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The Best Way to String A Guitar?

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Neil Lowe 02 Sep 99 - 12:55 PM
Roger in Baltimore 02 Sep 99 - 03:21 PM
Easy Rider 02 Sep 99 - 03:27 PM
Allan C. 02 Sep 99 - 03:35 PM
Bert 02 Sep 99 - 03:49 PM
Rick Fielding 02 Sep 99 - 03:52 PM
Songster Bob 02 Sep 99 - 04:00 PM
Neil Lowe 02 Sep 99 - 04:19 PM
John of the Hill 02 Sep 99 - 08:00 PM
DonMeixner 02 Sep 99 - 11:08 PM
catspaw49 02 Sep 99 - 11:43 PM
DonMeixner 02 Sep 99 - 11:51 PM
Guy Wolff 02 Sep 99 - 11:52 PM
03 Sep 99 - 01:59 AM
Mark Clark 03 Sep 99 - 09:45 AM
Jon W. 03 Sep 99 - 10:49 AM
Bert 03 Sep 99 - 01:28 PM
j0_77 03 Sep 99 - 01:38 PM
Bert 03 Sep 99 - 01:43 PM
Easy Rider 03 Sep 99 - 03:30 PM
wildlone 03 Sep 99 - 05:13 PM
Bert 03 Sep 99 - 05:22 PM
wildlone 03 Sep 99 - 05:26 PM
smithy 03 Sep 99 - 06:33 PM
Neil Lowe 03 Sep 99 - 08:24 PM
Mark Clark 03 Sep 99 - 11:42 PM
lloyd61 04 Sep 99 - 12:17 AM
VirginiaTam 23 Dec 09 - 04:17 AM
breezy 23 Dec 09 - 11:00 AM
GUEST,Ray 23 Dec 09 - 01:21 PM
PHJim 23 Dec 09 - 06:03 PM
GUEST,Abduk the bul bul on his laptop 24 Dec 09 - 03:08 AM
MikeL2 24 Dec 09 - 05:09 AM
mkebenn 24 Dec 09 - 02:46 PM
Bee-dubya-ell 24 Dec 09 - 03:27 PM
mkebenn 24 Dec 09 - 03:29 PM
Big Mick 24 Dec 09 - 03:40 PM
Fortunato 24 Dec 09 - 04:58 PM
GUEST,Ray 25 Dec 09 - 06:21 AM
Tim Leaning 25 Dec 09 - 07:15 AM
bubblyrat 25 Dec 09 - 09:38 AM
Fortunato 25 Dec 09 - 03:29 PM
Mark Ross 25 Dec 09 - 04:58 PM
Bonzo3legs 26 Dec 09 - 04:00 PM
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Subject: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Neil Lowe
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 12:55 PM

I was reading in a music gear magazine a tip on the best way to string a guitar through the tuning post in order to prevent slippage. Thusly:

1. Feed string through tuning post hole (hole perpendicular to neck).

2. Leave slack to wind string around post at least one full turn.

3. Twist string back around post and feed it under the string that is entering the post. Pull string tight.

4. Bend string back over "entering string."

5. Tune.

All you pros out there, is this the way you do it? If not, why not? Thoughts? Comments? Suggestions?

TIA Neil


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Roger in Baltimore
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 03:21 PM

Yeah, any opinions?

I'm stupid enough to listen even if you aren't an expert. You just need an opinion. I don't do all that stuff Neil talks about. But my luthier did on my last repair. D'ya think he knows something?

While we're on this, I have a related question. Do you take one string off at a time and replace it and then go on to the next one? Or can you take several off at a time? I saw a friend of mine once take all six off his guitar and just start over. I'm told him it was wrong. He told me I was wrong.

I heard that alters the tension too greatly on the guitar and over the long run can warp the guitar out of shape. I've always done it one at a time because that is how I was taught (and I don't know who or what taught me).

Roger in Baltimore


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Easy Rider
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 03:27 PM

If you go to Frets.com

frets.com

You will find an article, complete with pictures, on how to string a guitar, and lots of info on setup and tuning machines.

I have always removed ALL the strings before installing the new ones. It gives me a chance to clean the fingerboard and the area between the bridge and sound hole, and it does NO HARM (really) to the guitar.

EZR


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Allan C.
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 03:35 PM

My $0.02 is that perhaps the wisdom of changing only one string at a time grew out of the time before steel reinforced necks. I could see the sense of it in that case - sorta. Maybe. A little. I think.


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Bert
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 03:49 PM

Oh course, then there are those who 'only' change strings one at a time - When they BREAK ;-)


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 03:52 PM

Yeah, in theory if you change one string at a time it doesn't mess up the tension of the neck. I do it that way and have REALLY dirty necks on my instruments - which I clean once a year.

Here's something that may be of interest. I use a dropped D tuning when I play in D or G or even A (believe Pete Seeger does the same) so I always replace the bass (6th) string with one of slightly heavier guage. I used to have my sets made for me by Labella, but now I get a custom set from "MasterClass" in Britain. I really like them. They run 12 to 58, but have a much lighter tension. (about the same as a med-light, but cuts down on buzzing so you can have the action pretty low.

Rick


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Songster Bob
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 04:00 PM

I haven't looked at the Frets.com info, so I'll tell you how I do it. I generally change one string at a time, but will do an all-off/all-on change now and then, to clean and oil the fingerboard (lemon oil furniture polish keeps the wood from drying out, especially on the upper frets you don't play on as much -- the lower frets get some natural lubrication/moisture from the fingers) and clean the top.

When I put on a new string, I don't use the "back underneath" system, since it puts a kink under the string as it goes around the post. I try for three to five "winds" around the post (more for the thin strings, fewer for the big 'uns) and use my right hand as a guage, in this manner. Thread the string through the post, and put the right hand under the string as it lies there, one end in the birdge hole (pinned) and the other loosely in the tuner post. Now I spread my fingers apart, lifting the string up from the top of the guitar, and then put my left thumb on the string at the first fret, to hold it. Switching hands so the right hand is now holding the string, I start winding the string with my left hand, keeping tension with the left, till it (the string) comes up to near tension and I can lift my right hand off and use it to pluck the string and check the tuning.

[Another reason to change one at a time is you can get back to near concert pitch easier, since you'll have the old strings adjacent, to which to tune.]

The result of this is several windings around the barrel or post of the tuner (I tend to spread my finger "guage" wider for the higher strings), and the kink where the string goes through the post separated by those windings from the tension of the string. If you use too few windings, the kink -- a weakness -- is susceptible to the tension. If you use too many windings, of course, the string gets pretty lumpy on the end of the guitar there, and you get other bad effects (strings "pile up" around the post, and slip off the pile at critical times in your playing.

Now, what do you do with the ends? Personally, I cut 'em off with cutter pliers about 1" above the headstock, then use the pliers to fold 'em back toward the headstock, in a double-back shape, so there's no sharp pointy thing right at eye level as I remove the guitar from my shoulder as the audience applauds. Too many close calls make me leery of leaving anything sticking out there. Also, those points cut the sh*t out of the inside of my gig bags, and those things are 'spensive enough, thank you.

So, that's how I do it.

Bob Clayton


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Neil Lowe
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 04:19 PM

Thank you, Bob. I appreciate your response. When I read the tip to which I referred, I was a little concerned about that kink myself, having had personal experience with breaking brand new strings in such a fashion (right at the tuning post, of course....leaving too short a string to salvage in many instances). I wanted to pick other's brains to see if perhaps the tipster was on to something that I wasn't. I have always had trouble gauging with the naked, myopic eye how much slack to leave in the string to produce the correct number of windings around the post, so next time I'm due for a string change (around year 2007, or thereabouts *BG*) I'll try your "right hand method."

Regards, Neil


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: John of the Hill
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 08:00 PM

For me, stringing a guitar is like tying a necktie. I can do it slick as a whistle until I start thinking about it. John


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: DonMeixner
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 11:08 PM

Changing guitar strings is thought by many to be a no brainer. Not by me however. Neil describes the way I've changed them for years. It works I change strings this way. Every month or so, more often if I play often I will:

1. Loosen all the strings.

2. Cut all the strings off.

3. Clean (and oil with trumpet valve oil once a year) the finger board.

4. Restring with Martin Bronze Lights or Darco New Yorker lights.

5. Retune and play.

I have used Martins or Darco's for 25 years. They are consistant and dependable. I couldn't ask for more.

Don


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: catspaw49
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 11:43 PM

Ah Don, I knew I loved you like a brother and once again you have given additional support to that feeling. Don't go in much for the Zen aspects do you? The Howard Cosell of Mudcat (apologies in advance, but I say that with the best of Howard in mind).....Tell it like it is!

If I can't sleep later, I'll type up a long post regarding the boring details of density, retention, grain structure and patterns, etc. and a hell of a lot of real boring shit about wood. I WILL add this now because it bothers me every time I hear it........a Truss Rod isn't there as a steel reinforcement, but it is the most misused adjustable device on a guitar.

Change your strings however it winds your machine head, but the pin wrap needs at least a full wrap around before underlooping and should, when tuned, have at least 4-5 on trebles and 3-4 on basses to assure limited breakage problems. Just change them.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: DonMeixner
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 11:51 PM

I forgot to add that the reson most people use to change them one at a time was strings weren't always this cheap. They replaced what they broke.

Don


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Guy Wolff
Date: 02 Sep 99 - 11:52 PM

I mostly unstring the whole thing at once.Hold the neck and loosen first the two outside strings and work my way in. Clean the neck and restring <<<>>>Oh one great trick is to pull the string up to its peg-stem and winde the string around the stem {More with the lighter strings less with the heaveis} before puting the string through the hole in the peg.. Pull on the string when tytening.If a string breaks on stage,I've found this method invaluable for restringing in the dark!! For the very frugal if you dont cut the leftover length at the peghead but winde them there may be enough excess to tye the string if it breaks...{Above the peghead ofcource.You could get some strange sounds other-wise ,and some bloody finger-tips}...Ah the frugal musiction!!!


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From:
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 01:59 AM

with a wire cutters :)


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Mark Clark
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 09:45 AM

I use a "Side Winder" (one of those plastic cranks) to speed the re-stringing process. It really helps. And I too loosen and replace my strings one at a time.

Beginning with removal of the old string, I loosen the string so it has enough slack to push the ball end down into the guitar just a little. That allows the pin to become free and easily lifted out. I have never pried the pins out of the bridge and my pins are still the original ones that came with the guitar nearly thirty years ago.

When installing a new string I run it through the hole, which I have left parallel to the direction the strings run, and crank it a half turn so the string lays on the post *above* the "stub." The very next time around, I lay the string under the stub and continue winding under the stub from then on. The string never cuts over itself but, due to the hourglass shape of the pegs on my Grover Rotomatic tuners the windings grab the stub from both sides. I try to arrange the beginning slack such the the string gets five or six full wraps on the peg or, on the heaver strings, so it at least winds (just) to the bottom of the peg.

As each string is installed, I bring it up to pitch then grab the string around the eighteenth fret or so and give it one or two sharp tugs to "set" the string. I generally replace them in the order: D,G,A,B,E,E, I think because it keeps the stubs from getting in my way as I work. When all the string are replaced, I set them one more time, then clip the stubs to a quarter of an inch or so.

When the guitar was new I used to take all the strings off at once. That allowed me to clean the fretboard and apply woodwind oil as mentioned above. Now I just clean around the strings just before changing them.

When I was working I changed string at least once a week but now I just change them when my ear says they need it. Come to think of it, it was my ear that told me to change them once a week as well.

I currently use SIT Royal Bronze medium guage strings (13,17,26,36,46,56) because they really do stay in tune and I can buy them at the local music store. Years ago I used to use James Boyce strings and ordered them from Mr. Boyce a dozen sets at a time. They also retained their tuning very well and sounded wonderful on my guitar.

Hope this is useful,

- Mark


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Jon W.
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 10:49 AM

I thought the reason for changing only one string at a time was so your bridge didn't fall off. You guys are all playing old Stellas with floating bridges and tailpieces, aren't you??? Not to mention banjos.


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Bert
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 01:28 PM

I was expecting Catspaw's post to begin... "to get really good strings, first you have 18 inches of gut removed" ;-)


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: j0_77
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 01:38 PM

Bert don b naughty - :) Changin strings ...is this funny or what. Imagine a big thick book title 'The Changing of The Strings' by A. Wire Ph G.


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Bert
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 01:43 PM

We've gotta tease our 'Spaw. He's the only person ever to have a tiple strung with his own guts.


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Easy Rider
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 03:30 PM

The book should be titled, "Zen And The Art of String Changing".

The reason for kinking the string both where it enters the tuning peg and where it leaves and for wraping the loose end back, under and over itself, is so that it won't slip and go out of tune, later on. Many people have mistakenly replaced tuning machines or gotten rid of guitars because they wouldn't stay in tune, when all they needed to do was maintain the machines and string them properly. I have never broken a string by kinking it at the tuning post. There are other reasons, having to do with the nut, for a string to break at that end.

To get the right amount of slack, just put four fingers between the fingerboard and the new string, at the 12th fret, before locking the string on the post.

I also install the new strings from the outside in, so that the installed ones do not get in my way, when I go to install subsequent strings. I cut the excess as short as possible, so that I won't get stuck and bleed all over my guitar.

Thanx, EZR


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: wildlone
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 05:13 PM

The guitars I usually use [an ibanez 6 string or a marina 12 both 60s vintage] have been worked on by a local luthier who lowered the action so i use the lightest strings I can get mostly Earthwoods, and i take all of them off first. But who realy cares just play music.


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Bert
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 05:22 PM

wildone, how can you 'just play music' when you've taken all of them off? Or wasn't that strings you were talking about?



Bert ;-)


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: wildlone
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 05:26 PM

okay Bert you got me, just turn your box over and you got a handy drum.


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: smithy
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 06:33 PM

I tend to remove all strings during a re-string so that I can clean the fretboard. I use the "kinking" method and only have about two turns around the peg at tension. Once the string is at tension I can grab the excess end and just "spin it off" so that the string breaks where the second loop covers it. I have used this method for many years and find that, not only do I not need side cutters, string winders and other extras but I can replace a broken string very quickly. I haven't had significant breakage of strings at the tuning peg using this method, and find that locking the string by kinking it prevents any slippage.

Love and Julie Andrews,

smithy


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Neil Lowe
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 08:24 PM

Mark...I think you've posted the definitive treatise on the art of string changing....Thanks for taking the time to offer such a thorough description....

Regards, Neil


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Mark Clark
Date: 03 Sep 99 - 11:42 PM

Neil,

I suppose it was a little silly. I knew most of the information would be needless repitition of unnecessary redundancy but since folks seemed actually to be describing their process I figured some of the info might be useful to someone some day.

- Mark


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: lloyd61
Date: 04 Sep 99 - 12:17 AM

Now that you have heard from the pro's it is time to hear from the "old Man". I buy Martin Light by the box in order to get fresh strings. I have 6 guitars to string on a regular bases. Yearly I cut the old strings off and clean the fret board, the rest of the year I remove one string at a time. I thread the string thru the tuning peg, hold the string out at least three inches from the fret board, and start winding. I NEVR have a slip! last but not least, I streach the string before final tuning. It should be said that I have the guitars adjusted by a pro on a regular bases to keep them in good shape. I wish I could play as well as I keep my instruments.

Good Luck


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 23 Dec 09 - 04:17 AM

I just broke a string this weekend. I have never strung a guitar successfully or neatly.

Bit worried about my Sigma getting neck pulled outta shape. Now waiting for set of Newtone Heritage 12-51 to arrive.

Worry worry.


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: breezy
Date: 23 Dec 09 - 11:00 AM

Tie with a knot the ends of the broken string and stick it back on, or thread a twist through the 'hole that stops the string from popping out when jammed in by the pegs'

Were Elixir strings around when this thread started?

They last forever

Mine never break

playing through an amp increases string longevity too

Always have spare strings, never not have any


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: GUEST,Ray
Date: 23 Dec 09 - 01:21 PM

Stop worrying - the lack of a string or two will do nothing to harm a neck. All this business about locking on strings is un-necessary. I've never done it and I've been changing strings for over 40 years.

Simply attach the string to the bridge end and line up the hole in the tuner roughly with the path of the string. Pass the string through the hole and put a capo on at around the fifth fret to hold things in place. Grab hold of the string at the nut and pull it back out of the hole by around one and a half to two frets and bend the string behind the hole by 90 degrees. Wind on the string trying to keep the windings even and bring it up to pitch. Change them one at a time and once they're at pitch stretch them and bring them back up again.

The one and a half frets isn't crucial - what you're trying to achieve is a similar and sufficient amount of string to give enough to wind onto the stringpost (3 or 4 turns but possibly more on the top E and B) The more you do it the easier it becomes.
Ray


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: PHJim
Date: 23 Dec 09 - 06:03 PM

I just read this thread for the first time and was surprised to see that no one uses the method that I use. I change three strings at a time on guitar. I fasten each string at the bridge with the pin, then wrap the string around the post three times with as little slack as possible, pull the string through the hole, then tighten the string to pitch. I can often replace a broken string before the song ends using this method.
When I'm putting on a new set of strings, I cut them so about 1/4 inch protrudes from the hole. If I'm in a rush - changing a broken string on stage - I curl the string using a loonie or a quarter. This is the same method that people use to curl ribbon for Christmas presents, using the blade of a pair of scissors. I clip the end as soon as I get a chance. I always try to have a string winder on hand.


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: GUEST,Abduk the bul bul on his laptop
Date: 24 Dec 09 - 03:08 AM

Hi Tam, your neck will be OK, coincidentally I was with Brian yesterday and he mentioned he'd put the Heritage strings on Odetta.
As breezy says..always have spares.
I get my Newtones online from Sheehans in Leicester, they are the quickest I've found (Malcolm is sometimes a bit busy), although they have now started charging for postage.
Anyway as for stringing, I give the string a few turns round the post,more turns for thinner gauges, thread it through the hole, tighten up gradually one side then the other as you would with wheel nuts.
Al


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: MikeL2
Date: 24 Dec 09 - 05:09 AM

hi everyone

I have had many guitars over the years and strung them all myself....so I do have some experience.

I just did it the way that seemed the most logical to me - at the time not knowing anything about guitars.

It seems that I was lucky enough to hit on the way that many here have advised....and I have to say that I have never had any problems with breaking strings.

When I first had to re-string my first guitar I did it one string at a time. This was not for any reason about neck strees etc... it was a very practical reason - I did it so that I could keep the new strings in relative tune as I went along. That always worked for me - so to this day I still restring one at a time.

I don't know if we have any 12 string players here....but I restring my 12 string Guild the same way. I string the thicker guaged strings first so that I have in effect a six string box and the harmonics next....I know ity may sound complicated but it works for me.

Seasons greetings to all

cheers

Mike


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: mkebenn
Date: 24 Dec 09 - 02:46 PM

I pull the string thru machine, feed under and turn to lock. Not more than two wraps on any string. Wrong?, and why. Mike


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Bee-dubya-ell
Date: 24 Dec 09 - 03:27 PM

No matter what technique you use to change strings an instrument, one brief word of advice based upon experience:

Never trim your strings until after you've tuned the instrument up to pitch. If you should mix up, say, the A & D strings and you've already cut the excess off, you're screwed. One of the trimmed strings will be too short to reach the proper tuning machine.

I did it once, about 35 years ago, and I haven't trimmed a string since then until after I've tuned it to proper pitch.


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: mkebenn
Date: 24 Dec 09 - 03:29 PM

Bee...yea, me too, even longer ago. LOL, Mike


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Big Mick
Date: 24 Dec 09 - 03:40 PM

I do three strings at a time, or six at a time if I am doing the 12 string. This has little to do with the neck and everything to do with the ribbon transducer pickup. (I have the Baggs dual source pickups in both instruments. The manufacturer as well as Elderly Instruments recommend that you do it this way to keep the tension on that ribbon transducer.

As to methodology, I am with Bob Clayton, or at least close. I simply run the string through the post, keeping just about enough tenstion on the string to get it almost straight. At that tension, I will get just about the right amount of wrap to make it look professional as I bring it up to pitch.

All the best,

Mick


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Fortunato
Date: 24 Dec 09 - 04:58 PM

Two more notes on stringing and cleaning the neck:

1. Stringing: I push the string 3/4 inch past the hole and turn in towards the headstock. Passing the end under the winding string and bending it backward towards the guitar and continue winding to lock it.

2. Waxing the neck. I take all six strings off if I'm not playing a gig the same day when changing strings. While the stings are off I polish the frets with a soft, dry rag. Then I wax the neck with Butcher's Wax. (Bowling alley wax) Follow the directions on the can. This protects, shines, and prevents shrinkage of the neck. If I'm playing out that day I remove 3 strings at a time, and wax 1/2 of the neck at the time. Neck shrinkage can cause various negative consequences and prevention is worth the effort.

cheers
chance


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: GUEST,Ray
Date: 25 Dec 09 - 06:21 AM

What on earth is "neck shrinkage"?


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Tim Leaning
Date: 25 Dec 09 - 07:15 AM

Take all the strings off.
Clean as required.
put the pin in with the winding from the little oojama flip the right way round in the pins groove.
make sure the pin pushes against the little oojamaflip as you press it into the hole.
this cuts down on strange buzzings later.
at the peg end put the end of the string throught the peg,pull it around the next peg up and back to the one its going to be fastened on.
that gives you about the right length of string to wind on.
keep some tension with your fingers by pressing the string down or holding it as you wind.
do it every week so that if you meet BWM he dont bend your ear about your guitar strings being over used.


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: bubblyrat
Date: 25 Dec 09 - 09:38 AM

Take the old strings off :-
Thoroughly clean the fretboard with lemon oil (espcially if it's rosewood). Let it soak in,if the wood is dry,then wipe off any excess with a cloth.
    Meanwhile,clean the guitar all over with whatever you think best; I tend to use a damp cloth,then I wipe off any excess moisture with a cloth / rag, then apply (sparingly) polish ( if your guitar has a polished / lacquered finish ),and buff to a shiny finish.
Throw away the plastic bridge-pins,and replace with solid brass ,or spun aluminium,ones.The difference in tone and / or volume can be astounding !
Trim off the new strings,leaving some margin for error (!) and,having threaded them through the holes in your tuners,bend the ends back the OPPOSITE way ,whilst taking up the tension. Sounds odd,I know,but----it works !
Tune up to somewhere near what you are looking for,then lay the guitar on your lap,and ,with your fingers,pull up HARD on the string / strings you want to tune.
             Drink some /several beer/beers.
    Re-tune.
          Snip /trim excess from ends of strings at machine-heads with side-cutters. Do NOT repeat NOT curl several inches into a whirly thing.Looks really silly !
Wash blood from pin-pricks in fingertips, have another drink,put guitar in case,and go to bed with a pretty woman (or an ugly one--the end result is usually the same ).
    Or ----go to music shop / instrument dealer,and ask him to fit new strings.


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Fortunato
Date: 25 Dec 09 - 03:29 PM

I'll add to bubblyrat's good advice above that I don't "pull up HARD on the string" unless I've just broken a string and I'm going on stage NOW. It does reduce tuning, but it shortens the life of the string. (In my experience).


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Mark Ross
Date: 25 Dec 09 - 04:58 PM

In my experience, if you change the strings, tune them up to pitch and let them sit for 24 hours(if you have the time). They will last 3X as long if you don't play them while they are stretching.


Mark Ross


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Subject: RE: The Best Way to String A Guitar?
From: Bonzo3legs
Date: 26 Dec 09 - 04:00 PM

Loosen strings, scrub with WD40 then retighten to pitch. Repeat say monthly for 10 years - worked for me!!


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