1855 then married John Dunbar-- her version is dated about 1908 and was collected by Greig, version A from Greig-Duncan Collection.

7 Some court maidens for their money,
Bring to me their heart's delight,
He that wears the tarry trousers
Shines to me like diamonds bright.

Anyone know Eddie Butcher's version (1966) of Tarry Trousers held at Ulster Folk & Transport Museum collection? Can't find it there?

I've started writing the headnotes to "Madam" here: http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/8-madam-i-have-come-to-court-you-.aspx

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 20 Aug 17 - 03:24 PM

Hi,

Another version with Tarry Trousers is taken from Sam Henry's Songs of the People. Most versions titled "Tarry Trousers/Trowsers" are a different song of a mother-daughter conversation about marrying a sailor.

According to one online site (Contemplator): "Tarry trousers" refers to the sailor's practice of waterproofing their trousers with tar. This may be among the reasons sailors were referred to as "tars," a term used since 1676. Between 1857 and 1891 sailors also wore black 'tarpaulin' hats (boater-shaped with ribbon around the crown). The term "Jack Tar" has been in use since the 1780s.

Tarry Trousers- from Sam Henry, published in North Ireland on Feb. 10, 1934

Yonder stands a pretty maiden,
Who she is I do not know,
I'll go court her for her beauty,
Let her answer yes or no.

'Pretty maid, I've come to court you,
If your favour I do gain
And you make me hearty welcome,
I will call this way again.'

'Sit you down, you're heart'ly welcome,
Sit you down and chat a while,
Sit you down, you're heart'ly welcome,
Suppose you do not call again?'

'Pretty little maid, I've gold and riches,
Pretty little maid, I've houses and lands,
Pretty little maid, I've worldly treasures.
And all will be at your command.'

'What do I care for your worldly treasures?
What do I care for your houses and lands?
What do I care for your gold and riches?
All that I want is a nice young man.'

'Why do you dive so deep in beauty?
It is a flower will soon decay,
It's like the rose that blooms in summer
When winter comes, it fades away.'

'My love wears the tarry trousers,
My love wears the jacket blue,
My love ploughs the deep blue ocean,
So, young man, be off with you.'

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 20 Aug 17 - 02:40 PM

Hi,

The version below by Findlater (below) introduces the "tarry trousers" found in several other versions of Spanish Lady/Madam. I have the version from Sam Henry. Does anyone have The Tarry Trousers, "Yonder stands a pretty little maiden" from O Lochlainn, More Irish Street Ballads (1965) p.243 ?

Oh, Dear Oh (Spanish Lady)- Sung by Ethel Findlater of Orkney. Learned about 1914 from her cousin Bella who sang a chorus after every two verses, though Ethel thinks even that is too often.
Listen: http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/64119/3

1 Walking up Edinburgh city,
At the back of twelve o'clock at night,
There I spied a Spanish lady
Dressing herself with candlelight.

2 "Madam I have come to court you,
What you are I do not know;
Madam I have come to court you,
If your answer should be No."

(chorus) Oh, dear Oh, if I had a sailor,
Oh, dear Oh, if I had but one;
Oh, dear Oh, if I had a sailor,
With his tarry trousers on.

3 "Come sit down your hearty welcome,
Wither you call again or no;
Come sit down your hearty welcome,
If my should be no."

4 "Madam, I have gold and silver;
Madam, I have houses and land;
Madam, I have men and maidens,
And they all shall be at your command.

5 What care I for your gold and silver?
What care I for your houses and land?
What care I for your men and maidens,
All I want a handsome young man." .

(chorus) Oh, dear Oh, if I had a sailor,
Oh, dear Oh, if I had but one;
Oh, dear Oh, if I had a sailor,
With his tarry trousers on.

7. Madam you talk much of beauty
It is a flower that will soon decay;
For the fairest flower that blooms in summer,
When winter comes it fades away."

(chorus)

8 "Don't you see yon lugger coming,
With the long boat at the stern;
It's him that's got my heart a-keeping,
I wish he had my body too."

(chorus)

9 "My two eyes are dim with weeping,
Oh, dear O, what shall I do;
It's him that's got my heart a-keeping,
I wish he had my body too."

Chorus (2x)

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 19 Aug 17 - 11:37 AM

Hi,

TY for that post Reinhard. Curiously, Lomax wrote the notes for Ives 1945 Decca album "A Collection of Ballads and Folk Songs." I couldn't find those notes online. Anyone?

Since the version Ives collected has this line "Around her shoulders she pegged a towel" plus the "Wheel of Fortune" refrain which are also found in Frank Harte's version, it seems possible that Harte used part of Ives recording for his arrangement. Ives account of how he learned Dublin City from an Irish bartender in NYC would seem to contradict the account of him singing the song to his mother-- as if he learned it at an early age in Illinois.

An additional note about Norfolk version of "Twenty Eighteen" found in "The Espérance Morris Book" (1910) by Mary Neal, Clive Carey, Geoffrey Toye, states: An old settler in Massachusetts fifty years ago used to sing at the end of the refrain, "I've done," instead of "And one." This suggests that the "Charming creature" had to say "Yes" or "No" by the time the figures were counted.

The use of the "Twenty, Eighteen" chorus was also found in "The Queen's Health" given with music in "Songs Collected from Sussex" by Ralph Vaughan Williams, Cecil J. Sharp, G. S. K. Butterworth, Frank Kidson, A. G. Gilchrist and Lucy E. Broadwood (Journal of the Folk-Song Society, Vol. 4, No. 17 (Jan., 1913), pp. 279-324). Broadwood traced the tune for this and "Madam" to scarce ballad-opera of "Achilles" (1733). Her notes follow:

7.-THE QUEEN'S HEALTH.
SUNG BY G. KNIGHT,
AIR Noted by George Butterworth. HORSHAM, APRIL, 1907.

1. See and view this glass of liquor,
How inviting it does look,
It makes the lawyer prattle quicker,
And a scholar burn his book.

CHORUS Twenty, eighteen, sixteen, fourteen,
twelve, ten, eight, six, four, two, none,
Nineteen, seventeen, fifteen, thirteen,
'leven, nine, seven, five, three and on.

2. It makes a dead horse try to caper,
And a dumb man try to sing,
It makes a coward draw his baton,
So here's a health to our Good Queen.
Twenty, eighteen, etc.

Opinion is divided as to whether this is a Dorian tune or an "everlasting" tune in the Ionian (or major) mode. This is surely a favourite old Irish tune. Wedded to new words about "Sheela of the Silver Eye" it became extremely popular again in one form, a few years ago, owing to the singing of Mr. Plunket Greene. The earliest printed version that I know is in the scarce ballad-opera of "Achilles" (1733). It is worth comparing with the traditional " health," which probably was sung before Queen Victoria's accession seeing that "sing" should rhyme with " king." - L. E. B.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Reinhard
Date: 19 Aug 17 - 03:14 AM

There is a reference to Burl Ives in the notes to the two-verse fragment of Dublin City on the 1961 Caedmon album Songs of Seduction which was sung by Seamus Ennis to Alan Lomax in Dublin in 1951:

"Burl Ives used to sing another version of this song, which begins:

    A I walked out in Dublin city
    About the hour of twelve at night,
    I spied a fair young maiden
    Washing her feet by candlelight,

In the refrain, she appears to be counting, but in reverse series, running from twenty to nothing and from nineteen to one. If one combines this refrain with the second stanza of the present version, perhaps the song may make sense as a picture of a market girl or a prostitute summing up her day's receipt of coins. On the other hand, perhaps, the first stanza here is another of the many instances in Irish folk song of an encounter with a feminine symbol of the spirit of depressed Ireland?in this case a revolutionary one. Now it appears that Seamus Ennis has collected a version with an number of stanzas linking the song with No, John, No or Keys of Heaven (see text). My guess is that these stanzas are an addict and an afterthought, but what the song really concerns, no one can be sure. Perhaps Robert Graves could offer on of his reasonable, supernatural explanations."

Seamus Ennis sings:

As I walked through Dublin City at the hour of twelve at night,
Who should I see but a maiden beauty, combing her hair with a four-pronged pike?

Chorus (after each verse):
Turry-idle-ido-dido-dido,
Turry-idle-ido-dido-day.

As I walked again through Dublin, on the same or another night,
Who should I see but the same fair maiden, counting her cash by the candlelight?

This is extended by verses sung by Matt Linehan, Kerry that were collected by Seamus Ennis:

I says, "Fair maid I come you a-courting, your fine features for to win,
If you'll kindly entertain me some dark night I'll call again."

She says, "Kind sir, you've come me a-courting, my fine features for to win,
And if I kindly entertain you, you may never call again."

She sent me very tight all over, including the crown of my old hat,
I pulled out my "pouse" revolver and let fly a terror shot.

When I heard the answer that she made me, I called her a bloody bean,
"Don't you know to whom you're talking? I am Linnehan from Lisheen.

"I have gold and I have money, I have cattle and I have land,
I have ships upon the ocean ready to sail at my command."

"I don't want your gold or money, I don't want your cattle and land,
I don't want your ships from the ocean; all I want is a fine young man."

Courtin' women is foolish folly and marryin' women is just the same.
Courtin' women when they're not willin' is like throwin' water against the stream.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 18 Aug 17 - 11:40 PM

Hi,

The first published version similar to Frank Harte's version with the two choruses was in 1948. It was titled "Dublin City" and was collected about 1944 [my date, Ives was back in NYC Dec. 1943] by a once Illinois farm-boy living in New York City from an Irish bartender on Third Avenue. This singer included it on his first album in 1945, "A Collection of Ballads and Folk Songs" (Personality Series. Album No. A-407. New York: Decca Records). Did Frank Harte get part of his version from Burl Ives, an itinerant Illinois farm boy? Truth is sometimes stranger than fiction.

Here's the story behind the 1945 recording and the song, "Dublin City" which was published in "Wayfaring Stranger: An Autobiography" by BURL IVES. (Whittlesey House, 1948. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc. New York:

It was lunchtime and I began to feel hungry. The aroma of beer drifted past my nostrils, my head turned toward it, and I followed my nose into a little bar-restaurant on Third Avenue.

The bar stretched along one wall; opposite was a row of tables covered with red-and-white checked cloths. A man and woman were seated at a table eatinsf boiled beef and white potatoes. An old man sat sipping a glass of beer at the end of the bar, his back toward the street. Further along the bar a grocery clerk sat in a white apron and coat and a hard-brimmed straw hat. I took a bar stool and ordered a beer and a salami sandwich. Above the bar were two Irish thorn canes crossed like swords. When the bartender spoke, my guess that he would be an Irishman was confirmed. He had the Irish kind of face that all good Irish bartenders have. He called my order to the kitchen. "Coming up," the cook called back.

The bartender mopped up the bar and served me a beer. Nobody spoke except the couple at the table and they spoke in quiet tones. An elevated train roared by every minute or two, trucks and taxicabs made gross music as they stopped, started and tooted their horns. The bartender took a clean cloth and started to polish the glasses stacked before the mirror behind the bar. As he twisted the white cloth in and out and around the glasses he hummed a melody in a minor key over and over. His song was interrupted by the cook who handed him a plate with my sandwich. He mopped the bar in front of me, and his cloth absorbed the rings of wet beer made by my glass.

"What was that tune you were humming?" I asked.

He looked at me, surprised and embarrassed. "And was I hummin' a tune?"

"Yes, you were, and a very nice tune."

He shook his head, "If my life depended on it, I couldn't repeat it."

I started to eat. He served a beer to the old man and began to polish the glasses again. Soon he was humming the tune. I took a pencil from my pocket, drew a musical staff on my paper napkin, and jotted down the notes of the melody.

I called him for another beer, and when he stood before me I said, "What is the name of this song?" I sang his tune back to him.

"Why, that's a song I sang as a young man in Dublin. Where did you hear it?"

I told him it was his melody, and he was much impressed and looked at the notes on the paper napkin. "What do you think about that now?" was all his amazement could utter.

I asked him if he could recall the words. "I think so," he said, and quietly he sang as only an Irishman can sing his own songs:


As 1 was a walkin through Dublin City
About the hour of twelve at night,
It was there I spied a fair, pretty maid,
Washing her feet in candle light.

First she washed them, and then she dried them,
Around her shoulders she pegged a towel,
And in all me life I ne'er did see,
Such a fine young girl, upon my soul.

She had 20, 18, 16, 14;
12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, none;
She had 19, 17, 15, 13;
11, 9, 7, 5, 8 and one:

Round round, the wheel of fortune
Where it stops wearies me.
Fair maids they are so deceivin'
Sad experience teaches me,

She had 20, 18, 16, 14;
12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, none.
She had 19, 17, 15, 13;
11, 9, 7, 5, 3 and one.

When I had learned the song and put a guitar accompaniment to it, I made an acetate record at a little voice-reproduction shop and brought it to my friend the bartender. When I saw him a few weeks later he told me that he had gathered all his friends together to listen to it. He said it was his most prized possession.

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 18 Aug 17 - 08:31 PM

Hi,

Frank Harte sang The Spanish Lady in 1973 on his Topic LP "Through Dublin City." Harte said in the album liner notes:

    For too long this fine old Dublin song has been sung mainly by choral groups and concert sopranos. I remember the song from childhood and it has grown as I heard verses of it year after year. In some versions the last verse ends?

       She had 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 none
       She had 19 17 15 13 11 9 7 5 3 and 1,

    meaning "she had the odds and the evens of it"?- in other words she had everything.

The Spanish Lady- sung by Frank Harte at The Trinity Inn on June 12, 1998.
Listen: https://www.itma.ie/goilin/song/spanish_lady_frank_harte

As I was a-walking through Dublin City
About the hour of twelve at night,
It was there I saw a fair pretty female
Washing her feet by candlelight.

First she washed them and then she dried them
Around her shoulder she pegged a towel,
And in all me life I never did see
A maid so neat about the sole.

CHORUS: She had 20 18 16 14, 12 10 8 6 4 2 none,
She had 19 17 15 13, 11 9 7 5 3 and 1.

Well I stopped to look but the watchman passed
"Say, young fellow, the night is late
Along with you home or I will wrassle you
Straightway though the Bridewell Gate."

I got a look from the Spanish lady
Hot as the fire of ambry coals
And in all my life I never did see
A maid so neat about the sole.

CHORUS:

As I walked back through Dublin City
As the dawn of day was o'er
Oh, who should I spy but the Spanish lady
When I was weary and footsore.

She had a heart so filled with loving
And her love she longed to share,
And in all my life I never did meet with
A maid who had so much to spare.

CHORUS

Well, I've wandered north and I've wandered south
By Stoney Batter and Patrick's Close;
And up and around by the Gloucester Diamond
Back by Napper Tandy's house.

But old age has laid her hands upon me
Cold as a fire of ashy coals
But gone is the lovely Spanish lady
Neat and sweet about her sole.

CHORUS

2ND CHORUS: And round and round goes the Wheel of fortune,
Where it rests it wearies me,
Young maid's hearts are so uncertain,
Sad experience teaches me.

CHORUS

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 18 Aug 17 - 05:56 PM

Hi,

Another "Spanish Lady" variant is "Ettrick Lady" recorded by the Scottish folk group the Corries in 1975. This version is a re-write of "Galway City," a variant of "Madam" that Tommy Makem got from Irishman Sean O'Boyle (see original above).

Ettrick Lady- sung by The Corries from the Album: Live from Scotland Volume 2; 1975

[Mando solo]

As I gang doon the Ettrick Highway
At the hour o' twelve at night;
What should I spy but a handsome lassie,
Combin' her hair by candlelight.

Lassie, I have come a-courtin',
Your kind favors for to win;
And if you but smile upon me,
Next Sunday night I'll call again.

CHORUS: Falla-talla ru-dum, ru-dum, ru-u-dum;
Falla-talla ru-dum, ru-dum-day! (2X)

So to me you came a-courtin',
My kind favors for to win;
But 'twould give me the greatest pleasure
If you never would call again!

What would I do, when I go walking,
Walking out in the Ettrick view;
What would I do when I go walking,
Walkin' oot wi' a laddie like you?

- Chorus -

Lassie, I have gold and silver,
Lassie I have houses and land
Lassie, I have ships on the ocean,
They'll be all at your command.

What do I care for your ships on the ocean?
What do I care for your houses and land?
What do I care for your gold and silver?
When all I want is a handsome man!

- Chorus - [mando solo]

Did you ever see the grass in the mornin',
All bedecked with jewels rare?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie,
Diamonds sparkling in her hair?

Did you ever see a copper kettle,
Mended wi' an auld tin can?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie
Married up tae an ugly man?

- Chorus- (2x)

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 18 Aug 17 - 12:47 PM

Hi,

Here are two versions of "Madam, I'm a Darling," also known as "Chester City" (see DT link). The "Madam, I'm a Darling" title is named after the chorus which, in turn, is ironically similar to the words "Madam I'm come a courting." It was recorded in 1975 and is on the "Frank Harte: . . . and Listen To My Song" LP. Here are his notes:

MADAM I'M A DARLING ? This is another version of the type of song similar to the Spanish Lady. I have no idea of its origin or of the reference in the first line to "Chester City". I heard the song at a session in Kerry where it is Rabelaisian humour was much to the delight of the locals. I am sure that if this song had been collected in Victorian times it would have been stripped of its honest humour to suit the taste of the drawing room, as has been done with the Spanish Lady and so many of the English and Scottish ballads. I give it to you as I heard and enjoyed it. Another version called "As I strayed Through Dublin City" is very similar to this song.

Madam, I'm a Darling (Chester City)- sung by Frank Harte, 1975

As I came down to Chester City,
In the dark hour late at night
Who should I meet but a fair young maiden
Washing her clothes by the broad moon light

Chorus: Madam I'm a darling a-di-ro-didero
       Madam I'm a darling a-di-ro-dee

First she washed them, then she squeezed them
Then she hung them up to dry
Then she folded up her arms
Saying what a nice young girl am I!

Going to the well for a pail of water
Bringing it home for to make the tea
She fell over, I fell under
All the game was above the knee

Madam I will tie your garter,
I'll tie it above the knee
If you like, I'll tie it up farther
Madam I'm a darling a di-ro-dee

Madam you have gold and silver
Madam, you have tracts of land
Madam you ships on the ocean
All you need is a nice young man!

It also appears in "Songs of Dublin" edited by Frank Harte in 1978.

* * * *

A second version can be heard here:
http://www.dublincity.ie/songs-murder-madams-and-mayhem/madam-im-darling They've changed the city to Dublin City.

Madam, I'm a Darling." Performed by Anne and Niamh Buckley

As I rode out through Dublin city
It being the dark hour twelve at night
Who should I see but a fair young maiden
Washing her clothes in the pale moon light

Chorus (after each verse):
Madam, I'm a darling, a di ro, a dither o
Madam, I'm a darling, a di ro dae

First she washed them, then she squeezed them
And then she hung them out to dry
Then she folded up her arms
Saying what a nice, young girl am I.

Going to the well for a pale of water
Fetching it home for to make some tae [tea]
She fell over, I fell under
All the game was above her knee

Madam, I will tie your garter
I will tie it above your knee
And if you like I'll tie it up further
Madam, I'm a darling, a di ro de
Madam, I'm a darling, a di ro de

Have you ever heard of cups and saucers
Rattlin' around in an auld tin can?
Have you ever heard of a fair, young maiden
Married to an ugly, gray old man?

And blue it is a lovely colour
Until it gets the second dip
Well that's the way with the old man courting
You never know till he gets those fits

Madam, you have gold and silver
And madam, you have tracks of land
Madam you have ships on the ocean
All you need is a fine, young man.

There is an additional stanza associated with Spanish Lady/Madam that begins: "And blue it is a lovely colour" See a similar stanza in the several of versions of the "Madam" family ("Madam, Madam, You Came Courting" sung by William Gilkie, Sambro, NS, September, 1950). The "Madam, I will tie your garter" stanza is common to the "Oh No John" songs.

* * * *

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 18 Aug 17 - 11:24 AM

Hi,

Making sense of the many variations of Spanish Lady is not easy. The Dubliners and also the Clancy Brothers (with Tommy Makem) both have similar arrangements that combine both Campbell's poem and Hughes arrangement. Here's my transcription of Clancy Brothers:

Spanish Lady- Tommy Makem and the Clancy Brothers from "Irish Pub Songs."

[instrumental, fiddle]

As I came into Dublin city,
At the hour of twelve at night,
Who should I spy but a Spanish lady,
Washing her feet by candlelight.
First she washed them, then she dried them
Over a fire of ambery coal,
In all my life I ne'er did see
A maid so sweet about the sole.

CHORUS:
Whack fol the toora, toora laddy
Whack fol the foora loora lay (2x)

As I came back through Dublin city
At the hour of half past eight
Who should I spy but the Spanish lady
Brushing her hair in the broad daylight.
First she brushed it, then she tossed it,
On her lap was a silver comb
In all my life I ne'er did see
A maid so sweet since I did roam.

CHORUS

As [yet again] I came back through Dublin city
As the sun began to set
Who should I spy but the Spanish lady
Catching a moth in a golden net.
When she saw me then she fled me
Lifting her petticoat o'er her knee
In all my life I ne'er did see
A maid so fair as the Spanish lady.

CHORUS

I've wandered north and I've wandered south
Through Stonybatter and Patrick's Close
Up and around the Gloucester Diamond
Back by Napper Tandy's house.
But old age has laid her hand on me [tempo slows]
Cold as a fire of ashy coal
But where is the lovely Spanish lady
Neat and sweet about the sole.

CHORUS 2X [original tempo]

* * * *

A second version, "Galway City" with stanzas of "Madam" was recorded by the Clancy Brothers with Tommy Makem in New York in 1965 and appears on their 1966, "Isn't It Grand Boys" album. Tommy Makem got it from: "Sean O'Boyle, the well-known folk collector and Gaelic scholar" [born June 14, 1946 in Armagh, Ireland].

Galway City- Clancy Brothers from Sean O'Boyle of Armahg

(He:) As I walked out through Galway City
At the hour of twelve at night,
Whom should I spy but a handsome damsel,
Combing her hair by candlelight.

Lassie, I have come a-courting,
Your kind favors for to win,
And if you'd but smile upon me,
Next Sunday night I'll call again.

Chorus: Raddy at a toodum, toodum, toodum,
Raddy at a toodum, toodum day.
Raddy at a toodum, toodum, toodum,
Raddy at a toodum, toodum day.

(She:) So to me you came a-courting,
My kind favors for to win,
But 'twould give me the greatest pleasure
If you never did call again.

What would I do, when I go walking,
Walking out in the morning dew?
What would I do when I go walking,
Walking out with a lad like you?
Chorus.

(He:) Lassie, I have gold and silver,
Lassie, I have houses and land.
Lassie, I have ships on the ocean,
They'll be all at your command.

(She:) What do I care with your ships on the ocean?
What do I care with your houses and land?
What do I care with your gold and silver?
All's I want is a handsome man.
Chorus

(He:) Did you ever see the grass in the morning,
All bedecked with jewels rare?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie,
Diamonds sparkling in her hair?

(She:) Did you ever see a copper kettle,
Mended with an old tin can?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie
Married off to an ugly man?

Note the last stanza is similar to the one collected in Tennessee in 1953 (see above).

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 17 Aug 17 - 11:24 AM

Hi,

TY Steve, will make that correction,

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 17 Aug 17 - 11:05 AM

Some of these Campbells (if not all) should be 'Joseph'.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 17 Aug 17 - 10:56 AM

Hi,

The other important arrangement of Spanish Lady (Spanish Lady V) was made by Irish composer Herbert Hughes (May 16, 1882? May 1, 1937).

The Spanish Lady. "Old Song." Adapted and arranged by H. Hughes. Dedicated to Hugh Campbell Stracathro. Publisher: London and New York : Boosey & Co, 1930. The 1930 recording with Hughes playing piano and McCafferty singing can be heard here: https://www.itma.ie/digital-library/sound/cid-230911

I walked down thro' Dublin city
At the hour of twelve at night,
who should I spy but a Spanish lady
Washing her feet by candlelight.

First she washed them and then she dried them,
Over a fire of ambery coal,
In all my life I ne'er did see,
A maid so neat about the sole.

CHORUS: Whack for the toora, loora lady
Whack for the toora loora lee.
Whack for the toora, loora lady
Whack for the toora loora lee.

As I came back thro' Dublin city
At the hour of half past eight
Who should I spy but a Spanish lady
Brushing her hair in broad daylight.

First she tossed it, then she brushed it,
On her lap was a silver comb
In all my life I ne'er did see
So fair a maid since I did roam.

CHORUS:

As I went down thro' Dublin city,
When the sun began to set,
Who should I see but the Spanish lady
Catching a moth in a golden net.

When she saw me, then she fled me
Lifting her petticoat over the knee
In all my life I ne'er did spy
A maid so blithe as the Spanish lady!

CHORUS:

Hughes text has also entered tradition. There are five specific variants of the Spanish Lady, some used in the courting songs:

Spanish Lady I: Derived from the 1776 bawdy song which has been reworked. The first two stanzas are found in tradition with Spanish Lady instead of "pretty maid" and are followed by stanzas of "Madam" sometimes with the "Twenty-Eighteen" chorus and/or other choruses.
Spanish Lady II: The Spanish Lady as found in "No Sir" and "Oh No, John." She is the daughter of a Spanish merchant or Spanish sailor or captain.
Spanish Lady III: The Spanish Lady found as the poem of the same title by Irish poet Joseph Campbell based off the first two stanzas he collected of Spanish Lady I. Campbell's poem is sung and has entered tradition and is sometime sung with the "Twenty-Eighteen" chorus and/or other choruses.
Spanish Lady IV: The name "Spanish Lady" is found replacing "lovely creature" in a number of versions including children's game songs. "Here sits a Spanish lady" [JAF, Ontario, 1909 children's song]; See also Cox, Folk Songs of the South, 1925.
Spanish Lady V: An arrangement with new text of Spanish Lady for piano and voice by Irish composer Herbert Hughes. It was based on the first two stanzas (1911) supplied by Joseph Campbell from tradition. Hughes text also has entered tradition.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Madam, I Have Come To Court You
From: Richie
Date: 16 Aug 17 - 09:22 PM

Hi,

This version of the Spanish Lady" is found in "Folk Songs of Middle Tennessee: The George Boswell Collection" edited by Charles K. Wolfe- 1997; also in "Bulletin - Volumes 42" - Page 140, 1974. "Carbon City" is found in the US but it resembles Frank Harte's "Chester City." Here's a rare version from North America:

"The Spanish Lady" sung by Nancy McCuddy Stevenson of Clarksville, TN on Dec. 5, 1953, learned from her father. (Compare the ending with Clancy Brothers version)

1. I went down to Carbon City,
Twelve or one o'clock at night,
There I saw a Spanish lady,
Dressing by the candlelight.

CHORUS: Larry a-ma-lowdin, liden, looden,
Larry a-ma-1owdin liden lay.

2. With a vessel of cold water
And a mirror in her hand,
With her hair down over her shoulders,
Like an angel she did stand.
Chorus:

3. I can drink and not get drowsy,
I can fight and not get slain.
I can court a Spanish lady
And be welcome back again
Chorus:

4. Did you ever see a pewter vessel,
Mended with a copper pan?
Did you ever see a Spanish lady,
Married to an Irishman?
Chorus:

* * * *

Richie


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