Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Playing for old peoples homes

Related threads:
Folk music in community/day centres (5)
sing to recorded music- nursing home (26)
Best Closing Song for Nursing Home Gigs (93)
Nursing Home Play Lists - What's on your (5)
Old-Time String Band for Nursing Homes (17)
need advice for performing in old folks homes (30)
Teaching Seniors to Play Instruments? (23)
best christmas songs for retirement home (15)
Entertaining dementia patients (58)
Songs Appropriate for Nursing Home... (74)
Nursing home gigs (34)
Songs and stories at a care facility (34)
Old Folkies' Home/Retirement Village (95)
Nursing Homes etc - Setting up Sound (31)
Playing nursing home gigs (94)
Req: Sing-along songs from the 20's & 30's (76)
nursing home gigs, info please-neat article added (16)
Getting paid to sing in Retirement Cent. (44)
Songs about retirement / for a retirement party (91)
Getting nursing home gigs (128)
Connecticut nursing homes showcase? (5)
nursing home concert (24)
Songs NOT to sing in nursing homes! (107)
Music: Your Day Job (90)
Today's Nursing Home Gig (5)
My Nursing Home Gig (16)
Threads re Nursing/Retirement Home Gigs (8)


GUEST,Fyldeplayer 15 Oct 18 - 09:23 AM
G-Force 15 Oct 18 - 09:27 AM
Jack Campin 15 Oct 18 - 09:27 AM
medievallassie 15 Oct 18 - 11:11 AM
Peter the Squeezer 15 Oct 18 - 11:59 AM
Mooh 15 Oct 18 - 12:55 PM
wysiwyg 15 Oct 18 - 02:07 PM
Andy7 15 Oct 18 - 03:30 PM
Mooh 16 Oct 18 - 08:54 AM
Nick 16 Oct 18 - 01:48 PM
GUEST,Jack Campin 16 Oct 18 - 02:07 PM
meself 16 Oct 18 - 03:35 PM
John C. Bunnell 16 Oct 18 - 03:55 PM
wysiwyg 16 Oct 18 - 04:02 PM
GUEST 16 Oct 18 - 09:07 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Playing for old peoples homes
From: GUEST,Fyldeplayer
Date: 15 Oct 18 - 09:23 AM

We have been wondering about the way to get some paid work by playing in residential homes, we can certainly provide the music but what is the best way to contact these places? Thanks.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: G-Force
Date: 15 Oct 18 - 09:27 AM

Therer are agencies which specialise in just that.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: Jack Campin
Date: 15 Oct 18 - 09:27 AM

They aren't good payers. Almost the entire sector is run by fat cats who pay all their staff as little as possible.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: medievallassie
Date: 15 Oct 18 - 11:11 AM

Also, there are many local musicians that play at the these places for free. It's a volunteer option for them or a music ministry so they usually have a regular gig there. I have performed several times when asked but it was always for free.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: Peter the Squeezer
Date: 15 Oct 18 - 11:59 AM

My Mother lived in sheltered accommodation, with a common room hosting events organised by the residents own "social committee". I played for them on one occasion, after which the organiser told me they wanted sheets with words printed on. When I told him that would involve expense, for which I would require payment, I was never asked again.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: Mooh
Date: 15 Oct 18 - 12:55 PM

You may be up again free competition, but most private homes have some budget for it. Municipal homes often pretend they don't have a budget for it but they're likely not being entirely truthful. Depends where you are of course.

Cold calls do work, and offer your services for a variety of times during the day. For many years my guitar/fiddle duo played before lunch and we were told that residents tended to eat better, and it broke up their sometimes very long days.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: wysiwyg
Date: 15 Oct 18 - 02:07 PM

Lot of old threads on nursing home gigs. Full of great advice by folks (few) who manage to get paid.

~S~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: Andy7
Date: 15 Oct 18 - 03:30 PM

A few tips from me:

1. It's a great thing to do!

2. If you're just starting out, do offer gigs for free, or for a nominal cost. If they like you, you're more likely to be able to charge something next time. And word will get around that you're worth inviting.

But don't ever see this as a money maker. I've never achieved more than covering my costs, to be honest. I know that some people do make more, but it's not a lucrative career! Just do it for the love of the music, and to bring some joy into the lives of older people. If there's also a bit of pocket money for you at the end, that's just an extra bonus.

3. Don't sing Victorian parlour songs and WW1 songs! Well, maybe just 1 or 2 occasionally.

Before my first such gig, at a club for older people where I was a volunteer driver, I asked advice from the people I was transporting to and from the club. One lady said to me, "Please don't sing us all those old songs from our parents' and grandparents' days, like lots of people do! Our generation likes Elvis and The Beatles!"

4. Give out some inexpensive percussion instruments - shakers, woodblocks, etc - so that people can join in physically as well as vocally. They will really enjoy taking part in that way! (But do clean the instruments afterwards with alcohol gel, to avoid cross-contamination, before taking them on to the next home.)

You'll also need to check beforehand with the staff at the home whether it's okay to give out instruments.

5. If the size of the room doesn't require amplification, move around the room sometimes while singing, maybe even sitting with a group at the back for a song. It makes it much more personal and inclusive, and adds the interest of your music coming from different directions.

6. Spend some time chatting with the people before and/or after the gig. Older people are well worth getting to know, and it's so much nicer than just turning up, singing and disappearing again.

7. Ask in advance whether there are 2 or 3 songs that the group would particularly like. (Don't make it open-ended, or you might get a list of 50 requests!) If you then need to have the words in front of you for those couple of songs, no one will care! They'll just be glad to be able to sing along to songs that they love.

8. It's worth preparing - at your own expense - some laminated word sheets to hand out for maybe 4 or 5 of the most popular songs. These can be collected up afterwards, cleaned (as with the instruments) and used again, so the expense will only occur once.

Andy7

P.S.

"Almost the entire sector is run by fat cats who pay all their staff as little as possible."

I know from personal experience that this sweeping statement is unjustified. But I won't go into that here, it's a 'below the line' topic.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: Mooh
Date: 16 Oct 18 - 08:54 AM

We played a lot of swing tunes, celtic stuff, a bit of blues, and the odd '50s and '60s song or theme music.

It doesn't hurt to send out a flier/business card, maybe a video link, etc then back it up with a phone call. If you know a resident, pay them a visit, then visit the front office on your way out.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: Nick
Date: 16 Oct 18 - 01:48 PM

>>3. Don't sing Victorian parlour songs and WW1 songs! Well, maybe just 1 or 2 occasionally.

Before my first such gig, at a club for older people where I was a volunteer driver, I asked advice from the people I was transporting to and from the club. One lady said to me, "Please don't sing us all those old songs from our parents' and grandparents' days, like lots of people do! Our generation likes Elvis and The Beatles!

Absolutely. We sang for some 'older' people at a local methodist hall and people came up and said "thank goodness you didn't sing Vera Lynne or war songs that was my parents generation. I was born in 1941 John Lennon was born before me and I learned to dance to Buddy Holly"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: GUEST,Jack Campin
Date: 16 Oct 18 - 02:07 PM

This is the sort of person who ultimately runs your local care home.

Robert Kilgour

another article that also doesn't mention his home in Monaco

Good luck getting paid the minimum wage for your gig.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: meself
Date: 16 Oct 18 - 03:35 PM

Since the question was 'the best way to contact': phone'm up and tell'm what your business is - they'll put you through to the appropriate person. Be prepared to leave a voice message. Second best way - or, in some cases, the better way: send an e-mail with something like "re: entertainment" in the subject line.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Old people's homes (types of)
From: John C. Bunnell
Date: 16 Oct 18 - 03:55 PM

Geographic note first: I'm in the US Pacific Northwest, so what I can report may vary from what others, particularly in the British Isles and/or UK, may find on looking into matters. [Side query: what's the best way to refer to the whole of the territory over there nowadays, what with recent developments and all?]

That noted...

In the US today, there are now at least two quite distinct classes of facility catering to senior citizens/the elderly, and this is a case where it's important to distinguish between the two.

"Nursing homes" are designed specifically for those needing ongoing full-time support and observation by medical professionals, and function in most respects as residential hospitals with varying degrees of sophistication. Residents are there because they need ongoing care, medication, and observation for specific illnesses and conditions.

"Senior living communities" are a whole different kettle of fish, and a rapidly growing market segment as the American population ages. There are a considerable variety of these, falling into several broad categories: "independent living", "assisted living", and more recently, "memory care", with some facilities providing all these levels of service under one roof. An "independent living" apartment (or sometimes, condominium) is more likely to come fully furnished than a regular apartment; the monthly cost will usually include some level of housekeeping/maid service and often covers some meals in a common dining facility, which may be either buffet-style or in the mode of a full service restaurant. "Assisted living" generally includes all meals plus housekeeping and some degree of caregiving (for example, ensuring that residents' medications are taken on the proper schedule, or escorting them to and from activities). OTOH, unlike a nursing home, the assisted living facility has minimal true medical facilities of its own; many to most, though, provide supervised transportation to and from residents' medical appointments off-site. "Memory care" is just what it says; residents are those on the spectrum of conditions from mild dementia on up through Alzheimer's, are closely supervised, and provided with activities suitable for their particular mental capacity. Depending on their specific condition, memory care patients may take meals in the common dining areas or be served in their rooms.

My mother has been living in a senior living community for a couple of years now; hers is part of a regional group with more than a dozen locations scattered from southern Oregon to Montana. It is a large, bright place with two large dining rooms and a smaller area that's called a "pub" but which looks rather more like a wine bar with a billiards table and a couple of oversized TVs. They also have a small theater, a full-scale gym and pool, an onsite hair salon for the ladies, and several conference rooms of various sizes for social activities, and the staff includes a "social director" who is specifically charged with planning these activities and events...a percentage of which have included local musical talent. Her facility is around ten years old; the parent company has been opening more of these at the pace of one or two a year, and there is a bumper crop of new and similar facilities springing up all over my metropolitan area. Not all senior-living communities are as upscale and well-equipped as Mother's, but most of them are upgrading and refreshing themselves, in no small part because the new places have upped the standard by which the whole category is judged.

What does all this mean for musicians? My take is this: in general, at a nursing home, music is background, live music is a luxury, and it matters very little to anyone who's performing it. At a senior living community, music is entertainment -- and the audience you attract is there to see *you*. Moreover, both the facility's management and the residents (especially where a sizeable number are in independent-living units) have budgets for entertainment; if you have CDs to sell, people may very well buy them.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: wysiwyg
Date: 16 Oct 18 - 04:02 PM

I've been in a nursing home and totally enjoyed concerts in the lounge, coordinated by the activity director! However they're least likely to pay a musician-- their clientele is all on Medicare. Assisted living often also.

You want country-club-like resorts for seniors-- totally different thing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Playing for old peoples homes
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Oct 18 - 09:07 PM

I've done a couple of these type of old folks residences in the past. I make a point of asking the attendees before hand where they come from and who is/was their favourite singer. I then (if possible)sing a song from their home town or area or do a song by their favourite singer. Afterwards, I always thank them individually for coming to hear me.
FWIW, I never ask for a fee or expenses, however that item is entirely up to the performer.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 13 November 4:01 PM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.