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Origins: One Morning in May...

DigiTrad:
NIGHTINGALE (Wreck)
THE BRAVE VOLUNTEER
THE NIGHTINGALE
THE WILD RIPPLING WATERS


Related threads:
(origins) Origins: Sweet Nightingale... tune from an opera? (31)
Lyr Req: The Bold Grenadier (30)
Lyr Add: The Troubadour Song (sung by Burl Ives) (55) (closed)
Lyr Req: One Morning in May/Wild Rippling Waters (7)
Tech: ABC for The Nightingale Sings (5)
Origins: One Morning in May (19)
Lyr/Chords Req: Nightingale (Sandra Bernhard) (3)
Nightingale song recording (19)
Lyr Req: The Grenadier and the Lady (11)
The Nightingales Sing (51)
(origins) Lyr/Chords Req: The Nightingale Sings (29)
Lyr Req: The Nightingale (Burl Ives, et al) (18) (closed)
Lyr Req: Lyric Variants/The Nightingale/refra (6)
Lyr/Chords Req: Nightingale, White Orange and (5) (closed)
Lyr Req: The Nightingale/Bold Grenadier (3)
Listen to the Nightingale? (6)
LYR ADD: Nightingale's Song (original) (1)


Paul Jay 04 Jan 98 - 05:58 PM
Barry 04 Jan 98 - 06:51 PM
Bruce O. 04 Jan 98 - 07:33 PM
dick greenhaus 04 Jan 98 - 08:16 PM
dulcimer 04 Jan 98 - 10:50 PM
Barry 05 Jan 98 - 12:11 AM
Bruce O. 05 Jan 98 - 11:30 AM
Paul Jay 05 Jan 98 - 11:52 PM
GUEST,T in Oklahoma (Okiemockbird) 14 Feb 00 - 09:25 PM
Sandy Paton 14 Feb 00 - 10:21 PM
Amos 14 Feb 00 - 10:35 PM
Barry T 14 Feb 00 - 10:55 PM
Amos 14 Feb 00 - 10:59 PM
Barry T 14 Feb 00 - 11:13 PM
Amos 14 Feb 00 - 11:26 PM
Mbo 14 Feb 00 - 11:42 PM
jofield 14 Feb 00 - 11:54 PM
jofield 15 Feb 00 - 12:03 AM
GUEST,Annraoi 15 Feb 00 - 09:49 AM
GUEST,Antaine 15 Feb 00 - 03:15 PM
Lesley N. 15 Feb 00 - 06:21 PM
Stewie 15 Feb 00 - 06:37 PM
GUEST,Singout 15 Feb 00 - 07:34 PM
Snuffy 15 Feb 00 - 08:54 PM
Sandy Paton 15 Feb 00 - 10:45 PM
GUEST,Guest in Albany, NY 16 Feb 00 - 12:27 AM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 27 Apr 02 - 07:41 PM
GUEST,Thonolan 28 Apr 02 - 06:16 AM
JudeL 28 Apr 02 - 06:29 AM
Keith A of Hertford 28 Apr 02 - 02:54 PM
GUEST,Phillip 28 Apr 02 - 04:56 PM
kytrad (Jean Ritchie) 28 Apr 02 - 05:16 PM
GUEST,Terry McDonald 29 Apr 02 - 10:12 AM
GUEST,greg stephens 29 Apr 02 - 10:22 AM
GUEST,Arkie 29 Apr 02 - 10:24 AM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 21 May 02 - 05:38 PM
Declan 22 May 02 - 11:24 AM
GUEST,margot m_margot@libero.it 02 Mar 03 - 07:59 AM
Keith A of Hertford 02 Mar 03 - 08:10 AM
GUEST,arabella 02 Jul 03 - 03:57 PM
fox4zero 02 Jul 03 - 09:03 PM
GUEST,Kaa 10 Oct 04 - 06:48 AM
Leadfingers 10 Oct 04 - 06:57 AM
GUEST,Marion Amos 19 Feb 05 - 06:27 PM
Joe Offer 19 Feb 05 - 08:26 PM
BB 27 Feb 05 - 06:10 AM
GUEST,Marion Amos 12 Mar 05 - 02:09 PM
GUEST,Marion Amos 12 Mar 05 - 02:17 PM
Scoville 12 Mar 05 - 02:42 PM
pavane 07 Oct 08 - 10:22 AM
GUEST 04 Nov 09 - 06:00 AM
GUEST 21 May 10 - 10:07 AM
GUEST 12 Jul 12 - 04:54 PM
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Subject: One Morning in May...
From: Paul Jay
Date: 04 Jan 98 - 05:58 PM

I'm looking for the words to a song that (I think) James Taylor recorded in the early 70's or late 60's. The verses I remember are:

One morning, one morning, one morning in May,
I spied a young couple; they were making their way
And one was a lady so bright and so fair,
And the other was a soldier, and a brave volunteer

Good morning, good morning, good morning, said he,
And where are you going my pretty lady,
I'm going out a walking by the banks of the sea,
Just to see the waters roll and hear the nightingale sing.

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 17-Mar-02.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Barry
Date: 04 Jan 98 - 06:51 PM

Paul, try a search using Nightingale, in the DT you'll find 2 versions (1 is the american cowboy version Wild Rippling Waters). There are a number of other versions, The Bold Grenadier, Solider, Volunteer with slightly varying tunes. Barry


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE NIGHTINGALE’S SONG
From: Bruce O.
Date: 04 Jan 98 - 07:33 PM

Here's a version of 1682-4

The Nightingales Song; Or The Souldiers rare Musick,
and Maides Recreation
The Song adviseth Maidens have a care,
And of a Souldiers knap-sack to beware,
To the Tune of, No, No, No, not I, Or, Peggy and the Souldier.

As I went forth one Sun-shining Day,
A dainty young Couple were gathering May;
The one a fair Damosel of beauty most clear,
The other a Souldier, as it doth appear.

With kisses and compliments, to her he said
Good morrow sweet honey thou well favour'd Maid,
I think my self happy, I met with you here
As you are a Virgin, and I a Souldier.

And now if you pleased be, I will you bring,
Wheras you shall hear the sweet nightingale sing:
With other rare pastimes, my skill shall be try'd
If you will walk with me, to the merry green-wood side.

Sweet Sir (said the Damosel) If you will do so,
Then hand in hand with you, along I will go,
It is recreation for maids in the Spring,
To see Flowers grow, and hear the Nightingale sing.

And having thus spoken, together they went,
Unto the merry green-wood, where some time they spent,
In walking and talking, of many an odd thing,
But yet could not hear the Nightingale sing.

A danty clear river, was running them by,
A Bank of sweet Violets, and Primroses nigh:
Then said the young Gallant, sit down by this spring,
We'l here take our pleasure till the Nightingale sing.

The Maid seem'd unwilling, and said she'd be gone,
And yet she was loath for to leave him alone,
At last she resolved her self to the thing,
To stay till they heard, the sweet Nightingale sing.

Amongst the sweet flowers they Straightway sat down,
The young-man in kindness, gave her a green Gown,
He also presented to her a Gold Ring,
'Cause she should stay there, till the Nightingale sing.

And having thus done, he took her about the middle,
And forth of his Knap-sack, he pull'd a fare Fiddle,
And plaid her a fit, made the Vallies to ring,
Oh now (quoth she) I hear the Nightingale sing.

Then now said the Souldier 'tis time to give ore,
Nay prithee (quoth she) play me one Lesson more:
I like both the setting, and tuning the string,
Far better than hearing the Nightingale sing.'

He struck up his musick, unto a high strain,
And plaid the tune over again and again:
Gramercy brave Souldier (quoth she) that did bring
Me hither to hear the rare Nightingale sing.

Their sport being ended, then homeward they went,
Each one thought the time to be very well spent:
It was quoth the Damosel, a very rare thing,
Whilst thou play'd thy part, to hear the Nightingale sing.

At last with a deep sigh, these words spake she,
I pray thee good Souldier wilt thou marry me:
Else my hasty pleasure, sweet Sorrows will bring,
And I may repent I heard the Nightingale sing.

Oh no, quoth the Souldier, I may not do so,
Along with my Captain, to morrow I must go,
But if I come this way, again the next Spring,
We'll walk once more to hear the sweet Nightingale sing.

You Maides of the City, and Country that be,
Addicted to pleasure, take warning by me,
Let no flattering Young-man tempt ye to this thing,
To go to the wood to hear the Nightingale sing.

Make bargain before hand, for fear you miscarry,
Know whether or no they are minded to marry:
If I had been wise, and I had done such a thing,
I need not repent I heard the Nightingale sing.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 04 Jan 98 - 08:16 PM

Hi Bruce- You don't happen to have the melody to this, do you?


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: dulcimer
Date: 04 Jan 98 - 10:50 PM

I have found several versions in American sources. I find it interesting that more "recent" versions are considerably tamer and less explicit. Many versions do not have the warnings to young maidens.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Barry
Date: 05 Jan 98 - 12:11 AM

Come all you young maidens take a warning by me Never place your affections in a cowboy so free He'll go away & leave you like mine did me Leave you to rock cradles sing by oh baby (2x)

Barry


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Subject: Tune Add: PEGGIE IS OVER SEE WIE YE SOULDIOR
From: Bruce O.
Date: 05 Jan 98 - 11:30 AM

The tune "No, no, not I" is unknown. "Peggy and the Soldier" is a ballad of c 1635 of which there are two traditional versions in DT (Laws P13). There is a tune which may be the correct one, "Peggy is over Ye Sie wi' ye Souldier" in the Skene MS. [This is the published title. My reading of the title in the MS, 1972, is "Peggie is over see wie ye souldior". This title was added by a different hand than the rest of the titles in the MS.] The tune here is from Dauney's 'Ancient Scottish Melodies'. [The origianl is in mandora tablature.] C. M. Simpson in 'The British Broadside Ballad and Its Music', 1966, transposes the tune to Em.

Incidently, "The Bold Soldier/ Grenedier" is the title of a different song, originally "The Master-piece of Love-songs", by Abraham Miles. ("Jolly Soldier", Laws M27, in DT). (The soldier fights with his love's father and brothers in order to take her away.) There is another broadside version in which a Seaman replaces the Soldier/Keeper. This is no relation to our song here.

X:1
T:Peggie is over Ye Sie wi' ye Souldier
L:1/8
M:3/8
K:Am
cde|edd|geg|a3::c'ba|bag|c'2b|a2b|c'ba|geg|a2a|A3|]


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Paul Jay
Date: 05 Jan 98 - 11:52 PM

Thanks Bruce! This is Much better than the one I remember, and it will work with the same tune that I do remember. It is obviously the some song watered down for 20th c. listening. (Sorry Dick I dont now the name of the origional tune)


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE SWEET NIGHTINGALE (trad. English)
From: GUEST,T in Oklahoma (Okiemockbird)
Date: 14 Feb 00 - 09:25 PM

Here's another one:

The Sweet Nightingale
Source: English, 19th Century, from Surrey.
Edition: Lucy Broadwood and J. A. Fuller Maitland, English County Songs, Leadenhall Press, London, and Scribners, New York, 1893, page 124.

One morning in May by chance I did rove
I sat myself down by the side of a grove
and there did I hear the sweet nightingale sing,
I never heard so sweet as the birds in the Spring

All on the grass I sat myself down
where the voice of the nightingale echoed around;
don't you hear how she quivers the notes ? I declare
no music, no songster with her can compare.

Come all you young men, I'll have you draw near,
I pray you now heed me these words for to hear,
that when you're grown old you may have it to sing,
that you never heard so sweet as the birds in the Spring.

T.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 14 Feb 00 - 10:21 PM

R. L. Harmon and his sister, Margie, of Beech Creek, NC, sang a pleasant American variant for me in 1961, which I included on my The Traditional Music of Beech Mountain, NC, a two cassette set that comes with booklets of introductory notes and the texts of all the songs. Check the "custom cassette" section of my Folk-Legacy web site: Click here.

Sandy


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Amos
Date: 14 Feb 00 - 10:35 PM

Dick:

I can send you a rendition of the tune I know to it, but I have no lineage for it. It would be an .aiff recorded version. Advise if wanted.

A


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Barry T
Date: 14 Feb 00 - 10:55 PM

I've done a midi of the tune with a variation of the lyrics here


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Amos
Date: 14 Feb 00 - 10:59 PM

Nicely done! .
.
The air I learned was a different one, and the recurring theme was "To hear the waters roar, hear the nightingale sing....
.
A


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Barry T
Date: 14 Feb 00 - 11:13 PM

Actually I should have known better, Amos! I should have said... here is a version of the tune with a version of the lyrics. I've forgotten which library book gave me the melody line, but I do recall that it was also known under the title of The Grenadier and the Lady...

...which itself has its variations of melody and lyrics.

Don't you just love the folk tradition?!! 'Keeps us talking for months! ;-)


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Amos
Date: 14 Feb 00 - 11:26 PM

Yep -- it keeps me coming back to the 'Cat when I should be tending to business. I just tell meself at some level this is what I am more really about so it is business, so there..
.
A


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Mbo
Date: 14 Feb 00 - 11:42 PM

Oohh...Pentangle does a REALLY good version of this song--they call it "The Nightengale."

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: jofield
Date: 14 Feb 00 - 11:54 PM

I've never heard the James Taylor version, but I'd bet dollars to donuts he was singing something he heard from Jim Rooney -- they both used to hang out in the Boston area. Rooney, with Bill Keith on autoharp, did a wonderful and original treatment of what I gather is an old English tune. They did it as a slightly draggy waltz with the bluesy touches that -- to my mind -- made it a real song. When he got to the speaking parts ("Pretty soldier, pretty soldier, please play one tune more."/"Oh no, pretty lady, it's time to give o'er."), Rooney would put a little Willy Nelson "sprächgesang" into it -- it was great. I have heard an old(er) English version, but, American chauvinist that I am when it comes to music, if there isn't a trace of blues, it gets boring real fast.

James in Bristol, RI


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: jofield
Date: 15 Feb 00 - 12:03 AM

Jim used to sing "to see the waters gliding, and hear the nightingale sing." He really made it his own song without losing a real traditional feel. Everyone still asks him for it.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,Annraoi
Date: 15 Feb 00 - 09:49 AM

There are so many songs beginning one morning in May. Does anyone have the oyrics / sources for the macaronic Irish song "One morning in May agus mé 'dul ag spaisteoireacht" ? Annraoi


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,Antaine
Date: 15 Feb 00 - 03:15 PM

A Annraoi a chara,
Féach an snáth díospóireachta faoi 'Peigín mo chroí'.
Tá 'One morning in June agus mé.....' ar an gceirnín seo freisin.
Feicimid thú ag Sean-Nós Cois Life b'fhéidir?????
Antaine


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Lesley N.
Date: 15 Feb 00 - 06:21 PM

Another midi of the Nightingale - by John Davis is here (http://www.contemplator.com/folk6/nighting.html).


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Subject: Lyr Add: SOLDIER AND THE MAIDEN (trad. English?)
From: Stewie
Date: 15 Feb 00 - 06:37 PM

The version that Paul wants may be similar to that recorded by Crowdy Crawn in 1974:

SOLDIER AND THE MAIDEN
(Traditional)

One morning, one morning, one morning in May
I spied a young couple they were making their way
One was a maiden so bright and so fair
And the other was a soldier and a brave volunteer

Good morning, good morning, good morning , said he
And where are you going my pretty lady?
I'm going out a-walking on the banks of the sea
Just to see the waters glide and hear the nightingales sing

Now they had not been standing but a minute or so
When out of his knapsack a fiddle he drew
And the tune that he played made the valleys to ring
Oh hark, cried the maiden, hear the nightingales sing

Oh maiden, fair maiden, 'tis time to give o'er
Oh no, kind soldier, please play one tune more
For I'd rather hear your fiddle with the touch of one string
Than to see the waters glide and hear the nightingales sing

Oh soldier, kind soldier, will you marry me?
Oh no, pretty maiden, that never shall be
I've a wife down in London and children twice three
Two wives and the army's too many for me

Well I'll go back to London and I'll stay there for a year
It's often that I'll think of you my little dear
And if ever I return it'll be in the spring
To see the waters glide and hear the nightingales sing

Source: Crowdy Crawn: Brenda Wooten and Robert Bartlett 'No Song To Sing?' Sentinel LP SENS 1021 (1974).
PS.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,Singout
Date: 15 Feb 00 - 07:34 PM

What about

One morning, one morning, one morning in May, I heard a married man to a young girl say, "Oh dress you up pretty Katy, and come go with me, across the blue mountains to the Alegany." Etc., Etc.

I guess that is another song with a different title, huh?


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE GRENADIER AND THE LADY (trad. English
From: Snuffy
Date: 15 Feb 00 - 08:54 PM

THE GRENADIER AND THE LADY

Oh as I walk-ed out one morning in May
There I saw a young couple together at play
Oh one was a lady, I'll vow and declare,
And the other a soldier, a bold grenadier.

"Oh now", said the soldier, "shall we walk together?"
He wrapped his coat round her to keep her from the weather.
They walked till they came down to yonder spring
Where the small birds they whistle and the nightingales sing.

The soldier he caught up the lady by the middle
And out of his knapsack, he pulled out a fiddle
And he played her such merry tunes, called The Valleys Do Ring
"Hark, hark", said the lady, "how the nightingales sing."

"O now", said the soldier, "it's time to give o'er"
"O no", said the lady, "play me one tune more.
It's the charms of your music and the gauge of your string
"Hark, hark", said the soldier, "how the nightingales sing."

"Oh now", said the lady, "will you marry me.?"
"O no", said the soldier, "That never can be.
I've a wife and three children in the North count-e-ry
And a prettier woman did your eyes ever see.

And to the East Indies, love I am bound out,
To enjoy the sweet wine and the city* brown stout [*bitter?]
But if I ever return again, it will be in the spring
Where the small birds they whistle and the nightingales sing".

Collected from Charlie Carver at the Gardeners Arms, Tostock, Suffolk, 1960.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 15 Feb 00 - 10:45 PM

"Across the Blue Mountain to the Allegheny" was collected from Mary Bird McAllister in Brown's Cove, Virginia, by Paul Clayton. I recorded in on Folk-Legacy's 1966 recording ("Sandy and Caroline Paton" - EGO-30), Harry Tuft used it as the title song of his Folk-Legacy recording (now on compact disc, CD-63), Jennifer Armstrong has recorded it, and Robin and Linda Williams have also recorded it on one of their CDs.

When I was visiting with Vance Randolph and Mary Celestia Parler in Fayetteville, Arkansas, in 1962, Miss Parler asked me if I'd ever come across such a song, as she thought she had collected a unique piece of Americana. She was more than a little disappointed when I sang "Maybird's" song for her. Still, those two examples of the song are the only traditional sources of which I know.

And you're right, GUEST SingOut, it's an entirely different song. Good, though!

Sandy


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,Guest in Albany, NY
Date: 16 Feb 00 - 12:27 AM

Another good rendition is by Graz M'Taz (sp?) from the Washington, DC area. Al and Pat Pettiway were the leads. It was almost identical to the Crowdy Crawn version above. I recorded it off Dick Cerri's great "Music Americana" radio show down there in the mid 80's.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ONE MORNING IN MAY
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 27 Apr 02 - 07:41 PM

"ONE MORNING IN MAY" has been collected numerous times in North America. Sandburg, 1927, The American Songbag, gives two versions from the Appalachians, pp. 136-138.
Vance Randolph, in Ozark Folksongs, 1980, vol. 1, pp. 266-269, gives five versions. A short variant collected in Missouri in 1930 emphasizes the fiddle:

C
They had not been there scarce an hour or two,
When out of his satchel a fiddle he drew,
An' he played her a tune caused the valley to ring,
Hark, hark, says the lady, hear the nightingale sing.

Oh now, says the soldier, it's time to go home,
Oh no, says the lady, just play me one more tune,
For I'd rather hear the fiddle, one touch of the string,
Than to see the water glide, hear the nightingale sing.

He tuned up his fiddle to one higher key,
An' he played her the same tune right over again,
A-causin' the valley to echo and ring,
Hark, hark says the lady, hear the nightingale sing.

Oh soldier, oh soldier, won't you marry me?
Oh no, says the soldier, that can never be,
I've a wife in Furlando with children twice three,
An' two in the army's too many for me.

Another version, also collected in Missouri, concludes with the usual warning to fair damsels that ends so many songs:

E
Come all ye damsels, take warning from me,
Don't place your affections on a soldier so free,
He'll love you and leave you and give you no ring,
For to rock your own cradle while the nightingale sings.

Come all you young damsels, take a warning from me,
And never lay down 'neath a green willow tree,
My cheeks were once red as the bud of a rose,
But now they are white as the lily that blows.

It was commonly played as a fiddle tune.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,Thonolan
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 06:16 AM

Liam Clancy recorded a beautiful version of this song entitled "The Nightingale". It's one of my favorites.

Tina Greer's version of "One Morning in May" is also wonderful.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: JudeL
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 06:29 AM

May seems to be a very busy month for folk songs "Bold Fisherman" begins "As I rode out one May morning, down by the river-side"


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 02:54 PM

I forget who sings it, but a lovely "grenadier" version is sung in the film of Hardy's Far From The Madding Crowd. It is sung during the sequence where Sergeant Troy tries to place flowers on poor Fanny's grave, only to have the rain wash them away.
Keith.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ONE MORNING IN MAY
From: GUEST,Phillip
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 04:56 PM

The two verses quoted by Paul Jay are almost identical to a bluegrass version recorded by Charlie Waller and The Country Gentlemen in 1973 on their Vanguard album (Vanguard 79331), titled "The Country Gentlemen."

ONE MORNING IN MAY

(Trad)

One morning, one morning, one morning in May,
I spied a young couple, they were making their way.
One was a maiden, so bright and so fair,
The other, a soldier, and a brave volunteer.

"Good morning, good morning, good morning," said he,
"Where are you going, my pret-ty lad-y?"
"I'm going out walking, on the banks of the sea,
To see the waters rise, hear the nightingale sing."

They had not been standing, but a minute or two,
When out of his knapsack, a fiddle he drew.
The tune that he played, made the valleys all ring.
"O, hark!" cried the lady, "Hear the nightingale sing!"

"O maiden, fair maiden, 'tis time to give o'er."
"Oh no, kind soldier, please play one tune more!
I'd rather you fiddled, the touch of one string,
Than see the waters rise, hear the nightingale sing!"

"O soldier, kind soldier, will you marry me?"
"Oh no, pretty maiden, that never can be!
I've a wife down in London, and children twice three.
Two wives and the army's, too many for me!"

"I'll go back to London, and stay for a year.
It's often I'll think, of you my little dear.
If ever I return, it'll be in the Spring,
To see the waters rise, hear the nightingale sing!"


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: kytrad (Jean Ritchie)
Date: 28 Apr 02 - 05:16 PM

I believe that Isla Cameron's was the voice, although she was not the actress in the film, "Far From the Madding Crowd."


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,Terry McDonald
Date: 29 Apr 02 - 10:12 AM

yes, it was Isla Cameron, The actress was, of course, the fabulous Julie Christie. On the actual subject matter - I was always taught by my folkie betters in the 1960s that English versions begin 'as I was a-walking, one morning in May' whereas American ones start 'One morning, one morning, one morning in May.......'


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,greg stephens
Date: 29 Apr 02 - 10:22 AM

Very influential song in the folk revival. One version povided the tune for "the Patriot Game" and "With God on our Side". And the "standard" version in the British folk clubs (with the "arm in arm along the road" chorus) became one of the great anthems of the scene for full on harmony chorus singing. I think that version was originally collected from Aubrey Cantwell in Standlake: just how it spread to become a club classi would be interesting to find out,there must be plenty of Mudcatters from that era. Anybody recall how it was injected into the folkscene?


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,Arkie
Date: 29 Apr 02 - 10:24 AM

To Aunt Ollie Gilbert, a ballad singer from Mountain View Arkansas sing a version of this song go to the Max Hunter collection at http://www.smsu.edu/folksong/maxhunter/0793/index.html Neil Morris, the father of Jimmie Driftwood (James Morris) also sang a nice version of this song. I think that was printed in Sing Out ages ago.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ONE MORNING IN MAY
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 21 May 02 - 05:38 PM

Brown, North Carolina Folklore, vol. 5, "The Music of the Folk Songs," has five different melodies for five different versions of "One Morning In May."

An unusual version (1915) was collected by Owen Wister (author of The Virginian" and "Lin McLean") or possibly composed by Wister. The version (E, p. 14-15) attached to Wister, however, is one of five of this type. "The structures of all five versions are identical, and melodically (excepting the Owen Wister version), the second and last measures are identical in all." Multiple versions suggest that Wister collected the song.

Lyr. Add: ONE MORNING IN MAY (Wister?)

Good morrow, good morrow, good morrow, said she.
And where are you going, fair lady?, said he.
I am going to the bank, to the bank of Lolee
For to see the water gliding, hear the nightingales sing.
For to see the water gliding, hear the nightingales sing.

Unfortunately, I don't have vol. 3 so I can't set down the remaining verses. If anyone has them, I would greatly appreciate seeing them posted.
"Scale: Hexachordial. Tonal center: c. Structure: abb1a1a2 (2.2.2.2.2) (numbers superscript) = abb1a1 (2.2.2.4)."
Another thread (4319): Morning in May


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Declan
Date: 22 May 02 - 11:24 AM

I can confirm that the versions posted by Stewie and Guest Phillip above are identical to the lyrics recorded by James Taylor in about 1972-73.

I'd say there's a good chance that Taylor's version inspired the other two recordings quoted which seem to have come out shortly after this.

The "arm in arm along the road" version, called "The Nightengale" was also widely sung by Irish "Ballad Groups" in the 1960s & 70s, although I haven't heard it sung much since then.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,margot m_margot@libero.it
Date: 02 Mar 03 - 07:59 AM

A version of "The Nightingale song" is in the soundtrak of "Far from the madding crowd" by Schlesinger.
Who is the singer of the ballad on the movie?

Excuse me for eventual mistakes..
I'm italian


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 02 Mar 03 - 08:10 AM

Hi Margot.
That is a lovely version. The singer was Isla Cameron.
Best wishes,
Keith.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,arabella
Date: 02 Jul 03 - 03:57 PM

is this the same song that pierre bensusan includes on his first record, "pres de paris"?


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: fox4zero
Date: 02 Jul 03 - 09:03 PM

I'm particularly partial to Hoagy Carmichael and Mitchell Parish's
"One Morning in May" (C) 1930 or 1931.
My father told me that it was Hoagy's mother's favorite song. I especially like this version because it has nutritive value....I can afford to eat.

Larry P.


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,Kaa
Date: 10 Oct 04 - 06:48 AM

As i was a walking one morning in May
I spied a young couple a making of hay
Ohoh, one was a fair maid and her beauty shone clear
and the other was a soldier a bold grenadier

good morning, good morning, good morning, said he,
oh where are y ou going my pretty lady?
I am going for a walk, by the clear crystal stream,
to see cool waters glide and hear nightingales sing

oh soldier, oh soldier, will you marry me?
oh no, my sweet lady that never can be,
for i've got a wife at home, in my own country,
two wives and the army's too many for me

as i was a walking one morning in may
i spied a young couple a making of hay
ohoh one was a fair maid and her beauty shone clear
and the other was a soldier a bold grenadier


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Subject: RE: One Morning in May...
From: Leadfingers
Date: 10 Oct 04 - 06:57 AM

A slightly more modern version goes -:

As I was a walking one morning in May

I spied this young couple so boldly did stray

And one was a soldier and a bold Grenadier

While the other was a Choirboy - I thought 'Now Bugger ! Thats Queer '


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Subject: RE: Origins: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,Marion Amos
Date: 19 Feb 05 - 06:27 PM

I'm finding it confusing finding my way round the links, so please bear with me. I came looking for the lyrics and tune of the 'Nightingale Song'as I know it from Northamptonshire. I found it, under the main entry to Sweet Nightingale, and the tune provided is exactly as sung by several drunken villagers at 3am at my wedding. They way it is sung in the English midlands is to have a definite 'tremulous' effect on the chorus. When done well, it really does echo the sound of the nightingale in a valley........


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Subject: RE: Origins: One Morning in May...
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Feb 05 - 08:26 PM

Hi, Marion - yes, this song is a confusing web of variations and songs of varying degrees of relatedness. I take it the song you're thinking of is this one that was posted above, but then I'm wondering which tune you're referring to.
Can you enlighten us? Your experience with the song sounds memorable.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Origins: One Morning in May...
From: BB
Date: 27 Feb 05 - 06:10 AM

Unless I'm much mistaken, that's a version of the one the Coppers sing. Haven't looked it up, so can't remember how close it is.

Barbara


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Subject: RE: Origins: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,Marion Amos
Date: 12 Mar 05 - 02:09 PM

Thanks for the replies - sorry it's taken so long to get back! The tune is definitely very similar to the one given in the Mudcat link at the top of the page (under Nightingale). It's close enough to have brought some great memeories back when I played it! But the lyrics you suggest are not as I remember. The end line of the chorus was definitely something about the nightingales as 'they sang in the valley belooooow' - that last bit is the drawn out warble I refered to. Probably not making much sense! I will be visiting the area in a few weeks. I intend to find what exactly the words sung locally are and, if anyone is interested I can post them here.


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Subject: RE: Origins: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST,Marion Amos
Date: 12 Mar 05 - 02:17 PM

sorry folks - I warned you I was thick! Have just seen the words for The Nightingale - can't think how I managed to miss them before. I am pretty sure the song I am familiar with is the tune offered on the Mudcat Midi with these words. I will get a version of what's sung locally tho'. I know the principal singer in these melees is following a tradition which is as much 'midlands' as Northamptonshire, as the village is close to the joining point of Nortants, Oxfordshire, Warwickshire and Gloucestershire.


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Subject: RE: Origins: One Morning in May...
From: Scoville
Date: 12 Mar 05 - 02:42 PM

There's a pretty, slow, minor-key version in the 1967 movie adaptation of Thomas Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd (Alan Bates and Julie Christie). The recorded version I have is by Evelyne and Bob Beers and has a lively major-key melody (pretty much the same melodies but in completely different keys and tempos). The Beers version is "Volunteer" and I believe the movie version is "Grenadier".


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Subject: RE: Origins: One Morning in May...
From: pavane
Date: 07 Oct 08 - 10:22 AM

I noticed that the late Bruce O never gave a reference for the 1682 version he transcribed (above)

Here is a copy from the Bodleian library which I stumbled across when searching for something else

Here


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Subject: RE: Origins: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 06:00 AM

wasn't this song sung in the Julie Christie version of Far From the Madding Crowd?


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Subject: RE: Origins: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST
Date: 21 May 10 - 10:07 AM

I have always wondered something; is this song related to the song 'Monday Morning' sung by Peter, Paul and Mary? (They weren't the original singers, I don't think, but their version is the one I know)

It goes, "Early One morning, one morning in Spring, to hear the birds whistle and nightingales sing...I met a fair maiden who sweetly did sing I'm Going to be Married on Monday Morning"

Please tell me I'd really love to know! :-)


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Subject: RE: Origins: One Morning in May...
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Jul 12 - 04:54 PM

Guys - I am told it was NOT Isla Cameron who sang this in the Madding Crowd movie. Who was ot? Wanna buy it.

Thanks

Edwin J


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