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Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile

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AN DO/RD FIANNA:


Related threads:
Tune Add: Oro! Se Do Bheatha Bhaile (20)
Lyr Req: Oro Se Do Bhaile (from Dubliners) (26)
Lyr/Chords Req: Grainne Mhaol (4)
lyr req: oro seo (4)


Finn McCool 25 Aug 01 - 08:36 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 25 Aug 01 - 10:28 PM
Finn McCool 26 Aug 01 - 03:25 PM
GUEST 27 Aug 01 - 12:38 AM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 27 Aug 01 - 06:03 AM
GUEST,Lori 27 Aug 01 - 12:22 PM
Brían 27 Aug 01 - 01:43 PM
GUEST,chrisj 27 Aug 01 - 10:48 PM
GUEST,Annraoi 28 Aug 01 - 04:22 PM
Brían 28 Aug 01 - 08:33 PM
Jimmy C 28 Aug 01 - 11:56 PM
Jimmy C 29 Aug 01 - 12:01 AM
Brían 29 Aug 01 - 03:01 PM
GUEST,Philippa 30 Aug 01 - 09:11 AM
GUEST,Annraoi 30 Aug 01 - 03:52 PM
GUEST,JTT 30 Aug 01 - 03:54 PM
Brían 30 Aug 01 - 06:39 PM
Jimmy C 31 Aug 01 - 12:08 PM
GUEST,Philippa 01 Sep 01 - 09:11 PM
GUEST,Matty Paul 02 Mar 04 - 09:15 AM
Lighter 02 Mar 04 - 11:23 AM
Jim McLean 02 Mar 04 - 01:00 PM
Big Tim 06 May 04 - 08:55 AM
Big Tim 07 May 04 - 05:03 AM
Jim McLean 07 May 04 - 12:53 PM
Big Tim 08 May 04 - 05:14 AM
Jim McLean 08 May 04 - 05:53 AM
Big Tim 08 May 04 - 11:49 AM
Jim McLean 08 May 04 - 01:23 PM
Big Tim 09 May 04 - 03:53 AM
Fear Faire 09 May 04 - 04:17 AM
Jim McLean 09 May 04 - 04:32 AM
GUEST,emmi 24 Oct 04 - 05:18 PM
GUEST,eithne.oneill@wanadoo.fr 07 Jun 06 - 06:25 AM
Big Al Whittle 07 Jun 06 - 06:29 PM
Big Al Whittle 07 Jun 06 - 06:46 PM
Big Al Whittle 07 Jun 06 - 06:55 PM
Declan 07 Jun 06 - 08:05 PM
GUEST,Aaron MacDaibheid 02 Nov 07 - 11:27 AM
Snuffy 02 Nov 07 - 01:55 PM
GUEST,EirenRanger 19 Nov 08 - 06:11 PM
GUEST,Shannon 20 Mar 09 - 09:06 PM
GUEST,JTT 21 Mar 09 - 03:34 PM
GUEST,Seamus45 04 Jan 11 - 04:18 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 04 Jan 11 - 04:38 PM
ollaimh 04 Jan 11 - 05:01 PM
GUEST,Seamus45 04 Jan 11 - 06:09 PM
Jack Campin 04 Jan 11 - 06:29 PM
GUEST,celtic know it all 25 Jan 11 - 04:02 PM
GUEST,Shaz 02 Mar 11 - 11:12 AM
GUEST,caoimhe 22 Mar 11 - 02:40 PM
Thompson 22 Mar 11 - 03:43 PM
skarpi 22 Mar 11 - 05:45 PM
Sean Fear 23 Mar 11 - 03:10 PM
harmonic miner 23 Mar 11 - 03:22 PM
michaelr 23 Mar 11 - 05:11 PM
RunrigFan 23 Mar 11 - 06:00 PM
GUEST,Kate D. 16 Mar 12 - 05:28 PM
GUEST 24 Mar 12 - 11:28 AM
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Subject: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Finn McCool
Date: 25 Aug 01 - 08:36 PM

There are several translations of this Irish Gaelic song on the internet, as well as a great deal of background information, eg. Jacobite vs. Patrick Pearse lyrics, etc. But I have not been able to find anything pertaining to the first word of the song, "Oro". Is this an exclamation, proper name, change from shipwrecked Spanish Armada sailors?

Who or what is Oro?

--Finn


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 25 Aug 01 - 10:28 PM

It's a vocable.

Like "Yo-ho" or "ho"


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Finn McCool
Date: 26 Aug 01 - 03:25 PM

George,

Thanks for the answer, and also for introducing me to a nifty vocabulary word.

--Finn


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Aug 01 - 12:38 AM

Finn, I hope you don't mind my saying it but the song title should read: "Óró,'Sé Do Bheatha 'Bhaile". (Oh-ro, You Are Welcome Home). The words were written by Patrick Pearse. Thanks George for the technical term for "Óró", I wondered about that.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 27 Aug 01 - 06:03 AM

You're very welcome. Enjoy the music.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Lori
Date: 27 Aug 01 - 12:22 PM

The tune seems to be related to "The Drunken Sailor." Is this just a coincidence or is there a connection? Or do I suffer from an overactive imagination?


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Brían
Date: 27 Aug 01 - 01:43 PM

Now that you mention it, there is a similarity between the 2 song melodies. This might be worthy of another thread, because the shanty singers might be able to answer this one better. I know that many fine melodies have been used as hymns, ballads, lullabies, work songs in many different languages. As Kendall would say, "Why waste a good melody on only one song?".

Brían.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,chrisj
Date: 27 Aug 01 - 10:48 PM

'Oro Se Do Bheatha Abhaile' and 'What Shall We Do With the Drunken Sailor?' do share a maritime theme at least. 'Oro..' is about the Galway chieftainess Grace O'Malley who is reputed to have preyed on English shipping in the Irish Sea in Elizabethan times. She apparantly visited Elizabeth 1 of England at court and caused a stir as the 'Irish Pirate Queen'.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Annraoi
Date: 28 Aug 01 - 04:22 PM

Sadly, no, Chrisj, Gráinne Mhaol (Grace O'Malley, is mentioned in one verse only and that, unless my memory plays me tricks, is in the Pearse composition only.
Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Brían
Date: 28 Aug 01 - 08:33 PM

She is mentioned in 2 verses:

Verse 2:
Tá Gráinne Mhaol ag teacht thar Sáile

And in verse 3:
Gráinne Mhaol agus míle gaiscíoch ag fógairt fáin ne Ghalla

But the song is about the anticipacion of Irish men and women returning to rout the Stranger, not about Grace O'Malley.

Brían. I have searched the forum for any relationship between these 2 songs, and have only found one reference to Martin Ryan saying that he thought the melodies were the same.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Jimmy C
Date: 28 Aug 01 - 11:56 PM

Pearse wrote Oro Se Do Bheathe Abhaile but it was inpired by the following old Jcaobite Ulster song " Searlas Og" Young Charles

A Shearlas Oig a mhic Ri Sheamais
Se mo chreach do thraill ar Eirinn
Gan ruainne broig, stoca no leine
Ach a ciscairt leis ns Francaigh

Chorus - Curfa
Oro se do Bheatha 'un a bhaile
Oro as cionn a'n duine eile
Oro 'se do bhetha 'un a bhaile
Ta tu amuigh le raithe

O 'se mo lean gear nach bheicim
Mura mbeinn beo 'na dhaidh ach seachtain
Searlas Og agus mile gaisiopch
A' coscairt leis na Francaigh

Chorus

Ta Searlas Og a 'triall thar saile
Beidh said leisean cupla garda
Beidh siad leis Francaigh agus Spainnigh
'S bainfidh siad rinc' as na Gaillibh


Young Charles son of King James
It is my sorrow your coming here
Without a stitch of a shoe, sock or shirt
But you struggling with the French

Chorus

Oro you're welcome home
You;re welcome above all others
Oro you're welcome home
You've been away for a seasonMy bitter grief that I'm not seeing
If I only lived for a week
Young Charles and a thousand warriors
Struggling with the French

Chorus

Young Charles coming over the water
Some troops will be with him
The French and Spanish will be with him
And they will rout the English


p.s.p Strugggling with the French in verse s 1 and 2 probably means striving to get their support.?


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Jimmy C
Date: 29 Aug 01 - 12:01 AM

sorry, the chorus and 2nd verse should have looked like this

Oro you're welcome home You're welcome above all others Oro you're welcome home You've been away for a season

My bitter grief that I'm not seeing If I only lived for a week Young Charles and a thousand warriors Struggling with the French.

The tune is very similar to the P.Pearse one, but a little slower. Speeded up it could be considered similar to the Drunken Sailor.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Brían
Date: 29 Aug 01 - 03:01 PM

Thanks, Jimmy.

Brían.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 30 Aug 01 - 09:11 AM

If you do an archives search you'll find a few threads and both Pearse's and the Jacobite lyrics have previously been contributed. See this thread for abc and midi of tune.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Annraoi
Date: 30 Aug 01 - 03:52 PM

I note that Conrad Bladey aka Peasant failed to give the source of his lyrics in the thread blueclickied by Philippa. Would you mind giving us *your* source, Jimmy ?
Annraoi
Philippa, Cia mar a tha thu? Is fada ó bhí muid ag caint le chéile.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 30 Aug 01 - 03:54 PM

Umm, not really *welcome* home, more "hail to my home". "Sé do bheatha!" is an old-fashioned greeting. The traditional answer, as far as I remember, is "Go maireadh thú" (my tenses may be shaky here).

All the stuff about Searlas Óg is to do with Bonnie Prince Charlie, who became an almost mythical figure of rescue for the beleaguered Irish under occupation by "the Gall" - the Foreigners.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Brían
Date: 30 Aug 01 - 06:39 PM

The notes from Ó Bríain and Ní Úallacháín's ubiquitous A Stór 's A Stóirín says it can be found in Céad de Cheoltaibh Uladh bt Enrí Ó Muigheasa, 1915.

If anyone knows where I can find a copy of it let me know. There is another song in it I am interested in.

Beidh mé ag caint libh arís.

Brían.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Jimmy C
Date: 31 Aug 01 - 12:08 PM

Annraoi,

I got the info from the liner notes of a C.D. by Garry O'Briain and Padraiugin Ni Uallachain titled " A Stor's A Stoirin". A gael Linn production. A great collection of 36 songs for all ages. I believe Padraiugin Ni Uallachain is a school techer in Dundalk. I'm sure you have heard of her. Her father was a great fount of knowledge on the origins of many traditional songs.

Jimmy


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 01 Sep 01 - 09:11 PM

Tá mé go maith, a Annraoi; thiocfadh leat scríobh chugam go direach. I also have contributed the Jacobite lyrics in some other thread. Pádraigín sings them to a slightly different air than that used for the Pearse lyrics, her own adaptation. But the usual tune is given with the lyrics in Ceolta Theilinn.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Matty Paul
Date: 02 Mar 04 - 09:15 AM

I may not be an expert on music. But I like the information about this song and I would like to contribute what I know.

"Oro se do bheatha bhaile" As far as I know, it means: Long Life To You On Your Homecoming." In the english language. I've heard the irish tenors sing it, and it does sound like "What Shall We Do With The Drunken Sailor?" Personal, I like the first better than the second.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Lighter
Date: 02 Mar 04 - 11:23 AM

"Drunken Sailor" may be more likely to derive from the Irish tune than the other way round, if only because the shanty tune is simpler.
(Before somebody else points this out, the adaptation *could* have gone either way. But folk tunes, like folk lyrics, tend to wear down after long use.) Also, many shanty tunes appear to have come from prior sources: "Donkey Riding" (from "My Bonnie Hieland Laddie"), "The Hog-Eye Man" (from a minstrel song), "The Harp Without a Crown" (from "The Wearing of the Green"), "New York Girls" (from "Larry Doolin"), etc.

Not surprisingly, many of these melodic adaptations are from Anglo-Irish folk/pop culture; many first- and second-generation Irishmen served before (and abaft) the mast in British and American vessels.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Jim McLean
Date: 02 Mar 04 - 01:00 PM

Alos 'Donald where's your troosers'


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Big Tim
Date: 06 May 04 - 08:55 AM

The McPeakes recorded the song as "Doro Feinne (the Warrior's Chant" and Peter Kennedy's liner notes give the writer as Seumas Mahon. This is obviously wrong, Pearse wrote the lyrics, but who was Seumas Mahon?


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Big Tim
Date: 07 May 04 - 05:03 AM

I have just been informed by an Irish speaker that "doro" does not exist in Irish, that Pearse's original (1914?), was "An Dord Feinne" (The Warrior's Chant): "dord" meaning, in music, a bass humming sound.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Jim McLean
Date: 07 May 04 - 12:53 PM

I just listened to the LP of the McPeakes singing An Durd Feinne and that's the title on the sleeve .... durd rather that dord. Durd means the same in both Scottish and Irish gaelic, as you say Big Tim, a buzzing sound.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Big Tim
Date: 08 May 04 - 05:14 AM

Jim, surely it's "dord", not "durd"! That looks like a missprint on the sleeve. My McPeake version is on a CD reissure compilation, and it's "dord", as it is in Ruth Dudley Edwards biog of Pearse.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Jim McLean
Date: 08 May 04 - 05:53 AM

Big Tim, in Dwelly's the Illustrated Gaelic-English Dictionary, sometimes considered as the Bible for gaelic scholars, the word appears as 'durd'. Under 'dord' it says 'see durd' so we can make of that as we will, as both seem to be correct. The singer appears, to my ears, to be singing 'durd' but then again different accents, different sounds.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Big Tim
Date: 08 May 04 - 11:49 AM

Jim, I'll have to get a hold of that dictionary, thanks for the tip. I do have a big Irish to English only dictionary, 1300 pages, but durd doesn't appear. My informant is an Irish speaking, Irish university, Irish literature specialist: maybe she's wrong.

The McPeake's version is excellent, isn't it: so natural, primitive even, which I think is what Pearse was trying to conjure up; pity he didn't live to hear it. The Irish Tenors version is too fast, Black 47's rock version is interesting, Ronnie Drew's though is my absolute favourite.                                                      

(btw: I'm sticking with dord!)


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Jim McLean
Date: 08 May 04 - 01:23 PM

Big Tim, does 'dord' appear in your dictionary? I agree with you on the best versions!


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Big Tim
Date: 09 May 04 - 03:53 AM

Yes Jim, "dord" does appear, but not "durd".

Four definitions are given:
1. "deep sound, hum, buzz, murmur ,drone".
2. "deep or plaintive chant".
3. "An Dord Feinne - Chant of the Fianna".
4. "hum, buzz, drone, chant in deep voice"

Ronnie Drew certainly has a deep voice!

(My dict. is "Focloir Gaeilge-Bearla" [fadas missing], edited by Niall O Donaill, "a chuir in eagar". Dublin, 1977, 1992 print.)


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Fear Faire
Date: 09 May 04 - 04:17 AM

Dord is the earlier spelling. I'd imagine the spelling in Scotland still carries an accent (grave) given its derivation. O-u differentiation is not huge and the pronounciation of dord (or more commonly bord for table) varies from long o to short o or u to a diphthong and even long u in various dialects in Ireland today.

In modern lexicography, dord is used for bass instruments or to denote a related instrument of lower pitch as in the case of "dordveidhil" for violincello. The use of dord to denote a deep voice is attested in old sources. The name of the group Dordán is another noun derived from a verb.

Pádraig Mac Piarais' title "Dord Féinne" is based on Dord Fiansa in older sources where dord is a chant or refrain and some of the sources imagine a noise from beating together the shafts of spears accompanying the chant.

As this was in a context of warfare, I'm not sure if that makes it inclusive or exclusive to the varying opinions on guitars and percussion in Irish music sessions!


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Jim McLean
Date: 09 May 04 - 04:32 AM

Nice clarification and yes, the Scottish spelling still carries the grave.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,emmi
Date: 24 Oct 04 - 05:18 PM

hi. i was wondering if anyone could help me find the lyrics for this song that the browne sisters sing. my chorus at school would like to sing it and i would appreciate a phonetic version of the lyrics as well as a translation. if you could email it to me that would be great! (daemonsgirl74@yahoo.com) thank you so much!


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,eithne.oneill@wanadoo.fr
Date: 07 Jun 06 - 06:25 AM


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 07 Jun 06 - 06:29 PM

yes all right I can do it for you ddemon girl emmi.

e mail me

d.whittle@ntlworld.com and confirm that nobody else has done this for you. Alternatively if you know someone with Clancy Bros songbook, they will have it.

However its only a couple of pages I can scan them and send them to you

all the best

alan whittle


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 07 Jun 06 - 06:46 PM

on second thoughts, demon girl emmi. don't bother I'll e-mail them to you anyway - it will be my good deed for this year.

but please confirm receipt

al


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 07 Jun 06 - 06:55 PM

only just noticed it was twoyears ago
oh well!


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Declan
Date: 07 Jun 06 - 08:05 PM

The word 'dord' in Irish Gaelic is used to mean a bass as in bass guitar or double bass (as opposed to a fish or a pint of ale). I didn't know the derivation until now. Very interesting.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Aaron MacDaibheid
Date: 02 Nov 07 - 11:27 AM

Do any of you guys have notes for this on the tin whislte (preferable) or on the flute"!...

It would be greatly appreciated if you could send me an email of these notes, thanks!

Aaron MacDaibheid
Derry, the north of ireland

Slan go foile mo charas

(Aaron_cfc@hotmail.com)


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Snuffy
Date: 02 Nov 07 - 01:55 PM

I got the tune from one of those cheap whistle books you find in most music shops - I think it says Soodlums Irish Whistle something on the front.

Take a pen and paper with you and copy the notes if you don't want the whole book. :-)


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,EirenRanger
Date: 19 Nov 08 - 06:11 PM

Concerning, "What would you do with a drunken sailor" The melodies are meant to be the same. "What would you do with a drunken sailor" was written to the melody of the Irish rebel song, also it actually only; at least originally, contained 3 verses outside of the chorus. However more verses would be added to the song by sailor depending on the time a task took to complete. It was usually sung at the raising of the sails or the anchor and was one of the only songs allowed to be sung on Irish shipping vessels and oddly enough in the Royal Navy.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Shannon
Date: 20 Mar 09 - 09:06 PM

I have heard that Drunken Sailor MAY have stolen the melody from Oro Se do Bheatha Abhaile. It makes sense that the melody came from an Irish song since the heyday of the Royal Navy came later in a time when the Dorian mode was largely not used in English music. For those who aren't music nerds, the Dorian mode is a type of minor scale common to Oro Se do Bheatha Abhaila, Drunken Sailor, and Greensleeves.

In the Irish War for Independance, the P. H. Pearse version of the lyrics were sped up to make the song into a fast march. There's a wonderful rendition of this in the film The Wind that Shakes the Barley.

That said, the major difference between Drunken Sailor and Oro Se Do Bheatha Abhaile is the rhythm. For a tinwhistle player (or floutist) to play The Drunken Sailor, the technique used to create the abrupt stops between short notes is called tonguing. This percussive rhythm is not present in Oro Se Do Bheatha Abhaile.

Since I can't put an image of sheet music here, I'll tab out the song for whistle to meet Aaron's request. Parenthesis mean upper octave. You'll have to figure out the rhythm by listening to it. This should work on any tinwhistle or Irish flute. For E Dorian, use a key of D instrument or Tenor D instrument.

11210124 22222642 1121010(5) (5)(4)0(5)011


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 21 Mar 09 - 03:34 PM

Coming back to 'Sé do bheatha, it's also the first line of the 'Hail Mary' in Irish:

'Sé do bheatha, Mhuire, atá lán de grásta
(Hail, Mary, who is full of grace).


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Seamus45
Date: 04 Jan 11 - 04:18 PM

More on "'Sé do bheatha" - literally: "It is your life" and is used in both Gaeilge and Gaidhlig. It can mean both "Hail" and "You are welcome" (and in Gaidhlig, "You're welcome" as in a response to "Thanks") depending on dialect and intent.

Both Dord and Durd are "correct" in that both are used in both Gaelics. Likely that dord would be the more prevalent form in Ireland.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 04 Jan 11 - 04:38 PM

Source for this iconic Republican song.
Popularized by Sting recently
even then now a ways back.....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%93r%C3%B3_S%C3%A9_do_Bheatha_%27Bhaile

oro

Two sets of lyrics.

Conrad


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: ollaimh
Date: 04 Jan 11 - 05:01 PM

considering that pearse and others were exucuted soon after the song, i like yeats 1916 as a companion piece in english.

he thought highly of pearse as a poet with potential but was stunned by the sudden eruption of rebellion. most in irish society at the time thought the young radicals were all hot air.

a fellow named blake out in british columbia used to sing a very stirring version of oro se do bheatha bhaile. he was in a band called connely's men with kevin dooley and barry hall, and phillomena whose last name i forget. they brought the song alive with imediecy and grace


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Seamus45
Date: 04 Jan 11 - 06:09 PM

PS: Best sung versions (IMO) are Darach O Cathain's (available on YouTube and iTunes) and for the Jacobite version, Padraigin Ni Uallachain's version of "a Shearlas Oig, a mhic Righ Sheamais."


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Jack Campin
Date: 04 Jan 11 - 06:29 PM

This remind anybody of anything?

X:2
T:Johnie Cope
C:Charles Maclean
Z:Jack Campin: "Embro, Embro", transcription (c) 2001
F:16army/abc/JCopeMcV.abc
S:Charles Maclean, Collection of Favourite Scots Tunes, pub. Neil Stewart, c.1770
M:C|
L:1/16
K:G Minor
G4 (TG2FG) A2G2 (AG)(FD)|F4    F3G       A2GF F2A2|
G4 (TG2FG) A2F2   G2D2   |F2C2 (DC)(B,A,) G,4   G,4:|


It's part of a variation set on "Johnny Cope" composed not long after the song first appeared (early 1750s). The resemblance to "Oro se" seems too strong to be coincidence. (Slightly less close to "Drunken sailor").


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,celtic know it all
Date: 25 Jan 11 - 04:02 PM

it's a good song to sing while eating spaghetti by the fires


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Shaz
Date: 02 Mar 11 - 11:12 AM

Hi there!!

Does anyone have a nice, easy harmony for O ro se do bheatha bhaile? would be most grateful for any help!
Thanks,
Shaz


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,caoimhe
Date: 22 Mar 11 - 02:40 PM

thanks for all the help
thanks again,

      caoimhe.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Thompson
Date: 22 Mar 11 - 03:43 PM

Dord/durd comes from the conventions of Irish spelling. Dord would be correct for something rhyming with 'word' in the modern caighdeán, but durd might have been used in the 19th century - for instance, An Bonnán Buí, The Yellow Bittern, is An Bunnán Buí in 19th- and early-20th-century versions.

Similarly, what was always 'bas' when I was a child - the palm of the hand, pronounced to rhyme with 'moss', is now almost always written 'bos', which should properly be pronounced to rhyme with the English word 'bus'.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: skarpi
Date: 22 Mar 11 - 05:45 PM

"Óró,'Sé Do Bheatha 'Bhaile". (Oh-ro, You Are Welcome Home)

oh I like this song ...:O) and love singing it ....

all the best Skarpi


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: Sean Fear
Date: 23 Mar 11 - 03:10 PM

The origins of the song are in the original a Jacobite version in which The Young Pretender is called "Shéarlais Oig, Mhic Rí Shéamais" (Young Charles, King James's son") as stated in the first line of the song, is the one who was welcomed home to claim his birthright in 1745.
The lyrics of the newer version were written by Pádraig Pearse, one of the leaders of the Irish Rebellion of 1916, as an invitation to all Irishmen away from Ireland to return home and join the fight for independence.
The tune is in P. W. Joyce as "Oro,'Se do Bheatha a Bhaile": "Oro, Welcome Home!" A Hauling-Home Song, with following explanation:
"The 'Hauling Home' was bringing home the bride to her husband's house after marriage. It was usually a month or so after the wedding, and was celebrated as an occasion next only in importance to the wedding itself. The bridegroom brought back home his bride at the head of a triumphal procession- all on cars or on horseback. I well remember one where the bride rode on a pillion behind her husband. As they entered the house the bridegroom is supposed to speak or sing:
- Oro, sé do bheatha a bhaile,
Is fearr liom tu ná céad bo bainne:
Oro, sé do bheatha a bhaile,
Thá tu maith le rátha.
Oro, welcome home,
I would rather have you than a hundred milch cows:
Oro, Welcome home,
'tis you are happy with prosperity.
Pearse's Versionwith a fair translation is as follows:

ORO, SE DO BHEATHA ABHAILE
(OH WELCOME HOME)



SE DO BHEATHA, A BHEAN BA LEANMHAR
B'E AR GCREACH TU BHEITH I NGEIBHINN
DO DHUICHE BHREA I SEILBH MEIRLEACH
'S TU DIOLTA LEIS NA GHALLAIBH

WELCOME LADY OF GREAT SORROW
WE SHARE THE GRIEF OF YOUR INTERNMENT
YOUR FAIR LAND IN THE HANDS OF BRIGANDS
AND YOU IN BONDAGE TO STRANGERS


ORO, SE DO BHEATHA ABHAILE
ORO, SE DO BHEATHA ABHAILE
ORO, SE DO BHEATHA ABHAILE
ANOIS AR THEACHT AN TSAMHRAIDH

OH WELCOME HOME
OH WELCOME HOME
OH WELCOME HOME
NOW THE SUMMER IS COMING


TA GRANNIE MHOAL AG TEACHT THAR SAILE
OGLAIGH ARMTHA LEI MAR GHARDA
GAEIL IAD FEIN IS NI GAILL NA SPAINNIGH
IS CUIRFIDH RUAIG AR GHALLAIBH

GRANNIE MHOAL (GRACE O'MALLEY) IS CROSSING THE OCEAN
WITH ARMED WARRIORS AS HER GUARD
GAELS ARE THEY NOT FRENCH NOR SPAINNARDS
THEY WILL OVERWHELM TO THE FOREIGNERS

ORO.........


A BHUI LE RI NA BHFEART GO BHFEICEAM
MUNA MBEAM BEO INA DHIAIDH ACH SEACHTAIN
GRANNIE MHOAL AGUS MILE GAISCIOCH
AG FOGAIRT FAIN AR GHALLAIBH

THANK HEAVEN'S KING THAT WE SHALL SEE
EVEN THOUGH WE DIE SOON AFTER (THE NEXT WEEK)
GRANNIE MHOAL AND A THOUSAND WARRIORS
HERALD THE STRANGER'S RETREAT


ORO.........


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: harmonic miner
Date: 23 Mar 11 - 03:22 PM

I think 'dord' is used for Bass in Irish. 'Durd' would not be far off the pronunciation, at least in Munster Irish


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: michaelr
Date: 23 Mar 11 - 05:11 PM

'Dord" is used for 'bass'. Says so right on the back of my Clannad 2 LP.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: RunrigFan
Date: 23 Mar 11 - 06:00 PM

ORO, SE DO BHEATHA ABHAILE

Original Jacobite Version

       (Chorus)

    Óró, sé do bheatha 'bhaile,
    bh'Fearr liom tú ná céad bó bhainne,
    Óró, sé do bheatha 'bhaile
    Anois ar theacht an tsamhraidh.

    A Shéarlais Óig[1], a mhic Rí Shéamais[2]
    'Sé mo mhór-chreach do thriall as Éirinn
    Gan tuinnte bróig' ort, stoca nó leinidh
    Ach do chascairt leis na Gallaibh

       Chorus

    'Sé mo léan géar nach bhfeicim
    Mur mbéinn beo 'na dhiaidh ach seachtain
    Séarlas Óg is míle gaiscidheach
    Ag fógairt fáin ar Ghallaibh

       Chorus

    Tá Séarlas Óg ag triall thar sáile
    Béidh siad leisean, Franncaigh is Spáinnigh
    Óglaigh armtha leis mar gharda
    'S bainfidh siad rinnce as éiricigh!

       Chorus

        
English translation

       (Chorus)

    Oh-ro You're welcome home,
    I'd rather you to a hundred milking cows,
    Oh-ro You're welcome home...
    Now that summer's coming!

    Young Charles, son of King James
    It's a great distress – your exile from Ireland
    Without thread of shoe on you, socks or shirt
    Overthrown by the foreigners

       Chorus

    Alas that I do not see
    If I were alive afterwards only for a week
    Young Charles and one thousand warriors
    Banishing all the foreigners

       Chorus

    Young Charles is coming over the sea
    They will be with him, French and Spanish
    Armed Volunteers with him as a guard
    And they'll make the heretics dance!

       Chorus

[edit] Padraig Pearse Version

       (Chorus)

    Óró, sé do bheatha 'bhaile,
    Óró, sé do bheatha 'bhaile,[3]
    Óró, sé do bheatha 'bhaile
    Anois ar theacht an tsamhraidh.

    'Sé do bheatha, a bhean ba léanmhar,
    Do b' é ár gcreach tú bheith i ngéibheann,
    Do dhúiche bhreá i seilbh méirleach,
    Is tú díolta leis na Gallaibh.

       Chorus

    Tá Gráinne Mhaol ag teacht thar sáile,
    Óglaigh armtha léi mar gharda,
    Gaeil iad féin is ní Gaill[4] ná Spáinnigh,
    Is cuirfidh siad ruaig ar Ghallaibh.

       Chorus

    A bhuí le Rí na bhFeart go bhfeiceam,
    Mura mbeam beo ina dhiaidh ach seachtain,
    Gráinne Mhaol agus míle gaiscíoch,
    Ag fógairt fáin ar Ghallaibh.

       Chorus

        
[edit] English translation

       (Chorus)

    Oh-ro You're welcome home,
    Oh-ro You're welcome home,
    Oh-ro You're welcome home...
    Now that summer's coming!

    Welcome oh woman who was so afflicted,
    It was our ruin that you were in bondage,
    Our fine land in the possession of thieves...
    And you sold to the foreigners!

       Chorus

    May it please the King of Miracles that we might see,
    Although we may live for a week once after,
    Gráinne Mhaol and a thousand warriors...
    Dispersing the foreigners!

       Chorus

    Gráinne O'Malley[5] is coming over the sea,
    Armed warriors along with her as her guard,
    They are Irishmen, not French nor Spanish...
    And they will rout the foreigners!


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST,Kate D.
Date: 16 Mar 12 - 05:28 PM

Thanks, Jack, for pointing out the similarity in the melody between that Johnie Cope variation and Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile.


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Subject: RE: Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Mar 12 - 11:28 AM

i was told by an irish speaker it was about the earls comming back from europe.


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