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ADD: Songs from Trinidad

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Q (Frank Staplin) 31 May 11 - 04:36 PM
Azizi 31 May 11 - 05:54 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 31 May 11 - 06:21 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 31 May 11 - 08:43 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Jun 11 - 01:04 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Jun 11 - 01:53 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Jun 11 - 01:21 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Jun 11 - 04:36 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Jun 11 - 04:42 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Jun 11 - 07:48 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Jun 11 - 04:10 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Jun 11 - 05:04 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Jun 11 - 01:25 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Jun 11 - 02:16 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Jun 11 - 04:36 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Jun 11 - 05:23 PM
Azizi 16 Jun 11 - 05:36 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Jun 11 - 08:23 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Jun 11 - 09:04 PM
Azizi 16 Jun 11 - 09:49 PM
Azizi 16 Jun 11 - 10:01 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Jun 11 - 10:41 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jun 11 - 01:15 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jun 11 - 01:47 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jun 11 - 02:28 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jun 11 - 02:48 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jun 11 - 04:29 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jun 11 - 05:12 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jun 11 - 05:30 PM
Charley Noble 18 Jun 11 - 01:05 PM
Mrrzy 18 Jun 11 - 01:41 PM
Mrrzy 18 Jun 11 - 01:42 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Jun 11 - 04:25 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Jun 11 - 04:38 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 22 Jun 11 - 07:27 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Jun 11 - 01:58 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 28 Oct 11 - 04:51 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: DULCIE (Trinidad)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 May 11 - 04:36 PM

DULCIE
Folk, Trinidad

Dulcie in de moonlight, Dulcie in the dew,
Dulcie never came home until the clock struck two.
Walk in, Dulcie, walk in,-
Walk in here, I say,
Walk into my parlour to hear de banjo play.

Refrain-
Oh, Dulcie, oh Dulcie, oh Dulcie
Oh Dulcie, oh Dulcie, oh Dulcie,
Where have you bin so long?
oh Dulcie,
Where have you bin so long?

Good mornin', sister Katie,
Good mornin', sister Packofrat,-
Dulcie came home two o'clock
Tell me what do you think of dat?
So walk in Dulcie, walk in,-
Walk in here I say,--
Walk into my parlour to hear de banjo play.

Oh Dulcie, oh Dulcie, oh Dulcie,
Oh Dulcie, oh Dulcie, oh Dulcie
Where you been so long?--
oh, Dulcie
Where have you bin so long?

With musical score,pp. 68-68, notated for voice, guitar, drum and bass.
Edric Connor, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press.

Reminiscent of minstrel songs.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GYPSY IN THE MOONLIGHT (Trinidad)
From: Azizi
Date: 31 May 11 - 05:54 PM

Q, you're probably already familiar with the Trinidadian song "Gypsy In The Moonlight".

It may be that "Dulcie In The Moonlight" that Edric Connor included in his 1958 book is a version of the "Gypsy in the Moonlight" song that Alan Lomax collected from Trinidad in the 1990s. Or it could be that "Gypsy" was originally "Dulcie"*. But I wouldn't at all be surprised if both of those songs had a British source.

GYPSY IN THE MOONLIGHT
Sung by children at the San Juan Girls' Government School, San Juan Trinidad

In ring play formation, "Gypsy" dances outside the circle in verse one, inside during verse two, chooses a partner in verse three, and they dance together through the "tra la la" verse, when the first "Gypsy" leaves, and the new one takes over.

Group: Gypsy in the moonlight,
Gypsy in the dew.
Gypsy never come back,
Until the clock strike two.

Walk in, gypsy, walk in,
Walk right in, I say.
Walk into my parlor
To hear the banjo play.

Gypsy: I don't love nobody,
And nobody loves me.
All I want is Sarah [Harold; Marva etc]
To come dance with me.

Group: Tra la la la la la. (Etc)
-Alan Lomax, J.D. Elder; Bess Lomax Hawes: Brown Girl In The Ring,Caribbean Voyage (New York, Pantheon Press, 1997)

* It's possible that the name "Dulcie" in Connor's version might be the nickname of the girl whose turn it was to be the Gypsy in the singing game version of this song. The "walk with me" lines certainly strongly suggests that this is a dance song, and many singing games (and later, jump rope rhymes) came from social dance songs.

-snip-

The second verse (the Gypsy verse given above ) reminds me of a very similar verse from the jump rope (skipping) rhyme which is now mostly a hand clap rhyme (in the USA) is "I Like Coffee I Like Tea" (also given as "I Love Coffee I Love Tea")

Ilove coffee I love tea
I want [person's name] to come jump with me.

-snip-

A version of "I Like (Love) Coffee" has been documented in the USA as early as 1869.

"29 June 1869, Port Jervis (NY) Evening Gazette, pg. 2, col. 3:
The following amatory epistle from a little eight-year-old girl to her "bow" was picked up in one of the schools of Oswego, a few days ago. (...) I love coffee I love tea I love you if you love me."

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes for that and other examples.

-snip-

A mp3 for the song "Gypsy In The Moonlight" is found at http://www.amazon.com/Gypsy-in-the-Moonlight/dp/B0012JEHIO

A video of some British? school boys singing "Gypsy In The Moonlight" is found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdy8Qs6JLiU

The boys sing "I want __ to come sing with me".

The tune sounds like very much like "I Like (Love) Coffee I Love Tea".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dulcie (Trinidad)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 May 11 - 06:21 PM

The Songs from Trinidad with Dulcie is Edric Connor's 1958 book. Correction- pages 68-69. I will scan the sheets to Joe, perhaps he will be kind and make a midi.

Quoted from a reminiscence of Trinidad:

"I am often asked to compare the children of yesterday with those of today. While many of yesterday's girls sang "Dulcie in the Moonlight, Dulcie in the dew, Dulcie never came home, until the clock struck two," and lamented the disposition of a fabled Dulcie, there are all too many real Dulcie's today, not merely in Trinidad and Tobago but the world over, who are the dispair of their parents."

"Memories of My Childhood," George Allyene.
Printed in Trinidad & Tobago's Newsday, December 26, 2007.
He mentions games, but refers to "Dulcie in the Moonlight" as a hauntingly sad song, not a dance or game.

Perhaps the dance-game is later than the song. I can find no further information.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GO 'WAY, JESTINA (Trinidad)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 May 11 - 08:43 PM

GO 'WAY, JESTINA
Trinidad

Go 'way, Jestina, who go marry to you?
Go 'way. Jestina, who go marry to you?
Go 'way, Jestina, who go marry to you?
Look yo' face like a whale, like yo' jus' come from jail.

Where you been so long, me Jestina, where you been so long?-
Where you been so long, me Jestina, where you been so long?-
Where you been so long, Jestina, where you been so long?-
Ev'rybody lookin' fo' you, you run away from de town.-

Go 'way, Jestina, who go marry to you?-
Go 'way, Jestina, who go marry to you?-
Go 'way, Jestina, who go marry to you?-
Look yo' face like a whale, like yo' jus' come from jail.

Jestina, Jestina, Jestina, where you been so long?-
Jestina, Jestina, Jestina, where you been so long?-
Jestina, Jestina, Jestina, where you been so long?-
Ev'rybody lookin' fo' you, you run away from de town.

Go 'way, Jestina, etc.

With musical score, notated for voice, guitar, drums and base, pp. 26-27.
Edric Connor, 1958, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press.

Belize also? See album "Shine Eye Gal: Brukdon from Belize" 1994. Also has Sly Mongoose. Recorded between 1978-1985.


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Subject: Lyr Add: We Are Goin' Home (Trinidad spiritual)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Jun 11 - 01:04 PM

WE ARE GOIN' HOME
Trinidad spiritual, also known in Jamaica

We are goin' home, we are goin' home,
We are trav'lin' to de grave.

Holy Michael, Holy Michael,
He's a-leadin' all de way.

Den to de Cross I'll turn my eyes,
Do, Lord, remember me.

Holy Moses, holy Moses,
He's a-leadin' all de way.

Goin' home, we are goin' home,
we are trav'lin' to de grave.
'Cos we are goin' home, etc.

Holy Moses, holy Moses,
He's a-leadin' all de way'
(humming)

We are goin' home, we are goin' home,
We are trav'lin' to de grave.

With musical score, arranged for voices, guitar, drum and bass. Pp. 6-7.
Edric Connor, 1958, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press.

The theme is similar to that of U.S. spirituals, but may have been independently composed.


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Subject: Lyr Add: Bam Bye, Me Lawd (Trinidad, spiritual)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 01:53 PM

BAM BYE, ME LAWD

Chorus:
*Bam bye, bam bye, me Lawd, (4x)

1
Sister, come go to glory wid me,
Bam bye, bam bye, me Lawd.
Sister, come go to glory wid me,
Bam bye, bam bye, me Lawd.
Bam bye, bam bye, me Lawd.

2
Mother, come go to glory wid me, Bam bye, etc.

3
I want to walk and talk wid Jesus, etc.

4
Brother, come go to glory wid me, etc.

5
Come see how de heavens openin', etc.

6
Come see how dem Angels marchin', etc.

7
Come hear dem trumpets soundin', etc.

8
Come go to glory wid me, etc.

9
Come hear how de organ playin', etc.

10
Sinner, come go to glory wid me, etc.

11
Hear how dem Angels shoutin', etc.

12
Mother, come go to Eden wid me, etc.

13
Come go to Canaan wid me, etc.

14
Teacher, come go to glory wid me, etc.

*Bam bye- bye and bye.


With muscial score, arr. for voice, guitar, drum and bass by Gareth Walters. Pp. 14-15.
Edric Connor, 1958, Songs of Trinidad, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Jun 11 - 01:21 PM

Lyr. Add: PAPA DIDN'T KNOW

From Port-of-Spain to Lenegan,
One night they row'd without a man,
From Port-of-Spain to Lenegan.

Refrain:-
Mokey, monkey on a tree,
Oh, yah, me.
Better shut your eyes on what you see.
Monkey, monkey on a tree,
Oh, yay,me.
Never say a word of what you heard "Cause
They row'd away to Lenegan.

Chorus:-
Papa didn't know, Mama didn't know.
They row'd away to Lenegan.
Papa didn't know, Mama didn't know,
Papa didn't know, Mama didn't know,
They row'd away to Lenegan.

2
Passing among them all the while
Oh, for the kisses and the smiles,
Flying among them all the while.
(repeat last two lines)

3
Quickly they came to Port-of-Spain.
And when the moon began to wane,
Quickly they came to Port-of-Spain.
(repeat last two lines)

Lenegan is a small island six miles from Port-of-Spain.
The 'monkey', a Calypsonian, 'saw' them and he "sing on them."

Edric Connor, 1958, Songs from Trinidad, pp. 28-28. Arr. for voiced, guitar, drums and bass by Gareth Walters. Oxford University Press.

Originally copyright and printed by Boosey & Hawkes Ltd., used by permission.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Jun 11 - 04:36 PM

Lyr. Add: CONGO BARA

Chorus:-
Prisoner leve',-
mette lumiere bai
Congo Bara.

Solo
(Humming at first)
Congo Bara, Congo Bara,
de judge an' jury
goin' try you fo' murder.
Congo Bara, Congo Bara,-
'jour-d'ui ce la.

Chorus:-
Prisoner leve',-
mette lumiere bai
Congo Bara.

Solo
Congo Bara, Congo Bara,
de judge an' jury
done try you fo' murder.
Prisoner leve',- mette lumiere bai
Congo Bara.
(With repetitions. English and French patois. Lento doloroso.)

"Prisoner get up. Put a light for Congo Bara."

Musical score, Arr. for voices, guitar, drum and bass by Gareth Walters, pp. 32-33.

"After Canboulay was abolished, it was quite common to see clashes between individual "stick-men" (i. e., men versed in quarterstaff) and the police. This was during the period of confused uncertainty.
Congo Bara found himself in prison after one such altercation with the police. It is said in those days such prisoners would be "dosed," i. e., given harsh purgatives to weaken them. While this treatment was most illegal, it was a means of protection for the warders. Apparently Congo Bara was overdosed, and he died. This treatment was sung when other prisoners heard the news on the night of his death."

Edric Connor, Coll., 1958, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Jun 11 - 04:42 PM

Severe riots following the abolishment of Canboulay occurred in Trinidad Tobago in 1881 and 1884. These are still commemorated today


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Jun 11 - 07:48 PM

Lyr. Add: ONE, TWO, THREE

Solo
One, two, three,
Oh, de young girls so deceivin',
One, two, three,
Oh, de young girls so deceivin',
Den, look-oo wha' yo' do to me, Ti Venus,
Look-oo wha' yo' do to me, Ti Venus, oi.

Chorus:- (ad lib.)
One, two, three,
Oh, de young girls so deceivin',
One, two, three,
Oh, de young girls so deceivin',
Den look-oo wha' yo' do to me, Ti Venus,
Look-oo wha' yo' do to me, Ti Venus, oi.

Two, three, four,
Oh, de young girls so deceivin',
Two, three, four, etc.

Chorus:-
Two, three, four, etc.

Three, four, five,
Oh, de young girls so deceivin',
Three, four, five,
Oh, the young girls so deceivin',
Den, look-oo wha' yo' do to me, Ti Venus,
Look-oo wha' yo do to me, Ti Venus, oi.

Bam-bam-bam ba-ba-bam bam-bam - bam
ba-ba-bam bam-bam-bam ba-ba-bam bam-bam - bam ba-ba-bam

Four, five, six, etc.

Five, six, seven, etc.

Six, seven, eight, etc.

Counting song, sometimes used as a work song when shelling large quantities of dried peas.
[Mind-numbing!]
Musical score,
Arr. for voices, guitar, drum and bass by Gareth Walter.

Edric Connor, 1958, Coll., Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Jun 11 - 04:10 PM

Lyr. Add: RUN, JOE
Words and music by Dr. George Merrick,
Joe Willoughby and Louis Jordan.

Moe and Joe had a candy store,
Telling fortunes behind the door.
Cop grab Moe and as Joe ran out,
Brother Moe then began to shout:

Chorus:-
Run Joe
Man at the door,
Run Joe
De man won't let me go
Run Joe
Run as fast as you can
Run Joe
Police holding my hand.

2
Ask Juanita to stand me bail;
I don't want too sleep in de jail.
Hide de crystal ball by the fence;
So they won't find no evidence.
3
When you reach home, get into bed;
Call a doctor and tie your head.
Let Juanita invent a lie;
Got to have a good alibi.
4
Get a mouthpiece to talk for me;
They'll surely give me the third degree.
When they take me before the sarge;
I'm going to deny the charge.
5
When de Judge ask me how I plea,
"Not guilty, Sir!" most decidedly.
You can see Judge at a glance
I'm a victim of circumstance.
6
I'll be home by de break of day
If de Judge believe what I say.
If he don't, I'll be looking cute
Behind de bars wid me striped suit.
7
Me mama told me not long ago
To keep 'way from that worthless Joe.
If I heard what me mama say
I wouldn't be in this mess today.

"Copyright 1948 by Cherio Music Company...New York.... Used by permission."

This calypso is widely sung. Blind Blake from the Bahamas recorded the song. Joe Willoughby, one of the writers of the song, was born in Trinidad and Dr. Walt Merrick had many connections there.

Pp. 176-177, musical score with chords.
Jim Morse, Coll., 1958, Folk Songs of the Caribbean, Bantam Books.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Jun 11 - 05:04 PM

Lyr. Add: WEARY TRAVELLERS
Trinidad. Spiritual.

Oh, see de weary trav'lers,
Dey gwine home to rest,
Jesus, send de bright angel,
For to guide dem home.

Oh, see de weary trav'lers,
Dey gwine home to rest,
Jesus, send de bright angel,
For to guide dem home.

Guide dem home, angel,
guide dem home,
Jesus send de bright angel,
For to guide dem home.

Dere's Moses, David and Aaron,
Dey gwine home to rest,
Jesus send de bright angel,
For to guide dem home.

Dere's Moses, David and Aaron,
Dey gwine home to rest,
Jesus, send de bright angel,
For to guide dem home.

Guide dem home, angel,
guide dem home,
Jesus send de bright angel,
For to guide dem home.

Pp. 16-17, musical score arr. for voices, guitar, drum and bass by Gareth Walters.

Edric Connor, Coll., 1958, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Jun 11 - 01:25 PM

Lyr. Add: DODO PETITE POPO
Lullaby

Dodo, petite popo.
Petite popo pas fait dodo.
Dodo, petite popo.
Petite popo pas fait dodo.
Dodo, petite popo.
Petite popo pas vieu' dodo.
(hum)
Si vou' pas dodo, petite popo.
Macko chat allez mange 'ou
(hum)

Go to sleep little babe.
Little babe does not wish to sleep.
Go to sleep little babe.
Little babe does not want to sleep.

If you do not sleep little babe
The big cat will come and eat you up.

French patois. P. 63, arr. for voices, guitar, drum and bass by Gareth Walters.
Edric Connor, 1958, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Jun 11 - 02:16 PM

Lyr. Add: AFRICAN WAR CALL
Roaring Lion, 1938

La da de da da de da da dum-a
Ah de de da da de de da de dum
La da da da de de da da da
Ah de de da de la da de da Aja ju oku ro
(Calling the god Ajaja, "Saint Jonaj," who lives in the sea: "Ajaja, my friend")

Yea, aku ro sho aku ro sho
(emphatically requesting Ajaaja to mount a devotee)

Chorus- Ajaja oku ro
Lion- Yea, aku ro sho
Chorus- Ajaja oku ro
Eh ku ro sho aku ro sho
Ajaja oku ro
Sababo !
o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o !
(This call signals the mounting or posession of a dancer by a spirit or god. In this song, a call to several gods, there are several mountings)
All- Ajaja oku ro
Lion- Ku ro sho aku ro sho
Chorus- Ajaja oku ro
Sababo !
o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o!
All- Ajaja oku ro
Lion- Yea, aku ro sho aca 'bailar-oh
Chorus- Ajaja oku ro
Lion- Oku ro
Chorus- Oh-ro kuro ba' me (Oro is a god, a follower of the Ifa god of Medicine and Divination; a possible translation is that the devotee is asking the god Oro to leave but the god stops his request.)
Lion- Oku ro
Chorus- Oh-ro ku-ro ba' me
Lion- Vayase di-yeah
(good bye to the god that has possessed a devotee)
Chorus- Oh-ro ku-ro ba' me
Lion- Son abatala
(son of Abatala; e.g., the person devoted to Abatala and whom is possessed in the dance by Abatala)
Chorus- Oh-ro ku-ro ba' me
Sababo !
o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o!
Lion- Yea oku ro
Chorus- Oh-ro ku-ro ba' me
Lion- Emanja
(or Yemanja, Saint Anne, Oshun's sister, a river goddess)
Chorus- Oh-ro ku-ro ba me
Lion- 'Batala
Chorus- oh-ro ku-ro ba me
Lion- Ajaja
Chorus- Oh-ro ku-ro ba me
Sababa !
o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o!
Lion- Oh ku-ro
Chorus- oh-ro ku-ro ba me
Sababo !
Lion- Vayese di-yeah
Chorus- Oh-ro ku-ro ba me
Lion- Yea a new-war-e [?]
Chorus- Oh-ro ku-ro ba me
Lion- Son Ah-p[v]a-lo-pa
Chorus- oh-ro ku-ro ba me
Lion- Son ah-gu-ro
(The person mounted by Ahguro dancers)
Chorus- Oh-ro ko-ro ba me
Sababo !
o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o!
Lion- Eh! A gu ro
All- Oh-ro ku-ro ba me
(Drums)
Lion- Eh! A gu ro
Chorus- Oh-ro ku-ro ba me.
Lion's version of a Shango song that calls forth several gods who in turn mount, or possess individual dancers.

Atila the Hun, the scholar-politician-calypsonian of this era, called the part of the song sung to the god Ajaja the "first calypso."

From insert, Calypso Calaloo, Early Carnival Music in Trinidad.
Reference to this era- Donald R. Hill, 1993, Calypso Calaloo: Early Carnival Music in Trinidad.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Jun 11 - 04:36 PM

Lyr. Add: UGLY WOMAN
Composed by Roaring Lion, 1934

Now if you want to be happy living a king's life,
Never make a pretty woman your wife,
You want to be happy living a king's life,
Never make a pretty woman yout wife,
All you gotta do is just what I say,
Then you will be jolly, happy and gay-
So from a logical point of view,
You better love a woman uglier than you.

Well, a pretty woman make her husband look small,
And very often cause his downfall,
As soon as she marry, there and then she start,
To do the things that would ache his heart,
And when you think that she's belonging to you,
Boys, she's calling somebody else *"doodoo."
So from a logical point of view,
You better love a woman uglier than you.

But if you make an ugly woman your wife,
You can be sure you'll be happy in all your life,
For she will never do things in a funny way,
To allow the neighbors to have anything to say,
And she wouldn't disregard her husband at all,
By exhibiting herself to Peter and Paul-
So from a logical point of view,
You better love a woman uglier than you.

Now an ugly woman give you your meals on time,
And she always try to make you happy in mind,
At nights when you lay down in your cozy bed,
She will coax, caress you and *scratch your head,
And she'll begin to love you like a little baby,
And call you sweet names like "Sugar Daddy."
So from a logical point of view,
You better love a woman uglier than you, heh !

Version sung by Duke of Iron.
*darling. *sexual intercourse (double meaning).
The leaflet notes say that this song is old, originally in Trinidad patois, but English, taught in the schools, has taken over.

From album Calypso at Midnight, the Midnight Special Concert, December, 1946, at Town Hall New York; organized by Alan Lomax.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Jun 11 - 05:23 PM

Lyr. Add: HAPPY LAND OF CANAAN
Spiritual (Baptist)

Chorus:-
Happy Land of Canaan.

Come le' we go to the happy land,
I said, come le' we go to the happy land,
Ah, riddip (trumping), come le' we go to the happy land,
Hep-riddip (trumping)
I say le' we go to the happy land,
Huskiridi (trumping),
Hep-riddip (trumping).

Milk and honey in the happy land,
Yea, you put on your shoes in the happy land,
Ah, plenty honey in the happy land,
Heh, Lord, in the happy land,
Yea, you get so happy in the happy land,
Yea, Lord in the happy land,
Oh, milk and honey in the happy land,
Yea, milk and honey in the happy land.

Sung by Lord Invader and Duke of Iron, with chorus and drums.
Album Calypso at Midnight; Midnight Special Concert, December, 1946, Town Hall, New York.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Azizi
Date: 16 Jun 11 - 05:36 PM

The Trinidadian song posted above that was given the title "African War Call" appears to me to be a mix of folk etymology forms of Yoruba/Benin names for orisas (orishas), some English, some Spanish, and probably some onomatopoeic words.

I believe that at least one example of Spanish in that song is "bailar" meaning "to dance."

It also seems to me that the name "African War Call" was given to this song for public relations purposes as the song doesn't seem to have anything to do with war. It's worth noting that the Yoruba (Nigeria) orisha of iron and therefore also of war is "Ogun". And I'm not sure that "Ogun" is even mentioned in that "African War Call".

There is an orisha named "Aja",but I'm not sure if the word "Ajaja" mentioned in that song is that orisha or if "Ajaja" is a praise name for the Supreme Deity or a praise name for an orisha (god) that come from that Deity.

Be that as it may, some here may be interested in knowing that the eminent Yoruba percussionist Olantunji performed a song with the title "Ajaja". A video of that song can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51O2ymTtsR8


Here's some information about the Yoruba (Nigeria/Benin)religion from
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orisha
"An Orisha (also spelled Orisa or Orixa) is a spirit or deity that reflects one of the manifestations of Olodumare (God) in the Yoruba spiritual or religious system. (Olodumare is also known by various other names including Olorun, Eledumare, Eleda and Olofin-Orun)."

-snip-

To be clear, Olodumare (Olorun) is the Supreme God. The other names given are gods with a small "g".

That Wikipedia page and other sites provide the following information about the orishas that are mentioned in that song
Obatala
Obatala (Obatalá, Oxalá, Orixalá, Orisainlá) - arch-divinity, father of humankind, divinity of light, spiritual purity, and moral uprightness

Yemanja
"Iemanja (Yemaja, Imanja, Yemayá, Jemanja, Yemalla, Yemana, Yemanja, Yemaya, Yemayah, Yemoja, Ymoja, Nanã, La Sirène, LaSiren, Mami Wata) - divine mother, divinity of the sea and loving mother of mankind, daughter of Obatala and wife of Aganju."

-snip-

Sango (in the USA, usually spelled as it is pronounced "Shango")
"Shango (Shangó, Xango, Changó, Chango, Nago Shango) - warrior deity ; divinity of thunder, fire, sky father, represents male power and sexuality"

-snip-
[To clarify, "Shango: is the orisa of male sexuality not female. And the references to "sky father" that I've read are usually "Obatala" and "Olodumare/Olorun")

Osun (also spelled as and pronounced "Oshun"
"Oshun (Oshún, Ọṣun, Oxum, Ochun, Osun, Oschun) - divinity of rivers, love, feminine beauty, fertility, and art, also one of Shango's lovers and beloved of Ogoun"

-snip-

[Note "Ogoun" is usually given in the USA as "Ogun".

Orunmila (also "Orun" and "Oro")*
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orunmila
"In the Yoruba religion, Orunmila is the Yoruba Grand Priest and custodian of Ifá. This source of knowledge is believed to have a good understanding of the human form and of purity, praised as being a times more effective than remedies; his followers and priests are known as Babalawo."

-snip-

* I believe "Orun" (Orunmila; Oro) is the "Oh-ro" that is mentioned in that song.

Olokun *
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olokun
"Olokun also signifies unfathomable wisdom. That is, the instinct that there is something worth knowing, perhaps more than can ever be learned, especially the spiritual sciences that most people spend a lifetime pondering. It also governs material wealth, psychic abilities, dreaming, meditation, mental health and water-based healing. Olokun is one of many Orisa known to help women that desire children. It is also worshipped by those that seek political and social ascension, which is why heads of state, royalty, entrepreneurs and socialites often turn to Olokun to not only protect their reputations, but propel them further among the ranks of their peers.

Its name means Owner (Olo) of Oceans (Okun)."

-snip-

*"Olokun" may be the "Oku" that is mentioned in that song.

Aja
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aja_(Yoruba_mythology)
"In Yoruba mythology, Aja is an Orisha, patron of the forest, the animals within it and herbal healers, whom she taught their art.

Among the Yoruba, aja also refer to a "wild wind". It's believed that if someone is carried away by aja, and then returns, he becomes a powerful "jujuman" (or babalawo). The journey supposedly will have a duration of between 7 days to 3 months, and the person so carried is thought to have gone to the land of the dead or heaven (Orun)."


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Jun 11 - 08:23 PM

The Trinidadian "Orisha" cannot be directly related to pure Yoruba concepts.
Elements of Catholicism and Baptist belief have been added and combined.
Gods have changed or combined characteristics, e. g., Shango has been combined with John the Baptist, and other gods are identified with other saints. Notice "St. Anne" and the "Saint Jonaj" in the song, the latter a combined concept of some kind.
Moreover, elements of Hinduism have been incorporated.

The singer of the song may have been only marginally familiar with the religion.
Most Trinidadians have been raised with Christian beliefs (or Hindu, in the case of the many East Indians).
Over 95 per cent are Christian, Hindu and Moslem. Only about 2% are Orisha or Baptist Shouter, the two that have African elements.

See James T. Houk, "Spirits, Blood and Drums, The Orisha Religion in Trinidad," Temple Univ. Press. Excerpts of this and other books on line.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Jun 11 - 09:04 PM

Big Bamboo, a famous calypso song from Trinidad, is covered in thread 10522, Lyr. Reg. Big Bamboo.
Big Bamboo


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Azizi
Date: 16 Jun 11 - 09:49 PM

I meant to mention that the line "Oh-ro ku-ro ba me" in the "African War Call" song posted above may be a folk etymology reference to the orisha "Olokon"

I posted information about the Yoruba orishas as a means of better understanding the featured Trinidadian song and as information for those who are interested in that subject apart from or including that song.

Syncretism is a core concept for the study of religion among African and other peoples in the Caribbean and the Americans.

I include this quote from Wikipedia because Wikipedia is usually one of the first places online that people visit to read about a subject and because the quote is consistent with what I have read off-line.

"As mentioned, in order to preserve their authentic ancestral and traditional beliefs, the Lukumi people had no choice but to disguise their orishas as Catholic saints. When the Roman Catholic slave owners observed Africans celebrating a Saint's Day, they were generally unaware that the slaves were actually worshiping their sacred orishas.[7] In Cuba today, the terms "saint" and "orisha" are sometimes used interchangeably.

The term Santería was originally a derisive term applied by the Spanish to mock followers' seeming overdevotion to the saints and their perceived neglect of God. It was later applied to the religion by others. This "veil" characterization of the relationship between Catholic saints and Cuban orisha, however, is somewhat undermined by the fact that the vast majority of santeros in Cuba today also consider themselves to be Catholics, have been baptized, and often require initiates to be baptized. Many hold separate rituals to honor the saints and orisha respectively, even though the disguise of Catholicism is no longer needed."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santer%C3%ADa


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Azizi
Date: 16 Jun 11 - 10:01 PM

Here's that hyperlink:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santer%C3%ADa

Here's another quote from an online page about the syncretism of African religions and Catholicism:

In hiding their animistic religion behind Catholicism, enslaved Yorubans identified Olodumare with the Christian God and hid each orisha behind one or more Catholic saints. They associated the trickster Eleugga with either St. Anthony of Padua, St. Martin de Porres, or St. Michael the Archangel. Sometimes the association was made based on a perceived "common trait" of both the saint and the orisha. So Obatala was associated with Our Lady of Mercy, because she wears white, which is Obatala's color. The thunder-spirit Chango was associated with St. Barbara, a saint commonly believed to protect people from lightning. Yemaya was associated with Our Lady of Regla (a Cuban Madonna who protects sailors), Ochun with Our Lady of Charity (possibly because charity means "love"), Babalu-aye with St. Lazarus (portrayed as a sick man on crutches) and Ogun with St. John the Baptizer (who lived in the wilderness) or with St. Peter the Apostle.

These associations were made in Cuba, so they exist only among Cubans. The Yoruba in Africa do not recognize these Catholic saints, and although Santeria's sister religions worship some of the same spirits, they tend to associate them with different saints. (For instance, the Haitian equivalent of Eleugga is called Legba, and is associated with St. Peter the Apostle.) Also, a particular saint may be associated with one spirit in one religion and a totally different one in another. "

http://home.earthlink.net/~mysticalrose/pagan9.html


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Jun 11 - 10:41 PM

Lyr. Add" DEATH, O ME LAWD
Spiritual

Chorus:-
Death, Oh, death, Oh me Lawd,
Death, Oh, death, Oh me Lawd, (humming)

When-a me body lay down in de grave,
Den-a me soul gwine shout fo' joy.
When-a me body lay down in de grave,
Den-a me soul gwine jump fo' joy.
Death, Oh, death, Oh me Lawd,
Death, Oh, death,-
Death, Oh, death, Oh me Lawd,
Den-a me soul gwine shout fo' joy.

When-a de power come down from-a glory,
Den-a me soul gwine shout fo' joy.
When de power come down from-a glory,
Den-a me soul gwine shout fo' joy.
Death, etc.

Musical score arr. for voices, guitar, drum and bass by Gareth Walters.
Edric Connor, Coll., 1958, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jun 11 - 01:15 PM

Lyr. Add: MINA
Song within folk tale.

Mina, Mina, aye Mina, Mina gal, Oh !
Mina, Mina, aye Mina, Mina gal, Oh !
Mina yo' no' see danger,
Mina yo' no see soldier,
soldier a'ready dey yah.
Fetch me dat cookoo, soldier a'ready dey yah.
A-comin', a-comin', comin', comin',
A-comin', a-comin', comin', comin',
A-comin', a-comin', comin', comin',
Mina, Mina, aye Mina, Mina gal Oh !

Repeat number of times as required, but always more and more accelerando.

Chorus:- Repeat four bars
comin', comin', A-comin', a-comin', etc.

Sheet music for voices, guitar, drum and bass, pp. 59-61, arr. Gareth Walters.

Song from an old folk tale, Anansi story (a spider, = Brer Rabbit type stories)...
"The story of Mina takes a whole night to relate. The song... comes into the tale about midnight is the cry of a primitive sentry warning Mina and his people that "danger" was approaching. The "danger" took the form of Man-o0Wars with wings and long arms that could pluck their victims from anywhere. They also carried little men with "sticks" that belched fire.
"Cookoo" is a kind of food made from cornmeal."

Edric Connor, Coll., 1958, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jun 11 - 01:47 PM

Lyr. Add: THE STUTTERING PASTOR

Now in our town dere's a Reverend Brown,
De people's father and preacher,
Wherever he went dey were bound to tell,
Dat a stutterer was der preacher.
He had an impediment, dat preacher, wheneved he preach'd,
De congregation rose in laughter.

Reverend Brown was sent out of town,
For another parson acting,
And as a rule dere's a Sund'y school,
Where dey all like prayin' and singin'.
Dere arose a laughter when de stutterin' pastor
Spoke to de folks in dis way.

Refrain:-
Dearr, dearr, dearr, dearr br-br-br-bretheren,
A-join-join-join-join-join in de hymn an' sing
Glo-glo-glo-glo-glory hal-le-hal-lu-lal-lu-lal-lu-lal-lu-lal-lu-lal-lu-ja !
De congregation try to repeat-a,
But a singin' roarin' a-grinnin' dere teeth,
In de glo-glo-glo-glo-glo-glory hal-le-lu-ja !
Dearr, dearr, dearr, dearr br-br-br-bretheren,
A-join-join-join-join-join in de hymn and sing
Glo-glo-glo-glo-glory ha-le-hal-lu-lal-lu-lal-lu-lal-lu-lal-lu-lal-
lu-ja !
De congregation try to repeat-a,
But a singin' roarin' a-grinnin' dere teeth,
In de glo-glo-glo-glo-glo-glory hal-le-lu-ja !

Sheet music pp. 30-31, arr. for voices, guitar, drum and bass by Gareth Walters.
Edric Connor, coll., 1958, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jun 11 - 02:28 PM

b>Sing Sally Oh, an early calypso, linked above.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jun 11 - 02:48 PM

Lyr. Add: SALT FISH WATER
Fisherman's work song.

Salt fish water kill me daughter,
Pam, panam, nakam, panam.
Salt fish water kill me daughter,
Pam, panam, a-nakam, panam.
Oh a-heave and a-ho, look'e kill me daughter,
Pan, panam, a-nakam, panam.
Oh salt fish water kill me daughter,
Pam, panam, a-nakam, panam.
De gal run home an' she swallow de water,
Pam, panam, nakam, panam,
Salt fish water kill me daughter,
Pam, panam, nakam, panam,
Oh a-heave and a-ho, look'e kill me daughter,
Pam, panam, nakam, panam.
Salt fish water kill Annie daughter,
Pam, panam, a-nakam, panam.

Chorus:-
Pam, panam, nakam, papam.
Pam, panam, a-nakam, panam.

Sometimes used for hauling timber.
Pp. 40-41, Arr. by Gareth Walters for voices, guitar, drum and bass.

Edric Connor, Coll., 1958, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford Universiy Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jun 11 - 04:29 PM

Lyr. Add: TIME FOR MAN GO HOME

Time for man go home,
Time for man go home,
It's time for man and it's time for beast,
De bird in de bush bawl kwa, kwa, kwa !
Buckra bring old iron to break a man down,
De monkey a-bush bawl kwa, kwa, kwa !
Time for man go home!
Time for man go home !

Buckra- white man.
"It is dusk but the overseer seems unwilling to "knock-off" the workers."
Words ans tune by permission of Boosey & Hawkes Ltd.

Musical score arr. for voices and guitar by Gareth Walters.
Edric Connor, Coll., 1958, Folk Songs of Trinidad, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jun 11 - 05:12 PM

Lyr. Add: HIGHLAND DEY

Mary gone a-mountain,
Get yellow plantain,
Mary gone a-mountain,
Wid she yellow plantain.

Chorus:-
Highland dey !
Highland dey !
Highland dey !

Mary gone a-mountain,
Get yellow plantain,
Mary climb up de mountain,
Find more yellow plantain.

Mary gone a-mountain,
Get yellow plantain,
Mary boil she plantain,
Up on de mountain.

Mary gone a-mountain,
Get yellow plantain,
Mary come down de mountain,
Wid she yellow plantain.

Mary gone a mountain,
Get yellow plantain,
Mary eat she plantain,
All round de mountain.

Work song used mainly for hauling timber.
Musical score arr. for voices, guitar and bass by Gareth Walters.

Edric Connor, Coll., 1958, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jun 11 - 05:30 PM

Lyr. Add: LIMBO

I want a woman to Limbo like me,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.
Limbo, Limbo, to Limbo like me,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.
I want a girl to Limbo like dis boy,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.
Limbo, Limbo, to Limbo like dis boy,
Limbo, Limbo like me.
I want a woman to Limbo like me,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.
De girl must be good to Limbo like dis boy,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.
Limbo, Limbo, to Limbo like me,
Limbo, to Limbo like me,
Limbo, Limbo, to Limbo like dis boy,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.

Sheet music, arr. for voices, guitar, drum and bass by Gareth Walters.

Limbo- to limber up, a dance.
It originally "was created out of the "middle passage," between Africa and the West Indies. On the slave ships each slave had a space of 6 feet by 1 foot 4 inches in which to live. Consequently some of them arrived in Barbados, the auction centre, deformed. Many died. The dance demonstrates the way in which they manoeuvered in the limited space. It was later used by women for testing their spouses."

Edric Connor, Coll., 1958, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Charley Noble
Date: 18 Jun 11 - 01:05 PM

Another excellent thread on these songs.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Jun 11 - 01:41 PM

I have a vague memory from when one of my sisters was dating a belizian (?)...

Society man, here in Trinidad
bamno bamno bamno bamno bamno bobabbab
(---) pushing me around
Bamno...
(...)
they jump to the beat
But when they have competition, judges will say
I am a comedian..
(...)
I want to (...) ahd nave them juping
Just jumping
No fooling

and so on... please fill in for me!

Apparently they "jump" when dancing which involves rubbing your pubuc areas together and then later you shake all the loose hairs out of your pants... this is what I hear, anyway...


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Jun 11 - 01:42 PM

And if I tell you Jump
Keep jumpiong up
And if I catch you jumpijg up slow
I'll bust your tooth (you too?)...
i want to get those girls and have them jumping
just jumping...

More will come to me in my sleep tonight, I'm sure!


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Jun 11 - 04:25 PM

Lyr. Add: WIND'ARD CAR'LINE
Reel Dance

Wind'ard Car'line, come down, oh,
Come down, gal, come down, oh.
Wind'ard Car'line, come down, oh,
Come jump on Nine-toe Astor.

You bring any money? No, sir.
You bring any money? No, sir.
You bring any money? No, doctor.
Are jumbie way mek me poorly.

"During the reel dance, the ancestral spirit of Ma Caroline from Windward, Tobago, is invited to come and take possession of the medium, Nine-toe Astor, and to pass on messages and advice. A sick person, having no money, has turned to the ancestors for a cure.".

With musical score, No. 95.
A. L. Lloyd and I. Aretz de Ramón y Rivera, 1965, Folk Songs of the Americas, Novello and Co. Ltd., London.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Jun 11 - 04:38 PM

Lyr. Add: LEGGO ME HAN'
(Kalinda)

1
Leggo me han',
Lemme fight fo' me country, man.
Why, oh !
Leggo me han',
Lemme make a lash in dis lan'.
Why, oh !
2
Leggo mr han',
Lemme fight fo' me country, man,
Why, oh !
My mother will cry
When she hear how she sweet man die.
Why, oh !
3
Leggo me han',
Lemme fight fo' me country, man,
Why, oh !
Arima tonight,
Sangre Grande tomorrow night,
Why, oh !

With musical score, no. 97.
A. L. Lloyd and I. Aretz de Ramón y Rivera, 1965, Folk Songs of the Americas, Novello & Co. Ltd., London.

"Just before Carnival, the Kalinda *stick-fighting bands roamed the country-side, engaging nightly with other bands, to win fame for themselves."
*Quarterstaff.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 22 Jun 11 - 07:27 PM

"Marian, Marianne, Mary Anne"
Thread 9916: Mary Anne


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Jun 11 - 01:58 PM

Lyr. Add: OUT DE FIRE

Inspector Powell gave de command
When he heard the fire siren alarm

Out de fire
Out de fire down dey, out de fire.
Out de fire down dey.

Ev'ry body
Out de fire down dey, out de fire
Out de fire down dey.

Oh, well me friends, I say it sad
De worst fire in La Trinidad
Oh, well me friends, I say it sad
The worst fire in La Trinidad.

Oh, Miss Mary ran down de lane
To save some her sugar cane
Oh, Miss Mary ran down de lane
To save some her sugar cane.

No one came to the aid
Of the courageous fire brigade
No one came to the aid
Of the courageous fire brigade.

It was a most arduous bout
To put de big fire out
It was a most arduous bout
To put de big fire out.

Possibly based on a fire in the 1930s. Atilla the Hun sang a popular version of this old calypso.. Some made great use of orchestral fire bells, etc. Also recorded by Lord Flea.

With musical score and chords. Pp. 178-179.
Jim Morse, Coll.,1958, Folk Songs of the Caribbean, Bantam Books.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Songs from Trinidad
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Oct 11 - 04:51 PM

Since the music of Trinidadian Carnival is considered in this book, it is very briefly reviewed here, excerpted from the review by Katherine Borland in Jour. American Folklore, Fall, 2011, Vol. 124, No. 495, pp. 335-336.
G. L. Green and O. W. Scher, 2007, Trinidad Carnival: The Cultural Practice of a Transnational Festival, Univ. Indiana Press, 254 pp.

The book is a collection of essays on Trinidad festivals and festival arts. "Emphasizing the particularly forceful way in which local and global histories are intertwined in the Carubbean, the editors identify crisscrossing cultural influences operating between trinidad Carnival and the related festivals and activities that have emerged wherever large populations of Trinidadians have settled. The strength of the collection is its attention to patterns of outmigration and return, changes in the social identities of revelers, and questions of nationalism, heritage tourism, and commercialization.
These matters are discussed in the first six chapters. Skipping to chapters 7 to 9 which deal with the music, topics discussed are experimentation in the steel band repertoire, "a genre mythologized as the creative invention and expression of an industrial working class." The contribution of middle class composer and bandleader Ray Holman in promoting musical originality and re-imaging the "panman" as a complete musician.
In chapter eight, "Ray Funk and Donald Hill trace the meteoric rise and rapid fall of the calypso music fad in 1950s United States, due in large part to ..... Harry Belafonte."

"Despite a variety of marketing attempts, this most carnivalesque island music had limited appeal outside the West Indian context." Chapter nine (Robin Ballinger) "considers intellectual property legislation as it affects the circulation of Trinidadian music." ..... "Enforcement criminalizes producers and consumers operaing in the informal economy, who view carnival music as their collective property."

I wonder if this enforcement has caused the almost complete disapppearance of carnival music heard outside of the West Indies.


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