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ADD: jamaican folk music

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GUEST,bdermody 06 Nov 01 - 02:29 PM
Sorcha 06 Nov 01 - 02:33 PM
Sorcha 06 Nov 01 - 02:38 PM
GUEST,katlaughing 06 Nov 01 - 06:30 PM
MorwenEdhelwen1 08 Jun 11 - 06:17 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Jun 11 - 12:34 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Jun 11 - 01:20 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Jun 11 - 02:26 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Jun 11 - 08:22 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Jun 11 - 08:47 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Jun 11 - 08:50 PM
Nigel Parsons 09 Jun 11 - 08:51 AM
Nigel Parsons 09 Jun 11 - 08:53 AM
Nigel Parsons 09 Jun 11 - 09:40 AM
Nigel Parsons 09 Jun 11 - 10:09 AM
Nigel Parsons 09 Jun 11 - 11:19 AM
Nigel Parsons 09 Jun 11 - 11:50 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Jun 11 - 05:18 PM
meself 09 Jun 11 - 11:15 PM
Nigel Parsons 10 Jun 11 - 03:38 AM
Nigel Parsons 10 Jun 11 - 04:13 AM
Nigel Parsons 10 Jun 11 - 05:38 AM
Nigel Parsons 10 Jun 11 - 07:56 AM
Nigel Parsons 10 Jun 11 - 08:59 AM
Nigel Parsons 10 Jun 11 - 09:46 AM
MorwenEdhelwen1 11 Jun 11 - 08:08 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Jun 11 - 01:49 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Jun 11 - 02:00 PM
MorwenEdhelwen1 11 Jun 11 - 06:08 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Jun 11 - 06:31 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Jun 11 - 07:57 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Jun 11 - 08:16 PM
Nigel Parsons 12 Jun 11 - 03:09 PM
Nigel Parsons 12 Jun 11 - 08:17 PM
Nigel Parsons 12 Jun 11 - 08:19 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Jun 11 - 05:08 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 19 Jun 11 - 01:44 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 19 Jun 11 - 07:54 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 19 Jun 11 - 08:26 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Jun 11 - 02:41 PM
MorwenEdhelwen1 24 Jun 11 - 07:04 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 25 Jun 11 - 02:06 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 25 Jun 11 - 03:55 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 25 Jun 11 - 04:21 PM
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MorwenEdhelwen1 25 Jun 11 - 08:36 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 26 Jun 11 - 05:36 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 26 Jun 11 - 07:58 PM
MorwenEdhelwen1 27 Jun 11 - 06:27 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 27 Jun 11 - 07:40 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Jun 11 - 03:25 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 Jul 11 - 01:19 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 Jul 11 - 01:46 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 Jul 11 - 08:59 PM
MorwenEdhelwen1 05 Jul 11 - 06:31 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Jul 11 - 08:26 PM
MorwenEdhelwen1 10 Jul 11 - 12:14 AM
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MorwenEdhelwen1 12 Jul 11 - 04:06 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Jul 11 - 07:31 PM
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Subject: jamaican folk music
From: GUEST,bdermody
Date: 06 Nov 01 - 02:29 PM

I need lyrics and if possible, artists, for jamaican folk songs. Whether they be in English or the "Patois" (better known in jamaica as real english


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: jamaican folk music
From: Sorcha
Date: 06 Nov 01 - 02:33 PM

Hi! If you will type Jamaican in the white search box called Digitrad and Forum Search you will get 4 songs and several discussion links to click on.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: jamaican folk music
From: Sorcha
Date: 06 Nov 01 - 02:38 PM

I don't know if this site will help at all. It might just be modern stuff. I don't know Jamaican, so I can't tell.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: jamaican folk music
From: GUEST,katlaughing
Date: 06 Nov 01 - 06:30 PM

There are some with sound clips HERE


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: jamaican folk music
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 08 Jun 11 - 06:17 AM

Hello, bdermody! I'm Australian with an interest in Jamaican folk music :) what Sorcha said. For lyrics, Just type "Jamaican" in the search filter or "Search the DigiTrad" box, or type the title of a song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Jun 11 - 12:34 PM

Nigel, could you post "Brown Gal in de Ring" and maybe others? It would be much appreciated.


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Subject: Lyr Add: Walking Roun' de Valley (Jamaica, game)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Jun 11 - 01:20 PM

Lyr. Add: Walking Roun' de Valley
Jamaica, game song

Go walkin' roun' de valley,
Go walkin' roun' de valley,
Go walkin' roud' de valley,
An' follow in de depths so sweet.

Go face an' front yo' lover
Go face an' front yo' lover
Go face an' front yo' lover
An follow in de depths so sweet.

An' now we are married (3x)
An follow in de depths so sweet.

Go wheel around yo' lover (3x)
An follow in de depths so sweet.

The players form a ring. "One player on the outside of the ring walks about the circle, enters and chooses a partner. He then dances with her, according to the words of the song. The one selected goes outside the ring, and the game continues in this pattern."

With musical score, pp. 116-117.
Jim Morse, Coll., 1958, Folk Songs of the Caribbean, Bantam Books, New York.


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Subject: Lyr Add: Teacher Lick de Gal (Jamaica)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Jun 11 - 02:26 PM

Lyr. Add: Teacher Lick de Gal
Jamaican folk song

One shif' me got,-
Ratta cut i',
Same place i' cut,-
Muma patch i',
Same place i' patch,-
Fyah bun i'
Teacher lick de gal,
I' tun right ovah.
Teacher lick de gal
I' tun right ovah.

Hole him roun' him waia'
Madda Tracy,
Hole him roun' him wais'
Madda tracy,
Hole him roun' him waia'
Madda Tracy,
Teacher lich de gal
I' tun right ovah.
Teacher lick de gal
I' tun right ovah.
Teacher lick de gal
I' tun right ovah.

Wen de gal muma
Hole him fe beat him,
Wen de gal muma
Hole him fe beat him,
Wen de gal muma
Hole him fe beat him,
Fine two an' sixpence
Tie pon him nabel
Fine two an' sixpence
Tie pon him nabel
Fine two an' sixpence
Tie pon him nabel.

Tan tan tan
Mek me tell yuh,
Tan tan tan
Mek me tell yuh,
Tan tan tan
Mek me tell yuh,
Bitta Cassava
Kill Joe Brownie
Bitta Cassava
Renkin poison.
Bita Cassava
Renkin poison.

With musical score.
Tom Murray, edit. and arr. by, 1952, Folk Songs of Jamaica, Oxford Press.
Copied in Jim Morse, 1958, Coll., Folk Songs of the Caribbean, Bantam Books New York, used by permission. Pp. 110-111.

Recorded by Edric Connor, 1958, "Songs from Jamaica."


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Subject: Lyr Add: Rookoombine (Jamaican folk)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Jun 11 - 08:22 PM

Lyr. Add: Rookoombine
Jamaican folk song

Train top a bridge jus-a run like a breeze
An' a gal underneat' it a wash her chemise
Oh *Rookoombine eena *Santa Fe,
Rookoombine eena Santa Fe,
Oh, rookoombine.

Went Kingston town
Just to have me look around'
But instead look aroun'
Oh, me spent every poun'.

Went yesterday
Just to buy conga drum
But instead of de drum,
Look, me drink up de rum.

*Rookoombine, rookumbine- recombine, join together, sex.
*Santa Fe- a town in Jamaica.
Musical score and chords.

First verse from Folk Songs of Jamaica, edit. Tom Murray, 1952, Oxford University Press.
Verses 2, 3, by Jim Morse, edit., Folk Songs of the Caribbean, 1958, Bantam Books.


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Subject: ADD: Rukumbine (Jamaican folk)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Jun 11 - 08:47 PM

RUKUMBINE
Shenley Duffus version

*Good morning Mother Cuba
'Ow do you do?
Me 'ear seh you buy one brand new shoes
Me 'ear seh you buy one brand new hat
Mother Cuba tell me how much you pay for that hat?

Then a Rukumbine in a me san tom pee (in a mem te sem fe)
Rukumbine
I seh Rukumbine in a me san tom pee
Rukumbine.

Me seh the higher the hill
The greener the grass
The younger the gal
The sweeter the ass

Then a Rukumbine in a me san tom pee
Rukumbine
I seh Rukumbine in a me san tom pee
Rukumbine.

*Ooman a man a Kuba

*I said, engine a run
With fire and coal
Look 'pon the gal
With the big nose hole

Then a rukumbine etc.

*Girl in a tree
Pick her ackee
Boy underneath
A wask in khaki pants (cocky?)

Then a Rukumbine etc.

Probably garbled.
http://snwmf.com/phorum/read.php?1,247884,247884
(combined with words from site below for 'clarity'.

*I said a girl in a tree
A big uraki
right underneath her
Washing khaki pants.

*Engine a run
with fire and pull
look 'pon the girl
with the big bloosoo.

*Verses at http://ill-function.livejournal.com/69000.html


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Rookoombine (Jamaican folk)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Jun 11 - 08:50 PM

Rookoombine sung by Edric Connor, 1952, Songs from Jamaica

This may have started out as a children's song, but rewritten by mento singers.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: jamaican folk music
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 08:51 AM

Q:
Coming up as requested.
I'd already started typing these up when your message appeared, but looking at the source, several are almost schoolyard rhymes, and will benefit from tunes. So I've finally got around to giving myself a quick ABC tutorial.

Cheers
Nigel


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Subject: LYR ADD: On My Way To Heaven
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 08:53 AM

ON MY WAY TO HEAVEN
Jamaican: trad

One, two, three, four, five six, seven
I am on my way to heaven
By the grace of God in me,
Nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three.


According to the notes accompanying this song:
"This song is sung by Revival Groups in Jamaica and should be taken at a slow and dignified pace."



From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

ABC Notation:

X: 1
T: On My Way
M: 4/4
L: 1/4
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 09/06/2011
K: G
GDGD | GAB2 | cABG | FGA2 |
Bcdd | cBA2 | BGEA | GFG2 |


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Subject: Lyr Add: Brown Gal In De Ring
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 09:40 AM

BROWN GAL IN DE RING
Jamaican: trad

Dere's a brown gal in de ring, tra la la la la
Dere's a brown gal in de ring, tra la la la la
Dere's a brown gal in de ring, tra la la la la
For she like sugar and I like plum

Den yu skip across de ocean, tra la la la la
Den yu skip across de ocean, tra la la la la
Den yu skip across de ocean, tra la la la la
For she like sugar and I like plum

Den yu show me yu motion, tra la la la la
Den yu show me yu motion, tra la la la la
Den yu show me yu motion, tra la la la la
For she like sugar and I like plum


The singers may be divided into two groups. One group singing the words and the second group sings "Tra la la la la".


According to the notes accompanying this song:
"One child stands in the middle of the ring. At the second verse she skips around. At the third verse she does some action which the others have to imitate. Whoever imitates it best takes a turn in the ring."

From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

X: 1
T: Brown Gal in de Ring
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
O: Jamaica
N: 3 verses shown due to second bar variations
Z: NP 09/06/2011
K: F
z6 FG | A2A2AGF2 | AGABc2FF | G2G2GFE2 | GFGAc2FG |
A2A2AGF2 | AGABc2c2 | f2c2dd2B | A2G2F4 |
z6 FG | AAAGF2F2 | AGABc2FF | G2G2GFE2 | GFGAc2FG |
A2A2AGF2 | AGABc2c2 | f2c2dd2B | A2G2F4 |
z6FG | A2AGF2F2 | AGABc2FF | G2G2GFE2 | GFGAc2FG |
A2A2AGF2 | AGABc2c2 | f2c2dd2B | A2G2F4 |


NP


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Subject: LYR ADD: Colon Man
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 10:09 AM

COLON MAN

One, two, three, four, Colon man a come.
One, two, three, four, Colon man a come.
One, two, three, four, Colon man a come,
Wid 'im brass chain a lick 'im belly, bam, bam, bam.

According to the notes accompanying this song:
"Colon is another name for Panama. Many Jamaicans who went there to help build the Panama canal were therefore called Colon Men. With the money they earned some of them were able to buy watches, and this song makes fun of the Colon Man who is showing off his watch on his return home. In some cases, however, there was no watch on the end of the chain! When his neighbours suspected this they would tease him by asking him to take it out and tell them the time.

From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5


X: 1
T: Colon Man
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 09/06/2011
K: G
B2G2D2B,2 | CEEEE2 z2 | c2A2F2E2 | DGGGG2z2 |
B2G2D2B,2 | CEEEG2FE | D2FEDDEFG2G2G2z2 |

NP


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Subject: Lyr Add: Black Bud
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 11:19 AM

BLACK BUD
Jamaican: trad


Black bud a eat Puppa corn oh,
Black bud a eat Puppa corn oh,
Come go da mountain go drive dem.
Black bud a eat Puppa corn.



According to the notes accompanying this song:
"Nurses sang this lullaby to comfort children. The black bird used to be quite common in Jamaica and made a great nuisance of itself by eating the farmers' crops.
Hunters never bothered it as they felt it was a waste of a shot. So the children of the family had the task of driving it away from Papa's (Puppa) corn."

From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

X: 1
T: Black Bud
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 09/06/2011
K: C
CEGcAB | G3E3 | CEGcAB | G3E3 |
CEGFED | C3D3 | CEGFDE | C3z3 |



NP


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Subject: Lyr Add: Biddy Biddy
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 11:50 AM

BIDDY BIDDY
Jamaican: trad

Biddy, Biddy, hol' fas' los' my gold ring,
Carry me to London come back again
Biddy, Biddy, hol' fas' master gold ring,
Carry me to London come back again


According to the notes accompanying this song:
"For this game the players stand in a ring with fists held close together. As they sing, 'Master' goes from player to player pretending to drop the ring into each one's fists.
'Jack' is watching and tries to guess where the ring really is. If he guesses right he takes that player's place and the song begins over again."

From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

X: 1
T: Biddy Biddy
M: 2/4
L: 1/16
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 09/06/2011
K: C
GGGG E2G2 | C2E2E2E2 | DDDE F2D2 | EE2E E4 |
GGGG E2G2 | C2E2E2E2 | DDDE F2D2 | CC2C C4 |


NP


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 05:18 PM

Just got Walter Jekyll, 1904, Jamaican Song and Story, and found this, obviously a variant of "Brown Gal in de Ring." :

CIX
There's a black boy in a ring,
tra la la la la,
There's a black boy in a ring,
tra la la la la
He like sugar an' I like plum.

Wheel an' take you pardner, jump shamador!
(3x)
For he like sugar and I like plum.

The boy inside the ring chooses his partner, whom he leaves there after the dance. She obtains release by choosing another partner, whom she leaves behind. So there is alternately a boy and a girl in the ring.
"Shamador" is possibly a corruption of "camerado."

With musical score, the first part of which is used in the story of Annancy and Screech-owl.

A variant of the Colon rhyme, and possibly others, are in this excellent book, reprinted by Dover.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: jamaican folk music
From: meself
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 11:15 PM

Morwen... After you've been here awhile, you may or may not develop the habit of checking the year of the posts you respond to - don't feel bad if 'bdermody' doesn't acknowledge you - he or she made his or her sole post in 2001 ... (when you were seven-years-old, I believe)!

We've all gotten tricked like that ....


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Subject: LYR ADD: Jane and Louisa
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 03:38 AM

JANE AND LOUISA
Jamaican: trad

Jane and Louisa will soon come home, soon come home, soon come home.
Jane and Louisa will soon come home
Into this beautiful garden

My dear will you 'low me to pick a rose, pick a rose, pick a rose.
My dear will you 'low me to pick a rose
Into this beautiful garden.

My dear will you 'low me to waltz with you, waltz with you, waltz with you.
My dear will you 'low me to waltz with you
Into this beautiful garden.


According to the notes accompanying this song:
"The children form a ring with two girls on the outside (Jane & Louisa). During the first verse Jane & Louisa approach, walking slowly in time to the music.
In the second verse Jane and Louisa each go in a different direction around the circle pretending to pluck a rose from each child.
In the third verse each chooses a partner and waltzes in the ring. The partners then become Jane & Louisa and the song begins again.
This song probably had its origins in English Music Hall."

From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

X: 1
T: Jane and Louisa
M: 3/4
L: 1/4
N: 3 verses shown, variation in bar 8
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 09/06/2011
K: C
cBc | dcA | G2E | G3 | F2D |
F3 | G2E | G3 | cBc | dcA |
G2c | e3 | ddd | ABc | d3 | c3 ||
cBc | dcA | G2E | G3 | F2D |
F3 | G2E | G2G | cBc | dcA |
G2c | e3 | ddd | ABc | d3 | c3 ||
cBc | dcA | G2E | G3 | F2D |
F3 | G2E | G2G | cBc | dcA |
G2c | e3 | ddd | ABc | d3 | c3 ||


NP


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Subject: Lyr Add: Clap Hands
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 04:13 AM

CLAP HANDS
Jamaican: trad

(A) Clap hands, clap hands till Mama come home. (Repeat)
(B) Mama bring cake for baby alone
(C) Baby eat all no gi' Mama none.
(A) Clap hands, clap hands till Mama come home.

(A) Clap hands, clap hands till Mama come home. (Repeat)
(B) Mama bring cake for baby alone
(C) Baby eat all no gi' Papa none.
(A) Clap hands, clap hands till Mama come home.

(A) Clap hands, clap hands till Mama come home. (Repeat)
(B) Mama bring cake for baby alone
(C) Papa get vex an' throw baby down.
(A) Clap hands, clap hands till Mama come home.


According to the notes accompanying this song:
"The children choose partners and stand in two long lines facing each other. At points marked 'clap'* they clap hand first by themselves, and then with their partners alternately.
* points marked 'clap' shown here underlined (verse 1)

The first line sings part (B), The second line sings part (C) and both lines sing part (A) together."


From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

X: 1
T: Clap Hands
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 10/06/2011
K: C
z5c | G2c G2F | EFD C2c | G2c G2F | EFD C2z |
CEG G2F | EFD C2z | CEG G2c | AAA G2c | G2c G2F | EFD C2 ||


NP


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Subject: Lyr Add: Run Moses
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 05:38 AM

RUN MOSES
Jamaican: trad

Run, Moses, run Missa Walker da come.
Run, Moses, run Missa Walker da come.
If yu buck yu right foot, buck yu left foot, try doan look back.
If yu buck yu right foot, buck yu left foot, try doan look back.
Run, Moses, run Missa Walker da come.
Run, Moses, run Missa Walker da come.




According to the notes accompanying this song:
"Moses is a slave who has run away from his Master. The song urges him on and warns him not to look back even if he stumbles (buck yu foot). The rhythm is that of the Mazurka which was widely danced in Jamaica in the old plantation days. The basic dance step for the Mazurka is one long step on the strong beat of the bar followed by two very short ones. The first beat of each bar is heavily accented. The Mazurka is still danced by traditional groups in Jamaica."



From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

X: 1
T: Run, Moses
M: 3/4
L: 1/4
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 10/06/2011
K: C
GEG | c2E/2E/2 | GAG | D3 | FDF | B2D/2D/2 | FGF | E2G/2G/2 |
E/2D/2EG | E/2D/2EG | EFE | D2F/2F/2 | D/2C/2DF | D/2C/2DF | EFE | C3 |
GEG | c2E/2E/2 | GAG | D3 | FDF | B2D/2D/2 | FED | C3 ||


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Subject: Lyr Add: Guinea War
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 07:56 AM

GUINEA WAR
Jamaican: trad

War oh, Guinea war oh, _ _ _ _
War oh, Guinea war oh, _ _ _ _
War oh, Guinea war oh, _ _ _
An' a wonda weh dem gawn Guinea war _ oh. _ _ _ _ _


According to the notes accompanying this song:
"This is a Kumina song. Kumina is a religious cult of African origin which still flourishes in some parts of Jamaica. The main drum beats a steady (semi-quaver, dotted quaver, semi-quaver, dotted quaver) rhythm (like the Scottish snap).
The dancing, which is most exciting to watch, is marked by a beautiful erect bearing, and hands, head and hips respond to the rhythm of the drums.
At first the children can drum or clap at points marked (Underscored), but later drumming or clapping can accompany the entire song."



From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

X: 1
T: Guinea War
M: 4/4
L: 1/4
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 10/06/2011
K: F
c2 AG/2A/2 | B2 E2 | z4 | B2 GF/2E/2 | F2 C2 | z4 |
c2 AG/2A/2 | B2 D2 | z2 z1G/2A/2 | B/2A/2G/2F/2 E c/2c/2 | A2 F2 | z4 |


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Subject: Lyr add: Time Get So Hard
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 08:59 AM

TIME GET SO HARD
Jamaican: trad

Time get so hard.
Hog an' all a look wuk.
Dog sidung a market gate an' laugh after Hog distress.
Lu lu bam bam bam
Lu lu bam bam bam



According to the notes accompanying this song:
"This song is taken from an Anancy story

Anancy stories in Jamaica often explain why it is that certain animals don't get on with each other. In this case it is the Dog and the Hog. Once, very long ago, when times were hard, the Hog went to work for the Rat. But the Rat gave him very little money for his work. Dog, at that time had a good job as gatekeeper at the market. One day Hog was passing the market gate feeling very sorry for himself. Dog laughed at him, and from that day on the two have never liked each other."



From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

X: 1
T: Time Get So Hard
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
N: In skipping time
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 10/06/2011
K: G
G3 G2B | d6 | G2G GFE | D6 | c2A c2A | c2d cBA | GGA B2A | G3 D2G |
E2z F2z | G2z D2G | E2z F2z | G3 z3 |

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Subject: Lyr Add: Black Bud
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 09:46 AM

WHEN I GO HOME
Jamaican: trad

When I go home I will tell my Mama,
When I go home I will tell my Mama,
When I go home I will tell my Mama,
Jamaica girl won't leave me alone.


According to the notes accompanying this song:
"Many of the British soldiers and sailors who were posted to Jamaica soon fell to the charms of the local girls. This song is still used for quadrille dancing in Jamaica."

This song may be sung as a round, with entries at the start of each of the four lines.


From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

X: 1
T: When I Go Home
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 10/06/2011
K: C
CEE EDD | DCB, C3 |
EGG GFF | FED E3 |
Gcc   cBA | AGF E2D |
CEE E2D | DCB, C3 |

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Subject: RE: ADD: Day Dah Light
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 11 Jun 11 - 08:08 AM

Day Dah Light

Chorus
Day-o, Day-o!
Day dah light and mi waan go home

1. Come missa tallyman, come tally mi banana,
Come missa tallyman, tally mi banana
(Chorus)

Six han' seven han', eight han' bunch!

2. Checka dem a check, but dem check wid caution,
Mi back dis a bruk wid pure exhaustion,
(Chorus)

3.Mi come yah fi wuk, mi no come yah fi igle,
No gi me soso bunch, mi no horse wid bridle.
(Chorus)


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Jun 11 - 01:49 PM

Source, please. There are several versions of "Day dah Light," a song of the loading wharves in Jamaica.

The earliest version on record is that of Edric Connor, 1952. Saland reprint $19.99.
In 1954, the Smithsonian released songs sung by Louise Bennett.
"Jamaican Folk Songs sung by Louise Bennett." Both are available on cd, the Bennett by "custom cd" for $16.98.
Louise Bennett Tracks
1 Linstead Market
2 Chi-Chi Bud
3 Hossana
4 Cudelia Brown
5 Day Dah Light
6 Dip Dem
7 Me Want Me Daughter
8 Under the Cocoanut Tree
9 Dry Weather Houses
10 How You Come Over
11 Hol' 'M Joe
12 Towns of Jamaica

Edric Connor tracks:
1 Day Dah Light
2 Ada
3 Las Kean Fine
4 Hill an' Gully
5 Call Dinah
6 Wata Come A Me Y'Eye
7 Riber Ben Come Dung
8 Ball Gwan Roun'
9 Mada Cantinny
10 Linstead Market
11 Sammy Dead Oh
12 Chi-Chi Bud Oh
13 Cudelia Brown
14 Hol' Yuh Han'
15 Ratta Madan-Law
16 Rookoombine
17 Nobody's Business
18 Monkey Draw Bow
19 Missa Ramgoat
20 Judy Drownded
21 Teacher Lick de Gal
22 Docta Bud
23 De Ribber Ben Come Dung
24 Matty Walla-Lef
25 Fan Me Solja Man
26 Dallas Gawn
27 Hosanna
28 Fyah Bun
29 One Solja Man

The Belafonte-Attaway version, "Day-O," could have been derived from either or both. The Bennett tracks were, I believe, originally recorded at different times.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Jun 11 - 02:00 PM

The version of "Day Dah Light" posted by Morwen is the one recorded by Edric Connor, Westminster WP-6038, and also in the collection Folk Songs of Jamaica, Tom Murray, 1952, Oxford Univ. Press; song used by permission in Jim Morse, Folk Songs of the Caribbean, 1958, Bantam Books.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 11 Jun 11 - 06:08 PM

It is also found in the Jamaican songbook I own, "Mango Time: Folk Songs of Jamaica" collected by Noel Dexter and Godfrey Taylor, published in 2007 by Ian Randle Publishers. That version omits the "Six han', seven han', eight han' bunch" line.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Jun 11 - 06:31 PM

Lyr. Add: ME LOVER GONE A COLON BAY
Jamaican folk song

Me lover gone a Colon Bay,
Colon Bay, Colon Bay,
Me lover gone a Colon Bay
With a handsome concentina.

Oh what is your intention,
intention, intention?
Oh what is your intention?
My intention is to marry you.

I will married to you,
I will married to you,
I will married to you,
I will married to you,
I will married to you,
I will married to you,
With a handsome concentina.

With musical score.
Sung with a dance in which the dancers whirl around, "the wheeling becomes a giddy business..... The dancers never seem to feel it, nor do they appear to mind the heat. They simply stream with perspiration and put their handkerchiefs round their necks to save their white collars."

Walter Jekyll, 1904, Jamaican Song and Story, CXII.

A little breathing time is given by:-

Lyr. Add: GOOD MORNING TO YOU, MOTHER

Good morning to you, mother;
Good morning to you, daughter;
What is your intention?
I want to be a teacher.
You shan't be a teacher.
I bound to be a teacher.

Jump shamador, me darling.

What is your intention?
I goin' to be a doctor.
You shan't be a doctor.
I bound to be a doctor.
You shan't be a doctor.
I will be a doctor.

Jump shamadir, me darling.

With musical score. CXII
There is no dancing here. The mother walks round inside the ring, the various members of which she addresses in turn. "You shan't" is emphasized by an uplifted arm swept vigorously downwards and a stamp of the foot. The answers go through the various professions until it is felt that there is a want of something more exciting, which is supplied by:-".....
[CXIII]
Some 80 Dancing Tunes are given in the book, many of which are joined together as they might be at an actual party.

Walter Jekyll, 1904, Jamaican Song and Story..., Publications of the Folk-Lore Society LV. Reprint by Dover.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Jun 11 - 07:57 PM

Lyr. Add: ISAAC PARK GONE A COLON

Isaac Park gone a Colon,
Isaac Park gone a Colon,
Isaac Park gone a Colon,
Colon boat a go kill them boy.

Colon bolow gone a Colon
Colon bolow gone a Colon,
Colon bolow gone a Colon,
Colon boat a go kill them boy.

With musical score, a dancing tune, CLI. Danced to the "5th Figure," 6/8 or 2/4 time.
"Colon was the port of disembarkation for labourers on the Panama Canal."
The deaths took place because of yellow fever, and the work of assassination squads who murdered any 'wooly-haired man" in the camps. "Straight-haired Coolies, that is to say East Indians, were allowed to go unharmed."
Jekyll, 1904, see above.
In 1888, the French De Lesseps company began with 20,000 laborers, most of them Afro-Caribbean. Over 22,000 died in the 1880s.
The United States took over in 1904, the year Jekyll's book was published.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Jun 11 - 08:16 PM

Compare with Banana Loading Song.

Lyr. Add: CARRY BANANA
Ring Tune

The gal over yonder carry banana,
gal oh! gal oh! carry banana.
A nine-hand banana, carry banana,
a Chiney banana, carry banana.
You find the banana? carry banana.
You tief the banana? carry banana.

With musical score, XCIII.

"The girl is supposed to be carrying a bunch of bananas on her head, and the singers are commenting on it and asking the girl questions, as they do here at a distance of half-a-mile. "Look! It is a nine-hand banana. No, a China banana. Did you find it? Did you steal it?"
"Nine-hand is a convenient market size. The China banana is a stout low kind which withstands wind.
The signal for taking a partner is given by the words "You find the banana?"

Jekyll, 1904, reference above.


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Subject: Lyr Add:Late A Come
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 12 Jun 11 - 03:09 PM

BLACK BUD
Jamaican: trad

(Leader) Late, oh late, oh (Chorus) late a come.
(Leader) Late, oh late, oh (Chorus) late a come.
(Leader) An' you look upon your dummy watch for (Chorus) late a come.
(Leader) An' you look upon your dummy watch for (Chorus) late a come.
(Second voice part)
Late, oh late, oh late a come
Late, oh late, oh late a come
Late, oh late, oh late a come
Late, oh late, oh late a come



According to the notes accompanying this song:
"This is an unusual digging song in that it is rather slow & gentle. The words suggest that it would be used at the end of the day when the workers are becoming tired.
At first the song can be divided between the Leader, who sings the main line, and the Chorus who sing 'Late a come'.
Traditionally the Leader would improvise new words and clown to keep the workers in good spirits.
At the end it can be performed with everyone singing all the lines together with the second voice part added."

From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

X: 1
T: Late A Come
M: 2/2
L: 1/8
N: Main part, Leader & Chorus
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 12/06/2011
K: D
A2dc B2cB | zA2A A2z2 | A2dc B2cB | zA2A A2DE |
FE DC B,G EC | zD2E F2DE | FE DC B,G EC | zD2DD2z2 |


X: 2
T: Late A Come
M: 2/2
L: 1/8
N: Second part (optional)
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 12/06/2011
K: D
F2F2G2G2 | zF2FF2z2 | F2F2G2G2 | zF2FF2z2 | F2F2G2G2| zF2GA2z2| F2F2G2G2 | zF2DD2z2||



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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 12 Jun 11 - 08:17 PM

LATE A COME
Jamaican: trad

(Leader) Late, oh late, oh (Chorus) late a come.
(Leader) Late, oh late, oh (Chorus) late a come.
(Leader) An' you look upon your dummy watch for (Chorus) late a come.
(Leader) An' you look upon your dummy watch for (Chorus) late a come.

(Second voice part)
Late, oh late, oh late a come
Late, oh late, oh late a come
Late, oh late, oh late a come
Late, oh late, oh late a come


According to the notes accompanying this song:
"This is an unusual digging song in that it is rather slow & gentle. The words suggest that it would be used at the end of the day when the workers are becoming tired.
At first the song can be divided between the Leader, who sings the main line, and the Chorus who sing 'Late a come'.
Traditionally the Leader would improvise new words and clown to keep the workers in good spirits.
At the end it can be performed with everyone singing all the lines together with the second voice part added."

From:
"Brown gal in de Ring"
12 Jamaican Folk-Songs
Collected & arranged for schools by OLIVE LEWIN
Oxford University Press 1974
ISBN 0 19 330544 5

X: 1
T: Late A Come
M: 2/2
L: 1/8
N: Main part, Leader & Chorus
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 12/06/2011
K: D
A2dc B2cB | zA2A A2z2 | A2dc B2cB | zA2A A2DE |
FE DC B,G EC | zD2E F2DE | FE DC B,G EC | zD2DD2z2 |


X: 2
T: Late A Come
M: 2/2
L: 1/8
N: Second part (optional)
O: Jamaica
Z: NP 12/06/2011
K: D
F2F2G2G2 | zF2FF2z2 | F2F2G2G2 | zF2FF2z2 | F2F2G2G2| zF2GA2z2| F2F2G2G2 | zF2DD2z2||



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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 12 Jun 11 - 08:19 PM

Mud Elves:
Can you please remove the comment @ 03:09.
I have up-dated with a more accurate version.

Cheers
Nigel


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Jun 11 - 05:08 PM

Lyr. Add: OH, JOHN THOMAS !
Digging song.

Oh ! John Thomas,
Oh ! John Thomas,
Oh ! John Thomas,
Oh ! John Thomas,
We all a *combolow,
John Thomas.
Me go da *'leven mile,
John Thomas,
Me see one gal me love,
John Thomas,
Me court her all de way,
John Thomas.
Me come a *Bangheson,
John Thomas,
Me buy *one quattie bread,
John Thomas,
Me part it right in two,
John Thomas,
Me give her the biggest piece,
John Thomas,
And-a warra more you want,
John Thomas?

*combolow- we are all comrades.
*'leven mile- Eleven mile, half-way point between Goatridge and Kingston.
*Bangheson- a store.
*one quattie bread = 8 ounce loaf.

LXXVII, pp. 177-178, with musical score.
Walter Jekyll, 1904 and reprints, Jamaican Song and Story, Dover.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Jun 11 - 01:44 PM

Lyr. Add: DAY OH
Frats Quintet of Jamaica, 1949

Day oh, day oh,
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Day Oh, day oh,
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Come Mr. Tallyman come tally me banana
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Come Mr. Tallyman,
Come tally me banana
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Day oh, day oh,
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Day oh, day oh,
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Me come ya fe wo'k, me no come ya fe idle,
day de light an' me wan' go home;
No gimme such a load me no horse wid bridle,
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Day oh, day oh,
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Day oh, Day oh.
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
6 han', 7 han', 8 han', bunch !!
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
6 han', 7 han', 8 han', bunch !!
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Day oh, day oh,
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Day oh, day oh,
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
De Checker dem a check an' dem check wid caution,
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
De Checker jus' a nod but dem check wid caution,
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Day oh, day oh,
Day de light an' me wan' go home;
Day oh, day oh,
Day de light an' me wan' go home.

A bunch consists of many "hands,"
each having several "fingers."

From an insert with recordings, "Jamaican Folk Songs" Selections by the Frats Quintet of Jamaica, edited by Edward Seaga, Printed by The Gleaner Co., Ltd., Kingston, Jamaica, 1949-3/58.
The Frats Quintet lp was issued several times during the 1950s.

From www.mentomusic.com.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Jun 11 - 07:54 PM

"Linstead Market," the calypso, is based on a folk tune first published by Walter Jekyll in 1907; see thread 27427 on Linstead Market for lyrics and comment.
Linstead Market


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Jun 11 - 08:26 PM

Lyr. Add: LITTLE SALLY WATER

Little Sally Water sprinkle in the saucer;
Rise, Sally, rise an' wipe your weeping eyes.
Sally turn to the East,
Sally turn to the West,
Sally turn to the very one you like the best.

On the carpet you must be happy as the grass-bird on the tree,
Rise an' stand up on your leg an' choose the one that you like the best.
Now you married I give you joy,
first a gal an' second a boy;
Seven year after, seven year to come,
give her a kiss and send her out.

"First, as giving its name to the whole, must stand:-

The boys and girls join hands and form a ring.
One- the sex is immaterial- crouches in the middle and personates Sally Water. At the words "Rise, Sally, rise," he or she slowly rises to an erect position, brushing away imaginary tears, turns first one way and then another, and chooses a partner out of the ring. Where the tempo changes, they wheel- a rapid turning dance- and after the wheeling, the partner is left inside the ring and becomes Sally Water.
Perhaps the most widely spread of all English singing games- See A. B. Gomme, Traditional games, vol. ii, p. 149." [See threads]

LXXXIX, pp. 190-191, with musical score.
Walter Jekyll, 1907, Jamaican Song and Story, Dover reprint.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Jun 11 - 02:41 PM

Lyr. Add: MATILDA

Matilda *dé 'pon dyin' bed,
Matilda dé 'pon dyin' bed,
Matilda dé: 'pon dyin' bed,
Matilda dé 'pon dyin' bed,
Me want go *Colebra,
Me want go Colebra,
Matilda dé 'pon dyin' bed.

With musical score.
A dancing tune. At the time, if someone was ill, all relatives descended on the sick person's yard.
*dé also written as deh
*Culebra, on the Panama Canal cut near Colon. Matilda must have gone there to work or settle.

Walter Jekyll, 1907, Jamaican Song and Story, Dover reprints.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DIP AN' FALL BACK
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 24 Jun 11 - 07:04 PM

DIP AN' FALL BACK
(from Mango Time: Folk Songs of Jamaica)
Musical score (melody only) - p30.

Chorus:
Dip an' fall back, dip an' fall back!
My advice, there is nothing nice like di Dip an' Fall Back.

1.
Now when the war was ova an ev'ryting was scarce,
An' man was experimentin' wid things to fill dem space,
We had a lot a food but the meat was out a stock,
So to get a blen' we recommend di Dip an' Fall Back.

(Chorus)

2.
Some people call it Dash Een, some call it Full Mi Up,
Some call it Rock-An'-Fall-Back, but mi call it Full Mi Gut.
An' how di ting so sweet an' how it mek yu fat,
Jus' buy a pot an laan fi cook di Dip an' Fall Back.

(Chorus)

3.
Yu get a shad or herring an' put it on fi steam,
Wid peppa, tumaatis, skellion until it faam a cream.
No stew beef nor mackerel, mutton, pork or sprat
Can be so sweet when yu laan fi eat di Dip an' Fall Back.

(Chorus)

4.
Yu tek di shad or herrin' an' put it dung fi soak,
Get a bone-dry coak-nat, yu don't need no poak,
Yu greater dug di coak-nat an' put it on fi bwile,
Till di custard start fi settle dung pon di coak-nut ile.

(Chorus)

5. Yu get a bwile banana an' yu eat it wid di dip,
Wid a mug a bebridge an' so yu dip, yu sip,
An' if di war should come ya an' bum begin fi drap,
A would face a tank or a long-range gun fi di Dip an' Fall Back.

(Chorus)

4. Maas John sey "Tek mi lan', tek mi mule an' tek mi dray,
Tek mi married wife an' mi t'ree sweetheart away.
Tek away mi house an' tek mi burial spot.
don't skylark or A bus yu shut fi mi Dip and Fall Back."

(Chorus)

Note: melody of the chorus is the same as the melody of "Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela."


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 25 Jun 11 - 02:06 PM

The Spinners version of "Dip and Fall Back" is on thread 101959. Date 1970s (on a 1973 disc).
Dip and Fall Back

The Mento song seems to have appeared in the 1960s; in any case, the one with a similar tune to that used in "Matilda."
It was recorded by Lord Power, The Hiltonaires (Ska version) and Lord Fly with the Mapletoft Poulle Orchestra.

The lyrics suggest a possible post WW2 date, but I can't find any recordings from the late 1940s-early 1950s.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 25 Jun 11 - 03:55 PM

Lyr. Add: LITTLE BLUE-BELL
Game song.

Outside Blue-bell, thro' de window,
Outside Blue-bell, thro' de window
Outside Blue-bell, thro' de window,
Tra la la la la.

Den you take a little girl an' pat her on de shoulder,
Take a little girl an' pat her on de shoulder,
Take a little girl and pat her on de shoulder,
Tra La la la la.

Outside Blue-bell thro' de window
Outside Blue-bell thro' de window
Inside Blue-bell thro' de window
Tra la la la la.
(Cho.)

Outside Blue-bell thro' de window
Inside Blue-bell thro' de window
Welcome Blue-bell thro' de window
Tra la la la la.
(Cho.)

You ride Blue-bell thro' de window
You poke Blue-bell in de shoulder
You poke Blue-bell in de shoulder
Tra la la la la.
(Cho.)

Jamaican version of the familiar game song.
Two players run in and out of the ring during the singing of the first stanza. They choose partners, stand beside them, bow, dip and kneel, according to the lyrics.

With musical score, pp. 112-113.
Jim Morse, Coll., 1958, Folk Songs of the Caribbean, Bantam Books.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 25 Jun 11 - 04:21 PM

Lyr. Add: HOL' YUH HAN'

(D7)Dis (G)long time gal me never (Am)see (D)you,
(D7) Come meck me hol' yuh (G)han'.

Peel(G)-head John Crow sidung 'pon tree-top
(Em)pick off de blossom (D7)
Meck me hol' yuh (G)han' gal,
(D7) Meck me hol' yuh (G)han'.

Mento(CODA)
(D7)Meck we weel an' tun till we tumble dung,
Meck me hol' yuh (G)han' gal
(D7)Meck we weel an' tun till we tumble dung,
Meck me hol' yuh (G)han' gal.

Song in a humorous vein. Song should be repeated several times- or suitable verses improvised.

Musical score with chords, pp. 114-115.
Jim Morse, Coll., 1958, Folk Songs of the Caribbean, Bantam Books.
Recorded by Edric Connor, Westminster WT-6038. "From the collection Folk Songs of Jamaica, edit. Tom Murray, 1952, Oxford Univ. Press."
Used by permission.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 25 Jun 11 - 07:48 PM

Lyr. Add: DRY WEATHER HOUSES

(Db)Dry weather houses are not (Ab7)worth a cent
And yet we have to pay so (Db)much for rent.
One (Ab7)Monday (Db)morning a landlord went,
To a (Ab7)tenant to get his rent,
But the tenant say, "Massa me no (Db)fool,
Me no pay no rent, -(Ab7)- fe no swimmin' (Db)pool."

Look at the room you rent me to live,
The whole of the roof is just like a sieve.
When rain come if I sleep too sound,
So help me king, I shure wud a' drowned.
(Cho.)

Some of the rooms they rent out, you know,
Is just like a big scorpion depot.
If you go to bed and you don't take a oath,
Middle of the night cockroach cut your throat.
(Cho.)

Some of the rooms, the way them so small,
You can't even turn inside them at all.
When you want to turn you have to go outside,
Turn your turn and go back inside.
(Cho.)

Pp. 102-103, with musical score and chords. (b) = flat.
"...Louise Bennett, who introduced the song here, is a native Jamaican and former columnist for the Kingston Daily Gleaner."

From "Jamaican Folk Songs," arranged Louise Bennett, Folkways Record 846 (See Smithsonian Folkways website for later cd).
Used by permission.
Jim Morse, Coll., 1958, Folk Songs of the Caribbean, Bantam Books.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Fan Mi Solja Man
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 25 Jun 11 - 08:36 PM

Fan Mi Solja Man
(Traditional. From "Mango Time: Folk Songs of Jamaica)
1. Sake-a coolie-man bangle,
Sake-a coolie-man bangle,
Sake a coolie-man silver bangle,
Oh, gyal yu characta gone!

(Chorus)

Fan mi solja man, fan mi,
Fan mi solja man, fan mi,
Fan mi solja man, fan mi,
Oh gyal yu characta gone!

2. Whe' di use yu a haul-up, shawl-up,
Whe' di use yu a haul-up, shawl-up,
Whe' di use yu a haul-up, shawl-up,
An' yu characta gone!

(Chorus)

3. Whe' di use yu a lace-up, stace-up,
Whe' di use yu a lace-up, stace up,
Whe' di use yu a lace-up, stace-up,
An' yu characta gone!

(Chorus)
4. Gyal wha mak yu so faas and facey,
Gyal wha mek yu so faas and facey,
Gyal wha mek yu so faas and facey,
An' yu characta gone!

(Chorus)

5. Since di baby come bawn
An' him daddy gone a Contingent,
Ev'rybody come back bawl out sey
"Gyal yu characta gone!"

This song is self-explanatory. It is about a girl who has become a "camp follower"
and lost her reputation.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 26 Jun 11 - 05:36 PM

Lyr. Add: WHEN YOU SEE DE UGLY ONE
Game song.

(E)When you see de ugly one,
(A)When you see de (E)ugly one
(B7)When you see de (E)ugly one
You (B7)cur yo' eye an' pass dem.
(E)Dis is de way my lick-a-money go
(A)Dis is de way my (E)lick-a-money go.
(B7)Dis is de way my (E)lick-a-money go.
To buy a (B7)crochet (E) needle.

Wgen you see de pretty one (3X)
You rub yo' hand, call dem
Dis is de way ma lick-a-money go (3x)
To buy a crochet needle.

When you see de funny one (3x)
You bite yo' nail, an' pass dem
Dis is de way ma lick-a-money go (3x)
To buy a crochet needle.

Many different verses to this song.
Musical score and chords, pp. 100-101.
Jim Morse, coll., 1958, Folk Songs of the Caribbean, Bantam Books.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 26 Jun 11 - 07:58 PM

Lyr. Add: BALL GAWN ROUN'
Game song

De (D)play begin an' de (A7)ball gawn (D)roun',
(D)Mawga Nanny (A7)show me how de (D)ball (A7)gawn (D)roun'.
(D)Play bwoy, Play bwoy, (A7)Play bwoy, (D)Play.
(D)Mawga Nanny (A7)show me how de (D)ball (A7)gawn (D)roun'.

(D)Kingston (A)brown gal a (G)play we deh (A)play,
(D)Jigga Nanny (A7)show me how de (D)ball (A7)gawn (D)roun,
De (D)play begin an' de (A7)ball gawn (D) roun',
(D)Mawga Nanny (A7)show me how de (D)ball (A7)gawn (D)roun'.

(D)Short an' stout gal a (G)play we deh (A)play,
(D)Jigga etc.

We pass de ball, an' de ball gawn roun'-
Jigga Nanny show me how de ball gawn roun'!
We pass de ball, an' de ball gawn roun'-
Jigga Nanny show me how de ball gawn roun' !

Musical score and chords, pp. 108-109.
"To play the game, a circle is formed by boys and girls, their hands behind their backs. Whoever is chosen to be "Jigga Nanny" (principal character) stands in the center of the ring. A ball is passed from one child to the other and "Jigga Nanny" has to discover who is holding it.
While the players are singing, they move round in a circle, side-stepping to the rhythm. When "Jigga Nanny" finds the ball, he changes places with the child who in turn becomes "Jigga Nanny."

Jim Morse, Coll., 1958, Folk Songs of the Caribbean, Bantam Books.
Used by permission. From Tom Murray, edit., 1952, Folk Songs of Jamaica, Oxford University Press.

Recorded by Edric Connor, Westminster WP-6038; Edric Connor and the Caribbeans, cd, Songs from Jamaica, SP221.


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Subject: Lyr Add:SLY MONGOOSE (from "Mango Time")
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 27 Jun 11 - 06:27 PM

SLY MONGOOSE
(from "Mango Time: Folk Songs of Jamaica" Collected by Noel Dexter and Godfrey Taylor, published by Ian Randle Publishers, Kingston, Jmaica, 2007.

Chorus:
Sly mongoose, yu name gone abroad,
Sly mongoose, yu name gone abroad.

Verse 1

Mongoose go eena Bedward kitchen,
Tek out one a 'im righteous chicken,
Put it eena 'im wescut pocket,
Sly mongoose.

(Chorus)

Verse 2

Mongoose tek up a half a brick,
Bedward tek up a piece a stick,
Mongoose say, "If yu lick, a slip."
Sly mongoose.

(Chorus)

Verse 3

Mongoose say 'im like rice and punkin,
Bedward say 'im like cornmeal dumplin'
Mongoose say, "Yu no know good something."
Sly mongoose.

(Chorus)

Verse 4

Bedward draw a six-shooter gun,
Mongoose tek up a pint a rum,
Bedward halla, "Lawd, watch di fun."
Sly mongoose.

(Chorus)

Verse 5

Mongoose go eena Palace Theatre,
Swear to king him a operator,
Wille Willie say, "Come back later".
Sly mongoose.
(Chorus)


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 27 Jun 11 - 07:40 PM

See under "Related Threads," thread 138126. Origins, Sly Mongoose.
Origins Sly Mongoose


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Jun 11 - 03:25 PM

Lyr. Add: DIS LONG TIME GAL
Mento, for dance and play.

1
Dis long time gal a nevva see you
Come mek me hol' yu han',
Dis long time gal a nevva see you
Come mek me hol' yu han'.

Chorus:-
Peel head John Crow si-dung pon tree top
pick off de blossom
Mek me hol' yu han' gal,
Mek me hol' yu han'.

2
Dis long time gal me nevva see you
Come mek we walk an' talk,
Dis long time gal me nevva see you
Come mek we walk an' talk.
3
Dis long time gal me nevva see you
Come mek we wheel an' tun,
Dis long time gal me nevva see you
Come mek we wheel an' tun.
4 (Coda)
Mek we wheel an' tun till we tumble dung
Mek me hol' yu han' gal
Mek we wheel an' tun till we tumble dung
Mek me hol' yu han' gal.

No. 60, with musical score.

Olive Lewin, Coll., 1973, Forty Songs of Jamaica, General Secretatiat of the Organization of American States, Washington, D.C.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Jul 11 - 01:19 PM

A version of "Dip Dem, Bedward," by Sam West, was posted in the thread "Origins: Sly Mongoose," 138126.

Lyr. Add: BEDWARD
Anon. folk.

An' me always go up a de Augus' Town
But me never go up a Mona.
One day I was invited
By a ole man dem call Jonah,
When me go up a Mona,
me see Bredda Bedward standin',
Im tek Sister Mary pull im han'
An' dip her in de healin' stream.

Chorus:-
Dip dem Bedward dip dem
Dip dem in de healin' stream
Dip dem sweet but not too deep
Dip dem fe cure bad feelin'.

2
Some ride jackass but dem cyan get a pass,
Fe go dip in a de healin' stream.
Some carry Jimmy John, wid dem face favah pan,
Fe go dip in a healin' stream.
3
Some come from the wes' like a perfec' pes',
Fe go dip in a de healin' stream.
Some come from eas' like a big leggo beas'
Fe go dip in a de healin' stream.
4
Some come from de north wid dem face full a wart
Fe go dip in a de healin' stream.
Some come from de south wid dem big *yabba mouth
Fe go dip in a de healin' stream.

*Yabba- Big pot, Awawak origin, for domestic use.
leggo- let go

p. 38, with musical score.
Olive Lewin, Coll., 1973, Forty Folk Songs of Jamaica, General Secretariat of the Organization of American States, Washington, D.C.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Jul 11 - 01:46 PM

Lyr. Add: COME TO SEE JANIE
Game song

I come to see Janie (3 times)
An' where is she now?
2
She's washing her clothes (3 times)
You can't see her now.
3
Goodbye (6 times)
I'll call back again.
4
I come to see Janie, etc.
5
She's hanging out her clothes (3 times)
You can't see her now.
6
Goodbye, etc.
7
I come to see Janie, etc.
8
She is ironing her clothes (3 times)
You can't see her now.
9
Goodbye, etc.
10
I come to see Janie, etc.
11
She's sick, (6 times)
You can't see her now.
12
Goodbye, etc.
13
I come to see Janie, etc.
14
She's gone to the doctor (3 times)
You can't see her now.
15
Goodbye, etc.
16
I come to see Janie, etc.
17
She's dead (6 times)
An' cannot be seen.
18
What shall we bury her in, what shall we bury her in?
What shall we bury her in? Bury her in green.
19
Green is for the lizards (3 times)
An' that will not do.
20
What shall we bury her in? (3 times)
Bury her in black.
21
Black is for the mourners, (3 times)
An' that will not do.
22
What shall we bury her in? (3 times)
Bury her in white.
23
White is for the duppies (3 times)
An' here is she now.

"Jane is hidden behind one player and six or eight other players stand some distance away. As they sing," I come to see Janie, and where is she now" they all approach walking abreast. The player behind whom Janie hides replies and they reverse to their former position, singing goodbye excepting at the last verse "White is for the duppies" when Janie comes out of hiding and chases them. The person who is caught is beaten and then becomes Janie."

p. 50, with musical score.
Olive Lewin, Coll., 1973, Forty Folk Songs of Jamaica, General Secretariat of the Organization of American States, Washington, D.C.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Jul 11 - 08:59 PM

Lyr. Add: SAILOR GIRL FROM ASIA

I'm a sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
I'm a sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
An' I saw my papa coming from far upon the sea
An' I saw my papa coming from far upon the sea.
Papa, you bring me some silver
No I bring you none
Papa you bring me some gold
No I bring you none.
I come today to see you hang
An' hang you mus' be hang.
2
Sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
Sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
An' I saw my mama coming from far upon the sea
An' I saw my mama coming from far upon the sea.
Mama you bring me some silver
No I bring you none
Me mama you bring me some gold
No I bring you none
I come today to see you hang
An' hang you mus' be hang.
3
Sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
Sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
An' I saw my brother coming from far upon the sea
An' I saw my brother coming from far upon the sea.
Me brother you bring me some silver
No I bring you none
Me brother, you bring me some gold
No I bring you none
I come today to see you hang
An' hang you mus' be hang.
4
Sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
Sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
An' I saw my sister coming from far upon the sea
An' I saw my sister coming from far upon the sea.
Me sister you bring me some silver
No I bring you none
Me sister you bring me some gold
No I bring you none
I come today to see you hang
An' hang you mus' be hang.
5
Sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
Sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
An' I saw my cousin coming from far upon the sea
An' I saw my cousin coming from far upon the sea.
Me cousin you bring me some silver
No I bring you none
Me cousin you bring me some gold
No I bring you none.
I come today to see you hang
An' hang you mus' be hang.
6
Sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
Sailor girl from Asia, a sailor girl from home
An' I see my lover coming from far upon the sea
An' I see my lover coming from far upon the sea.
Please wait until he comes
Me lover you bring me some silver
Yes I bring you some
Me lover you bring me some gold
Yes I bring you some.
I come today to see you save
An' save you mus' be save.

Similar to the English song "The maid freed from the gallows," "The golden Ball," etc. and to an Anansi story transcribed by Jekyll 1907.
The tune resembles neither the English nor American tunes.

p. 87-89, with musical score.
Olive Lewin, Coll., 1973, Forty Songs of Jamaica, General Secretariat of the OAS, Washington, D.C.


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Subject: RE: ADD: DALLAS GAWN A CUBA
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 05 Jul 11 - 06:31 AM

DALLAS GAWN A CUBA
(from "Mango Time: Folk Songs of Jamaica" Collected by Noel Dexter and Godfrey Taylor, published 2007)

DALLAS GAWN A CUBA

1. Dallas gawn a Cuba,
Dallas gawn a Cuba,
Dallas gawn a Cuba, lef Francella wan fi wanda.

(Chorus)
Maamie, wai oh! She faint 'way!
Sen' fi di docta! She faint 'way!
Run fi di camphor! She faint 'way!
Maamie, wai oh! She faint 'way!

2. Po' Miss Mary daata,
Po" Miss Mary daata,
Po' Miss Mary daata,
Po' Francella lef fi wanda.

(Chorus)

3. Johnnie roun' di corner,
Johnnie roun' di corner,
Johnnie roun' di corner,
Him naa lef yu wan fi wanda.

(Chorus)

Musical score on pg 20 of "Mango Time". This song is about a girl, Francella, whose boyfriend immigrates to Cuba.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Jul 11 - 08:26 PM

The song "Colon Man" posted in the Barbados thread, may be Jamaican, but these songs do travel.
Colon Man


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Subject: RE: ADD: Mattie Rag
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 10 Jul 11 - 12:14 AM

Mattie Rag (

1.
Mumma, mumma, dem ketch puppa,
Dem ketch 'im dung a mango walk.
If a neva run dem woulda ketch mi tu,
So mi sing sweet song an' play guitar.

(chorus)
Wai oh, Mattie rag,
Wai oh, Mattie rag.

2. Puppa go down a mango walk
Cause 'im ear wan hog a chaw a piece a rag.
Wen 'im ax 'im a chaw fa (or: who fa) rag,
'Im tell 'im sey a Mattie rag.
(Chorus)
3. Pickney hear whe yu mumma sey,
Yu betta 'tap go mango walk.
If yu neva run dem woulda ketch yu tu,
So sing sweet song an' play guitar.
(Chorus)
Source: "Mango Time: Folk Songs of Jamaica" Noel Dexter and Godfrey Taylor, Ian Randle Publishers, Jamaica, 2007.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 10 Jul 11 - 12:17 AM

(A mento song).


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 12 Jul 11 - 04:06 AM

Add: WHEEL O'MATILDA
(from "Mango Time: Folk Songs of Jamaica".Noel Dexter, Godfrey Taylor. Musical score on p122)

1. Matilda laas ar pretty likkle gol' ring,
Matilda laas ar pretty likkle gol' ring,
Matilda laas ar pretty likkle gol' ring,
Tun di waata-wheel, O Matilda.

(Chorus)
Wheel O, wheel O Matilda,
Tun di waata-wheel, O Matilda.

2. Matilda fine ar pretty likkle gol' ring,
Matilda fine ar pretty likkle gol' ring,
Matilda fine ar pretty likkle gol' ring,
Tun di waata-wheel, O Matilda.

(Chorus)

3. Matilda walk an' yanga so-so,
Matilda walk an' yanga so-so,
Matilda walk an' yanga-so-so,
Tun di waata-wheel, O Matilda.
(Chorus)


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Jul 11 - 07:31 PM

Lyr. Add: CALL DINAH

1
All de call wa me dah call
Dinah, Dinah heary but him no 'peak.
Sake a de pain a back me kean limba,
Sake a de pain a back me kean limba,
Me got five more mile fe go walk.
2
Me beg Dinah buy quatty suga,
One big gill a coconot ile,
Ha' penny pickle fish fe de brata,
Now she heary but she no answer,
Sake a de pain a back me kean limba,
Me got five more mile fe go walk.

All de call wa me da call- As much as I am calling
Sake a- On account of
Kean limba- Can't hurry
Quatty- penny halfpenny
Big gill- One quarter pint
Ile- OilFe de brata- for good measure.
pp. 10-11, with musical score.
Tom Murray, edit., 1952, Folk Songs of Jamaica, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Jul 11 - 07:56 PM

HOSANNA, HOSSANNA: Jamaican song, posted in thread 138159.

Hosanna


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 15 Jul 11 - 06:24 PM

Lyr. Add: CHI-CHI BUD OH!

Chi-Chi Bud oh !
Some a dem a halla, some a bawl.
Chi-Chi Bud oh !
Some a dem halla, some a bawl.

Some a come long,
Some a dem a halla, some a bawl.
Some a Blue-foot,
Some a dem a halla, some a bawl.

Some a Ting-ling,
Some a dem a halla, some a bawl.
Some a Laggahead, Some a dem a halla, some a bawl.
Some a Chick-man-chick,
Some a dem a halla, some a bawl.

Some a Grung-dove,
Some a dem a halla, some a bawl.

Some a Black-bud,
Some a dem a halla, some a bawl.

*Some a Long-tail,
Some a dem a halla, some a bawl.
Some a John-crow,
Some a dem a halla, some a bawl.
Some a Night-owl,
Some a dem a halla, some a bawl.
*Repeat this section for last verse.

"The line 'Some a dem a halla, some a bawl' is the Chorus. There are two different melodic lines for this chorus and they can be combined with excellent effect.
"If the song is going well, the singer will improvise, and once the rhythmic movement is established, will take liberties in varying the song."
(Two additional lines of music, showing variation, with bird's name spoken.)
"In this manner the word 'Dove' or 'Owl' etc. (a word necessarily of one syllable), is spoken and not sung; all the time the singer and chorus slightly sway or keep the pulse by some physical action.
"This is a kind of perpetual motion song, to be continued as long as the singers wish, the bars .S to ⌢. being used to begin and end the song."

Chi-Chi Bud- a company of birds
Come long- flying over

Tom Murray, edit., 1952, Folk Songs of Jamaice, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jul 11 - 08:57 PM

Lyr. Add: WHEN YOU SEE ONE PRETTY GAL

When you see one pretty gal (3x)
You tek you finger call her.
2
When you see one ugly one (3x)
You cut you eye an' pass her.
3
You wheel her roun' an' twist her roun' (3x)
For kisses go by favour.
4
Hampton girl going marry to you
Going to marry to you, going to marry to you
Hampton girl going to marry to you
For kisses go by favour.
5
Dis is the way my money go (3x)
For kisses go by favour.

A variant of the Ugly Gal previously posted.

P. 107, with musical score.
Olive Lewin, coll., 1973, Forty Folk Songs of Jamaica, General Secretariat of the OAS, Washington, D.C.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Oct 11 - 08:51 AM

can someone post the lyrics to "One solja man a.k.a wheel and tun me" please


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Oct 11 - 02:00 PM

Lyr. Add: ONE SOLJA MAN

1
One solja man come fe court me,
Me sey me no ha' nobody,
*Him gimme one shillin' an' quatty.
Me tek i' buy silk an' satin.
2
Me wash i' me starch i' me iron i',
Me pred i' pon pingwing macka,
An one ole un-conscionable John Crow
Come fling i' eena crevice an' corner.
3
No tear i' Jeremiah, no tear i',
No tear i' Jeremiah, no tear i',
No tear i' Jeremiah, no tera i',
No tear up me silk an' satin.
4
A weh yuh dah weel an' tun me,
A weh yuh dah weel an' tun me,
Yuh mussa wan' me fe go fall dung,
An' lick me belly pon tambourina.

Solja- Soldier
Ha'- Have
Quatty- Penny halfpenny
Pred- Spread
Pingwing macka- Cactus
John Crow- Jamaican scavenger bird, but here used in a derogatory sense, alluding to 'Jeremiah'.
Eena- In
Weh- Why
Mussa- Must
Fe go fall dung- To fall down
Tambourina- Tambourine

Also sung as 'One Bungo Man', Bungo meaning an African.
*May be sung as: 'Him gimme one cock-y'eye fourbit', 'fourbit' being one shilling and sixpence.

Pp. 58-59, With music for voice and piano.

Tom Murray, Ed. and arr., 1951, Folk Songs of Jamaica, Oxford University Press.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 09 Nov 11 - 07:57 PM

UNITY (from "Mango Time" on p116-117. Sheet music with melody and lyrics. Described as "A mento song concerning an exorcism in rural Jamaica")

UNITY

1. Tell dem Brown's Town gyal mi say,
Tell dem Brown's Town gyal mi say,
Tell dem Brown's Town gyal mi say
Dem tek cocoa bade Miss Matty.

Chorus
Come wi go dung a Unity,
Come wi go dung a Unity,
Come wi go dung a Unity
Fi go si Matty chase one duppy*.

2. Tell Missa Tingling write di note,
Tell Missa Tingling write di note,
Tell Missa Tingling write di note
For duppy de go run like hell tonight.

(1st Chorus)

3. Firs' of all she tie ar ed,
Secondly she put on red,
Then she start provoke di dead
Jus' watch Matty an' di duppy.

(Chorus)

4. She buy one bran' new shetpan*
An' pack it full a white rice
Shake it up, wheel roun' three time
Den open di pan mek di duppy feed.

(Chorus)

5. Matty start fi groan an' prance,
Den she drop dung eena dance,
Now di whole ting gone to France,
Jus' watch Matty ketch di duppy.

(Chorus)

6. When Matty get up off di groun'
Tek up ar foot an' start fi run,
Matty bawl, nearly bun dung* town
When di duppy chase poor Matty.

Last Chorus
Come wi go dung a Unity,
Come wi go dung a Unity,
Come wi go dung a Unity,
Fi go si duppy chase poor Matty.

*shetpan- literally "shutpan", a can with a lid
*duppy*- a ghost or spirit
*bun dung*- burn down


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Jul 12 - 09:55 AM

A Guest's query about this song on another thread sparked my interest in this song. As a result, I published a post on my cultural blog about "One Solja Man". Here's a link to that post:

http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/07/caribbean-song-one-solja-man.html Caribbean Song "One Solja Man"

That post includes a video of the song "One Solja Man". Here are my comments about that song with a hat tip to Q for his posting of those lyrics on this thread from the 1951 book by

The composer of this old Caribbean song is unknown. I believe "One Solja Man" is a Mento from Jamaica.

With regard to the words "no tear i jeremiah" found in the song "One Solja Man" song as found in that 1951 book Folk Songs of Jamaica edited by Tom Murray, Oxford University Press:

I believe "no tear i" means "don't wheel & turn me [spin me around] so fast [or "too fast"] or I might fall on the dance floor*.

A subsequent verse of that song refers to the Caribbean dance movement of "wheel and turn" and I believe that "tear" is another way of referring to that fast spinning around movement....

*I've given "tambourina" the general translation of "dance floor" instead of the specific translation of the musical instrument "tamborine".

That said, it's also my position that the "no tear I Jeremiah" lyrics are an adaptation - albeit for a different purpose and with a different meaning- of the words of Jeremiah 9, verses 1-18.   
Here are two verses from that chapter:

Jeremiah 9:1 - 1 "Oh, that my eyes were a fountain of tears; I would weep forever! I would sob day and night for all my people who have been slaughtered"

Jeremiah 9:18 - 18 "Quick! Begin your weeping! Let the tears flow from your eyes"

-snip-
Because of those verses and other verses in that book of the Bible, "Jeremiah" is now known as the "weeping prophet".

By the way, I found those verses and other verses of Jeremiah 9 to be particularly poignant in the context of the horrific massacre of movie attendees that occurred on July 20, 2012 in Aurora, Colorado.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/07/caribbean-song-one-solja-man.html President Obama's Comments "The Dark Knight Rises" Shooting Aurora Colorado (Video & Transcript) for a post on my cultural blog about that massacre.

Best wishes,

Azizi Powell


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: GUEST,Azizi
Date: 22 Jul 12 - 10:05 AM

My apologies. Here is the correct link for the pancocojams post that is related to the Dark Knight Rising massacre:

http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/07/president-obamas-comments-dark-knight.html President Obama's Comments "The Dark Knight Rises" Shooting Aurora Colorado (Video & Transcript)

Azizi Powell


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Stringsinger
Date: 22 Jul 12 - 10:36 AM

Louise Bennett is one of the leading lights of Jamaican music.
She has a lovely song called "Evenin' Time" which someone could find and post.

Mento is the Jamaican folk jazz. Banjo is a principal instrument here.

Mention must be given to Bob Marley, an important influence.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: GUEST,Azizi
Date: 22 Jul 12 - 10:52 AM

Greetings, Stringsinger!

It's good to "hear from you" again.

**

I should have written that the word "tear" in the lyrics No tear i' Jeremiah, no tera i'/ No tear up me silk an' satin" in the "One Solja Man" song appears to have the clear meaning of "Jeremiah, don't cause me to tear [cut] my silk and satin dress. But I think that word "tear" may also have had the added meaning of "tearing around [moving fast, wheeling and turning] on the dance floor.

As to how the woman in the song might cut her dress, the subsequent verse has her cautioning Jeremiah not to wheel & turn her so fast on the dance floor.


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Subject: RE: ADD: jamaican folk music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 22 Jul 12 - 02:00 PM

Some notes from mentomusic.com
"...in 1965, The Wailers recorded a classic ska track, Rude Boy for Coxsone, with lyrics that grab from mento, American soul and Jamaican folklore. It's the couplet,
Now why you come wheel and turn me
Fi go lick a mi head 'pon you tambourine
That comes directly from mento. It's from a song alternatively titled "One Solja Man", or later, "Wheel and Turn Me"."
The first known recordings of this song come from the early 1950s. One was part of "Medley of Jamaican Mento" by Lord Fly & the Dan Williams Orchestra. This 78 RPM single of urban style mento released on M.R.S. is believed to be the very first Jamaican record (on youtube, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOtt1tAFsQ).

The other recording was the folk style"One Solja Man" by Edric Conner..."Songs from Jamaica." ( a partial may be heard at mentomusic, http://www.mentomusic.com/edricConner.htm#edric).
Many covers, including "Wheel and Turn Me" by Lord Lebby and the Montego Hotel Calypso Band "from later in the 1950s."


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