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Lyr Req: Dockyard Gate (from Peter Bellamy)

DigiTrad:
AROUND ME BRAVE BOYS
BRISK YOUNG WIDOW
NOSTRADAMUS
OAK, ASH, AND THORN
On Board a 98
THE BARLEY AND THE RYE
THE GOOD LUCK SHIP
THE OLD SONGS
WE HAVE FED OUR SEA FOR A THOUSAND YEARS


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Roberto 05 Aug 06 - 12:02 PM
Charley Noble 05 Aug 06 - 12:42 PM
The Sandman 05 Aug 06 - 12:51 PM
Roberto 05 Aug 06 - 01:14 PM
The Sandman 05 Aug 06 - 02:31 PM
The Sandman 05 Aug 06 - 04:10 PM
GUEST,Shimrod 06 Aug 06 - 03:36 AM
Charley Noble 06 Aug 06 - 01:50 PM
GUEST,Shimrod 06 Aug 06 - 04:13 PM
Charley Noble 06 Aug 06 - 04:37 PM
Roberto 07 Aug 06 - 01:55 AM
The Sandman 07 Aug 06 - 06:34 AM
Malcolm Douglas 07 Aug 06 - 09:30 AM
GUEST,Lighter 07 Aug 06 - 10:16 AM
The Sandman 07 Aug 06 - 10:21 AM
Charley Noble 08 Aug 06 - 09:17 AM
Jim Dixon 11 Aug 06 - 08:18 AM
Charley Noble 11 Aug 06 - 09:57 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: Roberto
Date: 05 Aug 06 - 12:02 PM

Please, a check to this transcription. Some word here and there may be uncorrect. Thanks. R

The Dockyard Gate
Peter Bellamy, Fair Annie, Fellside FECD 187 (recorded 1980-81). From the singing of Sam Larner.

Come list all you seamen unto me while these few words to you I'd write
Just to let you know how the game go on when you are out of sight
Just to let you know how the lads on shore go sporting with your wives
While you are out on the raging sea a-venturing of your sweet lives

Now, last farewell to her true love when she then began for to cry
She pulled her handkerchief from her breast for to wipe her weeping eye
Saying, my true love is gone to sea, what hard it is my case
But plenty more here on the shore, so another one will take his place

So you go down to the dockyard gate and wait till I come out
For this very day we'll spend his half-pay, we'll drink both ale and stout

Now the day being spent in sweet content and his half-pay was no more
Nevermind, my true love, she did say, for me husband is working hard for more
Perhaps it is his watch on deck all shivering in the cold
Perhaps it is his watch below, so our joy he can behold

So you go down to the dockyard gate and wait till I come out
For this very day we'll spend his half-pay, we'll drink both ale and stout

Yes, you go down to the dockyard gate and wait till I come out
For this very day we'll spend his half-pay, we'll drink both ale and stout


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: Charley Noble
Date: 05 Aug 06 - 12:42 PM

Roberto-

Are you sure the second line isn't:

Just to let you know how the game GOES on when you are out of sigh

I'm also puzzled by this line:

Perhaps it is his watch below, so our joy he can behold

It doesn't make sense to me unless she is being ironic about her husband's dreams.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: The Sandman
Date: 05 Aug 06 - 12:51 PM

i have recorded this song as well ,my version is the one collected by kidson it has an extra verse.
   and when her husband does come home shes waitng at the quay.
saying welcome home my husband dear, how lonely i have been.
   saying happy now we shall be that you are safe on ashore
   You must stay at home and stay with me and go to sea no more.
   DickMiles


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE DOCKYARD GATE (from Sam Larner)
From: Roberto
Date: 05 Aug 06 - 01:14 PM

This is Sam Larner's recording, the transcription is from the booklet. Charley Noble: I'm sure Peter Bellamy sings "Just to let you know how the game GO on when you are out of sigh", same as Sam Larner. As for the other line, Sam Larner sings "Or perhaps it is his watch below, our joys he can behold", but Peter sings it differently, and the line in my transcription is an attempt to get his words, but I'm not sure. Dick Miles: thank you for the extra-verse. R


THE DOCKYARD GATE
Sam Larner, Now is the time for fishing, Topic TSCD511 (originally released on Folkways Records FG 3507), 1961 (recordings 1958, 1959, 1960)

List you seamen unto me for these few lines to you I'd write
Just to let you know how the game go on when you are out of sight
Just to let you know how the lads on shore go sporting with your wives
When you are out on the raging seas all venturing your sweet lives

Now, last farewell of her true love she then began to cry
She took her handkerchief from her breast to wipe her weeping eye
Saying, my love is going to sea, how hard it is my case
There's plenty a-more all on the shore and another one to take his place

Now go you down to the dockyard gate and wait till I come out
For this very day we'll spend his half-pay and we'll drink both ale and stout

Now the day being spent with sweet content and his half-pay was no more
Never mind, my love, she then did cry, my husband is working hard for more
Perhaps it is his watch on deck all shivering in the cold
Or perhaps it is his watch below, our joys he can behold


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: The Sandman
Date: 05 Aug 06 - 02:31 PM

What you folks don't understand is the Norfolk accent. if you go to the kidson version ,its quite clear, its sight and cant .as the singing postman used to say, there's lots of people now alive that would be dead if they hadn't had the sense to mind their head, mind your head BOR mind your head, its Norfolk dialect, the same as Sam larner sings yarmouth roods , instead of roads, wheres your education. Hant yew ever bin to noorfulk bor.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: The Sandman
Date: 05 Aug 06 - 04:10 PM

Dear ,Roberto, I didnt mean to be rude ,I did not realise you were not english , please accept my apologies and hope that its clear its sight and cant, best wishes DickMiles


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: GUEST,Shimrod
Date: 06 Aug 06 - 03:36 AM

As someone with Norfolk connections I can confirm that the line "...as the game GO on" is much more authentic than "...as the game GOES on".

The Norfolk dialect is beautiful and expressive and, like all British dialects, can depart grammatically from 'standard' English. If you've never been to Norfolk you should drop everything and go NOW before it is completely colonised by rich Londoners and turns into a rural version of Islington.

By the way, Ewan MacColl sang 'The Dockyard Gate' on the first folk album I ever bought - 'A Sailor's Garland' by Ewan MacColl and A.L.Lloyd, XTRA 5013. Like Peter Bellamy, Ewan sang Sam Larner's version of the song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: Charley Noble
Date: 06 Aug 06 - 01:50 PM

I bow to those who know the Norfolk dialect and withdraw my inquiry.

I will puzzle further over how I as a non-Norfolk resident should sing this song. What dialect I do use might be liberally interpretated as folk music nautical slang; however, I'm not even sure if there is uniform agreement about what constitutes this archane dialect.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: GUEST,Shimrod
Date: 06 Aug 06 - 04:13 PM

Sing it in a way which feels comfortable for you - but I do recommend that you listen to a recording of Sam Larner first (if you've not heard Sam you're in for a treat - he was one of the greatest English trad. singers ever recorded).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: Charley Noble
Date: 06 Aug 06 - 04:37 PM

Shimrod-

I totally agree with you. The recordings of Larner should be required listening for every aspiring singer of traditional fisheries songs.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: Roberto
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 01:55 AM

Shimrod, do you think the line of my transcription from Peter Bellamy's recording can make sense, or there's something wrong with it?:

Perhaps it is his watch on deck all shivering in the cold
Perhaps it is his watch below, so our joy he can behold


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: The Sandman
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 06:34 AM

It should be our joys he cant behold


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 09:30 AM

This isn't a song that has turned up much in oral currency; the most complete text came from Frederick Fennemore at Portsmouth Workhouse in 1907 (Gardiner MSS H868). It has been published in Frank Purslow's Marrow Bones (1965), and in Roy Palmer's Oxford Book of Sea Songs (1986), re-isssued as Boxing the Compass (2001). In fact, Palmer reprints the Marrow Bones text, which had been edited a bit by Purslow, with an extra verse added and some alterations made based on broadside editions of the song. The line "Perhaps he's at his watch on deck, our joys he can't behold" quoted in Marrow Bones was actually sung by Fennemore as "Or perhaps he is in the black list, our joys will never unfold".

Sam Larner sounds to me to be singing "our joys we can behold", but it's "Our joys he can't behold" in the broadsides, two editions of which, both from Such of London, can be seen at  Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads:

Plymouth Sound.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 10:16 AM

Thanks for the Bodleian reference, Malcolm. I tried "Dockyard Gate" and found nothing.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: The Sandman
Date: 07 Aug 06 - 10:21 AM

the version, I sing is based on frank kidson who I think collected it in Whitby.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: Charley Noble
Date: 08 Aug 06 - 09:17 AM

Well, the line does make more sense to me as:

"Perhaps he's at his watch on deck, our joys he can't behold"

While:

"Or perhaps he is in the black list, our joys will never unfold"

only further evidences the perils of transcribing from what someone actually sings! Buy that singer another beer.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: Lyr Add: PLYMOUTH SOUND / DOCKYARD GATE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 11 Aug 06 - 08:18 AM

Here's the text from the Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads, Firth c.12(278). (I have modernized the punctuation.)

PLYMOUTH SOUND

Come list, you seamen, unto me and these few lines to you I'll write,
To tell you how the game goes on when you are out of sight;
To let you know how the lads on shore go sporting with your wives,
When you are on the raging main a-venturing your sweet lives.

"The ship she lies in Plymouth Sound all ready to set sail.
May the heavens above protect my love in a sweet and pleasant gale.
May the winds that blow him from the shore to me never more return
Until his pockets are well lined, and then he's welcome home."

Then to take a last farewell of him, she then began to cry,
And pulling out her handkerchief to wipe her weeping eye:
"My husband now he is gone to sea. How hard it is my case,
With plenty more all on the shore and another shall fill his place."

So straightway to the fancy man she goes and these words to him did say:
"Now my husband he is gone to sea. Tomorrow is his half-pay day.
So come down to the dockyard gate and wait till I come out,
For this very day I will spend his half-pay. We will drink both ale and stout."

And the day being spent in sweet content and his half-pay was no more,
"O Never mind, my love," she then said. "My husband he is working hard for more.
Perhaps he's at the topmast head all shivering with the cold.
Possibly it is his watch on deck. Our joys he can't behold.

"Hark! I hear the gun to fire. My husband he is homeward bound.
My husband he's returned from sea. The ship's perhaps in hulk or Plymouth Sound."
So straight to the neighbours' house she goes. "There is only one thing I crave:
Lend me your gown, for mine's in pawn, the only one I have."

So straight away to the ship she goes and boldly walkèd in,
And so grieved for her husband she cried and she flew and kissèd him,
Saying, "My husband he's returned from sea. O how happy I shall be!
Pray stay at home with me, my dear, and go no more to sea."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Peter Bellamy's Dockyard Gate
From: Charley Noble
Date: 11 Aug 06 - 09:57 AM

Jim-

Thanks for providing us the rest of the story.

In this case a lot was lost in folk-processing.

Charley Noble


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