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Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?

DigiTrad:
BANANA BOAT SONG
BELAMENA
CHOUCOUNE
COME BACK, LIZA
EDEN WAS JUST LIKE THIS
JAMAICA FAREWELL
TURN AROUND
YELLOW BIRD


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sandiweld@hotmail.com 12 Mar 99 - 04:53 PM
Paul Slater (inactive) 12 Mar 99 - 05:06 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 12 Mar 99 - 05:07 PM
Bob Landry 12 Mar 99 - 05:31 PM
12 Mar 99 - 05:38 PM
mountain tyme 13 Mar 99 - 03:29 AM
Penny 13 Mar 99 - 03:55 AM
MAG (inactive) 13 Mar 99 - 12:45 PM
Penny 13 Mar 99 - 01:41 PM
dick greenhaus 13 Mar 99 - 03:52 PM
Elizabeth 14 Mar 99 - 01:32 AM
Barbara 14 Mar 99 - 10:24 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 08 Apr 03 - 02:41 PM
greg stephens 08 Apr 03 - 02:47 PM
Amos 08 Apr 03 - 03:03 PM
Bernard 08 Apr 03 - 03:39 PM
Giac 08 Apr 03 - 03:43 PM
GUEST,Q 08 Apr 03 - 04:12 PM
Gene 08 Apr 03 - 04:21 PM
GUEST,Q 08 Apr 03 - 04:58 PM
SussexCarole 08 Apr 03 - 05:16 PM
GUEST,Q 08 Apr 03 - 06:10 PM
RangerSteve 09 Apr 03 - 08:53 AM
MAG 09 Apr 03 - 02:36 PM
Cool Beans 09 Apr 03 - 04:28 PM
GUEST,Q 09 Apr 03 - 04:39 PM
Stefan Wirz 10 Apr 03 - 09:36 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 10 Apr 03 - 10:56 AM
GUEST,The Sled 09 Feb 04 - 03:55 AM
Lighter 09 Feb 04 - 04:38 PM
Long Firm Freddie 09 Feb 04 - 05:29 PM
GUEST,Charlie 14 Dec 04 - 10:58 AM
Azizi 14 Dec 04 - 04:54 PM
Snuffy 14 Dec 04 - 05:11 PM
GUEST,banjammer 20 Jan 05 - 03:58 PM
GUEST 06 Sep 06 - 04:10 PM
GUEST 06 Sep 06 - 08:26 PM
GUEST 06 Sep 06 - 08:29 PM
Azizi 06 Sep 06 - 09:10 PM
KenBrock 07 Sep 06 - 11:35 AM
Azizi 07 Sep 06 - 10:05 PM
GUEST,Another Guest 06 Oct 06 - 01:15 PM
MartinRyan 15 May 09 - 11:26 AM
GUEST,TJ in San Diego 15 May 09 - 01:20 PM
GUEST,TJ in San Diego 15 May 09 - 01:50 PM
paula t 15 May 09 - 03:22 PM
Matthew Edwards 15 May 09 - 08:08 PM
GUEST,Guest 29 Sep 10 - 08:59 PM
Lighter 30 Sep 10 - 08:56 AM
McGrath of Harlow 30 Sep 10 - 03:37 PM
Gibb Sahib 30 Sep 10 - 04:29 PM
GUEST,DJ GIBS 24 Nov 10 - 03:34 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 May 11 - 01:56 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 19 Jun 11 - 01:59 PM
GUEST,Knight Samar 26 Feb 12 - 02:15 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 26 Feb 12 - 03:34 PM
Gibb Sahib 26 Feb 12 - 04:11 PM
GUEST,Dave Samuelson 01 Mar 12 - 03:05 PM
GUEST,ab..texas 15 Dec 13 - 11:19 PM
dick greenhaus 16 Dec 13 - 07:47 PM
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Subject: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: sandiweld@hotmail.com
Date: 12 Mar 99 - 04:53 PM

My dad who is in his 70's sang a song in his childhood about "hill and gully riders". I'm told it's a country and western song but I can't find a recording of it. Has anyone ever heard of this song from say, the 1930's or so? Does anyone know how I might get a recording of it? Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Paul Slater (inactive)
Date: 12 Mar 99 - 05:06 PM

Yes, there is definately such a song. Unfortunately I can only remember the first line of the chorus which was the same as your song title. Not much help but may encourage you to search further. Cheers, Paul


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 12 Mar 99 - 05:07 PM

I don't have a recording but in my old copy of "hi Ho the Rattlin Bog" by John Langstaff these are the words:

Hill and gully rider, hill and gully
Hill and gully rider, hill and gully
An' a bend down, low down, hill and gully
An' yuh better watch yuh tumble down, hill and gully

The source is given as being Jamaican. Hope this helps! Allison


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Bob Landry
Date: 12 Mar 99 - 05:31 PM

I seem to remember these words being used in a Harry Belafonte song.

Bob


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From:
Date: 12 Mar 99 - 05:38 PM

In "Day-O," Harry sang:

Hill and gully rider, hill and gully,
Hill and gully rider, hill and gully,
Day-o, day-o, daylight come and me wan' go home....

The rest of Day-o never mentioned "Hill and gully rider" again.

Maybe he borrowed the hill and gully stuff from another song (Harry did go to college in NYC, and was hip to the American traditional folk songs before concentrating on calypso and developing a Caribbean accent. I played music in the West Indies for six years and picked up a lot of calypso. West Indians love Harry, but they know he's from stateside).

Mark


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: mountain tyme
Date: 13 Mar 99 - 03:29 AM

The C & W song was done by the Light Crust Doughboys and the Sons of the Pioneers and covered by others. The name of the song escapes me right now. The words you have are the tag only. When I locate it I'll be back. It was a popular song up to the late 40s and covered in the early 50s till the demise of that style music.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Penny
Date: 13 Mar 99 - 03:55 AM

This was used in a BBC Schools broadcast some years ago. Unfortunately, a) I can't remember any more than Animaterra, b) Our school has had a major disposal of past pamphlets. I may have a copy in my loft, but haven't the time this weekend.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: MAG (inactive)
Date: 13 Mar 99 - 12:45 PM

Again, Doug Lipman uses this with kids a lot. Heavily rhythmic. simple tune. good zipper song.

Mary Ann


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Penny
Date: 13 Mar 99 - 01:41 PM

Haven't been in the loft, but the internal search engine has come up with an extra line.

Hill and gully rider, hill and gully,
Hill and gully rider, hill and gully,
And a ben' down, low down, hill and gully,
And a low down bessie down, hill and gully,
And you better mind you tumble down, hill and gully.

I think that's it.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 13 Mar 99 - 03:52 PM

Hi- It did appear in Banana Boat Song, but not in Bellafonte's version: The Tarriers recorded it at the same time, and did it as a medly of Day-O and Hill and Gully Riders, both of which were collected in the Islands and published by the Library of Congress back in the late 30s. There was a lawsuit about who had rights to what they both had stolen (borrowed, liberated, whatever); I don't recall who won.


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Subject: ADD: Hill and Gully Rider^^
From: Elizabeth
Date: 14 Mar 99 - 01:32 AM

I have a version in one of my ABC (Australia) school song books and it has appeared in the past more than once. It's listed as traditional Jamaican and has four verses as follows:

Took my horse an' comin' down,
Hill an' gully
But my horse done stumble down
Hill an' gully
An' the nighttime come an' tumble down
Hill an' gully.

The refrain appears between each line of the following verses too.

Oh the moon shone bright down,
Ain't no place to hide in down,
An' a zombie come a ridin' down

Oh, my knees they shake down
An' my heart starts quakin' down
An' I run 'til daylight breakin' down.

That's the last I set down,
Pray the Lord don' let me down.
Ain't nobody goin' to get me down.


(A bit nasty really!!)


^^


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Barbara
Date: 14 Mar 99 - 10:24 AM

Fancy that! All these years I thought the words were "Hill and gully rider, Here rango ree."


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 02:41 PM

I've found Elizabeth's version of the song in a Kodaly songbook which simply attributes it to "Folk Song of Jamaica". It's a fun song, and the kids love adding rhythmic percussion of all sorts ot it!
(hey, Dick Greenhaus, you watching? Here I am using the DT as a source at my job!0


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: greg stephens
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 02:47 PM

Two other snippets on this song: a closely related song is the shanty "Little Sally Rackett". More or less the same tune, with "haul him away" replacing "hill and gully". And Edric Connor(I speak from memory, I may be wrong), the Trinidadian singer. sang Hill and Gully Rider in "Moby Dick", while rowing in a whale-boat (or possibly while pulling on one of those rope things that figure so heavily in films of that nature).


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Amos
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 03:03 PM

My memory tells me there were actually three songs around the single theme, with similar tunes and segments: Banana Boat Song, Day-O, and Hill and Gully Rider. No idea who did which when!


A


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Bernard
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 03:39 PM

I thought 'Banana Boat Song' and 'Day-O' were the same song, just slightly different arrangements...?


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Giac
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 03:43 PM

My memory, which is increasingly faulty these days, includes some singer, somewhere, sometime (I could be more vague), explaining that the "hill and gully" actually referred to crests and dips in ocean waves, being "ridden" in a small boat.

I remember the version by the Tarriers, at least that's what I keep hearing (and will for days now [hill and GUL-LY in bass voice], thanks a lot!).

~;o) - Mary


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 04:12 PM

The Brothers Four used "Hill and gully" in the first and last verses (choruses).


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Gene
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 04:21 PM

http://www.mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2658

is this it????


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 04:58 PM

The line has been mis-heard by most; it should be "Hill and Gully Ride Oh!"

See the site with list of Jamaican songs (scroll down): Ja Web for Japeople
The song is attributed by some to the L. Reid group.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: SussexCarole
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 05:16 PM

The original Banana Boat song written by Eric Darling included:
Hill & gully rider,
Hill & gully      
Repeated
as an extra refrain the the song

Hilly & gully rider was a phrase from Moby Dick refering to a sailor who rides the top(Hill) and the trough(gully)of a wave.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 08 Apr 03 - 06:10 PM

The Caribbean song 'Hill and Gully Ride O" should not be confused with the derivative Banana Boat song (The Tarriers and the Weavers, with Erik Darling), etc.
Earl Stanley Reid, "Hill and Gully," and Hill and Gully Rider, part 2", I believe, preceded the Banana Boat versions, but these also were taken from the Caribbean song.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: RangerSteve
Date: 09 Apr 03 - 08:53 AM

A Jamaican version on 78rpm has been re-issued on one of the Secret Museum CD's on Yazoo or Shanachie (basically the same company).


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: MAG
Date: 09 Apr 03 - 02:36 PM

Melville went to sea as a youngster after his family went bankrupt; his use of a nautical term can be assumed to be authentic -- ie, learned at sea. -- MA


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Cool Beans
Date: 09 Apr 03 - 04:28 PM

Thanks a lot for making "Hill and gully rider, hill and gull-lee'' stick in my brain for the past 24 hours. Now, what can I do to reciprocate? Ah, I have it. Two words: Chicken Dance!


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 09 Apr 03 - 04:39 PM

Tune also known as Mr. Ramgoat, and "Haul 'er Away," as well as "Little Sally Racket."
Dana mentioned the shanty version in his 1840 book, "Two Years Before the Mast." See Traditional Ballad Index, ucfresno.
"Hill and Gully Ride Oh," the Jamaican song, may have nothing to do with whaling usage. It is a common expression for the troughs and crests on the sea as well as on land.
Does anyone have a recording that can be transcribed?


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Subject: Lyr Add: HILL AND GULLY (from G Heath & L Payant)
From: Stefan Wirz
Date: 10 Apr 03 - 09:36 AM

On their 1955 album 'Encores from the Abbaye' (Elektra 29) Gordon Heath and Lee Payant sing a version of 'Hill and Gully'.
The liner notes read as follows:

start of quote

HILL AND GULLY
(Jamaican Work Song)

Hill an' Gully ride-a,
Hill an' Gully,
Hill an' Gully ride-a.
An' a ben dung low dung, ('And I bend down, low down')
Hill an' Gully,
An' a low dung bessy dung,
Hill an' Gully.
An' yuh better min' yuh tumble dung ('And you'd better pay attention or you'll tumble down')
Hill an' Gully.

end of quote


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 10 Apr 03 - 10:56 AM

Cool Beans, how could you????? AAARRGHHHHHH!!!!


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,The Sled
Date: 09 Feb 04 - 03:55 AM

Maybe you are thinking of the Tarrier's The Banana Boat Song?


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Lighter
Date: 09 Feb 04 - 04:38 PM

"Hill and Gully Rider" is indeed sung (as background) in the 1956 "Moby Dick." But I've read Melville's novel a number of times and would be very interested to see the passage that includes that phrase, if you know what I mean...


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Subject: Lyr Add: HILL AN GULLY
From: Long Firm Freddie
Date: 09 Feb 04 - 05:29 PM

In a book called Mango Spice - 44 Caribbean songs chosen by Yvonne Conolly, Gloria Cameron and Sonia Singham, published by A & C Black of London, it gives the following:

HILL AN GULLY - Words and Melody Traditional Jamaican

Hill an gully rida,
(Hill an gully)
Hill an gully rida,
(Hill an gully)
An ah ben dung low dung,
(Hill an gully)
An a low dung bessy dung,
(Hill an gully)
Hill an gully rida,
(Hill an gully)
Hill an gully rida,
(Hill an gully)
An yu better mind you tumble dung,
(Hill an gully)
An yu tumble down yu bruk yu neck,
(Hill an gully)

The notes say Hill an Gully is a call and response song which used to be sung by workmen constructing new roads. In its topical way it refers to the uneven and hazardous terrain through which the new road had to be cut.

The response can be sung in unison or in two part harmony.

The thud of pick axes driven into the ground provided the accompaniment to the song... as the leader sang out his call, the pick axes were raised for the next downward swing.

LFF


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,Charlie
Date: 14 Dec 04 - 10:58 AM

Thanks for the info guys !


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Subject: Lyr Add: BESE DOWN
From: Azizi
Date: 14 Dec 04 - 04:54 PM

Somewhat off topic: this may be of interest to those interested in the phrases "bessie down" and "bessy dung" used in this song and others. I found the probable answer {or answers} in the book/CD "Brown Girl In The Ring, An Anthology of Song Games from the Eastern Caribbean",Alan Lomax,J. D. Elder, and Bess Lomax Hawes
{New York, Pantheon Books, 1997, pp.66-67.

The song is as follows:

BESE DOWN*
Group: Lauren, Lauran, bese down,
       Lauren, Lauren, bese down.
          We no dry like a bambam
          Bese down
          We no neery, neeray.
          Bese down,
          We no dry like a bambam,
          Bese down.

Lauren: Red rose, red rose, bese down.
Group: Red rose, red rose, bese down.
          We no drylike a bambam,
          Bese down etc.

Lauren: Green rose, green rose, bese down,
Group: Green rose, green rose, bese down, etc.
{sung by a group of children 9-11, Trinidad}

*Accents marks are written over the two e's

To Play: Children stand in a ring [circle] with one child {Lauren} in teh center.Each child making up the circle has claimed a colored rose as a name ... Lauren bows down {bese down} as the first verse is sung, either by kneeling or winding her waist in a downward upeard spiral. At the beginning of the second verse she calls on another child to join her {red rose, red rose, bese down}and the two bow down together. Then they decide which rose they will call on for the third repetition.. and so on. When all the children are inside the ringm they sing, 'All rose, all rose, bese down'.

On the island of Jamaica children play a game called "Bessie Down" in which "Bessie is instructed to walk, jump etc. It seems likely, however, that the term "bese" is a creolization of the French word "baisser," meaning "to bow", though there is some punning possible with the French term "baiser", meaning to kliss. "Bambam" means "pumpkin",and in the Trinidad they soometimes sing, "For the sake of the pumpkin, bese down". But no one has yet offered an explanation for the word 'neeray'" .


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Snuffy
Date: 14 Dec 04 - 05:11 PM

Could there be a connection with the sea shanty GO DOWN YOU BLOOD RED ROSES. They certainly seem to share elements in the call-and-repsonse sections.


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Subject: Lyr Add: BANANA BOAT SONG (from The Tarriers)
From: GUEST,banjammer
Date: 20 Jan 05 - 03:58 PM

Since no one has printed the lyric of the Tarriers' version in the late 50's, I'll pass it along for whoever. Called the "Banana Boat song"...

Hill and gully rider, hill and gully (4 times).
CHORUS: Day-O, day-o - day-li-light and I wan' go home (repeat).

1. Well, I'm loadin' de banana boat all night long –
day-li-lght and I wan' go home. Hey!
All-a de workman sing this song –
day-li-light and I wan' go home. CHO:

2. Now I sleep by sun an' I work by moon –
day-li-light an' I wan' go home.
When I get some money gonna quit so soon –
day-li-light and I wan' go home. CHO:

3. Well, I'll pack up all my t'ings an' I'll go to sea –
day-li-light an' I wan' go home.
Den de bananas see de last of me –
day-li-light an' I wan' go home, CHO:

Hill and gully rider, hill and gully (3 times).

(Sorry if you don't know the tune, but those are the lyrics).


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Sep 06 - 04:10 PM

All of these songs are old jamaican folk songs. They really should not be copyright. Hill and gully ride and banana boat song are two separate songs.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Sep 06 - 08:26 PM

Erik Darling has a few comments on it at www.erikdarling.com, under "history" and also contents of his "Child, Child", CD.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Sep 06 - 08:29 PM

BTW on his website Erik Darling refers to the Belafonte recording being on Capitol instead of RCA. It was Stan Freberg's version ((CRASH) "I came in through the window") that was on Capitol.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Azizi
Date: 06 Sep 06 - 09:10 PM

Thanks for posting this information, Guest.

If you really are a guest, how about joining our forum?
We need more folks posting information and examples about Caribbean music [not that that's the only music genre you seem to be interested in].

Mudcat membership is free & joining is easy. Just click on "Membership" near the top right hand corner of this [or any] page on this website.

And then, let me be the first to welcome you!

****

Here's the hyperlink for http://www.erikdarling.com/child_cd.html.

Also, Guest and others who may be interested, I took the liberty of posting lyrics to a song from the Erik Darling CD onto this Mudcat thread: RE: Songs & Rhymes That Mention Snakes.

I hope that's okay to do. If not, my apologies.

Best wishes!

Azizi


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: KenBrock
Date: 07 Sep 06 - 11:35 AM

Azizi - the guest in this case was me - I was on a different computer, and not logged in. BTW I hope to record a phone interview with Erik Darling for radio (and web) broadcast in a few months - will keep Mudcat informed if this happens.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Azizi
Date: 07 Sep 06 - 10:05 PM

Thanks, KenBrock!

I'll be interested in hearing or reading that interview.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,Another Guest
Date: 06 Oct 06 - 01:15 PM

I sang this as a child in Jamaica in the 1940s well before Harry Belafonte recorded it; it was at least as old as our grandparents. It's a digging song -- the gang leader calls out the first line -- everyone raises his pick-axe to "Hill an' gully rida" and then brings it down with a thud to "Hill an' gully". It could have been adapted from a sea-shanty.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: MartinRyan
Date: 15 May 09 - 11:26 AM

This turned up at our choir practice, the other night - first time I'd heard it for many years. Definitely related to the shanty "Little Sally Racket".

Regards


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,TJ in San Diego
Date: 15 May 09 - 01:20 PM

Both Harry Belafonte and the Tarriers did versions of the Banana Boat Song, though the latter might have had another title. The one most people remember is a Belafonte version, which still gets air play and was featured in the film "Beetlejuice."

I was in high school in around 1956-57 when these were playing on the radio. The "Hill and gully rider" line, I think, appeared in the Tarriers' song, circa 1956, done as a background chant, more or less. They are probably two related, but different songs.

During that time, Belafonte and the Kingston Trio, among others, popularized somewhat polished and abbreviated versions of calypso and other Caribbean music. Belafonte's "Belafonte Sings of the Caribbean" is still in my collection, with songs like "Brown Skin Girl," "Matilda" and "Island in the Sun," from the movie of the same name. Bongo drums were selling like hotcakes and you could hear them at a lot of parties, many of which were Caribbean themed.

By the way, for those unfamiliar with the Tarriers, they were a forerunner of groups like the Kingston Trio - by at least 4-5 years. The group was made up of Erik Darling, Bob Carey and Alan Arkin, who most only know as an actor.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,TJ in San Diego
Date: 15 May 09 - 01:50 PM

I found the definitive story behind this song, at least the Tarriers' version in the attached Erik Darling Obit. Lots of other interesting insights as well:

Erik Darling Dies at 74; Musician in the Weavers
By WILLIAM GRIMES
Published: August 7, 2008

Erik Darling, a preppy Ayn Rand devotee who replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers and who was associated with two of folk music's biggest commercial hits, "The Banana Boat Song" and "Walk Right In," died Sunday in Chapel Hill, N.C. He was 74.


Erik Darling, far left, with Lynne Taylor and Bill Svanoe in 1963.
The cause was lymphoma, said Allan Shaw, president of Folk Era/Wind River Records, for which Mr. Darling had made albums in recent years.
A virtuoso guitarist and banjo player, Mr. Darling performed with two of the leading folk groups of the day, the Tarriers and the Weavers, which he joined after Mr. Seeger left in 1958.
Mr. Darling "was the first guitar gunslinger I came across," said the singer and songwriter Don McLean, who befriended him in the early 1960s. "He practiced endlessly, and he got a beautiful sound out of his guitar and his banjo. Today you see any number of fabulous guitar players, but back then there were only a handful, and he was one."
Erik Darling was born in Baltimore and grew up in Canandaigua, in the Finger Lakes region of New York, where his father ran a paint business. His interest in folk music was sparked when the Sons of the Pioneers came to town for a concert.
After his parents divorced, he lived with his mother in New York City, where he attended the Rhodes Preparatory School.
"One New York Sunday I took a double-decker Fifth Avenue bus down to Washington Square, where I had been told people sang folk songs," he once wrote. At the time he knew only a few basic guitar chords. "I didn't dare play that first day, but I became part of that crowd and did not miss a Sunday for years," he wrote.
He improved. Later, when he was not performing and recording with his own groups, Mr. Darling played backup on recording sessions for artists like Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Oscar Brand, Jean Ritchie and Judy Collins.
In the early 1950s Roger Sprung, a banjo player prominent on the folk scene, invited Mr. Darling and Bob Carey to form the Folksay Trio, which recorded four songs, including "Tom Dooley," for the tiny Stinson label. Their syncopated interpretation of the song, which introduced a signature pause, or hiccup, between the words Tom and Dooley, strongly influenced the Kingston Trio when that group recorded the song.
After Mr. Darling's next group, the Tunetellers, disbanded, he and Mr. Carey formed the Tarriers, a trio that searched desperately for a stable third member until a young actor named Alan Arkin agreed to leave Los Angeles and join the group, which soon scored a Top 10 hit with "Cindy, Oh Cindy."
In 1956 the Tarriers (once billed as a dog act called the Terriers by a confused promoter) adapted a traditional work song that the folk singer Bob Gibson had heard in Jamaica and brought to Washington Square. After fusing it with another Jamaican song called "Hill and Gully Rider," they recorded it for Glory Records as "The Banana Boat Song" and watched in amazement as it climbed the pop charts and set off a craze for calypso music, fueled in part by Harry Belafonte's reworked version of their song, "Day-O."
The Tarriers, swept along by the calypso tide, appeared in the film "Calypso Heat Wave," whose performers included Maya Angelou. "Every time we appeared on a TV show, the set was palm trees and bananas, or pilings, barrels and docks, or all five," Mr. Darling once wrote.
When Mr. Seeger left the Weavers, Mr. Darling replaced him, initially on a trial basis as the group rushed to complete a half-finished album. He stayed for four and a half years as the group evolved into a genuine quartet rather than a trio appended to Mr. Seeger.
"He had an interesting voice rather than a beautiful voice," Mr. Shaw said of Mr. Darling. "But he was a superb instrumentalist and arranger."
Mr. McLean said: "Erik brought new energy and new harmonies to the group. He was good for them, and they were good for him."
His voice blended better than his libertarian politics, however, which eventually created friction.
In 1962 Mr. Darling formed the Rooftop Singers specifically to update "Walk Right In," originally recorded by Cannon's Jug Stompers in the 1920s but rearranged by Mr. Darling with twin 12-string guitars, played in a pounding, percussive style. The song became a No. 1 hit and created a fad for 12-string guitars.
The Rooftop Singers disbanded in 1967, and Mr. Darling, after recording a duet album with Pat Street, a replacement vocalist for the Rooftop Singers, drifted away from the music business for many years.
In 1994 he recorded "Border Town at Midnight" for Folk Era, a collection of western-tinged songs that reflected his new home, Santa Fe, N.M. In 2000 he recorded a concept album, "Child, Child," devoted to what he called "the most vital issue of our time — the thoughtful raising of children."
Mr. Darling is survived by his former wife, Joan, of Chapel Hill. Shortly before his death he completed an autobiography, "I'd Give My Life!: A Journey by Folk Music" (Science and Behavior Books).
Mr. Darling "brought folk music to people who had never heard it before," said Richie Unterberger, an author of several books on the genre. "It might not have been the rootsiest folk music, but it was very enjoyable to listen to."


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: paula t
Date: 15 May 09 - 03:22 PM

I use this with year 3 and 4 as a call and response type song."Music Express" was the source for me.I split the group into 2 and they take a line each. A good "Warm up".


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 15 May 09 - 08:08 PM

Greg Stephens wrote on 8 Apr 03:-

"... Edric Connor(I speak from memory, I may be wrong), the Trinidadian singer. sang Hill and Gully Rider in "Moby Dick", while rowing in a whale-boat (or possibly while pulling on one of those rope things that figure so heavily in films of that nature)."

Take a bow that man!

Melville, as Lighter correctly noted, never mentioned "hill and gully" in Moby Dick, nor is it in the least a nautical phrase.

The story of how Edric Connor, in the role of Daggoo, introduced the song into the film of Moby Dick is quoted from an interview with his widow Pearl Connor Mogotsi in the book Black in the British Frame by Stephen Bourne:-

'Hill and Gully Rider' is about the undulating land in Jamaica, but it was the undulating sea of Moby Dick, the ocean where they were looking for the whale, where Edric introduced the song. And it is a lyrical, lilting song, a beautiful thing that the director John Huston loved straight away. And Edric was always trying to do that, introduce Caribbean music into the films he worked on, and letting people know about our songs. So Huston allowed him to have an input, which was very good for Edric, and good for the film, also, I should think.

Matthew Edwards


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 29 Sep 10 - 08:59 PM

I know this is a very old thread, but someone asked whether their were any digital copies of this music. I happened to find two on YouTube - there may be more.
Go here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4O_m4EA38s
and here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-w01TrLoNX8

or just search YouTube for Hill and Gully. The above two versions are credited to The Charms, and possibly Lord Composer (rom the album V.A. Secret Museum of Mankind vol. 1)

Thanks for leading me to this music!
Gill


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Lighter
Date: 30 Sep 10 - 08:56 AM

As Stan Hugill mentions in Shanties from the Seven Seas, the tune and call-and-response structure of "Hull and Gully" are almost the same as those of the shanty "Little Sally Rackett,/ Haul 'em away!"

Q brought this up before, but he mentioned only the tune.

So Huston and Connor made a good choice.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 30 Sep 10 - 03:37 PM

So maybe it's all a mondegreen.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 30 Sep 10 - 04:29 PM

FWIW "Hill and Gully," from my experience with Jamaican music (I am not Jamaican) "Hill and Gully" is extremely well known, to the point that it functions as a sort of "standard reference"... maybe something like "Mary Had a Little Lamb" in North America. As such, the song been recycled in various genres -- evinced by the two samples by "Guest" a couple posts above, where one is in a Calypso style (no, calypso is not "native" to Jamaica, but this song has a calypso style) and the other is to the Ska rhythm. Rendition in a Mento (similar, but distinct from calypso) style are common. It seems as a "standard" item of repertoire for "folkloric" presentations of Jamaican music -- admittedly, the "folkloric" mobilizations of heritage are often pretty staid and contrived-feeling. However, beyond that, I have heard the melody "quoted" by instrumentalists in other genre contexts, and have even heard the phrase "hill and gully" used by at least one toaster/dj/rapper. Jamaican rappers often pull out proverbs and all kinds of non sequitur phrases drawn from the collective cultural conscious (for lack of a better term), so to hear one throw in "Hill and gully" is a pretty good indicator IMO that the ditty has endured and is quite well known. "Hill and Gully" has also been adopted by people in the names for other things...I can't point to any examples, but perhaps you'll take my word for it that they are there, eg. a jerk chicken shack might call itself "Hill and Gully Jerk Centre" or something of that sort.

ramble ramble ramble...


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,DJ GIBS
Date: 24 Nov 10 - 03:34 PM

I think this might have been covered already...

I don't know where it originated but I know that this was a very popular Jamaican folk song in the early-to-mid 1900s. It had been sung in Jamaica for decades before anyone there ever recorded it (as they didn't have a recorder until Times Records started recording and sending them to Decca in the UK to be pressed).

The earliest recording I know of "Hill And Gully Ride" is a Mento medley on a Jamaican 78 on the MRS label (#31). Considering this label started in '51 or so, this record was probably released in '53 by Lord Composer... the side B was "Hill And Gully Ride / Mandeville Road" Ironically, Belefonte also borrows from the second song on this medley in his version of "Emanual Road". He did not use "Hill and Gully Ride" in his version of Day-O. That was the version released by the Tarriers called "Banana Boat Song".

Hope that helps... although its been over 10 years since this thread started! So I doubt the orignator will read this.

sorry, no idea about Country & Western music... not my thing.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 May 11 - 01:56 PM

"Hill and Gully Rider" recorded in 1952 by Edric Connor on his Jamaican folk song album.
The word 'dung', in one of the songs posted above, means dug, as in digging.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Jun 11 - 01:59 PM

Versions of "Day Oh" (1949 printing), other versions, in thread 40845, Jamaican Folk Music.

Jamaican folk music


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,Knight Samar
Date: 26 Feb 12 - 02:15 PM

Feel like witnessing a historic conversation! :D

I heard this song over TV the other day and got the words totally wrong...Something like "Ilamboli Raaina" ...I was searching and searching and then hit the soundtrack list of Open Water (http://www.cduniverse.com/search/xx/music/pid/6770542/a/Open+Water.htm) and here I am :)

I don't understand Jamaican music and still don't get much of the lyrics (it would be great if someone could point to some source on the internet), but this song sounds lovely to me :)


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 26 Feb 12 - 03:34 PM

There are some good ones on youtube.com, but title or performer needed to find them (very few have 'Jamaica(n)' in the youtube lists).
Be careful of websites promising Jamaican songs, some are virused.

Titles can be found at mentomusic.com (an excellent site for lyrics, history and lists).

Also see the thread Jamaican folk music for lyrics, references and remarks about some singers.
jamaican folk music
(For some reason not included in the list at top of this thread)


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 26 Feb 12 - 04:11 PM

The word 'dung', in one of the songs posted above, means dug, as in digging.
It usually means "down" in Jamaican.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,Dave Samuelson
Date: 01 Mar 12 - 03:05 PM

In 1999 Erik Darling told me the Tarriers built its hit arrangement of "The Banana Boat Song" around Bob Gibson's version of "Day-O."


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: GUEST,ab..texas
Date: 15 Dec 13 - 11:19 PM

I am 66 years old. I vividly remember the Terriers' song- 1957. The phrase Hill and Gully Rider was appropriated by NYC disc jockey Murray the K (WINS) in the late 1950's; he referred to his listeners as Hill and Gully Riders. May Murray the K rest in peace.

A.B.


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Subject: RE: Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 16 Dec 13 - 07:47 PM

:ittle Sally Racket, I believe, passed through the creative system of A.L. LLoyd, and the result, while memorable, my well have had little relationship to the original.


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