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Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia

DigiTrad:
NOT IN THE BOOK


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Subject: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Joe Offer
Date: 15 Aug 20 - 10:32 PM

      This is an edited PermaThread®, used for a special project. This thread will be moderated. Feel free to post to this thread, but remember that all messages posted here are subject to editing or deletion.
      This thread will be edited by GerryM.
      -Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 16 Aug 20 - 04:14 AM

Anderson's Coast by John Warner

Old Bass Strait roars like a great mill race
    And where are you, my Annie?
And the same moon shines on this distant place
As shone that night on my Annie's face.

Chorus (after each verse):
And Annie dear, don't wait for me,
I fear I'll never return to thee.
There's naught to do but endure my fate
And watch the moon, the lonely moon,
Light the breakers of wild Bass Strait.

We stole a vessel and all her gear
    And where are you, my Annie?
And from Van Diemen's north did steer
Till Bass Strait's wild waves, they wrecked us here.

A mile inland as our path was laid
    And where are you, my Annie?
We found a government stockade,
Long, long deserted, but stoutly made.

And somewhere's west port Melbourne lies
    And where are you, my Annie?
Through swamps infested with snakes and flies
And the fool who walks there, the fool he dies.

We hail no ships, though time it drags,
    And where are you, my Annie?
For our chain gang roll and government rags,
They mark us out as Van Diemen's lags.

We fled the lash and the chafing chain,
    And where are you, my Annie?
We fled starvation and brutal pain,
But here we are, and here remain.

John Roberts and Debra Cowan sing Anderson's Coast. Words from Mainly Norfolk.
It's also in the DT: Here


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Jeri
Date: 16 Aug 20 - 10:22 AM

John and Debra sing Anderson's Coast on YouTube John DOES sing "our chain gang roll".


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 16 Aug 20 - 11:00 AM

John Warner Singer Songwriter Poet and good bloke

4. ANDERSON'S COAST
© John Warner 8/5/93

Old Bass Strait roars like some great millrace,
    And where are you, my Annie?
And the same moon shines on this lonely place,
As shone one day on my Annie's face.

    But Annie, dear, don't wait for me,
    I fear I shall not return to thee,
    There's nought to do but endure my fate,
    And watch the moon, the lonely moon
    Light the breakers on wild Bass Strait.

We stole a vessel and all her gear,
And where are you, my Annie?
And from Van Dieman's we north did steer,
Till Bass Strait's wild waves wrecked us here.

A mile inland as our path was laid
And where are you, my Annie?
We found a government stockade
Long deserted but stoutly made.

And somewhere west, Port Melbourne lies,
And where are you, my Annie?
Through swamps infested with snakes and flies,
The fool who walks there, he surely dies.

We hail no ships though the time, it drags,
And where are you, my Annie?
Our chain gang walk and our government rags
All mark us out as Van Dieman's lags.

We fled the lash and the chafing chain,
And where are you, my Annie?
We fled hard labour and brutal pain,
And here we are, and here remain.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GerryM
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 06:06 AM

As the Mudcat Songbook is intended to be a follow-up to Rise Up Singing and Rise Again, here is a list of the Australian songs that are already in those two books. No point in posting these songs to this thread (unless it's to make corrections/additions to the entries in those books).

Rise Up Singing contains
Kookaburra
Mothers Daughters Wives
No Man's Land
Safe in the Harbor
South Australia
Waltzing Matilda

Rise Again contains
Down Under
Rattlin' Bones
The Band Played Waltzing Matilda
Leaving the Land
The Court of King Caractacus
Tie Me Kangaroo Down, Sport
All For Me Job
If It Weren't For the Union
One Voice in the Crowd
Until


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Mysha
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 10:41 AM

"Now I'm easy"?


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 06:52 PM

Certainly, the chapter should include something from Henry Lawson, like The Outside Track.

Lots of ideas in John Thompson's Australian Folk Song a Day


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 08:11 PM

Battler's ballad

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Helen
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 08:53 PM

One of my favourite Henry Lawson songs is Do You Think That I Do Not Know?

The song is performed by Priscilla Herdman to the tune that Chris Kempster set it to, as shown in The Songs of Henry Lawson which CK compiled.

I like this song because a lot of HL's poems or songs are about people striving to make a living in the bush, some are funny like The Loaded Dog, some are sad, some are about the hard life on the land, but Do You Think ... is different. It seems more personal to HL.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 10:00 PM

Yes - a great choice, Helen.

I quite like "Service song" by Harry Robertson.

SERVICE SONG
Lyrics and Music: Harry Robertson
Arranged by Evan Mathieson
When I was a boy on my daddy’s farm, he sometimes used to say,
Take the brown cow out for service, son, to the farmer down the way.
Each time I took the cow down there, the farmer he would say,
Just leave the cow with me my boy, and come back another day.

For years it had me puzzled — what did this service mean?
’Til one day I decided that this service must be seen,
Through a knot hole in the barn door — with a youthful naked eye,
I saw what they’ve been doing to us in the years that had gone by.

We hear a lot of talk these days, from companies big and small,
What would we do without them, they’re a service to us all,
We’re here to serve the people — just buy from us once more,
For years we’ve really served you — but we’d love to serve you more.

When you hear a politician say, “I’ve served my country true.”
I don’t know what he means by that, so I’ll leave that one to you.
We’re here to serve the people — elect us just once more,
For years we’ve really served you — but we’d love to serve you more.

So in the next election friends, when you put your cross on the dot,
Be sure you elect a proper man — or you’ll get what the brown cow got!
We’re here to serve the people — elect us just once more,
For years we’ve really served you — but we’d love to serve you more!

(Repeat last two lines — with great gusto — for final chorus)

Any of Harry Robertson's songs would be good.


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Subject: RE: One of the has-beens -2 versions
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 02:12 AM

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6510 - Don Henderson's re-writing of this classic Australian folksong + original song both on this thread & below

One of the has-beens by Don Henderson

I'm one of the has-beens
A folk song I mean.
In oral transmission
I once was serene.
Illiterate agrarians
my worth would avow,
but you may not believe me
'cause they don't do it now.

Chorus

I'm as awkward as a new one,
much more cap and gown,
than a blithe air of arcadia;
I've been written down

Eluding the Banjo,
Vance Palmer, Bert Lloyd,
Jones, Durst and O'Connor
I did likewise avoid.
Manifold, Meredith,
Tate, de Hugard,
both Scotts, all found
finding me was too hard.

One day while engrossed
in making a whip,
my current custodian
let his version slip.
Ron Edwards was on hand
and wrote down all that,
while feigning description
of the sixteen strand plait.

Oh, it's no use complaining,
I'll never say die,
though the variant days
for me have gone by.
Now captured in MS,
stave and magazine,
I merely have told you
just what I have been.

Don Henderson 1937 - 1991

collectors of Australian Folk song
Banjo Paterson, Vance Palmer, Bert Lloyd, Percy Jones, Joy Durst, Norm O'Connor, John Manifold, John Meredith, Brad Tate,
Dave de Hugard, brothers bill scott and Alan Scott

Ron Edwards collector, folklorist, artist, storyteller, craftsman ...
==================

ONE OF THE HAS-BEENS. It's an Australian shearing song, and is from the point of view of an old man who used to be the best shearer in the sheds, i.e. the ringer, but now he is old and has lost most of his shearing prowess.

The tune is PRETTY POLLY PERKINS OF PADDINGTON GREEN, and this tune and lyrics are in the DT database, if you search for [Polly Perkins].

I probably found this on an Australian folk music site. I posted these lyrics in a thread called "Feedback please" a while back. I'll check where I got it from and post the site address.

Helen


ONE OF THE HAS-BEENS

I'm one of the has beens a shearer I mean
I once was a ringer and I used to shear clean
I could make the wool roll off like the soil from the plough
But you may not believe me for I cant do it now

CHORUS: I'm as awkward as a new chum and I'm used to the frown
That the boss often shows me saying keep them blades down

I've shore with Pat Hogan, Bill Bright and Jack Gunn
Tommy Leighton Charlie Fergus and the great roaring Dunn
They brought from the Lachlan the best they could find
But not one among them could leave me behind

It's no use complaining I'll never say die
Though the days of fast shearing for me have gone by
I'll take the world easy shear slowly and clean
And I merely have told you just what I have been

Notes - Printed in Stewart and Keesing Old Bush Songs with the note: "From Mrs G.L.Ginns, of Merrylands, NSW". (Written by Robert Stewart) From the singing of A.L.Lloyd, who writes on the notes for Across the Western Plains that he heard it in Cowra, NSW when he was working there in the 1920's. Tune 'Pretty Polly Perkins'


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST,Mysha
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:07 AM

Is there a separate chapter on New Zealand songs? Or else, where does By the Dry Cardrona go?

Bye
Mysha


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 02:44 PM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c80UR3PtGuQ Where the Brumbies Come to Water
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhH0r-0YbFo Reedy Lagoon


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:04 PM

Alistair Hulett's excellent song relating to Wittenoom mine in Western Australia.

He fades away

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:21 PM

Another fine song from Hulett's days in Oz:

Suicide town

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:37 PM

Rabbit Trapper

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:48 PM

WHERE THE CANE FIRES BURN
(Bill Scott)

I've wandered east, I've wandered west,
From the Hamersley Range to the Snowy Crest,
From the Lachlan Plains to the Broken Hill,
But my heart's at the Johnstone River still.
Now the time has come when I must return
Where the vine scrub grows and the cane fires burn.
Where the vine scrub grows and the cane fires burn.

By the Yarra now the cold rain falls
And the wind is bleak from the Bass Strait squalls,
I stand and wonder in the chill
Has the season started at Mulgrave Mill?
For Autumn comes and I must return
Where the harvesters chug and the trash fires burn -
Where the harvesters chug and the trash fires burn.

The smog is thick and stings the eye
Where the Harbour Bridge fills half the sky
And the sirens wail through Sydney town....
But I dream of Tully when the sun goes down
Where the rainforest covers the hills with green
The cane grows tall and the air is clean -
The cane grows tall and the air is clean.

I've been wandering South and West
On land and sea, but the north is best.
Now Autumn comes with its hint of snows
And I must follow where the egret goes
To watch the evening's first faint star
From Flying Fish Point or Yarrabah-
From Flying Fish Point or Yarrabah.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:02 PM

HEY RAIN
(Bill Scott)

CHORUS: Hey rain, rain comin' down
On the cane, on the roofs of the town.

There's rain on me hands and rain on me face,
Oh muddy old Innisfail's a muddy wet place,
Hey rain, hey rain.
And there's rain in me beer and rain in me grub,
And they've just fitted anchors to the Garradunga pub,
Hey rain, hey rain.
Chorus........

There's a Johnstone River crocodile livin' in me frig'
And a bloody great tree on the Jubilee Bridge
Hey rain, hey rain.
And the monsoon sky has sprung a leak
From Flyin' Fish Point to the Millstream Creek,
Hey rain, hey rain.
Chorus.....

And the storm clouds are so black and big
Theres an old flyin' fox in the Moreton Bay fig,
Hey rain, hey rain
It's the worst wet season we've ever had,
And I'd swim down to Tully, but it's just as bloody bad
Hey rain, hey rain.
Chorus.....

Youtube clip

Mudcat thread

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:33 PM

Bob Randall's classic song about the stolen generation:

Brown skin baby

A beaut cover and video by Tom Reid, an Irishman who spent time in Oz:

Tom Reid's rendition

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:59 PM

Phyl Lobl has written so many great songs.
lyrics


Antiwar songs In 1968, Phyl released her own E.P. (remember them?!) titled "Dark Eyed Daughter". It was a significant political statement by an Australian folk singer as it was dedicated to the political issue of Aboriginal Rights at a time when Australia's Aboriginal people were disenfranchised. Phyl recorded two of her own songs for the EP, the title song "Dark Eyed Daughter" and "Will You Fight, Will You Dare?" As well, Phyl recorded the song "Whose Hand" written by Ian Hills and Kath Walker's poem "No More Boomerang" to which she and her friend, later to be her husband, Geri Lobl had composed a tune and arrangement.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:00 PM

Dorothy Hewett's poem 'Sailor home from the sea'. In Darwin, we always called it 'Cock of the north'. It has been put to several tunes, but the one used in the NT was by Martyn Wyndham-Read.

SAILOR HOME FROM THE SEA

Oh cock of the morning with a dream in your hand,
My love has come home, come ashore to the land
As he walks through the door with his eyes like the sun
And his kit bags crammed full of the treasures he's won.

There's a pearl shell from Broome and a tall Darwin tale,
Coral and clam and the jaws of a whale,
And our kitchen is full of the smell of the sea
And the leaping green fishes my love brings to me.

Oh tumble your treasures from Darwin and Broome,
And fill with your glory my straight little room
With the sun in the morning ablaze on your chest,
My love has come home from the north of northwest.

4. And deep in these beds we will love and we'll lie,
We'll kiss and we'll listen to the rain in the sky,
Warm as the summer, we'll hive winter long,
My love has come home like King Solomon's song.

A recent video by Martyn:

Cock of the north

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:11 PM

Dorothy Hewett's Weevils in the flour

http://unionsong.com/u140.html - lyrics "Weevils in the flour" + original poem "Where I grew to be a man"

    On an island in a river
    How that bitter river ran
    I grew on scraps of charity
    In the best way that you can
    On an island in a river
    Where I grew to be a man.

    Chorus
    For dole bread is bitter bread
    Bitter bread and sour
    There's grief in the taste of it
    There's weevils in the flour
    There's weevils in the flour

    And just across the river
    Stood the mighty B.H.P.,
    Poured pollution on the waters,
    Poured the lead of misery
    And its smoke was black as Hades
    Rolling hungry to the sea.

    In those humpies by the river
    Where we lived on dole and stew,
    While just across the river
    Those greedy smokestacks grew,
    And the hunger of the many
    Filled the bellies of the few.

    On an island in a river
    How that bitter river ran
    It broke the banks of charity
    And it baked the bread of man
    On an island in a river
    Where I grew to be a man.

    Last chorus:
    For dole bread is bitter bread
    There's a weevils in the flour
    But men grow strong as iron upon
    Black bread and sour,
    Black bread and sour.

    Notes

    Many thanks to Dorothy Hewett and Mike Leyden for permission to include this song in the Union Songs collection

    Weevils in the Flour was published in Australian Tradition, November 1965 and is sung here by Declan Affley, from the 1987 memorial LP 'Declan Affley'

    here is the original poem:

    Where I Grew To Be a Man

    On an island in a river,
    How that bitter river ran!
    I grew on scraps of charity
    In the best way that you can,
    On that island in the river
    Where I grew to be a man.

          For dole bread is bitter bread,
                  Black bread and sour,
          There's grief in the taste of it,
          There's weevils in the flour.

    And just across the river
    Stood the mighty B.H.P.,
    Poured pollution on the waters,
    Poured the lead of misery,
    And its smoke was black as Hades
    Rolling hungry to the sea.

    In those humpies by the river,
    We lived on dole and stew,
    And just across the river
    Those greedy smokestacks grew,
    And the hunger of the many
    Filled the bellies of the few.

    Oh! Winter on the river
    Was a time of bitter cold,
    A time of hungry bellies
    And children growing old,
    And men with nothing else to do
    But watch the river roll.

          For dole bread is bitter bread,
                  Black bread and sour,
          There's grief in the taste of it,
          There's weevils in the flour.

    Oh! cats on the river,
    And men on the tide,
    They all became a commonplace
    On our river side,
    And even mothers couldn't weep
    When new-born babies died.

    Oh! black was the steel town,
    And black was the smoke,
    Cold-black the river water
    That can gag a man and choke,
    Till he dreams up a furnace fire
    Of his own to stoke.

    We met beside the river
    With the ghosts of good men drowned,
    We picketed the steel mill
    And we banked our hunger down
    With words that stung and deeds that hung
    Like live things on the town.

          For dole bread is bitter bread,
          There's weevils in the flour,
          There's rage in the taste of it.
                  Black bread and sour!

    On an island in a river,
    How that bitter river ran!
    It broke the banks of charity,
    It baked the bread of man,
    On that island in the river
    Where I grew to be a man.

          For dole bread is bitter bread,
          There's weevils in the flour,
          But men grow strong as iron upon
                  Black bread and sour!


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:16 PM

BARE LEGGED KATE
Words: John Dengate:
"Written for my mother, Born Kathleen Mary Kelly, Gundagai, NSW, 1914."         

Tune: Bare legged Joe

First Verse and Chorus:

Bare legged Kate with your natural grace,
The big big sad eyes in the Irish face.
A poor bush girl when the summer is high
In the stony hills of Gundagai.

Bare legged Kate why do you weep
When the men ride by with the travelling sheep?
Does the sight of the drover make you sad?
Do you think of the father you never had?

CHORUS:

Bare legged Kate why do you run,
Down to the creek in the setting sun?
Down where the eyes of the world cannot see -
Run Kate, run, from poverty.

CHORUS:

Bare legged Kate, there is gold in the hills
But you know that the cyanide process kills.
Poisons the miners and cuts them down
In the mean little homes below the town.

Bare legged Kate, when the floods come down,
It's the poor on the creeks are the ones who drown:
When the great Murrumbidgee is thundering by
Through the haunted hills of Gundagai.

The above is a transcription by Bob Bolton.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:48 PM

My apologies, the transcription that I posted above of 'Sailor home from the sea' needs severe correction. I copied and pasted it from a Mudcat thread. Martyn's version varies a little from Hewett's original, but this is what he sings:

SAILOR HOME FROM THE SEA

Oh cock of the morning with a dream in his hand,
My love has come home to this beautiful land
He bursts through the door with his eyes like the sun
And his kit bag crammed full with the treasures he's won

A coral from Broome and a tall Darwin tale,
A pearl and a clam and the jaws of a whale,
My kitchen is full with the smell of the sea
And the leaping green fishes my love brings to me

Oh tumble your treasures from Darwin and Broome,
And fill with your glory this straight little room
With the sun of the morning ablaze on his chest
My love has come home from the north of northwest

And deep in our bed, we'll lie and we'll be
We'll kiss and we'll listen to the rain on the sea
Warm as the summer, we've lived winter long
My love has come home like King Solomon's song

Poem

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 11:35 PM

Below is my transcription of a Martyn Wyndham-Read rendition:

THE BROKEN-DOWN SQUATTER
(Cherles Flower)

Come, Stumpy, old man, we must shift whilst we can,
Your mates in the paddock are dead
We must bid our farewell to Glen Even's fair dell
The place where your master was bred
Together we'll roam from our drought-stricken home
Seems hard that such things have to be,
And it's hard on the horse when he's nought for a boss
But a broken-down squatter like me

Chorus:
And the banks are all broken they say
And the merchants are all up a tree
When the bigwigs are brought to the bankruptcy court
What chance for a squatter like me?

No more we will muster the river for fats
Nor speed on the fifteen-mile plain
Nor rip through the scrub by the light of the moon
Nor see the old homestead again
Leave the slip-panels down, they don't matter much now,
There's none but the crows left to see,
Perching gaunt on a pine, as though longing to dine
On a broken-down squatter like me.

Chorus

When the country was cursed with the drought at its worst
The cattle were dying in scores
Though down on me luck, I kept up me pluck
Thinking justice might soften the laws
But the farce had been played, and the government aid
Ain't extended to squatters, old son;
When me money was spent, they doubled the rent
And resumed the best part of the run

Chorus

Twas done without reason, for leaving the season
No squatter could stand such a rub
And it's useless to squat when the rents are so hot
That you can't save the price of your grub
And there's not much to choose 'tween the banks and the screws
When a fellow gets put up a tree
Theres's no odds how I feel, there's no court of appeal
For a broken-down squatter like me

Chorus

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 03:56 AM

Stewie, do you perchance have an MP3 of Smokey's (et al) version of Lawson's "The Outside Track" (music by Gerry Hallom)???
I always thought his rendition was beautiful and needs to be known outside of The Top End.

Same with his singing of the "Northern Gulf" (was that with the early Tropical Ear perhaps?), using MacColl's "North Sea Holes" as a base.

I'd be happy to put them up on Paul's YT channel if you like.
Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Joe Offer
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 04:06 AM

Oh, this is fun. Thanks, Gerry. Anybody else ready to propose and manage a chapter?


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 07:36 AM

The late Paul Lawler's observations of the changing face of tropical architecture in the Top End of the Northern Territory, after Cyclone Tracy (not necessarily for the better), are immortalised in his song "My Dear Darwin", popular with so many folkies who have visited or lived in Australia's Top End - it's very singable!


MY DEAR DARWIN       © Paul Lawler, 1983                  

Time was, when people in harmony
With nature understood,
That freedom for living things went without saying
And life’s simple pleasures were good.

Asymmetrical, practical, buildings of yesterday
Made from lattice and lace,
But louvres and shutters and the wide open spaces
Now have concrete blocks in their place.

Chorus        
My Dear Darwin
Oh what have they done to your face,
Since Tracy blew, your tropical hue
Has somehow fallen from grace.

Call it green season, then build without reason
These homes from latitudes far,
Creating hot boxes, visually obnoxious
On Darwin’s horizon, a scar.

Government platitudes, old-fashioned attitudes
Building suburbs of gloom,
Breezes are few, in your tropical igloo
You’ll never enjoy the monsoon.

Caravan window, breeze adagio
Air condition the room,
Depend when you’re hot, on one thousand watts
Sealed in a suburban tomb.

But make the correction and opt for convection
Let the nor-wester in from the sea,
Airing your dwelling and bonus that’s telling
The wind and the breezes are free.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bueF-1abr_s


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST,Mysha
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 08:04 AM

Which end of Australia is its top?

Bye
Mysha


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 08:21 AM

The Top End is the pointy bit! Northern Territory & the northern part of Queensland.

Darwin has a Top End Folk Club which used to meet in the Gun Turret I've never been there & now I can see why the Gun turret was such a great venue.


sandra


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST,Mysha
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 09:35 AM

Ah, thanks Sandra. I have a grasp of how Jan Abe Tassema named those islands, but have only a vague idea of how later natives reinvented the topography afterwards. (-:

So, back to the general topic. I see we do have a mention of Van Diemenslandt. Are there specific parts of New Holland that we are missing but that are worth mentioning songs for?

Bye
Mysha


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 09:40 AM

R-J, unfortunately I do not have any recordings of Smokey. I recall he also did a belter rendition of 'Death of Ben Hall'. He had an excellent voice for Oz bush ballads - his German accent would
disappear when he sang.

Ah, Sandra, the turret days were wonderful. We had hundreds attend of a Sunday night. Many heard about us on the hippy routes to the north.

Here is an Australian version of Stephen Foster's 'Gentle Annie'. There are several variants, but the text of an unusual one was given to Danny Spooner by Dave Lumsden who said his family tradition had that it was written for his grandmother's sister, but that he believed it was probably written for a friend. The words were by Jack Cousens who was an itinerant worker around the Murray River in the 1890s. Cousens spent much of his time with the travelling steam-driven threshing machines that travelled from town to town.

GENTLE ANNIE

Now the harvest time is come, Gentle Annie
And the wild oats they are scattered o'er the field
And you'll be anxious to know, Gentle Annie
How your little crop of oats is going to yield

And we're travelling down the road into Barna
And we're following the feeder, Billy Yates
When we arrive and we see the donah
She's the little girl we left at Tommy Waits'

So we must meet again Gentle Annie
As each year we're travelling round your door
And we never will forget you, Gentle Annie
You're the little dark-eyed girl we do adore

Well, your mutton's very sweet, Gentle Annie
And your wines they can't be beat in New South Wales
But you'd better get a fence round your cabbage
Or they'll all be eaten up by the snails

And you'll take my advice, Gentle Annie,
And you're bound to watch old Chaffie going away
With a pack bag hung over his saddle
For he stole some knives and forks the other day

Yes, we must meet again Gentle Annie
Each year as we're travelling round your door
And we never can forget you, Gentle Annie
You're the little dark-eyed girl we all adore

Well, your little bed of oats is fresh, Gentle Annie
And the bullocks they are yoked to go away
You'll be sorry when we're gone, Gentle Annie
For you'll want us then to stop and thresh the hay

But we must say farewell, Gentle Annie,
For you know with you we cannot longer stay
But we hope one and all, Gentle Annie,
To be with you on another threshing day

Here's a version by Martyn Wyndham-Read:

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 10:17 AM

The late Chris Buch was a good friend of mine. He used to run the Mt Isa Folk Club which for a time was one of the clubs that organised the Top Half Folk Festival. Back when the world was young, Chris was commissioned by the Australian Folk Trust to go on a cattle drive and collect songs from the drovers. He went on the drive but was unable to collect any songs. Chris told me that the drovers were too buggered at night to sing around a campfire - all they did was consume soup, snore and fart in their sleeping bags. Bereft of any collected songs, Chris decided to write one himself. He based it on a drover from Camooweal who occasionally attended the Mt Isa folk club. It is a fine song indeed. The story goes that the song came over the radio in the Camooweal servo/cafe. One of the patrons yelled out to Johnny who happened to be there: 'Hey Johnny, there's some pommie bastard singing about you on the radio.

JOHNNY STEWART DROVER
(Chris Buch)

The mob is dipped, the drive is started out
They're leaving Rockland's dusty sheds behind them
The whips are cracking and the drovers shout
Along the Queensland stock-roads you will find them

Droving ways have been like this for years
No modern ways have meant their days are over
The diesel road trains cannot know the steers
Or walk them down like Johnny Stewart, drover

CHORUS
On the banks of the Georgina and down the Diamantina
To where the grass is greener, down by New South Wales
Johnny Stewart's roving with mobs of cattle droving
His life story moving down miles of dusty trails

The cook is busy by the campfire light
Above a fire a billy gently swinging
The mob is settled quietly for the night
And Johnny's riding softly around and singing

Johnny doesn't spend much time in town
Impatient for the wet to be over
Most of the year he's walking cattle down
The stock roads are home for Johnny Stewart, drover

CHORUS

Dawn will surely find another day
Sun still chasing moon, never caught her
The morning light will find them on their way
Another push to reach the next good water

CHORUS

They're counted in now, Johnny's work is done
And fifteen hundred head are handed over
It's into town now for a little fun
And a beer or two for Johnny Stewart, drover

CHORUS

The song has gone around Australia and the world. Gordon Bok made a fine recording of it:

Youtube clip


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 10:20 AM

Thanks Stew. I'll have to see what I can "carefully resurrect" from my old tapes!! Wonder if Tone has copies??
R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 10:45 AM

Will Ogilvie, a Scotsman, wrote some fine bush ballads during his years as a jackaroo in Australia. One of his best was 'When the brumbies come to water' which circulated in oral tradition, changed, shortened and turned into a song. This version was collected by Ron Edwards.

WHEN THE BRUMBIES COME TO WATER

There's a lonely grave half hidden where the blue-grass droops above,
A slab that roughly marks it: we planted it with love
There's a mourning rank of riders closing in on every hand
O'er the vacant place he left us: he was best of all the band
Now he's lying cold and silent with his hidden hopes unwon
Where the brumbies come to water at the setting of the sun

There's a well-worn saddle hanging in the harness-room above
A good old stock horse waiting for the steps that never come
And his dog will lick some other hand when the wild mob swings
We'll get a slower rider to replace him on the wing
Ah but who will kiss his wife who kneels beside the long lagoon
Where the brumbies come to water at the rising of the moon

We will miss him in the cattle camps a trusted man and true
The daddy of all stockmen was young Rory Donahue
We will miss the tunes he used to play on his banjo long and low
We will miss the songs he used to sing of the days of long ago
Where the shadow-line lies broken 'neath the moonbeams' silver bars
Where the brumbies come to water at the twinkling of the stars

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 11:02 AM

West Australian group, Loaded Dog, give their authentic version of Australia's best-known song. I reckon they are the best bush band in Oz. Alan Mann is telling the story and Bob Rummery is lead vocalist and box player.

Waltzing Matilda

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 11:04 AM

I've just made a quick list of traditional songs, collected & re-popularised in the revival of the 50s/60s.

They were all published by the Bush Music Club in Singabout (1956-67)

Maggie May

Nine Miles from Gundagai

The Neumerella Shore - 1 2 pages The Neumerella Shore - 2

The Wild Colonial Boy

The Black Velvet Band & The Old Bark Hut also in Singabout 5(1) 1963

The Drover's Dream & Wild Rover both also in Singabout 3(1) 1958

Old Black Billy (written in 1938 but thought to be trad. when it was collected)

and a couple of other classics which strangely enough were not published in Singabout! - Moreton Bay & Reedy River lyrics & video of Chris Kempster singing


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 11:46 AM

Gerry Hallom sang The Outside Track to his own tune in 1984 on his Fellside album A Run a Minute. He noted:

Another Lawson poem which fits conveniently into song. To me it captures the sadness and emptiness when parting company from friends when futures are uncertain. The traveller at least has his adventures before him to soften the parting, but those on the quayside have only the loss.

There were ten of us there on the moonlit quay,
And one on the for’ard hatch;
No straighter mate to his mates than he
Had ever said: “Len’s a match!”
“’Twill be long, old man, ere our glasses clink,
’Twill be long ere we grip your hand!”—
And we dragged him ashore for a final drink
Till the whole wide world seemed grand.

For they marry and go as the world rolls back,
They marry and vanish and die;
But their spirit shall live on the Outside Track
As long as the years go by.

The port-lights glowed in the morning mist
That rolled from the waters green;
And over the railing we grasped his fist
As the dark tide came between.
We cheered the captain and cheered the crew,
And our mate, times out of mind;
We cheered the land he was going to
And the land he had left behind.

We roared Lang Syne as a last farewell,
But my heart seemed out of joint;
I well remember the hush that fell
When the steamer had passed the point
We drifted home through the public bars,
We were ten times less by one
Who sailed out under the morning stars,
And under the rising sun.

And one by one, and two by two,
They have sailed from the wharf since then;
I have said good-bye to the last I knew,
The last of the careless men.
And I can’t but think that the times we had
Were the best times after all,
As I turn aside with a lonely glass
And drink to the bar-room wall.

But I’ll try my luck for a cheque Out Back,
Then a last good-bye to the bush;
For my heart’s away on the Outside Track,
On the track of the steerage push.

Thanks to Mainly Norfolk


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 08:48 PM

Here's a good'un from Roy Abbott, a West Australian singer-songwriter. It was first recorded by Mucky Duck Bush Band.

AND WHEN THEY DANCE
(Roy Abbott)

I play in a band, I’ve played all around,
From Perth in the west to old Melbourne Town,
But one thing delights me each time I look down
It’s the lasses who dance ‘til the morning.

Chorus:
And when they dance their dresses spin round,
They travel so light that they scarce touch the ground
And the smiles on their faces would win any crowd
The lasses who dance ‘til the morning.

I’ve played for the gentry I’ve played for them all,
From the old bush hut to the debutante’s ball,
But one thing unites them the great and the small
It’s the lasses who dance ‘til the morning.

And when the dance ends and they all leave the floor
Their legs are so weary tired and sore
But who are the ones that keep yellin’ for more?
It’s the lasses who dance till the morning.

So, long may I travel and far may I roam
Around this big country we call our home
Playing for people that I’ll never know
And the lasses who dance till the morning.

Danny Spooner recorded it on his 'Emerging Tradition' album, but here is a live version:

Youtube clip


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 09:01 PM

My apologies. The Guest above for 'And when they dance' was me. I forgot to log in or to sign the post.

Henryp referred to Gerry Hallom and 'Outside Track'. Here is a link to Gerry singing it:

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 09:19 PM

Gallipoli is a striking example of place identity. Bob Hawke fancied that Anzac Cove is ‘a little piece of Australia’ and John Howard postulated that the Gallipoli peninsula is ‘as much a part of Australia as the land on which your home is built’. We have been told for decades that Australian soldiers sacrificed their lives there for our freedoms. If anything, the notion of ‘sacrificing for freedoms’ is truer for the Turks. The Turks were defending their land from invasion at a cost of over 50 000 dead – the Anzac count was 10 000. For Turks, every piece of soil at Gallipoli is sacred.

Historians, Mark McKenna and Stuart Ward, wrote in their essay ‘An Anzac Myth: The Creative Memorialisation of Gallipoli’:

'Turkey and Australia have rushed to memorialise a romantic image of Gallipoli – one of co-operation and friendship. As admirable as these intentions might be, they are based on falsehoods and the misrepresentation of war. Far better a friendship that has the courage to confront war’s brutality and the senseless loss of life that occurred in 1915'

WATCHERS OF THE WATER
(Paul Hemphill)

It is the night of April 25th, 1915. The Turkish soldiers are waiting for the ANZAC assault on Gallipoli to begin …

The sun's fiery furnace beat down upon our backs
As we fixed our sharpened bayonets and shouldered heavy packs
We marched in ordered files to destiny that day
In a land God had forgotten, due east of Suvla Bay

And in the hills so rough and rugged, we hauled our guns by hand
Raised the shells upon our shoulders to the heights we must command
We watched and prayed and waited, each heart beating like a drum
We all had our eyes on the seaward horizon to west where they would come

And the cold moon she rose on the watchers of the water
The stars hung brightly high above the trees
And in the warm night-tide, sheep came to the slaughter
From their land so far away across the seas

And when night fell, oh, she fell so soft and silent
We could have been in the Garden of Paradise
And no man raised his voice, not a soul made a noise
Though our blood ran as cold, as cold as ice

And the cold moon she shone on the watchers of the water
The stars hung brightly high above the trees
And in the warm night-tide, sheep came to the slaughter
From their land so far away across the seas

The cold moonlight upon the water glistened
And enwrapped in all of our hopes and fears
As through the long night-tide, oh, we watched and listened
With sharpened eyes and very, very frightened ears

And we saw small boats come sailing from great ships far out to sea
Shells came at us wailing in infernal symphony

And with fists of fire and steel, we were hammered hard that night
And many brave men went to God without the chance to fight
And as the boats drew nearer, oh, we watched with bated breath
We waited for the order and our turn to deal out death

And the cold moon looked down on the watchers of the water
The stars hung brightly high above the trees
And in the warm night-tide, sheep came to the slaughter
From their land so far away across the seas
From their land so far away across

Youtube clip

--Stewie.






.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 21 Aug 20 - 07:56 AM

very famous songs in copyright

Redgum - I was only 19 lyrics I was only 19 video

Paul Kelly & Kev Carmody - From little things big things grow In this video Kev Carmody and Paul Kelly talk about the process of writing the song. From Little Things Big Things Grow tells the story of Vincent Lingiari, a Gurindji stockman who, in 1966, initiated a strike in response to the poor working conditions faced by Gurindji workers, on the Wave Hill Cattle Station.


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Subject: RE: LYR ADD-Time is a tempest
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 21 Aug 20 - 08:22 PM

TIME IS A TEMPEST
John Broomhall / John Thompson
As sung by Cloudstreet on "Dance up the Sun" (2008)

Time is a tempest and we are all travellers.
We are all travellers; we are all travellers.
Time is a tempest and we are all travellers,
Travelling through the storm.

Our cities are crowded; our forests are falling,
War clouds above, angry voices are calling.
Five minutes to midnight is no time for stalling.
It's time to share our load.

So lift up your voices and sing of the wind and rain.
Sing of the wind and rain; sing of the wind and rain.
Lift up your voices and sing of the wind and rain,
Travelling through the storm.

For time is a tempest and we are all travellers.
We are all travellers; we are all travellers.
Time is a tempest and we are all travellers,
Travelling through the storm.

They've poisoned the oceans; they've dammed the great rivers.
They've killed all the jungles; they're takers, not givers.
They call it progress; well, it gives me the shivers.
We're in for a winter that's cold.

So lift up your voices and sing of the wind and rain.
Sing of the wind and rain; sing of the wind and rain.
Lift up your voices and sing of the wind and rain,
Travelling through the storm.

For time is a tempest and we are all travellers.
We are all travellers; we are all travellers.
Time is a tempest and we are all travellers,
Travelling through the storm.

So brothers and sisters, we'll join hands together.
With love in our struggle, we'll face the foul weather.
And when the sun shines through, under blue skies we'll gather.
Our journey will take us home.

So lift up your voices and sing of the wind and rain.
Sing of the wind and rain; sing of the wind and rain.
Lift up your voices and sing of the wind and rain,
Travelling through the storm.

For time is a tempest and we are all travellers.
We are all travellers; we are all travellers.
Time is a tempest and we are all travellers,
Travelling through the storm.


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Subject: RE: LYR ADD - The Answer's Ireland -John Dengate
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 21 Aug 20 - 08:30 PM

http://ozfolksongaday.blogspot.com/2011/03/answers-ireland.html

The Answer's Ireland (Tune Rody McCorley)

originally published in Singabout 6(1), 1966, p.4

Who gave Australia the tunes to sing, the tunes of songs so grand?
Songs to inspire, full of beauty and fire – the answer's Ireland.
Know when you sing of Jack Donahue, that he was a Dublin man
And Dennis O'Reilly is travelling still with a blackthorn in his hand.

Who raised a ruckus at Castle Hill, who there defied the crown?
'Twas the same rebel boys who in '98 'gainst odds would not lie down.
Oh, but they made Samuel Marsden fret and ruffled silver tails,
Why, the words "Croppy Pike" were enough to strike fear into New South Wales.

Who agitated at Ballarat for Joe Latrobe's death knell?
Who was it raised up the five-starred flag and damned the traps to hell?
Who was it gathered beneath that flag, where solemn oaths were sworn?
Who would not run from the redcoats' guns, upon Eureka morn?

Ned Kelly's dad was an Irish lad, the Kellys all died game.
Brave Michael Dwyer's bones are buried here, we'll not forget that name.
Who could resist Larry Foley's fist, and Foley wore the green.
Who led the anti-conscription ranks in 1917?


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 21 Aug 20 - 08:59 PM

It is a somewhat disappointing that it was up to a Canadian - Garnet Rogers - to put a tune to one of Lawson's finest poems:

AFTER ALL
(Henry Lawson)
   
The brooding ghosts of Australian night have gone from the bush and town;
My spirit revives in the morning breeze, though it died when the sun went down;
The river is high and the stream is strong, and the grass is green and tall,
And I fain would think that this world of ours is a good world after all.

The light of passion in dreamy eyes, and a page of truth well read,
The glorious thrill in a heart grown cold of the spirit I thought was dead,
A song that goes to a comrade's heart, and a tear of pride let fall --
And my soul is strong! and the world to me is a grand world after all!

Let our enemies go by their old dull tracks, and theirs be the fault or shame
(The man is bitter against the world who has only himself to blame);
Let the darkest side of the past be dark, and only the good recall;
For I must believe that the world, my dear, is a kind world after all.

It well may be that I saw too plain, and it may be I was blind;
But I'll keep my face to the dawning light, though the devil may stand behind!
Though the devil may stand behind my back, I'll not see his shadow fall,
But read the signs in the morning stars of a good world after all.

Rest, for your eyes are weary, girl -- you have driven the worst away --
The ghost of the man that I might have been is gone from my heart today;
We'll live for life and the best it brings till our twilight shadows fall;
My heart grows brave, and the world, my girl, is a good world after all.

Rogers makes some very minor changes to the Lawson text:

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 21 Aug 20 - 09:42 PM

I first heard a lovely setting of another Lawson classic on a home-recorded cd of Brian Mooney given to me by his fellow Tasmanian, Mike Manhire.

THE SLIPRAIL AND THE SPUR
(Henry Lawson)

The colours of the setting sun
Withdrew across the Western land -
He raised the sliprails, one by one,
And shot them home with trembling hand;
Her brown hands clung - her face grew pale -
Ah! quivering chin and eyes that brim! -
One quick, fierce kiss across the rail,
And, "Good-bye, Mary!" "Good-bye, Jim!"

Oh, he rides hard to race the pain
Who rides from love, who rides from home;
But he rides slowly home again,
Whose heart has learnt to love and roam.
A hand upon the horse's mane,
And one foot in the stirrup set,
And, stooping back to kiss again,
With "Good-bye, Mary! don't you fret!

When I come back" - he laughed for her -
"We do not know how soon 'twill be;
I'll whistle as I round the spur -
You let the sliprails down for me."
She gasped for sudden loss of hope,
As, with a backward wave to her,
He cantered down the grassy slope
And swiftly round the darkening spur.

Black-pencilled panels standing high,
And darkness fading into stars,
And, blurring fast against the sky,
A faint white form beside the bars.
And often at the set of sun,
In winter bleak and summer brown,
She'd steal across the little run,
And shyly let the sliprails down,

And listen there when darkness shut
The nearer spur in silence deep,
And when they called her from the hut
Steal home and cry herself to sleep.
And he rides hard to dull the pain
Who rides from one that loves him best...
And he rides slowly back again,
Whose restless heart must rove for rest.

Unfortunately, Mooney's rendition is not available on the Net. However, Garnet Rogers recorded a version on his 'Speaking softly in the dark' album. He is faithful to Lawson's text for the first few stanzas but reshuffles and rewrites the latter part of the poem. You can listen to it on Bandcamp here:

Rogers

There's a trio of renditions available on Youtube, including one by a choir, but none of them sparks my clod.

Youtube clips

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 21 Aug 20 - 10:08 PM

At a themed concert that my mate Phil Beck and I presented at folk festival in Tasmania, Phil had this to say about another Alistair Hulett belter:

'"The Swaggies Have All Waltzed Matilda Away" is from the pen of the song writer non-pariel, Alistair Hulett. It’s really a potted history of the foundation of Australia as we know it, and refers not only to transportation of convicts but also to the dispossession of the Aboriginal lands to the newcomers. I’m sure I remember Alistair telling me that he wrote the song as an entry into an Australia Day song-writing competition and this was his ‘up yours’ take on the thing. Whatever, it’s an optimistic song and says that whatever our people in the end, we all ought to be united".

THE SWAGGIES HAVE ALL WALTZED MATILDA AWAY
(Alistair Hulett)

You came to this country in fetters and chains
Outlaws and rebels with numbers for names
And on the triangle were beaten and maimed
Blood stained the soil of Australia
Dookies and duchesses, flash lads and whores
You worked their plantations and polished their floors
Lived in their shadow and died in their wars
Blood stained the soil of Australia

Chorus:
Does it quicken your heart beat
To see tar and concrete
Cover the tracks of the old bullock dray
Have you grown so heartless
To christen it progress
When the swaggies have all waltzed Matilda away

Driven like dogs from your own native home
Hardship and poverty caused you to roam
Over the bracken and over the foam
Blood stained the soil of Australia
Then in the fever for fortune and fame
You caused the poor blacks to suffer the same
Imprisoned on missions or hunted for game
Blood stained the soil of Australia

Chorus

Its two hundred years since you came to this land
Betrayed by the girl with the black velvet band
And still to this day you don't understand
Blood stained the soil of Australia
Koori and white, old Australian and new
Brothers and sisters of every hue
The future is ours, take the wealth from the few
And raise the Red Flag in Australia

Let it quicken your heart beat
The road's at your own feet
Travel it lightly and travel it well
And don't speak of success
Or christen it progress
Til the swaggies can all waltz Matilda as well

[Repeat last 3 lines of final chorus]

Hulett recorded it first with Roaring Jack. Unfortunately, although there are clips by Roaring Jack on Youtube, this is not among them. However, Wongawilli do a fine rendition, but they replace Hulett's 'red flag' with 'true flag'. Bowdlerism!

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 21 Aug 20 - 10:22 PM

My favourite rendition of another beaut Lawson poem:

Riogh

PAST CARIN’
(Henry Lawson)

Now up and down the siding brown
The great black crows are flyin’
And down below the spur, I know
Another `milker's' dyin';
The crops have withered to the ground,
The tank's clay bed is glarin'
But from my heart no tear nor sound
For I have gone past carin' —

Through death and trouble, turn about
Through hopeless desolation
Through flood and fever, fire and drought
Through slavery and starvation
Through childbirth, sickness, hurt and blight
And nervousness and scarin'
Through bein' left alone at night
I've got to be past carin'.

Our first child took, in days like these
A cruel week in dyin'
All day upon her father's knees,
Or on my poor breast lyin'
The tears we shed, the prayers we said
Were awful, wild, despairin'
I've pulled three through and buried two
Since then, and I'm past carin'.

T’was ten years first, then came the worst
All for a dusty clearin'
I thought, I thought my heart would burst
When first my man went shearin'
He's drovin' in the great North-west
I don't know how he's farin’
For I, the one that loved him best
Have grown to be past carin'.

My eyes are dry, I cannot cry
I've got no heart for breakin'
But where it was in days gone by
A dull and empty achin'
My last boy ran away from me
I know my temper's wearin'
But now I only wish to be
Beyond all signs of carin’
Past wearyin' or carin'
Past feelin' and despairin';
And now I only wish to be
Beyond all signs of carin'.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 21 Aug 20 - 11:52 PM

The late Danny Spooner recorded this little gem on his final album 'Home'. Danny noted that a 1935 article identified the author as Jimmy Connors. If that is correct, it passed into oral tradition. The version below was collected here in the Northern Territory by Geoff and Nancy Wills. The song was published in the Stewart & Keesing, John Manifold (Penguin) and Ron Edwards books of Australian folk songs.

THE REEDY LAGOON

The sweet-scented wattle sheds perfume around,
Enticing the bird and the bee;
As I lie at my rest in a fern-covered nest
In the shade of a currajong tree;
High up in the air I can hear the refrain
Of a butcher-bird piping its tune,
For the spring, in her glory, has come back again
To the banks of the Reedy Lagoon.

I've carried my bluey for many a mile,
My boots they are worn out at the toe;
And I'm dressing, this season, in a far different style,
To that of last season, God knows!
My cooking utensils, I'm sorry to say,
Consist of a knife and a spoon.
And I've dry bread and tea, in my battered jack-shay
On the banks of the Reedy Lagoon.

Where is old Frankie, man how could he ride,
And Johnny, the kind-hearted boy;
They tell me that lately he's taken a bride,
A benedict's life to enjoy.
And Big Mac, the Scotchman; I once heard him say,
That he wrestled the famous Muldoon:
But they're all far away, and I'm lonely today
On the bank of the Reedy Lagoon.

Now where is that lassie I oft-times caressed,
The girl with the sad dreamy eyes?
She pillows her head on another man's breast,
While he tells her the very same lies.
My bed she would hardly be willing to share,
Where I camp by the light of the moon.
But it's little I care, cos I couldn't keep square
On the bank of the Reedy Lagoon.

Martyn Wyndham-Read recorded on his 'A rose from the bush' LP and noted: 'I would take this song with me to a desert island, as it brings home so much of Australia and the smell of the bush to me'. I first heard it recorded by Gordon Bok on his 'Seal Djiril's Hymn' album. He sticks pretty close to the Wills text.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Aug 20 - 09:30 PM

Always great fun to sing - from 60's group The Settlers:

THE COOMA CAVALIERS
(Ulik O'Boyle)

From Jindabyne tunnel and 'round Island Bend
We boys go to Cooma, our money to spend
And we'll buy youse one beer there if you happen to see
Four Italians, three Germans, two Yugoslavs and me

Chorus
Now we may not be diggers but we'll have you know
We're digging thee tunnels up here in the snow

It's dark in that tunnel and the work she is rough
By the time it hits payday we all have enough
So we rush in to Cooma to have us one spree
Four miners, three fitters, two chippies and me

We pull up in Sharp Street by the Alpine Hotel
If you've been to Cooma you'll know this place well
Before we get inside our order rings out
Four vinos, three schnappses, two slivovitz, one stout

Well I guess a we got-a noisy, though no-a harm did we mean
Singing "O Solo Mio" and "Lili Marlene"
Some Aussies went crook 'cos they didn't agree
With four singing, three marching, two dancing and me

We may not be diggers but we'll have you know
The barmen all love us up here in the snow

The barman stood up then with a snarl on his face,
He said: "You Europeans, you're a flipping disgrace,
Stop drinking those queer drinks if you want to stop here
Become integrated drink our Aussie beer.

So we switched on to schooners and to the bar's cheers
Sang "Waltzing Matilda" and "Click Go The Shears"
For hours and hours without any cease
'Till the sudden arrival of the Cooma police

Now we may not be diggers but we'll have you know
We're regular swiggers up here in the snow

In a furious moment the whole bar was cleared
And no sign remained of those Aussies that cheered
So the coppers locked up then - unfair you'll agree -
Four Italians, three Germans, two Yugoslavs and me

Now we're back in that tunnel as broke as can be
For it cost us a fortune to bail ourselves free
But before you start laughing let me make it clear
It was worth it Australia for the sake of your beer

We may not be diggers, but we'll have you know
We dig digger beer up here in the snow

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Aug 20 - 10:23 PM

Another fine song relating to an immigrant worker is Ted Egan's 'Sayonara Nakamura' - one of his best:

Mudcat thread

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Aug 20 - 10:44 PM

Another Ted Egan song posted by rich-joy. 'Back to Broome always feature in 'uglies' at Top Half Folk Festivals here in the Northern Territory.

Mudcat thread

Youtube clip

--Stewie


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Aug 20 - 10:55 PM

My apologies, the Youtube link in my previous post was the wrong one.

It should have been:

Back to Broome

Where are other Oz 'catters? Is our thread moderator going to post any songs?

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Aug 20 - 11:00 PM

Please ignore my previous post. It appears the Youtube link was correct. Somehow when I first clicked it, the Nakamura clip came up. I'll go and lie down.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 23 Aug 20 - 09:59 PM

In Sydney the Redfern Shanty club does a great version of "Broome" & it might be on their facebook page as it's not on their Reverbnation page
I met Ted Egan at Illawarra Folk Festoval one year & suggested he see Shanty club as thy were on the program, I hope he got to see them

When you get (got! preCovid) a legal maximum for the premises of 45 mainly young singers all roaring out a shanty or sea song under the instruction to the newcomers "if you don't know the words, sing louder" it is magic. One day they will be back.

sandra


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 23 Aug 20 - 10:17 PM

Here's another fine Ogilvie poem that has been put to music. At this very moment, due to covid-19, there are challengers to bringing in the NZ shearers needed to do the job in Oz.

NORTHWARD TO THE SHEDS
(Will Ogilvie)

There's a whisper from the regions out beyond the Barwon banks
There's a gathering of the legions and a forming of the ranks
There's a murmur coming nearer with the signs that never fail
And it's time for every shearer to be out upon the trail

Chorus:
For the western creeks are calling,
And the idle days are done
With the snowy fleeces falling,
And the Queensland sheds begun

They must leave their girls behind them and their empty glasses too,
For there's plenty left to mind them when they cross the dry Barcoo
There'll be kissing, there'll be sorrow much as only sweethearts know
But before the noon tomorrow they'll be singing as they go

Chorus

There is shortening of the bridle, there is tightening of the girth
There is fondling of the idol that they love the best on earth
Northward from the Lachlan River and the sun-dried Castlereagh
Outward to the Never-Never ride the ringers on their way

Chorus

From the green bends of the Murray they have run their horses in
For there's haste and there is hurry when the Queensland sheds begin
On the Bogan they are bridling, they are saddling on the Bland,
There is plunging and there's sidling -- for the colts don't understand
      
Chorus

They will camp below the station, they'll be cutting peg and pole
Rearing tents for occupation till the calling of the roll
And it's time the nags were driven, and it's time to strap the pack
For there's never licence given to the laggards on the track

Chorus

Hark the music of the battle: it in time to bare our swords!
Do you hear the rush and rattle as they tramp along the boards?
They are past the pen-doors picking light-wooled weaners one by one
I can hear the shear-blades clicking, and I know the fight's begun!

Ted Egan printed the complete Ogilvie poem in his 'The Shearers: Songbook', but the clip on Youtube for 'Northward to the sheds' has 3 stanzas only - the song begins at the 2 minute mark.

Gerry Hallom also messes with and shortens the Ogilvie text, but it's worth a listen:



--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 23 Aug 20 - 10:23 PM

I don't know what happened in my above post, but it seems that my signature became the
link to Youtube.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 24 Aug 20 - 10:02 PM

Sandra, it looks like it is down to us. I don't mind posting some more - our moderator can always chuck 'em out.

LAST COAL TRAIN
(Paul Wookey)

No more black-faced miners
Buying carbide at the store
All the lamps that lit the darkness
Are hangin’ empty by the door
And the chilly winds that blow no good
Have blown no good once more
And the last coal train is leavin’ town

No more kids out on the trestle bridge
Playin’ that dangerous game
You’ll never have to mend a broken track
Or drive the spike again
You can leave the sleepers rotting
The signals rusting in the rain
‘Cause the last coal train is leavin’ town

You’ll never have to feed a family
Upon a striker’s pay
You’ll never have to fight for what’s yours by right
In this game that rich men play
And for the first time in a long time
You might see the light of day
And the last coal train is leavin’ town

So the word came down from Melbourne
Said they’ve got to close the mine
Oh we can’t afford to dig it out
We’ll just have to leave it lyin’
With all the men who died in 20 shafts
Who’ll lie there for all time
And the last coal train is leavin’ town

Youtube clip

Paul Wookey, was raised in the Dandenong Ranges. An excellent singer and guitarist, he was heavily influenced by American folk, blues and country. He had a solid reputation in Melbourne’s folk clubs – Traynor’s, Outpost Inn and One-C-One. A fine example of his original work is 'The Last Coal Train' which he noted ‘was the last coal train that left Wonthaggi some time in 1968 after the coal mines were finally closed down. It represents the passing of a period in Australian history – the generational move from the land to the city, the loss of country jobs, the dislocation of the pre-war generation.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 24 Aug 20 - 10:24 PM

SERGEANT SMALL

I went broke in western Queensland in 1931
Nobody would employ me so my swag carrying begun
I came down into Charleville through all the western towns
I was on my way to Roma destination Darling Downs

My pants were getting ragged my boots were getting thin
But when I stopped at Mitchell a goods train shunted in
I heard the whistle blowing and looking out could see
She was on her way to Roma it was quite plain to me

Chorus
I wish I was about twenty stone andgonly seven feet tall
I'd go back to western Queensland and beat up Sergeant Small

Now as I sat and watched her inspiration's seed was sown
I remembered the government slogan: Here's the railway that you own
By this time the sun was setting and the night was getting nigh
So I gathered my belongings and took her on the fly

When we got into Roma I kept my head down low
I heard a voice say "Any room mate?" I answered "Plenty Bo"
"Come out of there my noble man" came the voice of Sergeant Small
"I have trapped you very nicely - you've ridden for a fall"

The judge was very kind to me he gave me thirty days
Saying "Maybe this will help to cure your rattler jumping ways"
So if you're down and outback boys I'll tell you what I think
Stay off those Queensland goods trains for they're a short cut to the clink

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 24 Aug 20 - 11:21 PM

DUSTY GRAVEL ROAD
(Alan Mann)

Have you travelled northwards past the slime dumps of Kalgoolie
Out upon the old Broad Arrow Road
Have you seen the heaps of mullock like the tombstones in a graveyard
That signify the finding of a lode
Have you ever stopped to wonder how many picks and shovels
And aching muscles on bodies young and old
Would have scraped the dust of legend, the clay and the ironstone
Searching for a dish of yellow gold

Chorus:
For the passing of some years seats you in a four-wheel-drive
The exhaust pipe leaves your sweat and your worries far behind
The air-conditioned faint north-easter blows cool air across your mind
Travelling on the dusty gravel road

Well ahead there's corrugations and you spot the blackened carcass
Of a tyre gone to pieces on the side
Christ, what happens if you break down - the petrol tank is holed
Or, worst of all, the grog supply runs dry
Like the heroes in that legend maybe you'll walk a while
Maybe you'll get lucky, hitch a ride
But would you push your barrow, loaded up with life's possessions
Like some of them damn near three hundred mile

Chorus

At the turnoff there's some diggings and you stop to rest a while
As nightfall pulls the curtain on the day
By the last few glints of sunlight something on that yonder hillside
Beckons you to come and walk that way
Glittering in the gully, piles of champagne bottles
Signs they caught up with the golden fate
And you lift the flimsy flip-top from a frosty ice-cold can
And you join their celebration just eighty years too late

Chorus

Alan Mann, a fine musician and songwriter, has been part of the West Australian folk scene for ever. 'Dusty gravel road' is the title track of an album by Loaded Dog. In respect of this song, Alan noted: 'The first prospectors had a great and intimate understanding of the goldfields country. It was not until 1986 that the output of gold in Western Australia exceeded that of the halcyon year of 1904'.

Unfortunately, the only clip of Loaded Dog on the Net is the one I posted re 'Waltzing Matilda'. Loaded Dog's website has disappeared. They have 4 excellent CDs. If any 'cattier is interested in obtaining their music, send me a personal message and I will put you in touch.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 24 Aug 20 - 11:37 PM

Loaded Dog are fantastic, they turned up at Jamberoo years ago & I had hopes of booking them for the Loaded Dog Folk Club, but alas, they never came east again. I think they had a grant from some Govt agency to travel that year.

Poison Train is one of the best session songs, & we've had it many a time at the Dog, often sung by Margaret & Bob Fagan. The Dog is run by singers for a singing audience. I remember the first time I went to another club after a friend took over the Dog in 1995 & NO-ONE SANG ALONG!

sung by Chloe & Jason Roweth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45fvCPqTm8M

Subject: ADD: The poison train ^^
From: Stewie - PM
Date: 04 Mar 00 - 08:52 PM

THE POISON TRAIN
(Michael O'Rourke)

This old town has had its day
All the people moved away
And the houses standing empty
In the dry and the dusty day
No one cares for this old town
Now the money's not around
And the railway lines are rusty
And the station's falling down

Chorus:
There's a light down the line
Let it shine, shine, let it shine
There's a camp down the way
All the fettlers will be coming home today

When the railway opened here
All the gutters flowed with beer
And the people stood beside the line
To watch and wave and cheer
All the speeches that were made
When the bosses smiled and said
'The good times are just beginning
Follow us and you'll go ahead'

Chorus

Well, they built the street so wide
It would be a thing of pride
To walk across it drunk
Or throw a stone to the other side
And the buildings grew so tall
You would tremble at the fall
But they've just dried out
And you would never know
There was anyone there at all

Chorus

I still hear the tall man say
To the children at their play
'You'd better go home early
And you'd better stay away
Stay away from the line
Can't you hear the railway humming
The grass has grown too tall
And the poison train is coming

Chorus

You feel sorry for the grass
All it did was grow too fast
All the weapons used against it
It was never made to last
And the man and his offsider
Are all dressed in black
As the poison train goes through the town
And blisters all the track

Chorus

Well, it never lasted long
Half the town was packed and gone
And everybody was afraid
To be left there alone
All the people stayed away
And there was no celebration
Nobody made a speech the day
They closed the railway station

Chorus

Published by Greenhouse Publications. Source: Roy Bailey 'New Directions in the Old' Fuse CFCD 402. Recorded by 'Mike O'Rourke on 'Flying Pieman' 1980.
PS.

The image of the 'Poison Train' is used by O'Rourke to describe the decay of outback towns that grew too quicly. The fast-growing grass around the railway tracks has to be burnt back.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 12:10 AM

You are doing a great job, Stewie!


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 12:19 AM

PADDY'S BACK
(Alan Ralph)

Father had a soft spot for the men out on the track
And somehow Paddy featured regularly
He worked upon the rabbit-proof and when he came to town
He'd doss down in our shed for a week or three
He'd spend his days in the town's hotels drinking pinkie wine
And shouting drinks for almost all the town
We'd feed his horse and dog and keep them watered regularly
And when he left, he'd give us half-a-crown

Chorus:
And the spring-cart tracks led through our gate
His horse and dog were there
We ran to mother, shouting out the news
'Paddy's back from the rabbit-proof, he's in from way outback
And I'll bet he's down at the Federal getting boozed'

When Paddy staggered home alone or on a copper's arm
We'd take him down some supper on a tray
A plate of snags and murphys or mother's shepherd pie
He thought it like a banquet, so he'd say
And often when we'd go out to the outhouse in the night
We'd hear old Paddy talking to his dog
Or singing Irish melodies or spieling to the stars
He'd stay a gentle man despite the grog

Chorus

When his money was all gone, then father told him so
His clothes were laundered, he was scrubbed and shaved
He'd join us at the table and tell stories of the bush
Us kids would listen spellbound to his tales
Then next day he'd load his cart up with stores to see him through
And father'd slip some pinkie in the back
He'd head off to the rabbit-proof to check along the fence
And we'd watch him disappear along the track

Chorus

At christmas time there'd always be a parcel for us kids
That Paddy got the local store to send
And one year I remember when he really got it right
Tin soldiers in a box - a hundred men
Father would get a cherry pipe, a tablecloth for mum
The gifts were better than a lump of gold
A flask of Irish whisky was what father'd give to him
To frighten off the snakes and beat the cold

Chorus

But somehow Paddy drifted from our lives as we grew up
I often wonder where old Paddy went
Did he meet a childhood sweetheart and settle down in town
Or did he die out by that lonely fence
The snake that killed his old blue heeler, did it get him too
Or did he strike it rich in someone's will
Either way I still can hear those Irish melodies
And tin soldiers march across the table still

Chorus

That cracker of a song was written from an old-timer's recollections of growing up in country Western Australia. It is on Loaded Dog's 'Dusty gravel road' album. Alan Ralph is not a member of the group. His song was published in 'The West Australian'.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 11:28 AM

thanks for the memories, Stewie, I need to locate my Loaded Dog CDs from wherever they are hiding.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 09:08 PM

Cheers Jennie and Sandra.

I'll post a few more favourites from the Dog albums. Bob Rummery wrote the tune for this one:

CALL OF THE NORTH
(J.Sorensen/R.Rummery)

Oh the western wind is blowing
So there’s rain and storm in store
And the teams have long been going
Down the road to Glindawor
To where tropic sun is gleaming
And the fragrant winds blow free
I’ve awakened from my dreaming
And the north is calling me

Chorus:
Oh, the steam is in the boiler
In the expert’s room below
While upon the board each toiler waits
To hear the whistle blow
For the shearing is beginning
And my heart is fancy free
And the friction wheels are spinning
So the north is calling me

From the southward to the nor’ward
Where the long brown tracks wind down
All me mates have hastened forward
To the wilderness from town
Gone! By stony hill and hollow
To where I now fain would be
Where they lead, I needs must follow
For the north is calling me

Chorus

What’s this news I have been hearing
Tidings strange to me indeed
Bidgimia now is shearing
With Sawallish in the lead
Straining camels teams are swaying
From the junction to the sea
Why so long am I delaying
When the north is calling me

Chorus

And so northward I am going
For I cannot linger here
For the starting whistle’s blowing
And the ‘guns’ are into gear
So to be there I am yearning
I will hail the sheds with glee
For the friction wheels are turning
And the north is calling me

Chorus

The song is on 'Dusty gravel road'. Here is a rendition by Wongawilli:

Youtube clip

My mate, Phil Beck from Perth, and I once presented a themed concert 'Songs of Separation' which included 'Call of the north'. For those who may be interested, here are Phil's remarks about the life of Jack Sorensen:

Sorenson was amongst other things a shearer and a pugilist (at one time welter weight champion of WA) who once said you had to be prepared to be the latter if you were going to pretend to be the former in and around a shearing shed in the outback. In other words that one needs to be a hard man in a hard environment.

Born in Western Australia he began his working life as an orchardist on his family's property in Perth, and then worked as a shearer on stations in the Murchison, Gascoyne and Kimberleys. Returning to Perth, Sorensen took up employment with Mr Sampson, a local MP, who was influential in having some of his early poems published in local papers.   Throughout his life he drew on his early bush experiences to write poetry and songs mainly about life in rural Western Australia, often with an environmental theme. He clearly loved the bush and the sense of peace that living in the outback can bring.

The outbreak of war evoked in Sorensen a sense of doom that was to haunt him forever. The death of his friend and mentor, Mr Sampson had a further detrimental effect on his mental health to the point that he was discharged from the military. Not long after his discharge, his mother also died, further deepening his melancholia.

Seeking happier times, Sorensen set out for the Kimberleys searching for that inner peace that he’d felt in the north of WA in earlier years. This song, probably written around that time, revolves around the start of the shearing season in northern Western Australia. The Bidgemia mentioned is a reference to Bidgemia Station located on the south bank of the Gascoyne River. Sawallish refers Bob Sawallish a gun shearer of the time. Mullewa, inexplicably referred to as Glindawor in our version of the song, is a shire in mid west WA.

Sadly the inner peace Sorensen sought eluded him, so in 1949, he decided to fulfil his lifetime dream of going to the Queensland outback. He sailed from Fremantle, but never reached his goal, for it was on the ship in Sydney, just a week or so short of his destination that Jack decided his life was no longer worth living.


--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 09:25 PM

My apologies, I once again forgot to log in before posting 'Call of the north'.

A couple of decades ago, Bob Bolton posted the lyrics to Alan Mann's 'Windmill run' together with a few notes to assist non-aussies:

THE WINDMILL RUN
(Alan Mann)

The Southern Cross is turning, creaking joints need oiling
There's a finger-full of grease for cog and gears,
Clockwise, ever clockwise, hot-dipped and galvanised,
The blades have turned for fully fifty years.

One day's dawn will find him, astride his faithful Harley
Just a kerosene tin jammed between his knees.
There's a hessian bag of tucker, twitch wire and some pliers,
And his camouflage, khaki dungarees.

Out along the western fence, the three-mile troughs are full,
And it's north along the track 'till deadwood bore.
There's spinifex and mulga, plus the dozen mills or so,
'Till nightfall finds him on an Alcan floor

The Southern Cross is turning, creaking joints need oiling
There's a finger-full of grease for cog and gears,
Clockwise, ever clockwise, hot-dipped and galvanised,
The blades have turned for fully fifty years.

Well, every now and then, there's a breakdown - and he finds it
Depressing as the jammed-up rods he frees.
Fifty head it cost him ... and the crows with bellies full;
Sitting there ... laughing in the trees.

Mostly, though, it's endless toil – adjusting floats and valves,
And checking out the fences near and far.
Visions of the wife and kids – see him through the afternoon,
'Till his nightly destination with the stars.

The Southern Cross is turning, creaking joints need oiling
There's a finger-full of grease for cog and gears,
Clockwise, ever clockwise, hot-dipped and galvanised,
The blades have turned for fully fifty years.

Gone again's another week and he turns up at the homestead,
Just a silhouette against the setting sun,
There's just two days at home, for there's sheep to dip tomorrow.
And a rest before another windmill run.

The Southern Cross is turning, creaking joints need oiling
There's a finger-full of grease for cog and gears,
Clockwise, ever clockwise, hot-dipped and galvanised,
The blades have turned for fully fifty years.

The Southern Cross is turning, creaking joints need oiling ...

Notes:

Alcan: Local brand of aluminium (well, lots of Canadian money in it as well). Presumably the floor of a work shed or store out on the run. Clockwise, ever clockwise: Of course, the blades always turn in the same direction because the tailpiece keeps them pointing up wind Dungarees: Work overalls – in this case ex-army
Fifty head it cost: On these huge inland runs, there is little permanent water and the bore (artesian) water brought up by the windmill may be all there is. A pump breakdown can mean death to all the cattle in that paddock.
Harley: Harley Davidson motorbike? Maybe an old WWII despatch rider's bike, rather than the fat road bikes of today
Hot-dipped and galvanised: They made things to last back then … not that there is much rain to rust windmill blades out in the outback!
Mulga: Low scrubby acacias of the arid interior
Southern Cross: The best known Australian brand of water-pumping windmill (named for the famous southern sky constellation).
Spinifex: Thorny weed - the Australian species is zygochloa paradoxus.
Tucker: Food, supplies
Twitch wire: Binding or tie wire for minor repairs

You can find the song on Loaded Dog 'A Coastline Facing West'. Here is a rendition by Wongawilli:

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 10:07 PM

DOWN THE RIVER
(H. Lawson/I. MacDougall)

I've done with joys an' misery,
       An' why should I repine?
There's no one knows the past but me
       An' that ol' dog o' mine.
We camp an' walk an' camp an' walk,
       An' find it fairly good;
He can do anything but talk,
       An' he wouldn't if he could.

We sits an' thinks beside the fire,
       With all the stars a-shine,
An' no one knows our thoughts but me
       An' that there dog o' mine.
We has our Johnny-cake an' "scrag,"
       An' finds 'em fairly good;
He can do anything but talk,
       An' he wouldn't if he could.

He gets a 'possum now an' then,
       I cooks it on the fire;
He has his water, me my tea —
       What more could we desire?
He gets a rabbit when he likes,
       We finds it pretty good;
He can do anything but talk,
       An' he wouldn't if he could.

I has me smoke, he has his rest,
       When sunset's gettin' dim;
An' if I do get drunk at times,
       It's all the same to him.
So long's he's got me swag to mind,
       He thinks that times is good;
He can do anything but talk,
       An' he wouldn't if he could.

He gets his tucker from the cook,
       For cook is good to him,
An' when I sobers up a bit,
       He goes an' has a swim.
He likes the rivers where I fish,
       An' all the world is good;
He can do anything but talk,
       An' he wouldn't if he could

You can find the song on Loaded Dog 'That there dog o' mine' album. They note that the
tune they use is by Ian MacDougall. I can't find any rendition on the Net. There is a tune by Chris Kempster in his songbook (page 12):

Kempster


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 10:41 PM

Here's another good'un from the pen of John Warner. Kitty Kane is a tough woman who thumbs her nose at convention and not only survives but thrives. Good on her!

KITTY KANE
(John Warner)

I came up the Thomson with thousands of others
When Walhalla's gold wove its wild, shining spell
I was young, I was pretty, I called myself Kitty
I offered the best jewels a woman could sell
A length of fine velvet in well fitting burgundy
Tight round the curves where a man's eye could fall
Lace at the edges and eyes full of laughter
Oh young Kitty Kane was the pride of them all

(Chorus)
I might take a walk by the wild Thomson River
Where the mountain ash rise in the soft misty rain
There's gold in the range and there's gold in the memories
Of the lady of pleasure they call Kitty Kane

The publican brought a piano from Melbourne
I could tell you right now, it was never in tune
But the work-weary diggers came crowding to hear it
When Samson would play in the late afternoon
On nights when Walhalla lit up like a fire
And the miners were roaring some boozy refrain
There would always be eyes lit with lust and desire
And bright gold for evenings with young Kitty Kane

Chorus

There were schemers and sailors and bearded old diggers
Whose tough, hairy hides had the gravel ground in
Young men far from home who still needed a mother
And sad furtive parsons who needed to sin
Rough, drunken brutes with the manners of cattle
Who let me lie bleeding and shaking in pain
I served them their drinks while my bruises were healing
And I laughed and I shone, I was still Kitty Kane

Chorus

I've heard the men singing down at the piano
That youth it soon passes and beauty will fade
But I gave them their pleasure when I was past forty
It's the light in me eyes made me queen of my trade
Though Walhalla now is all merchants and farmers
Whose wives see in me what they think of as shame
I'll die in this valley with fine, singing memories
My name's Kitty Kane, I was best in the game

Chorus (X2)

You can find the song on Margaret Walters' excellent 'Pithead and Fern' album.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 11:15 PM

I did it again - lost my cookie.

Here's an amusing little poem that my good mate, the late Paul Lawler, put to music. It is by the late John Manifold, a fine poet, activist and editor of the original 'Penguin Australian Song Book'. Perhaps Rich-Joy will post the tune to the website of Paul's music in due course.


ON THE DEATH OF MR HOLT
(John Manifold/Paul Lawler

Only a week before Christmas,
   The happiest day of the year,
They held a wake for Harold Holt,
   And the bigwig guests came here.

Bonnie Prince Charlie came owre the sea
   With Wilson, who never smiles,
And L.B.J. from the U.S.A
   And the king of the Cannibal Isles;

Chaps from Siam and from South Vietnam
   And the Philippines too, I think;
Some for the sake of the free, free world,
   And some for the free, free drink.

They made long speeches and shed loud tears
   To propitiate Harold's ghost,
And the king of the Cannibal Isles got up
   To propose a final toast.

He said: "We have had such a splendid time,
   Such generous Christmas cheer,
We hope you'll be able to drown
   A Prime Minister every year!"

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 26 Aug 20 - 03:52 AM

good one, Stewie, the more serious side of John Manifold


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 26 Aug 20 - 04:02 AM

& I located my Loaded Dog CDs today, so can play them again.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 26 Aug 20 - 10:57 PM

Many thanks for that, Sandra. It is very interesting, albeit difficult (physically), reading. Have you read his 'Who wrote the ballads'? He wrote one of Australia's finest poems:

The Tomb of John Learmonth AIF

THE SHAME OF GOING BACK
(Henry Lawson)

When you've come to make your fortune, and you haven't made your salt
And the reason of your failure isn't anybody's fault
When you haven't got a billet, and the times are very slack
There is nothing that can spur you like the shame of going back

Chorus:
Crawling home with empty pockets
Going back hard-up
Oh! it's then you learn the meaning of humiliation's cup

When the place and you are strangers and you struggle all alone
And you have a mighty longing for the town where you are known
When your clothes are very shabby, and the future's very black
There is nothing that can hurt you like the shame of going back

When you've fought the battle bravely and are beaten to the wall,
'Tis the sneer of man, not conscience, that makes cowards of us all
And while you are returning, oh! your brain is on the rack,
And your heart is in the shadow of the shame of going back

When a beaten man's discovered with a bullet in his brain
They post-mortem him, and try him, and they say he was insane
But it very often happens that he'd lately got the sack
And his onward move was owing to the shame of going back

Ah! my friend, you call it nonsense, and your upper lip is curled
You have had no real trouble in your passage through the world
But when fortune rounds upon you and the rain is on the track
You will learn the bitter meaning of the shame of going back

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 27 Aug 20 - 12:37 AM

we have copies of "Who wrote the Ballads" in BMC library.

THE PEOPLE HAVE SONGS
(Miguel Heatwole)

Here voices are tuned to each other in gladness
To all here in common affection belongs
Here joy and laughter meet keening and sadness
Here tyranny's cursed for the people have songs

Chorus:
Let us set the room ringing with the sound of our singing
When we come to the end let us hold the chord long
Hear the harmonies rise and all close our eyes
'Til the last cadence dies the people have songs

Here is war parting sweethearts
Here are strong sweating sailors
And poets for beauty who ardently long
Here are people at work singing loud at their labours
Here are marriage and drinking for the people have songs

Respect for each other gives each one a hearing
And whether the voice be uncertain or strong
We listen with love if the heart is endearing
Supported in harmony the people have songs

Disdaining oppression like others before us
Our gentleness angered by history's wrongs
Our tradition endures, and our voices in chorus
Are lifted in hope for the people have songs!

People have Songs on bandcamp

anotehr greta session song -


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 27 Aug 20 - 12:43 AM

TYPO! how did I hit submit?

another great session song is former Catter Canberra Chris's Call to Song , also recorded by Miguel for his latest CD More People Have songs, also available on Bandcamp. I'll ask him to pop in with the words.   

sandra


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 27 Aug 20 - 01:25 AM

Gotta have Union Street by Alistair Hulett

Siege of Union Street video

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=118813
THE SIEGE OF UNION STREET (words & music by Alistair Hulett) words taken from 'The Cold Grey Light of Dawn' by Alistair Hulett & Dave Swarbrick
Musikfolk Ltd, 1997.

The Unemployed Workers Union was formed in Melbourne during the Great Depression to fight evictions by heartless landlords of destitute families for non-payment of rent. A Sydney branch soon followed and the UWU drew thousands into it's ranks. Matters came to a head in Union Street in the inner city suburb of Erskinville in Sydney, when over a thousand militants fought a pitched battle with police that lasted several days. The tenants were a 'war widow' and her children, so emotions were running high and the struggle received much media coverage
The Communist Party was deeply committed to supporting the UWU and the police had assistance from the covert right wing paramilitary group identified by D.H. Lawrence in his novel "Kangaroo." Casualties on both sides were high but the issue was finally resolved when the Labor State Premier, Jack Lang, introduced legislation to protect the unemployed from being thrown out of their homes. Jim Munroe, a founding member of the UWU is the source of the material on which much of this song is based.


You should have seen us down at Erko
Fourteenth August, Saturday night
To Newtown, Stanmore, Enmore and Petersham
Calls went out 'Workers unite!'
We built a bloody great wall
With planks and boards full seven foot tall
We didn't mind the howling wind and sleet
When we stood around the fire at Union Street

The man from the shop said put it on tick
The kids came round with bottles and bricks
There was Irish stew and home-made lemonade
They were grand old days on the barricade

I never thought I would join a party
Carry a card or see things red
The sight of bare foot children crying
Out on the pavement turned my head
Their old man's over in France
Flapping like a rag on a barbed wire fence
Their Mum does what she can to make ends meet
And she's down at the siege of Union Street

The cops came down and they came down hard
They must have numbered five hundred strong
They called us reds and they cracked our heads
To teach us poor sinners right from wrong
I learned a lesson that night
It's all out war when you stand and fight
I saw those brisk young coppers on their beat
Behave like thugs in Union Street

Sunshine danced on the broken glass
It shone like diamonds as morning broke
The cops were back by the railroad track
And the streets were filled with working folk
They'd bashed us bloody and raw
But it forced Jack Lang to change the law
Now the landlords have to cop it sweet
And the Red Flag flies over Union Street

The man from the shop gave out licorice sticks
To the kids who cleaned up the bottles and bricks
Down the years those memories never fade
Of the grand old days on the barricade.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 27 Aug 20 - 10:50 PM

Another fine song from Alan Mann. Alan noted:

Home thoughts from abroad! Sitting in a Canadian airport in winter knowing that in Western Australia it is summer and remembering the landscapes and associated farming activities.


WINNIPEG IN WINTER
(Alan Mann)

Winnipeg in winter is not the place to be
When the wind is up to 30 knots and it's minus 23
And all around a sea of white, snow drifts and sheets of ice
Frozen lakes, high latitudes don't make for paradise

Freezing, fevered snowbound - I'm sitting all alone
In Winnipeg in winter, ten thousand miles from home

Summertime is beautiful, so the locals say
I'm not convinced to press my luck and stay another day
Instead of this white wilderness, I see the big red heart
Purple hill and spinifex - I'm ready to depart

Brown and yellow's on the fields, a harvest's coming in
Sweaty seat, the Inter truck, Kellerberrin bin
And all along the gravel roads, lines of eucalypts
Dance and shimmer in the heat, and make the light of it

There an azure ocean laps a golden beach
A little line of breakers is curling out of reach
Majestic stands off karris and ghostly river gums
Throw their shade at red-brown dirt 'til evening's blanket comes

Of this distant dreaming it's not hard to make some sense
When from a fresh-cut field of oats or along a barbed-wire fence
Dust clouds spiral skywards, you'd pause and take a guess
'It's forty in the water bag' - more or less

Stooped against the driving snow, hail the brave Canuck
Wrapped up in fur and feathers, shuffling through the muck
Tugging at the parka hood, he nods and says 'G'day'
Breaking links to a train of thought - ten thousand miles away

Winnipeg in winter is not the place to be
When the wind is up to 30 knots and it's minus 23
And all around a sea of white, snow drifts and sheets of ice
Frozen lakes, high latitudes don't rate with paradise

Freezing, fevered snowbound - I'm sitting all alone
In Winnipeg in winter, ten thousand miles from home

You can find the song on Loaded Dog's 'That there dog o' mine' album. For this one, there
is a beaut video on Youtube. Bob Rummery is lead singer:

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 27 Aug 20 - 11:41 PM

AWAY TO TINTINARA
(Mike O'Connor)

It's away to Tintinara and miles to Emu Springs
Every year a little farther to the song the drover sings
It's a hundred miles from Adelaide the Overlander rolls
Then a dusty road to sunrise where open bushland calls

Chorus:
And the music on the wind is the creaking of the saddle
And the rhythm of the song are the hooves upon the ground
Where the fences run forever to the dusty blue horizon
And like gems on distant velvet, stars echo to the sound 'Call me back'

There's a lonely crossroad beckons to the blue remembered hills
Then beyond the sands of Sugarloaf where memory lingers still
On the sunlit plains of yester year where lyre birds dance and sing
Are the echo of the voices a bushman's dreams can bring

Chorus

And around the paddock dreaming, you know that she'll be right
And around the billy boiling the stories last the night
For there's room enough for breathing, there's space to be your own
And to sing again the old song and watch the sun go down

Chorus

Martyn Wyndham-Read explains the genesis of the song at the end of this video:

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 28 Aug 20 - 03:57 AM

Sorry, only just got my 'puter back from the Docs (with a warning that it won't last too much longer :(   
I will try to add some more suggestions too!

Crikey Sandra, that's funny about "Poison Train" - it was a firm favourite in SE Qld sessions when I arrived some 27 years ago and is still frequently heard. Good Song!

Stewie, re "On the Death of Harold Holt" : a good 18 months back I was preparing Lawls' TEFC bracket of Manifold songs, with pics, for upload to his YT channel ..... not quite sure why they haven't manifested there yet ..... LtU&E, I guess :(

I was always very fond of "Fannie Bay" [by D&A Tainsh] as sung by the late "Tropical Ear" in Darwin. Their version was quite unlike the (Dobe Newton's) Bushwackers version, more poignant and more singable. And not at all like the "Galway Bay" parody on John T's "Oz Folk Song a Day" webpages!!!
So I'll just have to add another to my upload list, along with the previously mentioned "Northern Gulf", sung by Smokey.

Happy Friday!!
R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 28 Aug 20 - 09:04 PM

R-J, good to hear you got your 'puter back. What is LtU&E? Is it something like a 'round tuit'?

Bob Rummery put the tune to this one:

WHEN YOU'RE FLUSH
(T.Brittain/R.Rummery)

The work's been long and steady, now the contract's finished up
When the pass is hard, it doesn't pay to rush
Burning in my moleskin pocket is what I got from it
And there's other things you think of when you're flush
So I'll wind up the stringline, I'll put the tools away
And I'll turn the old camp-oven upside down
And in quest of earthly capers, I will look around a bit
And I'll try the bill of fare in Bunbury town
Yes, I'll try the bill of fare in Bunbury town

By the noon I'd crossed the sandplain and I didn't raise a sweat
'Cause a traveller that day was kind to me
I alighted from his sulky at the Prince of Wales Hotel
And soon afterwards embarked upon a spree
When a lady I befriended, so delightful was her charm
My desire of it was soon to wear me down
I feted her a fortnight with all the spice of life
It was nice, the bill of fare in Bunbury town
Yes, it was nice the bill of fare in Bunbury town

And then a day out at the races, some pennies that I tossed
Soon relieved me of my remaining dough
So I shouldered my possessions, I whipped the cat a bit
To the bush I stretched, 'twas time to strike a blow
Back across the Preston River, and about a mile beyond
Resting in the shade of Boyle O'Reilly's tree
My mind's eye shaped a picture of him trudging years before
In a way that seemed a parallel with me
Yes, In a way that seemed a parallel with me

Having finished with my dreaming at the junction of the roads
And with thirty mile or more still left to tramp
And past another sunrise to a gully farther on
I've rested in the refuge of my camp
Where I've unwound the stringline, I've turkeyed up my axe
And I hope my daily tallies bring renown
Cooking in the old camp-oven there's a lovely mutton stew
And it beats the bill of fare in Bunbury town
Yes, it beats the bill of fare in Bunbury town

I've been toiling long a steady since the contract started up
When the pass is hard, it doesn't pay to rush
I'll settle up and clean the slate with what I get from it
And I'll satisfy my needs when I am flushed
Yes, I'll satisfy my needs when I am flush

The song is on 'A coastline facing west'. Bob introduces the song in one of the few videos of the Dog available on the Net (there's some competition from sprog noises):

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 28 Aug 20 - 09:53 PM

Alan Mann used the tune of an old favourite for this one. He noted:

This is the true story of the founding of the town of Menzies in WA's goldfields in 1894. After striking it rich, Leslie Robert Menzies tipped his nuggets on the floor of the Bank of Coolgardie and proceeded to shout the town 4000 pounds worth of champagne. Lonnie Donegan had a great skiffle version of this tune which had previously been covered by Leadbelly and collected by Alan Lomax.

MENZIES' SHOUT (HAVE A DRINK ON ME)
(Alan Mann)

In the eighteen nineties down a dusty road
Came a saddle-bagged miner with a six ton load
Everybody - have a drink on me
He was caked in dust from his foot to his head
But he had a 'gold smile' it had to be said
Hey, hey ev'rybody drink on me

He reined his camels, hitched them to the rail
Shouted to his mates: 'Found the Holy Grail'
Everybody - have a drink on me
He staggered to the bank, tipped nuggets on the floor
'I've pegged out ground, there's a whole heap more'
Hey, hey ev'rybody drink on me

Chorus:
Have a drink, have a drink, have a drink on me
Ev'rybody have a drink on me
Hey, hey ev'rybody drink on me
Have a drink, have a drink, have a drink on me
Hey, hey ev'rybody drink on me

There's trouble in store at the Old Camp Saloon
It being quite early - not yet noon
Everybody have a drink on me
'First things first, a day of champagne
Settle in boys for a long campaign'
Hey, hey ev'rybody drink on me

Well I've been to Hannans and to Kununulling
Toasted success - this time we're skulling
Everybody have a drink on me
This new show, a hundred miles from here
Has beaten all the rest for all of last year
Hey, hey ev'rybody drink on me

I went to the Barossaa to float another mine
The gold was scarce, but the red was fine
Everybody have a drink on me
Seems like the gold and my luck have run out
But I remember the day it was my turn to shout

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 28 Aug 20 - 10:23 PM

"Life, the Universe, & Everything" Stew!
(#1 excuse for not coping, or doing!!!)
R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 28 Aug 20 - 11:20 PM

Thanks R-J.

There are fewer Paterson poems set to music than those of Lawson, but there are some. Cathie O'Sullivan put a tune to this one years ago.

SONG OF ARTESIAN WATER
(Paterson/O'Sullivan)

Now the stock have started dying, for the Lord has sent a drought,
But we're sick of prayers and Providence - we're going to do without,
With the derricks up above us and the solid earth below,
We are waiting at the lever for the word to let her go.
Sinking down, deeper down,
Oh, we'll sink it deeper down:
As the drill is plugging downward at a thousand feet of level,
If the Lord won't send us water, oh, we'll get it from the devil;
Yes, we'll get it from the devil deeper down.

Now, our engine's built in Glasgow by a very canny Scot,
And he marked it twenty horse-power, but he didn't know what is what.
When Canadian Bill is firing with the sun-dried gidgee logs,
She can equal thirty horses and a score or so of dogs.
Sinking down, deeper down
Oh, we're going deeper down:
If we fail to get the water, then it's ruin to the squatter,
For the drought is on the station and the weather's growing hotter,
But we're bound to get the water deeper down.

But the shaft has started caving and the sinking's very slow,
And the yellow rods are bending in the water down below,
And the tubes are always jamming, and they can't be made to shift
Till we nearly burst the engine with a forty horse-power lift,
Sinking down, deeper down,
Oh, we're going deeper down:
Though the shaft is always caving, and the tubes are always jamming,
Yet we'll fight our way to water while the stubborn drill is ramming-
While the stubborn drill is ramming deeper down.

But there's no artesian water, though we're passed three thousand feet,
And the contract price is growing, and the boss is nearly beat.
But it must be down beneath us, and it's down we've got to go.
Though she's bumping on the solid rock four thousand feet below,
Sinking down, deeper down,
Oh, we're going deeper down:
And it's time they heard us knocking on the roof of Satan's dwellin',
But we'll get artesian water if we cave the roof of hell in-
Oh we'll get artesian water deeper down.

But it's hark! the whistle's blowing with a wild, exultant blast,
And the boys are madly cheering, for they've struck the flow at last:
And it's rushing up the tubing from four thousand feet below,
Till it spouts above the casing in a million-gallon flow.
And it's down, deeper down-
Oh, it comes from deeper down:
It is flowing, ever flowing, in a free, unstinted measure
From the silent hidden places where the old earth hides her treasure-
Where the old earth hides her treasures deeper down.

And it's clear away the timber and it's let the water run,
How it glimmers in the shadow, how it flashes in the sun!
By the silent belts of timber, by the miles of blazing plain
It is bringing hope and comfort to the thirsty land again.
Flowing down, further down:
It is flowing further down
To the tortured thirsty cattle, bringing gladness in its going;
Through the droughty days of summer it is flowing, ever flowing-
It is flowing, ever flowing, further down.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 29 Aug 20 - 01:35 AM

Gerry Hallom put a tune to Paterson's beaut poem 'With the cattle'. He makes some minor changes and omissions: here is how he sings it:

WITH THE CATTLE
(Paterson/Hallom)

The drought is down on field and flock
The riverbed is dry
And we must shift the starving stock
Before the cattle die
So we muster up with weary hearts
At breaking of the day
And turn our heads to foreign parts
And take the stock away
By the stock routes bare and eaten
On dusty roads and beaten
In heat and drought and hopeless pain, we take the stock away

We cannot use the whips for shame
On beasts that crawl along
We have to drop the weak and lame
And try to save the strong
For the wrath of God is on the track
The drought fiend holds his sway
With blows and cries and stock whip crack
We take the stock away
As they fall we leave them lying,
With the crows to watch them dying
With half a chance to save their lives we take the stock away

So in dull despair the days go by
With never hope of change
But every stage we draw more nigh
The distant mountain range
And some may live to climb the pass
And reach the great plateau
And revel in the mountain grass
By streamlets fed with snow
As the mountain wind is blowing
It starts the cattle lowing
The creatures smell the mountain grass that's twenty miles away

They press towards the mountain grass
They look with eager eyes
Along the rugged stony pass
That slopes towards the skies
Though their feet may bleed from rocks and stones
And though the blood-drop starts
They struggle on with stifled groans
For hope is in their hearts
As the mountain wind is blowing
And the mountain grass is growing
They break in to a kind of run – pull up, and let them go!

The days are done of heat and drought
Upon the stricken plain
The wind has shifted right about
And brought the welcome rain
The river runs with sullen roar
All flecked with yellow foam
And we must take the road once more
And bring the cattle home
And it's `Lads! we'll raise a chorus
There's a pleasant trip before us
Towards the far-off mountain-land, to bring the cattle back'

We have to watch them close at night
For fear they'll make a rush
And break away in headlong flight
Across the open bush
And by the campfire's cheery blaze
With mellow voice and strong
We hear the lonely watchman raise
The overlander's song
While the stars shine out above us
Like the eyes of those who love us
The eyes of those who watch and wait to greet the cattle home

The plains are all awave with grass
The skies are deepest blue
And leisurely the cattle pass
And feed the long day through
But when we sight the station gate
We make the stockwhips crack
A welcome sound to those who wait
To greet the cattle back
And through the twilight falling
We hear their voices calling,
As the cattle splash across he ford and churn it into foam
And the children run to meet us
Our wives and sweethearts greet us
Their heroes from the overland who brought the cattle home

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Aug 20 - 10:04 AM

geez, Stewie, don't you have anything else to do!

I'd love to put some of Kevin Baker's songs up, but I'd have to type them. Tthere's not much online, just this bio from a 2006 appearance at Sutherland folk club.

Kevin Baker
A long time political activist and historian, Kevin Baker is a brilliant exponent on the social, economic and industrial life of the Illawarra. He has recorded in song the struggles of workers and the despair of unemployment. Kevin’s song The Snowy River Men” is regarded as the most powerful anti-war song ever written. His three recordings, The Snowy River Men, Still a Rich Man’s Land and Harvest and Heartbreak, all his own compositions carry a wealth of Australian history and are an invaluable Australian Folk Collection. A poet/singer/songwriter Kevin knows and feels the real Australia and has that special gift of telling a story in song.

Kevin Baker - Snowy River Men - video

Dear Mrs Allen I write to you today
To say that I was with your son just before he passed away
I trained with him at Goulburn and we traveled on to France
And I was there when he got hit in the German advance.

It seems so long ago since we marched into your town
And all the young men heard the call and signed their name straight down
And the girls and the children proudly all cheered us all along
At Bibbenluke that day was a feast of speech and song.

CHORUS - And the Snowy River men just couldn't march today
There's far too many of them dead for the rest to feel that way
The cold ground of Europe has been watered with their blood
There's a strange new crop of crosses rising in this foreign mud

From Goulburn to Sydney and then a ship from Circular Quay
A spirit of adventure stirred and filled both Les and Me
It was great to be with comrades true and travelling abroad
For a while the war seemed far away and the world was to be toured

In Durban the natives took us travelling in style
In rickshaws that they pulled along at a shilling a mile.
In Capetown we watched the black boys diving in the Bay
The Snowies had a good time there and would have liked to stay

CHORUS - But the Snowy River men just couldn't march today
There's far too many of them dead for the rest to feel that way
The cold ground of Europe has been watered with their blood
There's a strange new crop of crosses rising in this foreign mud

When we landed at Plymouth, we'd spent 8 weeks at sea
And entrained straight way for Wilton where our camp turned out to be,
They treated us well there so we really can't complain
That the sky was grey, the weather bleak and it always seemed to rain

When we set sail for France, the weather had turned fine
And it wasn't long before the call to reinforce the line
Then a shell whined above us and we were raked with stones and mud
And I turned and saw Les sitting there in a pool of his own blood

CHORUS And the Snowy River men just couldn't march today
There's far too many of them dead for the rest to feel that way
The cold ground of Europe has been watered with their blood
There's a strange new crop of crosses rising in this foreign mud

He stared as the blood poured out of his legless thigh
And I carried him back to the aid post close nearby
His blood soaked my uniform but he never breathed a sigh
And I had no idea then that he was going to die

When I left him he spoke of a pain inside his chest
I suppose that's what killed him, I just don't know the rest
But I know that we all miss him and cant help but wonder why
So many Snowy men so quickly had to die.

CHORUS - And the Snowy River men just couldn't march today
There's far too many of them dead for the rest to feel that way
The cold ground of Europe has been watered with their blood
There's a strange new crop of crosses rising in this foreign mud

We hear the king's grateful for all the men who've died
And is sending home a photo of the graves in which they lie
Well I still think that the cause is right but it's not clear any more
Why so many Australian men should die in Europe's war

We hope with our hearts that time will ease the pain
Of never once to see his face or hear his voice again
But I've seen so much death now since that day on which he died
That I can't now be the snowy man that once I was inside

CHORUS - And the Snowy River men just couldn't march today
There's far too many of them dead for the rest to feel that way
The cold ground of Europe has been watered with their blood
There's a strange new crop of crosses rising in this foreign mud


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Subject: LYR ADD - Kevin Baker - Superstar
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Aug 20 - 10:52 AM

Kevin Baker - Superstar

I still hear my mother whistling as she hung clothes on the line
While our neighbour did the Monday wash and sang away the time
Down the road on a building lot where hammers kept the beat
Workmen sang and shared their lunch with the boy from up the street
And the Baker's cart and the Rabbito came trading to a tune
As we lived to our own music morning night and afternoon.

CHORUS - But now you've got to be a superstar if you want to sing a song
If they catch you quietly singing people think there's something wrong
Somehow we lost the right to sing: it almost seem a crime
To share the things you care about in music, words and rhyme.

I hear echoes of my father in the songs he used to know
Of love and work and freedom; the memories start to flow
And my mother played an old squeeze-box as he people had before
And friends would visit friends and bring their songs in through the door.
And no-one was at all surprised or thought it indiscreet
If the friendly sound of music were to spill out on the street.

CHORUS

But now we get our music with an electronic sound
In accents strange and foreign that aren't heard on our home ground
It's slick and flash but hasn't got a thing to do with me
But it clogs up all our radios and floods out from TV
And I can't help looking back to when we thought we all belonged
Before we lost our voices and bought other people's songs.

CHORUS

Rabbits were poor people's meat & Rabbitos sold them door to door.


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Subject: LYR ADD - The Rabbiter by Stan Wakefield
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Aug 20 - 11:08 AM

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=23038

THE RABBITER
Words and music: Stan Wakefield

I read about the fortunes that the rabbiters make outback -
The sporting life and the lairy tales of prices fetched at Sydney sales,
So I started out across New South Wales on the roving rabbiters' track.

CHORUS: With a hool-em-up and a sool-em-up And the fool-em-up decoys;
The men who scalp the rabbiters Are the Sydney market boys.

A free and independent life, a life of simple joys
I camped beneath an old belah ' and my tucker was mostly fried galah,
And I trapped 'em near and I trapped 'em far, for the Sydney market boys.

I poisoned out at Hillston, and I trapped at Gundagai,
I followed 'em over creeks and bogs, and chopped 'em out of hollow logs,
And tailed 'em up with yelping dogs, 'way back of Boggabri.

Besides the bunnies that you catch, there's things that you despise:
A hawk, a snake, a crow, a rat, a bandicoot, a tiger cat,
And when you're lucky, a lamb that's fat is a welcome enough surprise.

I skinned and scalped and scalped and skinned, till my back was nearly broke,
With blood and muck all stiff and brown, the stink of my clothes would knock you down,
And I slaved all day for half a crown for the Sydney market bloke.

I thought I'd get a snifter cheque for skins I sent from Bourke,
But the broker rogues in Sydney Town, they weigh them short and they grade them down,
And they sent me back three lousy pound, for a month of slavin' work.

Some day we're going to set our traps to catch the hungry crew
Who live on useful workers' sweat -- we'll stop their thieving racket yet,
And to make them earn their tucker, you bet, is the job for me and you.

With a hool-em-up and a sool-em-up,
And there'll be no more decoys;
Then a-hunting, hunting we will go
For the Sydney market boys.


Stan (died early 1960s) wrote The Rabbiter's Song in the 1930s. It refers to the Government attempt to persuade the unemployed to go out and make money from trapping rabbits, instead of applying for the dole (which required working for the Government anyway - usually on public works programmes ... sometimes of utility and value).

Of course, when a whole mob of unemployed city slickers started sending off rabbit skins to the Sydney or Melbourne markets ... the price dropped (the law of supply and demand) as well as a number of the skins arriving rotten due to poor preparation. Anyway, there wasn't much money to be made in the game and Stan, being the good Left-winger that he was, wrote a beaut song and, being the competent musician that he was, wrote his own tune to it.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 29 Aug 20 - 04:50 PM

Thanks for The Rabbiter Sandra. It's one I've sung occasionally for many years, but I was missing the last verse. Now I have to graft that onto what is already in my brain.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Aug 20 - 10:24 PM

Extracts from Singabout - the early songwriters - Stan Wakefield (1906 - 1962)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 29 Aug 20 - 10:37 PM

It keeps me off the streets, Sandra. Thanks for posting the Wakefield songs - excellent. it looks like it is up to us. I am puzzled by the absence of our thread moderator who listed songs in Joe's original thread, but has posted none.

Anyhow, this lovely song is one of my wife's favourites.

BRUNSWICK ROAD
(Steve Groves & Danny Bourke)

I know a woman who says she's old
She weaves a spell around my rented house of stone
It's late when we leave at the foot of the stairs
The gas pipes ring as she laughs and sings of her dancing years

Chorus:
And she tells me we should go home down Brunswick Road
Where we would walk and we would talk till the moon went down
We were arm in arm, as in days of old
We thought the street was lined with gold down Brunswick Road

We live in the heart of the town she loves
She doesn't mind I can't recall her yesterdays.
Outside the hall, the iron lace
Her dancing's over now the pain is on her face

She laughs again, she sees her man
He's singing Daisy on a bike out in the rain
He fades from sight, he's out of view
and if I had the chance I'd bring him back to you

Chorus

As sung by Graham Dodsworth:

Brunswick Road

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 29 Aug 20 - 11:03 PM

SHEARING IN A BAR
(Duke Tritton)

My shearing days are over, though I never was a gun
I could always count my twenty at the end of every run
I used the old trade union shears, and the blades were always full
As I drove ’em to the knockers, and I chopped away the wool
I shore at Goorianawa and didn’t get the sack
From Breeze out to Compadore, I always could go back
And though I am a truthful man, I find when in a bar
My tallies seem to double, but I never call for tar

Shearing on the western plains where the fleece is full of sand
And the clover burr and corkscrew grass is the place to try your hand
Where the sheep are tall and wiry where they feed on the Mitchell grass
And every second one of them is close to the cobbler class
And a pen chock full of cobblers is a shearer's dream of hell
So loud and lurid are their words when they catch one on the bell
But when you’re pouring down the grog, there's no need to call for tar
For a shearer never cuts ’em, when shearing in a bar

At Louth I caught the bell sheep, a wrinkled, tough-wooled brute
Who never stopped his kicking till I tossed him down the chute
My wrist was aching badly, but I fought him all the way
I couldn’t afford to miss a blow, I must earn my pound a day
So when I’d take a strip of skin, I’d hide it with my knee
Turn the sheep around a bit where the right bower couldn’t see
Then try and catch the rousie’s eye and softly whisper 'tar'
But it never seems to happen when I’m shearing in the bar

I shore away the belly wool and trimmed the crutch and hocks
Opened up along the neck while the rousie swept the locks
Then smartly swung the sheep around and dumped him on his rear
Two blows to clip away the wig – I also took an ear
Then down around the shoulder when me full blades open wide
As I drove ’em on the long blow and down the whipping side
And when the fleece fell on the board, he was nearly black with tar
But this is never mentioned when I’m shearing in a bar

Now when the season's ended and my grandsons all come back
In their buggies and their sulkies -I was always on the track
They come and take me into town to fill me up with beer
And I sit on a bar stool and listen to them shear
There’s not a bit of difference – it must make the angels weep
To hear a mob of shearers in a barroom shearing sheep
For the sheep go rattling down the race with never a call for tar
For a shearer never cuts ’em when he’s shearing in a bar

Then memories come crowding in and they wipe away the years
And my hand begins to tighten and I seem to feel the shears
I want to tell them of the sheds, the sheds where I have shorn
Full fifty years and maybe more, before these boys were born
I want to speak of Yarragin, Dunlop or Wingadee
But the beer has started working and I’m wobbling at the knees
So I’d better not start shearing, I’d be bound to call for tar
Then be treated as a blackleg when I’m shearing in a bar

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Aug 20 - 11:33 PM

Extracts from Singabout - the early songwriters - Duke Tritton (1886-1965)

I'll contact Gerry


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Aug 20 - 11:35 PM

Pete Seeger talks with Duke Tritton 1963


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 30 Aug 20 - 07:14 PM

Western Australian Herald - 23 October 1869:

Preparation for the New Pearling Season ...take the first of the ebb and glide away out of the creek ... then comes the most important part, the picking up of niggers ... for pearling after all would never pay white labour.

LEWIS ISLAND LUGGER
(M.Murray & L.Silvester)

The lugger is painted already
She is painted in red and in green
She is painted so gaily we smile at her
She is painted in red and in green

The lugger is rigged out already
She's rigged out with tackles and ropes
She's rigged out to take us a-pearling
She's rigged out with tackles and ropes

And the lugger is charted already
She's charted out from Nichol Bay
She's charted to go for the pearling
She's charted out from Nichol Bay

O father why are we waiting
Away from our home far away
Why do we wait on Lewis Island
For the lugger to take us away


And the lugger is loaded already
She's loaded with beer and with wine
Loaded with blackbirds from the Gascoyne
Loaded with beer and with wine

The lugger is waiting already
She's sailing away from the land
She's taken away my family
She's sailing away from the land

O father why are we waiting
Away from our home far away
Why do we wait on Lewis Island
For the lugger to take us away


And the lugger is stranded already
She's stranded between surf and reef
Now gone are my sister and brother
Stranded between surf and reef

And their headstone is written already
Written in pearl shells and blood
A headstone to stand among many
Written in pearl shells and blood

O father why are we waiting
Away from our home far away
Why do we wait on Lewis Island
For the lugger to take us away


And the lugger is saiing already

The song may be found on Mike Murray and Lesley Silvester 'Strangers on the Shore' TimeTrackers TT0101 2001. It is an album of true stories of ships, the sea and first contact with Western Australia.

Mike and Lesley noted:

Blackbirding flourished in the pearling industry in NW Australia. Kidnapped Aborigines from the Gascoyne region were held captive on islands such as Lewis Island, and the luggers would call in from time to time to replace those who had perished either from the bends, ill-treatment or shipwreck.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 30 Aug 20 - 07:57 PM

Here's another one from the NT. Dave Oakes is a fine singer/songwriter from Alice Springs.
[He's not the one you get if you put the name in Youtube search],

BENEATH ULURU
(Dave Oakes)

Looking forward to seeing you
You're just a week away
And like so many times before
I'd want that time to stay for more
And yet before we know it
We'll be saying our goodbyes
Time will have come and gone
To be seen through memory's eyes

Time has no time, time's passing through
No one can hold it, it's always anew
That was a time, the memory of you
Under the starlight beneath Uluru


Nothing comes from yearnin'
Just an achin' for the heart
And time is just like learnin'
With no endin' and no start
Got no time for worryin'
'Bout tomorrow or yesterday
Stop the clock and turn the tide
It's on the wings of change time flies

Time has no time, time's passing through
No one can hold it, it's always anew
That was a time, the memory of you
Under the starlight beneath Uluru


That was a time, the memory of you
Under the starlight beneath Uluru

Youtube clip

Perhaps R-J could check my above transcription.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Aug 20 - 10:36 PM

SHIP REPAIRING MEN
(Harry Robertson)

To the workshop off we go, toolkits heavy in our hands
To a big ship that’s come in, from a trip to foreign lands
Salty streaks of rust have marked her, but her moorings hold her tight
And we’ll work to fix her engines, all today and half the night

CHORUS:
Don’t wait up for me this evening — I’ll be out all night again
Working on the Brisbane River with the ship repairing men.

Oil-fired boilers throb with power, drinking up the furnace heat
Water turns to driving steam to make the engines beat
But the feed pump’s sighing wail to us cuts through all other sound
As it sings a song of triumph, for the valves that we have ground

Engine bearings that knocked and hammered through the wild and stormy seas
Will be machined and fitted till they run with silent ease
And that winch that rattles every time the piston turns the shaft
Will hum along and sing its song to men skilled in their craft

When you see an ocean liner glide between the river banks
And the Captain in his gold braid orders men of lesser ranks
Have you thought perhaps this stately craft might never sail again
If it wasn’t for the toil and sweat of ship repairing men

The National Sound and Screen Archive released a CD of Robertson: 'Whale Chasing Men' SSA/WC0022. This song is not on it. I first heard it on a Declan Affley LP. You can find it on Evan
Mathieson 'Harry's Legacy' Mamaia 0701. Evan Mathieson has a second CD devoted to Robertson: 'Tribute to Harry Robertson' Mamaia 0902.

Here is a rendition by John Thompson.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 30 Aug 20 - 11:14 PM

Bugger, I did it again - all the nameless GHESTS in this thread are yours truly.

Here's another Robertson favourite that I first heard on Declan Affley's 'Rake and a Rambling Man' LP.

HOMELESS MAN
(Harry Robertson)

I've travelled hard these last ten weary years
And my youthful dreams have slowly turned to fears
If you think I am complaining I can tell you that I'm not
For I know that this is just the drifter's lot

Many years my home has been the wayside camp
And I've starved and sweated on the river banks
And I've fought with fists and feet, rough-neck drifters that I meet
Broken dreams and bottles pave my lonely street

As a homeless boy I thought when I'm a man
I'll change this world and right what wrongs I can
Since then I have met defeat, it's a bitter bread to eat
And the homeless boy is now a homeless man

Happiness has not been mine upon this earth
Both my parents left me when they met their death
And I'll drink before I eat with the drifters that I meet
But the sorrow here is mine and mine alone

So my friends I think that I should move along
And I'm glad that you have listened to my song
For the road is all I know and I'll wander it alone
As an outcast homeless drifter, and unknown

The text above is copied from the booklet to Mathieson's 'Harry's Legacy'. Evidently, the tune is
traditional Norwegian.

The only clip I could find on the Net is by Warren Fahey:

Youtube clip

Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 30 Aug 20 - 11:43 PM

Perhaps the best-known of Robertson's songs is 'Wee Pot Stove'. I've copied this text from the booklet to Mathieson's 'Harry's Legacy':

WEE POT STOVE
(Harry Robertson)

How the winter blizzards blow when the Whaling Fleet's at rest
Tucked in Leither Harbour's sheltered bay, safely anchored ten abreast
The whalers at their stations, as from ship to ship they go,
Carry little bags of coal with them, and a little iron stove.

Chorus:
In that wee dark engine room, where the chill seeps in your soul
How we huddled roon' that wee pot stove, that burned oily rags and coal

Fireman Paddy worked with me, on the engines stiff and could
A stranger to the truth was he, there's not a lie he hasn't told
He boasted of his gold mines, and the hearts that he had won
And his bonny sense of humour shone, just like a ray of sun.

Chorus

We laboured seven days a week, with could hands and frozen feet
Bitter days and lonely nights making grog and having fights
Salt fish and whalemeat sausage, fresh penguin eggs a treat
And we trudged along to work each day through icy winds and sleet

Chorus

Then one day we saw the sun, and the factory ship's return,
Meet your old friends, sing a song, hope the season won't be long
Then homeward bound when it's over, we'll leave this icy cove
But I always will remember that little iron stove

Perhaps the best-known cover is the one by Nic Jones who recorded it under the title 'The Little Pot Stove' and used a phrase in the song as the title of his album.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 31 Aug 20 - 12:27 AM

Speaking of Henry Lawson, I'd like to put in a vote for Reedy River.

http://folkstream.com/073.html

Cheers,

Andrez


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 31 Aug 20 - 05:00 AM

good one, Andrez

Stewie - Chloe & Jason Roweth present Saturday Streaming 8th August, 7-8.30pm (Aus Eastern Standard time), The Songs & Tunes of Bob Rummery, live on facebook, donations welcome (To be posted on youtube a week later)

Over the years our repertoire has greatly benefited from the addition of songs from Bob Rummery, and we are thrilled to have the chance to focus on his work in this special presentation.

Bob has been performing and championing West Australian songs and music both as a solo performer and with West Australian band Loaded Dog for many years. He is a fine tune writer and sets Australian poetry to music as though it was always meant to be sung that way.

It occurs to me that many folks who loves Bob Rummery’s work, might not be Facebook users. If you know anyone who might be interested, please pass it on... As usual for our Saturday Streaming shows, it will be on YouTube early next week.

Likewise - it’d be great to have mates of Bob’s join in the craic on Saturday night. It’ll be a real pleasure to focus on his great work - all in one show!

We’d appreciate any folks sharing this one - hoping to reach all Bob’s friends and fan...


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Andrez
Date: 31 Aug 20 - 07:37 AM

Another one of my all time favourites, Weevils in the Flour by Dorothy Hewitt in 1962. Somewhere on one of my old cassettes I've got a version of the late Hugh McDonald singing this and I also have fond memories of Dave Brannigan singing it around the traps and or folk festivals too.

The link belowis a video with her son (I think) singing a version.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tgp7zWdZtoM

Cheers,

Andrez


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 31 Aug 20 - 07:57 AM

Joe is her son & one of her literary executors

from Bush Music Club Blog -
Weevils in the Flour, October 2012. A preliminary history of a song;
the early songwriters - Dorothy Hewett (1923-2002) & Merv Lilley (1919-2016)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 31 Aug 20 - 10:02 AM

Thanks, Sandra. I'm not on facebook, but I'll watch it on Youtube. Bob is a fine composer and performer and a thoroughly good bloke. He composed a tune after a bbq and music session with Darwin folkies. We would occasionally gather on the cliffs above the Nightcliff foreshore for such sessions. He simply titled it 'Nightcliff' and it is the final track on his solo album 'The Man with the Concertina'.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 31 Aug 20 - 10:08 AM

I'm not on facebook either, but I do look at a few sites.

I used to have Bob's CD but gave most of my Oz CDS to a radio program that promotes Australian music, otherwise I could listen again.   

sandra


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 31 Aug 20 - 07:29 PM

Gerry Hallom put a tune to Paterson's 'Song of the wheat'. Once again, he makes omissions and minor changes to the poem. Here is what he sings:

SONG OF THE WHEAT
(Paterson/Hallom)

We have sung the song of the droving days
Of the march of the travelling sheep
How in silent stages and lonely ways
The drovers’ herds did creep
But the man who now by the land would thrive
Must keep to a plough-share beat
And the singer changing his tune may strive
To sing the song of the wheat

Silver gum and box and pine
’Twas axe and fire for all
We scarce could tarry to blaze the line
Or wait for the trees to fall
But the land was cleared both far and wide
As the dust from the horses feet
Rose up like a pillar of smoke to guide
The wonderful march of wheat

Furrow by furrow, and fold by fold
The soil is turned on the plain
It’s better than silver, it’s better than gold
The precious mine of the grain
Better than cattle and better than sheep
In the fight with drought and heat
For a stubborn streak both wide and deep
Lies hid in a grain of wheat

Green and amber and gold it grows
As the sun sinks late in the west
And the breeze sweeps over the rippling rows
Where the quail and the skylark nest
Mountain or river or shining star
There’s never a sight can beat
Away to the skyline stretching far
A sea of the ripening wheat

When the burning harvest sun sinks low
And the shadows stretch on the plain
The roaring harvesters come and go
Like ships on a sea of grain
And the lurching, groaning wagons bear
Their tale of the load complete
Of the world’s great work he has done his share
The man who has gathered wheat

Princes, kings and queens and czars
Travel in royal states
But old King Wheat has a thousand cars
For his trip to the water-gate;
And his thousand steamships breast the tide
And sail through the winds and sleet
To the lands where the teeming millions lie
And say, ‘Thank God for wheat!’

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 01 Sep 20 - 07:08 PM

Another themed concert that Phil Beck and I presented was entitled 'A Sense of Place'. It included several songs that may be of interest in this context.

This one, relating to the red centre, is by a Scot.

SINGING LAND
(Dougie Maclean)

Your burning skies are never ending across your red brush plains
Out where the dingo still is king and eternity remains
There between the old and ancient desert oasis bright
Your gentle children who have gone are close to me tonight

Chorus:
In your singing land
In your singing land
Shine on, oh shine on over me

There's a feeling still and eerie, there's a feeling strong
The path humanity has come and the path that he has gone
Me I am, I am just passing, three score years and ten
And I'm just a stranger who may never come this way again

Chorus

Under the spell of caterpillar dreaming a new light shapes its form
Along the river's naked banks which are straining from the storm
On secret rock in thunder ocean the tree of man grows clear
The woodlarks sing, the woodlarks dance and the dawn is slipping near

Chorus

Youtube clip

Phi's intro:

'The Singing Land' is set in the MacDonnell Ranges out of the Alice Springs. The red centre of Australia is a place of quiet almost mystical vastness where, as yet, man has made little impact. It’s magnificent ancient country, a vision splendid in any and every direction. The song captures perfectly the timelessness of this place of Aboriginal dreaming. The three score years and ten conventionally allotted to we mortals is as nothing to the ancient Country that is just there and has been so forever, seeming to mock the utter insignificance of man. The melody too fits perfectly with the tranquillity of the red centre: it’s in sync with the rhythm of the land which is slow, and natural change will take its own good time.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 01 Sep 20 - 07:21 PM

My friend, Terry Piper, was at one time a ranger at Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory - he now lives in Cairns. He wrote this song decades ago, but its theme is still very relevant. Just recently, a mining company blew up sacred sites in the Kimberley.

BAW BAW BIG BILL
(Terry Piper)

It’s been ten long years now
Since they first found uranium
Did you know what it meant
Did you see through the lies
When they hounded your people
Did you know it was no good
Did you give up the fighting
Just for some peace and quiet

Chorus:
And it’s baw baw Big Bill
Will the brolgas keep dancing
Will the bones rest safe
In the caves where they lie
Though the people keep coming
And the mines keep on growing
Who’ll look after the land
One day when you die

In come the people
With machines and their buildings
And they take what they want
Do they ever give back
And they stay only long enough
To earn what they can
They just couldn’t give a damn
They’ll never return

Chorus

You’re a rich man now
But will that really save you
Where will you spend it
And what will you buy
And your culture will change
When it’s all you’ve to cling to
And they’ll use all the money
As a cheap alibi

Chorus

You’re watching the old people
The once proud and bold people
They get fewer each day
Its hard to survive
When the drink takes its hold
It soon takes its toll
When there’s so much to run from
Is it easier to hide

Chorus

It’s been ten long years now
Since they first found uranium
And you land has changed more
Than in ten thousand years
And the scars will live on
Once the tears have long gone
Will they poison the world
While your people disappear

Chorus (x2)

My intro:

Big Bill Neidjie was a traditional owner of the northern Kakadu National Park area. Fearing that he might take his language and traditional secrets to the grave, he shared many of his stories with anthropologists despite the taboo against revealing them to the uninitiated.

The English language has a word that closely links human distress to a sense of place. The root meaning of ‘nostalgia’ – nostos, return to home or native land and algia, pain or sickness – was a concept related to a medically diagnosable illness.   It is well-documented that dispossessed indigenous peoples worldwide have been likely to experience such a pathology. They have experienced physical and mental illness at rates far beyond those of other groups. Their social problems – unemployment, alcoholism, substance abuse, disproportionate rates of suicide, incarceration etc – have led to community dysfunction and crisis. Yi-Fu Tuan, the eminent pioneering researcher of sense of place, points out that such serious distress of nostalgia can also be produced by a feeling of changes occurring too rapidly and without one’s control.


--Stewie


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 01 Sep 20 - 07:54 PM

This is by a Queensland singer/songwriter:

HANGING ON FOR THE RAIN
(Anne Infante)

Well Christmas is coming across this dry land
I’m hanging on, I’m hanging on
I’ve drawn the line, I’m making a stand
Hanging on for the rain
The shepherds who watched o’er my flocks have all gone
I’m hanging on I’m hanging on
The few sheep I’ve left I can watch on my own
I’m hanging on for the rain

Chorus
I’m hanging, on I’m hanging on, this drought can’t last for ever
And I’m searching the skies blinking sweat from my eyes
While I wait for a break in the weather

The wise men flew in to this land scorched and parched
They said the drought won’t break til maybe next March
Well I’ve sold all the cattle that I can afford
And now I’m hand rearing the best of my herd

And the kids they’re excited that Christmas is near
They’ll think Santa’s a mean old bugger this year
For Jill wants a raggy doll, Jack wants a train
But my Christmas wish is for good summer rain

When they close the long paddock, you know times are hard
There’s no use going droving with no grass to be had
And I’ve thought about walking off hundreds of times
But I’m tied to the land with invisible chains.

This song was recorded by Danny Spooner's for his final album 'Home'. Danny's note:

Australia is a country of extreme weather patterns: flood and fire, wind and drought are part of the rural weather cycle. In Anne Infante's song, we hear a farmer enduring these devastating extremes to restock when conditions improve.

Phil's intro:

This song was written about 10 or 15 years ago and, taking away references to toy trains for example, could easily describe the Australia of the 1800s. The fact that it would have been as relevant then as it is now demonstrates how little has changed in the bush. This ancient land changes slowly.

Anne Infante

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Andrez
Date: 01 Sep 20 - 08:03 PM

Great one Stewie. I'd completeley forgotten about BB big Bill but the tune came right back to me as soon as I read the words. It resonates especially as I spent a long time working in the NT and the Kimberley. One special moment that comes back to me was the time I visited Kalkaringi and took the chance to stand at Wattie Creek and reflect on time past a few years earlier when Gough met Vincent Lingiari.

Cheers,

Andrez


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 01 Sep 20 - 08:59 PM

Thanks for your comments, Andrez. You remind me that this one should be posted:

FROM LITTLE THINGS BIG THINGS GROW
(Paul Kelly/Kev Carmody)

Gather round people I’ll tell you a story
An eight-year-long story of power and pride
’Bout British Lord Vestey and Vincent Lingiarri
They were opposite men on opposite sides
Vestey was fat with money and muscle
Beef was his business, broad was his door
Vincent was lean and spoke very little
He had no bank balance, hard dirt was his floor

From little things big things grow
From little things big things grow

Gurindji were working for nothing but rations
Where once they had gathered the wealth of the land
Daily the oppression got tighter and tighter
Gurindji decided they must make a stand
They picked up their swags and started off walking
At Wattie Creek they sat themselves down
Now it don’t sound like much but it sure got tongues talking
Back at the homestead and then in the town

From little things big things grow
From little things big things grow

Vestey man said, 'I’ll double your wages
Seven quid a week you’ll have in your hand'
Vincent said, 'Uhuh we’re not talking about wages
We’re sitting right here till we get our land'
Vestey man roared and Vestey man thundered
'You don’t stand the chance of a cinder in snow'
Vince said, 'If we fall others are rising'

From little things big things grow
From little things big things grow

Then Vincent Lingiarri boarded an aeroplane
Landed in Sydney, big city of lights
And daily he went round softly speaking his story
To all kinds of men from all walks of life
And Vincent sat down with big politicians
This affair they told him is a matter of state
'Let us sort it out, your people are hungry'
Vincent said, 'No thanks, we know how to wait'

From little things big things grow
From little things big things grow

Then Vincent Lingiarri returned in an aeroplane
Back to his country once more to sit down
And he told his people let the stars keep on turning
We have friends in the south, in the cities and towns
Eight years went by, eight long years of waiting
Till one day a tall stranger appeared in the land
And he came with lawyers and he came with great ceremony
And through Vincent’s fingers poured a handful of sand

From little things big things grow
From little things big things grow

That was the story of Vincent Lingiarri
But this is the story of something much more
How power and privilege cannot move a people
Who know where they stand and stand in their law

From little things big things grow
From little things big things grow
From little things big things grow
From little things big things grow

Youtube clip

Wave Hill story

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 01 Sep 20 - 09:22 PM

Oodgeroo Noonuccal (Kath Walker) was the first Aboriginal Australian to publish a volume of verse.

NO MORE BOOMERANG
(Kath Walker)

No more boomerang, no more spear
Now all civilised, colour bar and beer

No more corroboree, gay dance and din
Now we got movies and pay to go in

No more sharing what the hunter brings
Now we work for money and pay it back for things

Now we track bosses to catch a few bob
Now we go walkabout on bus to the job

One time naked who never knew shame
Now we put clothes on to hide whatsaname

No more gunya, now bungalow
Paid by hire purchase in twenty years or so

Lay down the stone axe, take up the steel,
Work like a nigger for a white man's meal

No more firesticks that made whites scoff
Now all electric and no better off

Bunyip he finish got now instead,
Whitefella bunyip, call him Red

Abstract pictures now, what they comin' at
Cripes, in our caves, we did better than that

Black hunted wallaby, white hunt dollar
Whitefella witchdoctor wear dog collar

No more message lubras and lads
Got television now, mostly ads

Lay down the woomera, lay down the waddy
Now we got atom bomb. End everybody

Gerry Hallom put a tune to the poem and recorded it on his 'Old Australian Ways' album. There are some alterations.

Youtube clip

Oodgeroo Noonuccal

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 02 Sep 20 - 10:18 AM

Phyl Lobl's EP Dark-Eyed Daughter. audio of the EP

This EP recording was made in 1968 for the Aboriginal Advancement League of Victoria. All proceeds went to the League. Director Stan Davey and Pastor Doug Nicholls were instrumental in organising the recording with W&G and for the distribution of the disc.

“Dark Eyed Daughter” Lobl nee Vinnicombe
“Whose hand?” Ian Hills/Margaret Kitamura
“No more boomerang” Oodgeroo Noonuccal (Kath Walker)
Will you fight, will you dare?” Lobl nee Vinnicombe


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Sep 20 - 08:25 PM

My apologies, Sandra. I had forgotten that you posted links re 'From little things...' It seems so long ago. Anyhow, the words are now available on this thread.

From Union Songs website:

THIRTY TON LINE
(Don Henderson)

Purpose built tugs that like line boats attended
berthed bulk coal carriers in open sea.
To fulfil that function, the union contended,
required four deckhands. The owners said three.
Three deckhands and motorman just couldn't handle
sixteen inch polyprop, double dead eyes.
When the tow-hook was blacked, the company gambled
on a tension winched, ten inch, calm sea compromise.

Chorus
Broadsound. Belyando. Nebo. Sarina.
The sea snaps your hawsers like thin strands of twine.
Broadsound. Belyando. Nebo. Sarina.
Hundred ton bollard pull thirty ton line.

At two in the morning we made fast the Martha.
By nine the Academy Star had been berthed.
Then all tugs and line boats returned to the harbour.
Their work being finished, the four crews dispersed.
Five the same evening, storm warnings were sounding.
Cyclone approaching, no time for delay.
At their berths the big bulkies were taking a pounding.
Broadsound and Belyando must get them away.

To Hay Point at full speed the two tugs went dashing;
got lines on the Martha at Wharf Number Two.
Though twelve foot green water on our decks was crashing,
the order for maximum tow had come through.
With the whole hull vibrating, the tension winch slipping,
then came the moment that all tugmen dread.
The sudden lurch forward, the broken line whipping.
The thought of old shipmates; the injured, the dead.

The Martha had cleared just as our line had broken.
The Academy Star was at Wharf Number One.
Though the help we could offer might be but a token,
in her plight that help would be better than none.
Time and again, we tried to position,
so the tow might commence with all possible speed.
With a jury-rigged line and in such bad conditions,
three deckhands and motorman could not succeed.

Well, not fully laden and high in the water,
the Academy Star could not be controlled.
With a strong on-shore wind by her bow on the quarter,
she slammed at the pylons till her hull had holed.
And yet the ship owners and those who do their will,
send tugs to sea, light on gear, under-manned.
One million dollars will be the repair bill.
They'd pay that in preference to one more deckhand.

Notes

Don Henderson wrote:

"Arriving in Mackay for me to assess the songwriting situation for "The Flames of Discontent" album created a bit of suspicion among maritime workers.
Willsie had stayed C.P.A. when E.V. Elliott had led the union to the S.P.A. and who was this ageing hippy in Chelsea Flair cowboy boots and a burgundy and gold brocade coat that understood the struggle for tug jobs anyway?
A well known P&D knuckle man was delegated to ask me why I wore a coat like that. I answered that it got me into a better class of fight. He took back the verdict that I was O.K. After a week's work and no song had appeared, this verdict was being questioned. Back in Brisbane going over notes, a bit of paper appeared on which l'd written down the names of the tugs and line boats as they were tied up at the wharf.
Broadsound, Belyando, Nebo, Sarina. Said quickly it seemed to sing. Getting the facts of the night right, I wrote the song and sent a cassette to Mackay.
The original O.K. verdict was confirmed. I might look like an old ponce but the song was the one they wanted."

Don first recorded this song on the 1979 LP "Flames Of Discontent". It is also on the MUA Centenary CD "With These Arms"

The tune can be found here:

Union Songs

Music and chords are on p176 of Don Henderson '100 Songs & Poems: A Quiet Century' Queensland Folk Federation-

Danny Spooner did a fine rendition on his 'Emerging Tradition' CD.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 02 Sep 20 - 11:31 PM

I did it again. I must stop clearing my website data each evening. But, as Art Thieme would say, when your memory's shot, forget it.

The tune to this one is on a Mudcat thread, but not the lyrics. It was very popular back in the early days of the revival. I first heard it on a Declan Affley LP.

RAKE AND A RAMBLING MAN
(Don Henderson)

Chorus
I am a rake and a rambling man
Fortune I fall to when I can
Could I be, would I be, other than
A rake and rambling man

I travel far, I travel wide
From where winds spring to where winds blow
And if I walk or if I ride
Won't matter only that I go
Stay with the friends that I have made
I stay with the rich and the poor
No welcome has been overstayed
I never linger too long for
I'm a rake but a rambling man

With the police, I know the score
Seldom we meet, but now and then
I'm called to mind that there are more
Police than ever were rambling men
Once as I got, I quickly returned
I am a man and free
Long nights go by and the lesson learned
That in jail no one can be
A rake or a rambling man

Women know men and that talk of the day
Pries at the secrets silent nights hold
Two thousand miles and ten towns away
Names fade and fall from the story that's told
Walked into wind whips at the foot fall
Night breeze is soft and soon spent
Who can't love one might better love all
What cares the road of the farewell that went
With a rake that's a rambling man

I travel far, I travel wide
From where winds spring to where winds blow
For every hill has an unseen side
Cross roads that quarrel the four ways to go
I'll take by chances with fortune and fame
Heads and tails fall as they will
If some know my song who do not know my name
It will not matter if I am still
A rake and a rambling man

The tune and chords may be found at page 63 of the abovemented Don Henderson songbook.

Henderson noted: 'Declan Affley sang this song beautifully. He gave it a quality that can't be conveyed on this page, one that I am not sure was even there when I wrote it. Some reviewers have said that this song is autobiographical; so is the information on my driver's licence'.

Youtube only gives you a Don Williams song with a similar name.

The Affley recording has been reissued on the double CD 'Songs of Don Henderson' on Shoestring Productions label - well worth purchasing:

CD

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 03 Sep 20 - 05:16 AM

it's also on the LP Declan Affley made by Colleen Burke, Mark Gregory & Peter Parkhill in 1987, & I'm lucky enough to have a CD version of it, made by a friend some years back.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 03 Sep 20 - 08:44 PM

Sandra, also thanks to a good friend, I'm fortunate enough to have 3 Affley LPs on CD and also the Australian Folk Archive vintage live recordings CD.

Gary Shearston added a tune to Thomas E. Spencer's lovely 'Bonnie Jess'. Spencer is perhaps best remembered for his 'How McDougal topped the score'.

BONNIE JESS
(T.Spencer/G.Shearston)

Now the shearing time is over, Bonnie Jess
And the sheep are in the clover, Bonnie Jess
By the creek the kine are lowing
And the golden crops are growing
While the setting sun is glowing, Bonnie Jess
And a kiss to you he's blowing, Bonnie Jess

To your face the crimson's rushing, Bonnie Jess
Ah! I know why you are blushing, Bonnie Jess
‘Tis the memory appearing
Of the promise in the clearing
When you said twixt hope and fearing, Bonnie Jess
You would wed him after shearing, Bonnie Jess

And now the shearing time is over, Bonnie Jess
And you're looking for your lover, Bonnie Jess
And his horse's hooves are ringing
As along the road he's swinging
And a song for you he's singing, Bonnie Jess
And the wedding ring he's bringing, Bonnie Jess

I first heard it on the Cobbers' beaut LP 'Portaits of Australian Women' which is still available as a digital download via Bandcamp.

Cobbers

Shearston

--Stewie


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 03 Sep 20 - 08:59 PM

GIRLS IN OUR TOWN
(Bob Hudson)

Girls in our town, they just haven't a care
You see them on Saturday floating on air
Painting their toenails and washing their hair
Maybe tonight it'll happen

Girls in our town they leave school at fifteen
Work at the counter or behind the machine
And spend all their money on making the scene
They plan on going to England

Girls in our town go to parties in pairs
Sit 'round the barbecue, give themselves airs
Then they go to the bathroom with their girlfriend who cares
Girls in our town are so lonely

Girls in our town are too good for the pill
But if you keep asking they probably will
Sometimes they like you or else for the thrill
And explain it away in the morning

Girls in our town get no help from their men
No one can let them be sixteen again
Things might get better but it's hard to say when
If they only had someone to talk to

Girls in our town can be saucy and bold
At seventeen, no one is better to hold
Then they start havin' kids and they start gettin' old
Girls in our town
Girls in our town

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 03 Sep 20 - 09:24 PM

Here is another one that I first heard on the Cobbers 'Portraits ...' LP.

NED KELLY'S FAREWELL TO GRETA
(Traditional)

Farewell to my home in Greta, to my sister Kate farewell.
It grieves my heart to leave you, but here I must not dwell
They placed a price upon my head, my hands are stained with gore
And I must roam the forest wild within the Australian shore

But if they cross my chequered path, by all I hold on earth
I'll give them cause to rue the day their mothers gave them birth
I'll shoot them down like carrion crows that roam our country wide
And leave their bodies bleaching upon some woodland side

Oh, Edward, darling brother, surely you would not go
So rashly to encounter with such a mighty foe
Now don’t you know that Sydney and Melbourne are combined
And for your apprehension, Ned, there are warrants duly signed

To eastward lies great Bogong, towering to the sky
From east to west and then you’ll find that's Gippsland lying by
You know the country well, Ned, go take your comrades there
And profit by your knowledge of the wombat and the bear

And let no childish quarrels cause trouble in the gang
Bear up with one another, Ned, and guard my brother Dan
See, yonder ride four troopers; one kiss before we part
Now haste and join your comrades, Dan, Joe Byrne and Steve Hart

Youtube clip

Cobbers note:

Greta was a town in central Victoria where the Kellys made their home. The song is supposed to be a conversation between Ned Kelly, the famous bushranger, and his sister Kate. It is one of the many songs collected from the 'Kelly Country' around Benella in Victoria and, despite its dubious authenticity, it is a rather lovely song.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 03 Sep 20 - 10:39 PM

This jaunty piece of nonsense has long been a favourite of mine.

IRISH GIRLS (WILL STEAL YOUR HEART AWAY)
(Gary Shearston)

From Carlow to Tipperary and martyr Ring of Kerry
Waterford, Roscommon, Dingle Bay
From Sligo to Connemara, Wicklow to Wexford Harbour
Irish girls will steal your heart away

Now one day by Shannon water, I met a Kerry daughter
Riding on a colt of dapple grey
She just said her name was Ethne then rode away and left me
Thinking I’d been dreaming in the day

So I made a quick inquiry up at the local priory
An old monk just winked at me and said
‘Ah, for sure, go down the road there, you’ll find a path that’s quite clear
Leading to her home but not her bed

For her heart is with a stranger whose grave is marked bush ranger
They both used to live ‘round here before
And together they cavorted until he got transported
To Australia from Erin’s shore’

I just figured he was far gone, been on his knees for too long
Heard as much as he could absolve
But his words came back to haunt, to tease, perplex and daunt me
Leaving me a mystery to solve

So next day I went a-courting, sweet apples she was sorting
Smiled at me then quickly looked away
And said of the rose I brought her, ‘I suppose you think that oughta
Make me wanna roll you in the hay’

I just laughed and begged and pleaded, she finally conceded
Horses we might ride a little way
She brought out the dapple grey, called the bay, she said
‘I might just saddle both of them without delay’

Beneath skies of stormy weather, we rode through mountain heather
She said that she did not have long to stay
Later, strolling by the river, I promised I would give her
Anything she wanted not to stray

As her fancy I was seeking, I heard a willow creaking
And turned around in time to see it sway
But, as it began to tumble, it made me trip and stumble
Dragged her to the ground in disarray

There our arms and legs entangled, and for a while we dangled
Then she said goodbye and rode away
And although I tried to follow, up hill, down dale and hollow
I kept getting lost along the way

Then a mist began a-falling, seemed bent upon forestalling
Any hope of sign upon the ground
Next thing I heard a fiddle, snare drum, a paradiddle
I tell you I shivered at the sound

So next day I took the quare path, returned again to her hearth
It was just a pile of ruined stones
Out the back a cross was hedged in, it bore the strangest legend
‘Here lies one of Johnny Doolan’s bones’

From Carlow to Tipperary and martyr Ring of Kerry
Waterford, Roscommon, Dingle Bay
From Sligo to Connemara, Wicklow to Wexford Harbour
Irish girls will steal your heart away
Irish girls will steal your heart away

Maybe someone could check the accuracy of my above transcription.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 04 Sep 20 - 07:50 PM

I posted this fine song decades ago:

THE KELLY'S TURNING
(Larry King)

We're meeting by the riggin'
For the word has passed around
We'll drink our spree on Texas tea
So the drills are goin' down
Men roll in from everywhere
From France and England too
Boomers and boll weevils that make up the drillin' crew

Chorus
The kelly's turnin', the drill rod churnin'
The metal burnin' as she breaks the hard rock floor
Rough voices grumblin'
The diesel's rumblin'
The kelly fumblin' with the key to Satan's door

There's Hank and Mac and Paddy
From across the sea they've come
With Czechs and Swedes, all kinds o' breeds
They share a common bond
It's music in the air to men
Followin' the call
When high upon the christmas tree
They hear the driller call

Chorusr

Devil's getting' angry
There's a rumblin' in the well
For men are cruel who steal the fuel
That feeds the fires of hell
His heart is big and black as soot
And darker is his soul
And when he cries, he fills the skies
With tears as black as coal

Chorus

Well, now the drillin's ended
So we'll pack our things and go
We've drawn a million barrels
From a thousand feet below
So it's bound for eastern cities
Our hard-earned cheques to spend
On girls and grog and fancy krog
Till the word goes out again

Chorus

We're meeting by the riggin'
For the word has passed around
We'll drink our spree on Texas tea
So the drills are goin' down
Men roll in from everywhere
From France and England too
Boomers and boll weevils that make up the drillin' crew

Chorus

Larry King and Alex Hood wrote 2 songs a night for Bill Peach's 'This Day Tonight' show, one of which was telecast. The pair undertook an Arts Council-sponsored tour of Australia as The Prodigal Sons and wrote many songs together. However, 'The Kelly's Turning' is a Larry King solo effort inspired by time spent with the oil rig workers in Exmouth, Western Australia. It is set to a Dutch traditional tune 'The windmill's turning'.

Scott Balfour of Alice Springs has recorded it on his excellent CD, 'Mother Land'.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 04 Sep 20 - 08:29 PM

SONG OF THE SHEETMETAL WORKER
(John Dengate)

Oh when I was a boy in Carlingford
All sixty years ago,
The eucalypts grew straight and tall
And the creeks did sweetly flow
But times were hard when the old man died
And the orchard would not pay
So I left the land for the factory bench
And I'm working there still today.

I've earned my bread in the metal shops
For forty years and more
My hands are hard and acid-scarred
As the boards on the workshop floor.
My soul is sheathed in Kembla steel
And my eyelids have turned to brass
And the orchard's gone, and the apple trees
Where the wind whispered through the grass.

The workbench is my altar
Where I come to take the host.
Copper, brass and fine sheet steel
Father son and holy ghost.
The sacramental wine of work
Grows sour upon my tongue
Oh the fruit was sweet on the apple trees
When my brothers and I were young

Youtube clip

Dengate's tribute to his father. The tune is 'Valley of Knockanure'.

John's recording is on John Dengate 'Australian Son: Vollume I'
Danny Spooner recorded it on his 'Emerging Tradition' CD.
It is also on Declan Affley 'Vintage Recordings' CD

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 04 Sep 20 - 09:12 PM

DIAMENTINA DROVER
(Hugh McDonald)

The faces in the photograph have faded
And I can't believe he looks so much like me
For it's been ten long years today
Since I left for Old Cork Station
Sayin' I won't be back till the drovin's done

Chorus
For the rain never falls on the dusty Diamantina
And a drover finds it hard to change his mind
For the years have surely gone
Like the drays from Old Cork Station
And I won't be back till the drovin's done

It seems like the sun comes up each mornin'
Sets me up and then takes it all away
For the dreaming by the light
Of the campfire at night
Ends with the burning light of day

Chorus

Sometimes I think I'll settle back in Sydney
But it's been so long and it's hard to change your mind
For the cattle trail goes on and on
And the fences roll forever
And I won't be back when the drovin's done

Chorus

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 04 Sep 20 - 09:40 PM

I WAS ONLY NINETEEN (A walk in the light green)
(John Schumann)

Mum and dad and Denny saw the passing out parade at Puckapunya
It was a long march from cadets
The sixth battalion was the next to tour and it was me who drew the card
We did Canungra, Shoalwater before we left

And Townsville lined the footpaths as we marched down to the quay
This clipping from the paper shows us young and strong and clean
And there's me in me slouch hat with me SLR and greens
God help me
I was only nineteen

From Vung Tau riding Chinooks to the dust at Nui Dat
I'd been in and out of choppers now for months
And we made our tents a home - V.B. and pinups on the lockers
And an Asian (agent?) orange sunset through the scrub

And can you tell me, doctor, why I still can't get to sleep?
And night-time's just a jungle dark and a barking M16?
And what's this rash that comes and goes, can you tell me what it means?
God help me
I was only nineteen

A four-week operation, when each step can mean your last one on two legs
It was a war within yourself
But you wouldn't let your mates down 'til they had you dusted off
So you closed your eyes and thought about somethin' else

And then someone yelled out 'Contact!', and the bloke behind me swore
We hooked in there for hours, then a God almighty roar
And Frankie kicked a mine the day that mankind kicked the moon
God help me
He was goin' home in June

And I can still see Frankie, drinkin' tinnies in the Grand Hotel
On a thirty-six hour rec leave in Vung Tau
And I can still hear Frankie, lying screaming in the jungle
'Til the morphine came and killed the bloody row

And the Anzac legends didn't mention mud and blood and tears
And the stories that my father told me never seemed quite real
I caught some pieces in my back that I didn't even feel
God help me
I was only nineteen

And can you tell me, doctor, why I still can't get to sleep?
And why the Channel Seven chopper chills me to my feet?
And what's this rash that comes and goes
Can you tell me what it means?
God help me
I was only nineteen

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 06 Sep 20 - 12:48 AM

COURTING THE NET
(Bob Wilson)

My love is on the Internet again
He says he'll come to bed soon, but he never tells me when
He's out there surfin' somewhere with imaginary friends
He's a little fish in a big pond, dot com.au at the end

My love is on the Internet again
I fear some horny geek girl is messing with his brain
For the Net's an open sewer, and he's peering down the drain
Printing out the porn page as I sing this sweet refrain

Why won't you come to bed with me
We could yahoo all night long for free
Make a real connection if we try
But every time I hear that modem squeal
Like a lover's cry that's not quite real
I put a bookmark in my paperback, think about the things I lack
And dream about a real time guy

My love is on the Internet again
I wish he'd kept his motorbike, we'd more in common then
But he's moved away from maintenance and he's given up on zen
Now he follows the money markets and the fortunes of the yen

Oh the information highway is an easy road to be on
Kerouac could have travelled it without ever leavin' home
It's like a message in a bottle, swept up on the sand
But there's a million bottles on the beach, each with a unique message of its own

My love is on the Internet again
His cyber-infidelity indelibly ingrained
He left me with the phone bill, I left him standing in the rain
He even took the lap top where I wrote this sweet refrain

Why won't you come to bed with me
We could yahoo all night long for free
Make a real connection if we try
But every time I hear that modem squeal
Like a lover's cry that's not quite real
I put a bookmark in my paperback, think about the things I lack
And dream about a real time guy

Source: transcription from The Goodwills 'Courting the Net'

Bob Wilson is a Kiwi who now lives in Maleny, Queensland.

The Goodwills

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 06 Sep 20 - 03:53 AM

I haven't heard that song for years, since they were in Sydney & did a floorspot @ The Dog.

sandra


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 06 Sep 20 - 09:09 AM

The Goodwills are now based in Warwick, Qld, closer to the border, but are practising Grey Nomads for much of the year!
R-J :)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 06 Sep 20 - 08:20 PM

Thanks, R-J.

THE MAN WITH THE CONCERTINA
{Stewart/Rummery/Kevans

Once more I'm away on the bridle track and through the mountains steering
With a horse to ride and one to pack, I'm jogging down to shearing
At night I pick the driest camp and build a three-log fire
And when a man is on the tramp what more could he desire

I eat my tucker and drink my tea, perhaps with a piece of damper
Then lie for a while upon my back and watch the possums scamper
I light my pipe and puff a cloud, you'd think it was a steamer
Then 'Finnegan's Wake' I finger out upon the concertina

There's a place I long to be, it's on the old Monaro
For ryebuck sport and company, you'd have no need to care O
For the boys all get together there and we all toss in a deeper
And we'll buy some grog and have some tunes upon the concertina

Now, my boys, my song is done I find my throat wants clearing
I've told you how to have some fun going down the river shearing
You'll hear of me I have no doubt all through the Riverina
You're sure to hear them talk about the man with the concertina

This song is the title track of Bob Rummery's 'The man with the concertina' CD.

Bob noted:

A poem by Robert Stewart who travelled from the Illawarra to the Riverina for the shearing season. The third verse was sung, and written by, the late Jacko Kevans and the late 1960s Canberra band The Monaro Boys. The tune after verse 3 is 'Cosgroves Schttische'.

The Chloe and Jason Roweth tribute to Bob Rummery, mentioned above by Sandra, is now on Youtube - beaut stuff.

Roweths on Rummery

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 06 Sep 20 - 09:31 PM

THE GLENBURGH WOOL
(Jack Sorensen)

The ramp outside the woolshed door
Holds yet another load:
So yolk the camel team once more
And take the waggon road.
The shafters prop, the leaders pull
The wheels creak dismally,
And sixty bales of Glenburgh wool
Roll westward to the sea

On down the winding dusty track
From dawn till close of day
The punchers shout, the big whips crack
While straining camels sway
By stony plain, by sandhills brown
By wattles o'er the lea
The hard-won wool goes rolling down
From Glenburgh to the sea

Chorus:
Come spare a thought for lads outback who shear the Glenburgh wool
In summer heat out on the board where the wool fleece bob and pull
Our ringer's Tommy Gibson, he's a gun from northern town
And he shears his tally every day when the Glenburgh wool goes down

A creek to cross, a hill to climb
A stretch of sandy track
They'll haul it through if given time
Though a straw would break each back
So a morning breaks, a bright sun wanes
Till a day, then a week, is gone.
Yet with creaking wheels and clinking chains
The Glenburgh wool rolls on

Chorus

Cool nights of rest while the camels swell
As they munch the mulga near
While the hobble chain, and the doleful bell
Will lull the puncher's ear
Two more long days from Rocky Pool
And then Carnarvon town
So sixty bales of Glenburgh wool
From inland heights go down

Chorus

This song may be found at about 30-min mark of the Roweth concert linked in my previous post.
The poem by Sorensen has been set to music by Roger Montgomery, Alan Ferguson et alia.
A chorus, written by Wendy Evans, has been added to the poem. I'm not sure of the latter part of the second line - 'where the wool fleece ....' A correction is welcomed.

Roger Montgomery's band 'Dingo's Breakfast' issued a CD of Sorensen: 'Jack Sorensen: Weaver of Dreams'. You can listen to it on Spotify.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 06 Sep 20 - 11:18 PM

JAIL AWAY FREMANTLE
(W.Evans/A.Ferguson)

Chorus:
Let the rope, soap and calico take me
I’ll grin and I’ll hold me head high
And the devil take he who can make me
Bow low ‘cos I’d far rather die

The landlord that fenced in our farmland
Was a thief and he left us to die
The judge gave 5 years transportation
So I downed him and blackened his eye

On the boat we fared far worse than cattle
I was detailed to clean up the ship
The devil take ye, says I, what a battle
But I laughed when they gave me the whip

Chorus

At Fremantle a rat cell awaited
Some others had died in that place
The guard who released me weeks later
Gave a curse as I spat in his face

I was sentenced to work on the chain gang
Lashed backs as the rocks we did crush
But I struck a great blow at a weak link
And made a quick dash to the bush

Chorus

Near starving I met up with Dugan
And rode with his wild Irish band
And plundered the rich idle squatters
When we levelled our guns and cried stand

We were caught in an ambush near Collie
And most of them died in that fight
I was locked up in jail for a dawn dance
But I broke through the roof in the night

Chorus

I have rode with the rustlers at Moora
And many the cattle I’ve duffed
I’ve ridden the wild trails through the outback
And with me swag many miles I have roughed

With a new name I joined in the gold rush
And was lucky and struck a rich vein
For the landowner’s hirelings claim-jumped me
So I swore that I’d blacken his name

Chorus

Now killing don’t make a man suffer
It’s others that get to despair
But he’s brought his young wife to the diggings
So I gave the old bastard an heir

And he sent out his hirelings to kill me
And I laughed as the bullets did fly
And I’ll laugh when I hang in the morning
‘Cos I don’t give a damn if I die

Chorus

Alan Ferguson put a tune to this ripper Wendy Evans poem. The Settlers, a West Australian band, recorded it on 'Bound for Western Australia' Tempo DBCD 114.

Thanks to Phil Beck for checking my above transcription.

Info on Wendy Evans may be found here:

Wendy Evans

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Sep 20 - 11:50 PM

Oh, gee, these are wonderful. Be sure to look at Australian Folk Song a Day from Cloudstreet and John Thompson.
Also "Australian Folk Songs":
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 07 Sep 20 - 04:36 AM

Ah, I've always loved that "Let the rope, soap, and calico take me ...." number - Alan and Sean were a great duo, way back when (and as I've said before, when they supported The Dubliners in Perth, The Settlers ran rings around the Dubliners - until the Dubs were shocked into lifting their game, LoL!!)

R-J :)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 07 Sep 20 - 10:50 PM

Hi Joe, irrespective of what happens re 'Rise Up Singing', I reckon it's good to have a collection of Australian songs, particularly less-well-known ones, in one place on this site. It's a pity that it is only Sandra and I doing the bulk of the posting.

R-J, Sean's voice was particularly fine on those recordings.

THE TOWN OF KIANDRA (THE WEE ONE)

I am a young man from the town of Kiandra
I married a young woman to comfort my home
She goes out and she leaves me and cruelly deceives me
She leaves me with a baby that's none o' me own

Chorus
Oh dear, I rue the day ever I married
How I wish I was single again
With this weeping and wailing and rocking the cradle
And rocking the baby that's none o' me own

While I'm at work, my wife's on the rantan
On the rantan with some other young man
She goes out and she leaves me and cruelly deceives me
And leaves me with a baby that's none o' me own

Now all you young men with a fancy to marry
Be sure you leave them flash gals alone
Or by the Lord Harry, if one you should marry
They'll leave you with a baby that's none o' your own

This is in the DT under the title 'Rocking the Cradle'. Extensive information on its provenance may be had here:

Mainly Norfolk

Bob Bolton posted this back in the day:

The "Wee One" was collected by John Meredith from the wonderful old Australian singer Sally Sloane, late 1950s or early 1960s. A.L. Lloyd would have seen the words in the photocopies of Meredith, Ward and Stewart & Keesing's collection notes lodged with the EFDSS (by Edgar Walters?) and possibly heard the field tapes.

Lloyd altered the words "I am a young man, cut down in my blossom..." to "I am a young man from the town of Kiandra..." because he had heard of someone from Kiandra to whom such things had happened.

Martyn Wyndham-Read may well have sung the Lloyd version in the 1960s.

The modal tune is Sally's and typical of her Irish heritage. The song words come from a long and forked line of songs/parodies/re-works that go all the way back to "The Christ Child Lullaby", in the Erse and, at least as far forward across America as "Get along Little Dogey".

The details of Meredith collecting this song (and many others, along with a lot of dance tunes) would be in "Folk Songs of Australian and the men and women who sang them", Volume 1, John Meredith & Hugh Anderson, (Ure Smith ~1967 / University of New South Wales Press ~1988).

The song was also published in "Singabout Magazine, the journal of Australian folksong", Vol. 5, No. 2, p5, Bush Music Club, October 1964, and so appears in my anthology "Singabout - Selected Reprints", Bush Music Club, 1985. If you are interested in looking at primary sources, these two publications are still available for the Bush Music Club at $12A and $9A plus $3A post/packaging.

Sally Sloane was a wonderful singer and I am proud to have known her - and had her sing for me in concerts in the 1970s. She contributed more songs and tunes than any other single singer of Australian tradional songs. I like to remember her by her original songs, rather than the changed versions of later singers.


Danny Spooner recorded it under the title 'The wee one' for his last album 'Home'. Wongawilli recorded it under the title 'The Town of Kiandra (The Wee One)'.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 07 Sep 20 - 11:44 PM

HUMPING THE DRUM

I've humped my drum from Kingdom Come
To the back of the Milky WaY
I boiled my quart on the Cape of York
And I starved last Christmas Day

I cast a line on the Condamine
And one on the Nebine Creek
I've driven through bog, so help me bob
Up Mungindi's main street

I crossed the Murray and drank at Cloncurry
Where they charged me a bob a nip.
I worked in the Gulf where the cattle they duff
And the squatters they give 'em tip

I've worked from morn in the fields of long corn
Till the sun was out of sight
I've cause to know the Great Byno
And the Great Australian Bight

I danced with Kit, when the lamps were lit
And Doll when the dance broke up
I flung my hat on the Myall Track
When Bowman won the Cup

I laughed aloud with the merry crowd
In the city of the plains
I sweated too on Omdooroo
While bogged in those big bore-drains

I wheeled me bike from the shearers' strike
Not wanting a funeral shroud
And I made the weights for the Flying Stakes
And I dodged the lynchin' crowd

I've carried a gun through World War One
Then went to the track again
From Omeo to Bendigo
To Bourke and back again

I lost some tears in the hungry years
When jobs were short and few
And I picked up me swag and me old tucker bag
There was nothing else to do

There are various versions of this song, but the above is what Danny Spooner sang on his final album 'Home'.

Danny noted:

I like the way that each verse seems to be sung by another travelling character ... these words were adapted by Graham Seal.

I first heard the song on an old Larrikin LP by a group named 'Steam Shuttle' of which Graham Seal was a member - 'Steam Shuttle Larrikin LRF-018. Unfortunately, I am unable to play it to check the lyrics against Danny's version as my record player is stuffed. However, the note on the LP sleeve reads:

A recitation from Stewart and Keesing's revision of Banjo Pateron's 'Old Bush Songs'. A few verses have been cut out, a couple added and the whole thing set to an Irish tune. As it now stands, the song is essentially a potted history of itinerant labour in Australia up the 1930s. 'Humping the drum' is one of the many terms for carrying a swag.

--Stewie.


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Subject: LYR Add - The Country Knows The Rest -Graham Seal
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 08 Sep 20 - 03:51 AM

Back of the Milky Way (Humping the Drum) - lyrics & audio Lyrics to Graham's songs, all with audio.

Graham Seal writes good songs (he also writes good books) & was Australia's first (& maybe only) Professor of Folklore. interview with Graham

The Country Knows The Rest by Graham Seal with audio link. Norman Brown was an innocent bystander, he was not one one the strikers. He was JennieG's mother's cousin

    The year was nineteen-twenty-nine, the place was Rothbury town,
    The miners were all locked out and our wage had been knocked down,
    From March until December we lived on bread and dole,
    Until the Rothbury mine re-opened, with scabs to dig the coal -
    And the country knows the rest …

    So the miners’ dole was cut and our strike pay couldn’t last,
    But the men and women of Rothbury determined to stand fast.
    All across the coalfields miners heard the call,
    On a warm night in December they met at Rothbury, one and all -
    And the country knows the rest …

    It was early in the morning upon that fateful day,
    Many hundred miners gathered there to send the scabs away,
    A piper played before us in the breaking blood-red dawn,
    But when we reached the Rothbury mine gates a bloodier day was born -
    And the country knows the rest …

    The police were in the bushes with pistols in their hands,
    There were more of them on horseback to break the miners’ stand,
    Just how it started I swear I'll never know,
    But the guns began firing and the blood began to flow -
    And the country knows the rest …

    When the firing was all over and the police had broken through,
    Many miners badly beaten - bullet-wounded, too,
    Beneath the Rothbury mine gate Norman Brown was lying dead,
    And the lifeblood from his veins stained the coaldust red -
    And the country knows the rest …

    Notes

    Many thanks to Graham Seal for permission to add this song to the Union Songs website.

    Graham writes
    'The Country Knows the Rest was written in the 1970s while I was researching popular protest in Australia. One of the Kelly ballads used the line the country knows the rest and I was also struck by a few phrases from the oral accounts of miners who had been at Rothbury. The music and lyrics came together from these sources.

    I recorded the song on my Barbed Wire Ballads in 2005 and Andy Saunders and Tim Glover recorded it as The Symbolics, back around the late 70s/early 80s.'

    When the depression hit at the end of the 1920s miners everywhere were in trouble. In February 1929 the coalowners of the Hunter Valley NSW demanded a 12.5% wage cut. When the workers refused, the bosses, supported by a conservative State Government, locked them out of the mines for 15 months. Towards the end of 1929 the coalowners tried to open some pits with scab labour. Miners decided to take them on. Around 4000 of them made there way to Rothbury on December 16th and the police opened fire killing the young miner Norman Brown and wounding many others.

    Veteran miner Jim Comerford, now in his nineties, was at Rothbury when he was just 16 years old, he tells his story in his book The Great Lockout


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 08 Sep 20 - 12:51 PM

> Lloyd altered the words "I am a young man, cut down in my blossom..." to "I am a young man from the town of Kiandra..."

I had heard or read before now that the "town of Kiandra" words were due to Bert, and I had wondered whether we should encourage singers to revert to the version as collected. However "cut down in my blossom" clearly belongs in a different song, not this one. The man is justifiably lamenting having to rock the baby that is not his, but he is not the Unfortunate Rake who really has been cut down. Not for the only time, I think we have to count Bert's work on this song as an improvement.

On another matter entirely: it has struck me that a lot of the songs being put forward in this thread are of fairly recent origin. Nothing wrong with that in itself but there are lots of older ones that I think are equally deserving.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 08 Sep 20 - 08:18 PM

Thank you, Sandra!

On a completely differnt note, I quite like Enda Kenny's Earl Grey Tea song - although I never drink tea, I'm a coffee girl.


EARL GREY

Is it perfume? Is it tea?
Whatever it is, it does nothing for me
Should I drink it? Or dab it on?
Can I swap it for a coffee or has all the water gone.

It is hot, it is wet,
It is eau de toilette
Is it from the House of Lipton or Chanel?
I only want a cup of tea, not this stuff you've given me,
If you think I'm going to drink it go to.....

Help me someone......
Call a doctor or a nurse,
Call an ambulance I'm poisoned,
And I think it's getting worse.
I only wanted a cup of tea
But I fear that my last mouthful will be the death of me

It is hot, it is wet,
It is eau de toilette
To my mind it is more toilette than eau.
If you want to spoil your day
Add the oil of Earl Grey,
I'm reliably informed it's bergamot.

What a mouthful!
Is it perfume? Is it wee?
Whatever it's supposed to be it doesn't taste like tea.
Should I drink it, or dab it on?
Can I swap it for a coffee or has all the water gone.

It is hot, it is wet,
It is eau de toilette
Is it Twinings? is it Tetley? let me see.
Go ahead and make my day
But please don't make me drink Earl Grey.
All I want is a proper cup of tea.

Enda Kenny (1995)
Earl Grey Tea


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 08 Sep 20 - 08:46 PM

Richard M, well why don't you 'put forward' a few? My impetus has been to post, mainly but not exclusively, worthy songs that have not been posted or have been buried deep in the forum database - songs that are less well known and not as easily accessed as the warhorses.

Sandra, thanks to the link to Seal's lyrics. Apart from some reordering, Danny's version is much the same. Two stanzas from the Stewart/Keesing printing, as collected by Bill Bowyang, have been dropped:

I courted Flo in Jericho
And Jane at old Blackall
I said farewell to the Sydney belle
At the doors of the Eulo hall

And the final one:

I've seen and heard upon my word
Some strange things on my way
But spare my days, I was knocked sideways
When I landed here today

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 08 Sep 20 - 09:28 PM

For those who have not heard Steam Shuttle, there are 2 recordings available on Youtube. The better one imo is their rendition of Duke Tritton's 'Sandy Hollow Line'. They noted that they put it to a traditional tune that Tritton had used for another of his songs, 'The Great Northern Line', 'in preference to the usual dreary melody'. Amen to that!

THE SANDY HOLLOW LINE
(Duke Tritton)

The sun was blazing in the sky and waves of shimmering heat
Glared down on the railway cutting, we were half dead on our feet
And the ganger stood on the bank of the cut and he snarled at the men below
"You'd better keep them shovels full or all you cows 'll go."

"I never saw such a useless mob, you'd make a feller sick
As shovel men you're hopeless, and you're no good with the pick"
There were men in the gang who could belt him with a hand tied at the back
But he had power behind him and we dare not risk the sack.

So we took his insults in silence, for this was the period when
We lived in the great depression and nothing was cheaper than men
And we drove the shovels and swung the picks and cursed the choking dust
We'd wives and hungry kids to feed so toil in the heat we must

And as the sun rose higher and the heat grew more intense
The flies were in their millions, the air was thick and dense
We found it very hard to breathe, our lungs were hot and tight
With the stink of sweating horses and the fumes of gelignite

But still the ganger drove us on, we couldn't take much more
We prayed for the day we'd get the chance to even up the score
A man collapsed in the heat and dust, he was carried away to the side
It didn't seem to matter if the poor chap lived or died

"He's only a loafer," the ganger said. "A lazy, useless cow
I was going to sack him anyway, he's saved me the trouble now"
He had no thoughts of the hungry kids, no thought of a woman's tears,
As she struggled and fought to feed her brood all down the weary years

But one of the government horses fell and died there in the dray
They hitched two horses to him and they dragged the corpse away
The ganger was a worried man and he said with a heavy sigh
"It is a bloody terrible thing to see a good horse die"

"You chaps get back now to your work and don't stand loafing ther
Get in and trim the batter down, I'll get the engineer"
Well the engineer he looked around and he said as he scratched his head
"No horse could work in this dreadful heat or all of them will be dead"

"They're much too valuable to lose, they cost us quite a lot
And I think it is a wicked shame to work them while it's hot
So we will take them to the creek and spell them in the shade
You men must all knock off at once - of course you'll not be paid"

And so we plodded to our camps and it seemed to our weary brains
We were no better than convicts, though we didn't wear the chains
And in those drear depression days, we were unwanted men
But we knew that when a war broke out, we'd all be heroes then

And we'd be handed a rifle and forced to fight for the swine
Who tortured us and starved us, on the Sandy Hollow Line

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 08 Sep 20 - 09:49 PM

The other Youtube video of Steam Shuttle is one of those warhorses. They noted that their version was based on one collected by John Meredith from Mrs Ewell late of Bathurst NSW.

THE STREETS OF FORBES (THE DEATH OF BEN HALL)

Come all you Lachlan men and a sorrowful tale I'll tell
Concerning of a hero bold who through misfortune fell
His name it was Ben Hall, a man of good renown
Who was hunted from his station and like a dog shot down

Three years he roamed the roads and he showed the traps some fun
One thousand pounds was on his head, with Gilbert and John Dunn
Ben parted from his comrades, the outlaws did agree
To give away bushranging and cross the briny sea

Ben went to Goobang Creek and that was his downfall
For riddled like a sieve was the valiant Ben Hall
'Twas early in the morning upon the fifth of May
When the seven police surrounded him as fast asleep they lay

Bill Dargin he was chosen to shoot the outlaw dead
The troopers all fired madly and they filled him full of lead
They rolled him in his blanket and strapped him to his prad
And they led him through the streets of Forbes to show the prize they had

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 08 Sep 20 - 10:39 PM

Here's a delightful little ditty that has been buried deep in the forum database. It was posted and collected by Joybell, a lady who used to post prolifically to Mudcat. She explained:

I believe it deserves its own thread and a place in the DT. It's a Melbourne song probably from around the early 1900s. I learned it from an elderly man, in about 1984, in a pub in Collingwood, a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. He called it an old Melbourne song. He used the title "Push on the Corner". A friend, Jack Johnson, recorded an almost identical version from an elderly man in a Melbourne nursing home. My informant told me he wanted me to have the song because I was "a Collingwood Lassie". He added that he meant not of the type described in the song. These two appearances of the song are the only ones I've come across. It sounds like somebody's music-hall turn.

THE PUSH ON THE CORNER

Last night I was driven near crazy
By one I both love and adore
Now she's packed up her boxes and left me
And I ain't gonna see her no more
I've written her hundreds of letters,
To beg her my faults to forget
But now she's found one she loves better
And this is the answer I get

Oh, wait till the push on the corner
Refuses to drink a long beer
Wait till the thieves and pickpockets
From the streets of Fitzroy disappear
When the dear little Collingwood lassies
rom powder and paint they are free
When the Chinese are coppers on Bourke Street
My darling I'll come back to thee

The tune may be found on a beaut CD O'Leary & Hildebrand 'Together Again, Again'

--Stewie


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 08 Sep 20 - 11:26 PM

Here's another forgotten gem, also on the Hildebrand and O'Leary CD. It is in the style of CJ Dennis. Below is how Hildebrand sings it. You can find the original and info here:

Info


BOURKE STREET ON SATURDAY NIGHT
(P.C. Cole & Fred Hall)

Them ragtime songs got me fair pippy
All Hawaii or old dixie land
And the same kind of tarts always in ‘em
Starry eye, golden hair, china hands

Now tell me what’s wrong with Australia
And the cliner on which I am shook
I don’t need no cotton fields shady
And I don’t need no soft purlin’ brook

So give me old Melbourne and give me a tart
And then I am simply all right
Can any bloke point to a better old joint
Than Bourke Street on a Saturday night

When me and me Maudie goes out for a stroll
Me cobbers all try to be smart
‘Get out of their way, here comes Billo’, they say
Walkin’ out with his fair dinkum tart

On Princes Bridge once we were standin’
And gazed down at the water below
In the lamplight we feels sentimental
Holdin’ hands, all that rot, don’t you know

Says Maud, ‘Prove you’re fond of me really
So I looked to see no one was near
I gives her a kiss, then she murmurs
’Now you loves me, I know, Billo dear’

Repeat stanzas 2 and 3.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 12:54 AM

Here is another Ogilvie poem to which Gerry Hallom put a tune. As usual, his version has alterations and omissions - good but!

NORTHWARDS TO THE SHEDS
(W.Ogilvie/G.Hallom

There's a whisper from the regions out beyond the Barwon banks
There's a gathering of the legions there's a forming of the ranks
There's a murmur coming nearer with the signs that never fail
And it's time for every shearer to be out upon the trail

(Chorus)
For the Western creeks are calling
And the idle days are done
With the snowy fleeces falling
And the Queensland sheds begun

There is shortening of the bridle, there's a tightening of the girth
There is a grooming of the horse that they love the best on earth
Northward from the Lachlan River and the sun-dried Castlereagh
Outward to the Never-Never ride the shearers on their way

Chorus

They will leave their girls behind them and their empty glasses too
For there's plenty left to mind them when they cross the dry Barcoo
There'll be kissing, there'll be sorrow such as only sweethearts know
But before the noon tomorrow, they'll be singing as they go

Chorus

They will camp below the station, they'll be cutting peg and pole
Raising tents for occupation till the boss he calls the roll
And it's time the colts were driven, it's time to strap the pack
For there's never licence given to the laggards on the track

Chorus

John Thompson has a version on his site that is close to the original poem. His source is the
excellent CD by Alan Musgrave (with Bob McInnes & friends) 'Songs They Used to Sing: A panorama of Australian folksong'..

Hallom

Thompson

I found this on the Net, but I can't verify its authenticity:

As Will wrote in 'My life in the open (Short stories)' (1908):
On a big sheep station everything dates from shearing-time. “It was just before last shearing,” they say, or “I will attend to it after shearing,” or “So-and-so was here two shearings ago.” Through the greater part of the year a large station of 50,000 to 80,000 sheep is worked by a staff of ten to fifteen men; but at shearing-time the shed and surrounding buildings contain from fifty to a hundred men, with here and there a white tent starring the plain, and the stir and hum of the work turn this quiet corner into the semblance of a thriving settlement.


--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 01:13 AM

Words and music to "Bourke Street on Saturday night" can be found in "A treasury of favourite Australian songs, with complete words and music" compiled by Therese Radic. Published by Currey O'Neil, Melbourne, 1983. Music by Fred Hall, words by P.C. Cole, 1918.

I wonder if this was one of the Cole faimly of "Cole's funny picture books" fame?

Whether it is or isn't, this book is a great addition to my book shelf.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 02:08 AM

Gurindji Blues

Poor bugger me, Gurindji
Me bin sit down this country
Long time before the Lord Vestey
Allabout land belongin' to we
Oh poor bugger me, Gurindji.
Poor bugger blackfeller; Gurindji
Long time work no wages, we,
Work for the good old Lord Vestey
Little bit flour; sugar and tea
For the Gurindji, from Lord Vestey
Oh poor bugger me.

Poor bugger me, Gurindji,
Man called Vincent Lingiari
Talk long allabout Gurindji
'Daguragu place for we,
Home for we, Gurindji:
But poor bugger blackfeller, Gurindji
Government boss him talk long we
'We'll build you house with electricity
But at Wave Hill, for can't you see
Wattie Creek belong to Lord Vestey'
Oh poor bugger me.

Poor bugger me, Gurindji
Up come Mr: Frank Hardy
ABSCHOL too and talk long we
Givit hand long Gurindji
Buildim house and plantim tree
Longa Wattie Creek for Gurindji
But poor bugger blackfeller Gurindji
Government Law him talk long we
'Can't givit land long blackfeller, see
Only spoilim Gurindji'
Oh poor bugger me.

Poor bugger me, Gurindji
Peter Nixon talk long we:
'Buy you own land, Gurindji
Buyim back from the Lord Vestey'
Oh poor bugger me, Gurindji.
Poor bugger blackfeller Gurindji
Suppose we buyim back country
What you reckon proper fee?
Might be flour, sugar and tea
From the Gurindji to Lord Vestey?
Oh poor bugger me.

Oh ngaiyu luyurr ngura-u
Sorry my country, Gurindji.

© Ted Egan      
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8LcF0kwbjE&t=2s

Here is a later version by Galurrwuy Yunupingu with Vincent Lingiari :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EdLIlyhLewI

The importance of Ted's song and this piece of NT history, cannot IMHO, be overestimated. It was also often played on Perth's ABC radio, back in the day. See also the previous post of "From Little Things, Big Things Grow".

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 02:38 AM

the bush girl    (henry lawson)

So you rode from the range where your brothers “select”
Through the ghostly grey bush in the dawn
You rode slowly at first, lest her heart should suspect
That you were [so] glad to be gone.
You had scarcely the courage to glance back at her
By the homestead receding from view
And you breathed with relief as you rounded the spur
For the world was a wide world to you.

    Grey eyes that grow sadder than sunset or rain
    Fond heart that is ever more true
    Firm faith that grows firmer for watching in vain
    She’ll wait by the sliprails for you.


Ah! The world is a new and a wide one to you
But the world to your sweetheart is shut
For a change never comes to the lonely Bush Girl
From the stockyard, the bush, and the hut.
And the only relief from the [its] dullness she feels
Is when ridges grow softened and dim
And away in the dusk to the sliprails she steals
To dream of past meetings [evenings] with him.

    Grey eyes that grow sadder than sunset or rain
    Fond heart that is ever more true
    Firm faith that grows firmer for watching in vain
    She’ll wait by the sliprails for you.

Do you think, where in place of bare fences, dry creeks
Clear streams and green hedges are seen
Where the girls have the lily and rose in their cheeks
And the grass in midsummer is green.
Do you think now and then, now or then, in the whirl
Of the city, while London is new
Of the hut in the bush, and the freckled-faced girl
Who is eating her heart out for you?

   Grey eyes that are sadder than sunset or rain
   Bruised heart that is ever more true
   Fond faith [heart] that is firmer for trusting in vain
   She waits by the sliprails for you.

Sung here by the late Gary Shearston (tune by Con Caston) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQ9vgyb2S2Y

Seeing “Bonnie Jess” posted above, reminded me of this one – a very singable favourite in my teenage years and often heard in Perth’s folkclubs of the 60s-70s!

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 03:16 AM

Richard - I've posted a lot of old songs on Bush Music Club blog, but I'd have to type up the words & that is putting me off - unless I post the URLs of the song image.

I've posted 43 articles which include the subject "songs" This article Compilation - Early Song Sheets1950s/60s has links to 14 of them. There are over 600 articles so the blog is heard to search - best way to search is to open a google page & do a site search -(subject) site:blog.bushmusic.org.au & skim down the offerings.

Not every song is traditional - The Bush Music Club was founded in 1954 to collect, publish and popularise Australia's traditional songs, dances, music, yarns, recitations and folklore and to encourage the composition of a new kind of song - one that was traditional in style but contemporary in theme.

Australian Song Index by Hugh Anderson Being a list of 375 Bush Ballads that have been published between the days of transportation & 1956. The Black Bull Chapbooks No.7, 1957.

Here's another good source of early & contemporary Australian songs 2020 Joy Durst Memorial Song Collection download - FREE - Victorian Folk Music Club (est 1959 as Victorian Bush Music Club) 1st ed, 1970, 2nd ed. 1980. It includes audio files

sandra


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 03:21 AM

YIL LULL ~ Joe Geia


I sing, for the black, and the people of this Land
I sing, for the red, and the blood that’s been shed
Now I’m singing for the gold, of a new year young and old.

Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay
Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay

I sing, unto Him, of the most high
I sing, so much praises, it makes me want to cry
Now I’m singing, just for you, so all can recognise.

Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay
Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay

Sing for the black (Singout!)    Sing for the red (Singout!)
Sing for the black (Singout!)    Sing for the red (Singout!)
        
Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay
Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay

Sing for the black!    Sing for the red!      And the gold!
Stories told, for young and old.

        
Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay        
Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay        
Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay        
Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay, Yil Lull ay.


“Yil Lull means Sing!” in Kuku Yalanji language of FNQ”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9BvEa9xxvQ

The YT clip is from 1988 when Joe first wrote and released the song (now regarded as an anthem!), but he is still going strong and I was lucky to be part of the choir performing with him at Qld's Maleny Festival in 2019!

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 04:19 AM

OK, the subject of this song may not be commonly regarded as Aussie or Kiwi, or even Southern Hemisphere, BUT, I prefer to think that - just like the ubiquitous Chickenman - "He's EVERYWHERE, He's EVERYWHERE"!!
So, this is a session favourite from Qld's CLOUDSTREET.

THE GREEN MAN ~ John Thompson

Ch.        
The Green Man’s a traveller, a reveller, unraveller
Of dreams and of fancies from first to the last
Older than all men, living in all things
Son, father and sage, long live The Green Man.


First light of first morning saw The Green Man there waiting
He saw the creation and joined in the dance
All creatures grew round him
He grew with them singing
The first song of all, sing of The Green Man.

Quietly watching and waiting and learning
The storms are his fury, the lightning his laugh
The first leaf of spring is his beauty and glory
His stillness, his power, in the trees in his path.

There are fewer trees now, but The Man is not sleeping
‘Though our ruin brings sorrow to Time’s oldest heart
In our soul we may find him and remember his wisdom
And rekindle the flames, once again make a start.


There are a couple of Cloudstreet versions on YT - This is from "Swallow the Concertina" in 2000 (and the second is from 2010's "Circus of Desires") :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIRK0uQs760

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bS32e1qWhIM


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 05:36 AM

DAVEY LOWSTON

Oh me name is Davey Lowston, I did seal, I did seal
Oh me name is Davey Lowston, I did seal
Though my men and I were lost and our very lives it cost
I did seal, I did seal, I did seal.

We were set down in Open Bay, were set down, were set down
We set down in Open Bay, we set down
We were left, we gallant men, never more to sail again
For to sail, for to sail, for to sail.

Our captain, John Bedar, he set sail, he set sail
Yes, all for Port Jackson, he set sail
“I’ll return men, without fail”, but, he foundered in the gale
And went down, and went down, and went down.

We cured ten thousand skins for the fur, for the fur
We cured ten thousand skins for the fur
Brackish water, putrid seal, we did all of us fall ill
For to die, for to die, for to die.

Come all you lads who sail upon the sea, sail the sea
Come all you jacks who sail upon the sea
Though the schooner “Governor Bligh”, took on some who did not die
Never seal, never seal, never seal.

Oh me name is Davey Lowston, I did seal, I did seal
Oh me name is Davey Lowston, I did seal
Where the icebergs tower high, it’s a pitiful place to die
Never seal, never seal, (never) seal.


Regarded as a traditional New Zealand song, though many scholars believe it originated on the Sydney docks - and it was collected on t’other side of the world. No matter. It’s a goodun!

Here is a version by Qld harmony group “Work in Progress” :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvDn3tQ7cTI

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 06:06 AM

COONAWARRA [HAS] THREE SHADOWS   ~ Judith Crossley

T’was the ninth of October, in Echuca way she lay
A new boat on the river, while the steamers passed away
Laid up, forgotten, rotting, just a few were left to trade
Of those roaring river steamers, that saw the outback made.


Ch.        
Excelsior keep turning
Murrumbidgee, you’ll never die
J L Roberts on the water, see the paddles fly
Shadow ships go softly with her, drift on all her days
Coonawarra, lovely black swan, takes the River Ways.


She was built in 1950, for the Murray tourist trade
Murray Valley Coaches, lost a boat in ’48
Brave old Murrumbidgee burned, that sad heroic day
There was not a soul there perished, but that fine ship passed away.


Last barge to work the Murrumbidgee, J L Roberts stood alone
For sixty years she had ploughed the rivers, her story was well-known
On her hull they have built a lovely boat, to take the ‘Bidgee’s place
And they named her for the black swan, Coonawarra, full of grace.


For ninety years that redgum hull, has left the river sand
For thirty years the Coonawarra, beat across the land
Three ghosts they travel with her, from the elder time
And three shadows has the Coonawarra, they carry on the line.



Lyn and Denis Tracy used to do a really beautiful version of this, but luckily there is a version on YT by Irene Petrie :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJhLeRTyqoU

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 06:32 AM

Davy Lowston is one of my favourite songs, thanks for posting it.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 07:36 AM

FANNIE BAY ~ Doug & Andy Tainsh / and possibly David Charles


Tell her I’m droving down Camooweal way
Or signed on with pearlers for seas far away
You can tell her I’ve gone, I’ll be back some day
Please don’t tell her they hanged me in old Fannie Bay.

ch.
And on Thursday Island the sun warms her hair
As the breeze from the sea blows her hair
And she sits by her window and calls me
Yes, she calls me.

You can say I’ve gone on the old “River Queen”
Its whistle a-haunting the bullockys’ dream
Down the Murray I’ve gone, I’ll be back some day
Please don’t tell her they hanged me in old Fannie Bay.

You can say the bush has called me away
And I’m riding the fences for ten bob a day
Yes, I needed a job, I needed the pay
Please don’t tell her they hanged me in old Fannie Bay.

And they came to the door and they dragged me away
From all that I love and I pray
That it won’t reach her ears, ‘cause I love her
And she’d die - she’d die - she’d die for sure.

Just say the gold has taken me down
To the places where fortunes are easily found
Yes, I’ve gone, but tell her I’ll be back some day
Just don’t tell her they hanged me in old Fannie Bay.



I wanted to link to the version by Darwin, NT trio "Tropical Ear" - from the 1980s - but I cannot locate one on YT.   
However, I found this version which has similarities - it's by FNQ [= Far North Qld] group "Snake Gully" :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_yniaWFegcE


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 08:00 AM

Miner’s Washing ~ John Warner

I come from Durham in 99
Married a laddie from the Coal Creek mine
The finest lad that a girl could ever know
Til he brought me his washing from the pit below.

Ch.
Scrubbing the miner's clothes
Scrubbing the miner's clothes
All piled up in a ghastly stack
Heavy as lead and smelly and black
And oh, the pain in my aching back!
Scrubbing the miner's clothes

Well your Currumburra miner is a grimy sort of bloke
So I chuck in his duds for an all-night soak
I takes me a soap and I'll grate it like a cheese
And I'll chuck it in the bucket with his grubby dungarees.
                                                        
And it's haul ‘em from the copper to the rinsing tub
Pound ‘em with the dolly and scrub – scrub - scrub
Pour away the mucky water, do it all again
Haul ‘em through the wringer and pray it doesn't rain.

Beyond Cardella, the sky is looking fine
Basket out the washing to the old clothes line
I bet when they're hung out and I've hauled up the prop
The rain'll come a-pouring and the wind will drop.

So all you maids who to marriage do incline
Never wed a laddie from the Coal Creek mine
A squatter may be surly, a merchant may be mean
A banker may be boring but they're easier to clean.


A great session song - didn't find Margie Walters' version, but here is one from Qld duo, Cloudstreet :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NtnwKFjM1Sc


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 08:26 AM

THE STATION COOK ~ trad Oz


The song I’m going to sing to you, will not detain you long
It’s all about a station cook we had at old Pinyong [Penong]
His pastry was so beautiful, his cooking was so fine
It gave us all a stomach ache, right through the shearing time.


Oh, you should see his plum-duffs, his doughboys and his pies
I swear by Long Moloney, they’d open a shearer’s eyes
He’d say “take your time good fellows” and he’d fix us with a glance
Saying “I’ll dish you up much better, if you’ll give me half a chance.”


Oh you should see his doughboys, his dumplings and his pies
The thought of such luxuries would open a shearer’s eyes
He gets up in the morning, gives us plenty of stewed tea
And don’t forget when shearing’s done, to sling the cook his fee.


But oh dear, I feel so queer, I don’t know what to do
The thought of leaving Fowler’s Bay just breaks me heart in two
But if ever I catch that slushy, I’ll make him rue the day
That he ruined me constitution while shearing at Fowler’s Bay.



The Station Cook could often be an old shearer who can no longer do his tally a day, bent over on the board -
much like The Old Woman was often an old cowboy who could no longer do long days in the saddle, keeping the cattle in check on the Trails.
Fowler's Bay is in South Australia's Eyre Peninsula/Nullarbor Plain region.

Here is Gary Shearston's version from 1965 :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONE44capghQ


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 08:38 AM

> Richard M, well why don't you 'put forward' a few?

Fair comment! But where do I start? I could just scan the contents lists of a few books (where presumably the editors had already exercised some selection) but I should try to make a personal selection. I'm a bit tied up just now but I'll have a go.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 09:03 AM

Mysha's earlier question re if there will be a separate "edition" for Kiwi material, wasn't really answered and I've just come across typed words for one of me EnZed faves, so here goes :


PACKING MY THINGS ~ Phil Colquhoun


When first to this country I came [when I came and took up my claim]
Well, Bill Muggins was me name
And though I’m a young man and able
Here am I stuck rocking the cradle
- And that’s a Bill Muggins game.


But I’m awake up – I will break up
I’m never more going to roam
I've panned in my dugout with never a nugget
I’m packing my things to go home.

I’ve hunted Otago for gold
In the wind and the rain and the cold
And I’ve holed up all winter all under the snow
All along the winding Molyneux
- And that is where you need to have holed!

But I’m awake up – I will break up
I’m never more going to roam
I've panned in my dugout with never a nugget
I’m packing my things to go home.

In those shanties where you spin
Away all your hard-earned tin
Nancy’s smiles are so beguiling
That’s why Nancy is always smiling!
- Landlord says he’s not taking you in.

But I’m awake up – I will break up
I’m never more going to roam
I‘ve panned in my dugout with never a nugget
I’m packing my things to go home.


I almost gave up hope of finding many Kiwi folk songs on YT until I thought to plug in "Phil Garland"!
So here is his version :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3kH8cLjr0A



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 07:45 PM

You have posted some good'uns, R-J.

Re Gurindji people, are you aware that only 2 days ago (Tuesday 8th Sept) they were finally granted native title over Wave Hill Station at a special sitting of the Federal Court?

ABC report

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 08:53 PM

Another Lawson poem adapted by Gerry Hallom.

THE FREE SELECTOR'S DAUGHTER
(Lawson/Hallom)

(Chorus)
I met her on the Lachlan side
A darling girl I thought her
I swore before I left I'd win
The free selector's daughter

I worked her father's farm a month
I brought the wood and water
I mended all the broken fence
Before I won the daughter.

I listened to her father's yarns,
I did just what I oughte
And what I'd had to do to win
The free selector's daughter

So I broke my pipe and burnt my twist
Gave up my beer for water
I had to shave before I kissed
The free-selector's daughter

Chorus

Then, rising in the frosty morn
I brought the cows for Mary
And when I'd milked a bucketful
I took it to the dairy

I poured the milk into the dish
While Mary held the strainer
I summoned heart to speak my wish
And, oh, her blush grew plainer

Chorus

I told her I must leave this place,
I said that I would miss her
At first she turned away her face
But then she let me kiss her.

I put my pail upon the ground
And in my arms I caught her
I'd give the world to hold again
The free selector's daughter

Chorus

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 09:58 PM

Here is a Hallom original. He recorded it on his 'On the Periphery' album. The fizzer delivered mail in the Northern Territory at the turn of the 20th century. He based it on information in Jeannie Gunn's autobiography.

THE FIZZER
(Gerry Hallom)

A thousand miles in forty days
He carries the precious freight
To the homes along the bush highways
For settlers who yearn and wait
Day by day, week by week
Keeping tight to the government time
Dicing with death on the dried out creeks
Yet it’s his face not his heart that bears the lines

Chorus
A thousand miles ‘cross the great divide
Inside mail from the world outside
No sooner here than he’s gone
With a hale so long

The long dry stretch on the open downs
That’s where the fizzin’ gets done
Eighty miles till a drink is found
Then fifty more with none
The thirst of the team fixes the time
This gamble with death is played
Where the searing, scorching heat combines
With a downs that holds no shade

Chorus

A drink at the well, an all night spell
To the toughest pinch of all
Fifty miles of sunbaked hell
With a team that’s fit to fall
And here’s where the tracks are vague and tell
Of a bushman’s skill and pluck
It’s here where the last mailman fell
And they talk of the fizzer’s luck

Chorus

Is it luck to know to the very last drop
Just what a horse can do?
Luck to know just when to stop
To know when to take them through
Is it luck to have the courage to play
This game when the stakes are high?
For only those who’ve been can say
What’s faced by a man on the downs in the dry

Chorus

Sixteen days on the open downs
He takes the treacherous run
Knowing the folk at Anthony’s town
Will come out in the noonday sun
To watch for the distant moving frame
Away in the quivering glare
And death will have won in the dice-throwing game
If the fizzer is late getting down there

Chorus

Youtube clip

Ted Egan also wrote a song about the fizzer.

Ted Egan

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 10:13 PM

The reference to Jeannie Gunn reminded me of a very fine song by a good mate of mine, Bob Sharp, who lived for many years in the NT but now lives in Tasmania.

BOSS LADY
(Bob Sharp)

She came to the outback unwanted, unseen
By the men who lived their lives hard
They could not foresee what life there could be
For a lady from Melbourne’s backyard
But bold Jeannie Gunn would prove it to them
She was as strong in the heart as the rest
It did not take long before she proved them all wrong
And they found a new type of respect

She was the lady of old Elsie Station, arrived from the city in 1902
They called her Boss Lady respected her greatly
For all the things that she went through

Heard many stories of men and their travels
And how they developed new lands
Jeannie she wrote of a woman's view
In a man’s world of hot fiery sands
Their lives were hard in a far different way
Their reasons for being there too
They would follow their men to the ends of the earth
To make far distant dreams come true

Chorus

Time has moved on and the old homestead's gone
White ants have left their mark here
Road markers stand where the station once stood
Now only the hot springs run clear
The legends live on of bold Jeannie Gunn
Her stories of good times and bad
And what it would be for a lady like thee
To experience the times that you had

Chorus

Bob recorded it on album that he made with Ken Ferguson 'The Windmill Run' - the duo called themselves 'Facial Expressions'. You can find info here:

Bob Sharp

Phil Beck and I included the song in a themed concert entitled 'Images of Strong Women'. Phil's introduction to the song:

Jeannie Gunn (nee Taylor), ‘The Little Missus’, was born on 5 June 1870. Her father was a Presbyterian minister. In the 1890s she met Aeneas James Gunn, son of Rev. Peter Gunn. Gunn had spent most of the 1890s in northern Australia and helped to establish sheep and cattle stations. Aeneas and Jeannie married in December 1901. Just before his marriage Aeneas had agreed to manage the Elsey cattle station on the Roper River, about 300 miles south of Darwin, so on 2 January 1902 the couple sailed for Port Darwin.

In Darwin Jeannie was told that as a woman she would be 'out of place' on a station such as the Elsey. The Territory had always been considered a man's world and news of her arrival in Darwin caused an alarm amongst the tough stockmen of the Elsey who attempted to stop this female invasion by forwarding telegraph messages to prevent her coming. This wasn't enough to discourage Jeannie, all five feet of her had always had a determined streak. The Elsey was in a remote part of the NT known locally as the ‘Never-Never’: in fact later on in life Jeannie wrote ‘We of the Never Never’ based on her time there. The homestead when she arrived was a run down, comfortless bush dwelling which Jeannie set about trying to transform into a home.

The stockmen were not easily won over. They were men who’d withdrawn from civilisation and were intolerant of anything that wasn't an accepted part of their lifestyle, which included intrusions from women. Jeannie's friendliness and humour as well as her personal courage and refusal to complain showed these bushmen that she would, like them, accept and make the best of conditions. It was this attitude along with her determination that in the end earned their respect and admiration.


--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 11:45 PM

Thanks for that extraordinary Wave Hill news, Stew; I've been off the news radar for a few days!

And speaking of Jeannie Gunn, do you have the lyrics/recording to Bob Sharp(?)'s 'Boss Lady'???
I'm having great trouble dredging the singer/songwriter names and songs from my aging memory (and it could be that the continual post-midnight bedtimes and poor diet, are not assisting me?! :(

I noted "The Streets of Forbes" posted above and have "The Death of Ben Hall" ready here - but I wanted Tony Lavin's excellent recording to go with it. Haven't found it on YT and Andy Irvine's is just not quite what I wanted.
I think Tony's was on "Glenrowan to the Gulf" (Wild Colonial Boys), but I no longer have that LP.

I hafta opine that SO MUCH much good earlier Folkie material - esp the HUGE swag of LPs and tapes from 70s-90s - is missing from the Internet, whilst the dross increases by the minute (or am I being too unkind?!)


OK, gotta go and werk.
Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 09 Sep 20 - 11:47 PM

OMG Stewie - that'll teach me to update the page before I post, haha!

But great song choice, eh :)

R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 10 Sep 20 - 12:28 AM

I wonder if I still have Ken Ferguson's tapes? - I just leaned to the right & immediately put my hands on them.

Franklin & The Singing Wire, not much use tho, unless I buy a plug-in cassette machine, & transcribe them ...

The National Library has both cassettes, but there is no other info on line

sandra


obit for Ken Ferguson https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=124337


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 10 Sep 20 - 02:34 AM

I just revisited the interesting 2009 discussion thread re Austn Songs of Influence, for the new (at the time) "Museum of Australian Democracy" in Canberra :
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=118102#2552374

However, of the final 30 chosen by the Curating team, at first glance I recognised exactly half - not sure what that says of me, hahaha!!

Archer, Robyn    Menstruation Blues
Blue King Brown    Come and Check Your Head
Bogle, Eric    And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda
Carmody, Kev    Cannot Buy My Soul
Cox, Kerrianne    Beagle Bay Dreaming
De Bortoli, Lucia    [trad] Mama Mia Don me Cento Lire
Hewett, Dorothy and Mike Leyden    Weevils In The Flour
Hicks, Peter and Geoff Francis    One day in October
Hunter, Ruby    Down City Streets
Luscombe, Jack    [trad] Sam Griffiths
Mazella, Kavisha    Love and Justice
McCormick, Peter Dodds    Advance Australia Fair
Midnight Oil    US Forces
Mills Sisters    Waltzing Matilda (Wadjimbat Matilda)
O'Loughlin, Tim and Angie McGowan    No dams
Palmer, Helen and Doreen Bridges    Ballad of 1891
Randall, Bob    My Brown Skin Baby
Reddy, Helen and Ray Burton    I am Woman
Slim Dusty    When the Rain Tumbles Down in July
Sloan, Sally    Ben Hall
Small, Judy    Mothers Daughters Wives
Storer, Sara    Land Cries Out
The Herd    The King is Dead
The Saints    Stranded
Warner, Dan & Dastey, Sally    Anthem
Warumpi Band    Blackfella Whitefella
Wiggan, Roy    Bardi Ilma
Wright, Lola and Ruth Shepherd    The Equal Pay Song
Youthu Yindi    Treaty

Wonder if the museum is still going strong and if the song list is still the same?!


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 10 Sep 20 - 03:59 AM

I remember that thread

search-Austn Songs of Influence at Museum of Australian Democracy 13 results & first one is Songs of Influence - I was only 19!


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 10 Sep 20 - 05:24 PM

The Museum of Australian Democracy is in the old Parliament House in Canberra. Might check it out, when and if we can ever visit Canberra again.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 10 Sep 20 - 08:14 PM

THE BALLAD OF 1891
(H.Palmer/D.Jacobs)

The price of wool was falling in 1891
The men who owned the acres saw something must be done
“We will break the Shearers' Union, and show we're masters still
And they'll take the terms we give them, or we'll find the ones who will.”

From Claremont to Barcaldine, the shearers' camps were full
Ten thousand blades were ready to strip the greasy wool.
When through the west like thunder, rang out the Union's call:
“The sheds'll be shore Union or they won't be shorn at all.”

Oh, Billy Lane was with them, his words were like a flame,
The flag of blue above them, they spoke Eureka's name.
“Tomorrow,” said the squatters, “they'll find it does not pay.
We're bringing up free labourers to get the clip away.”

“Tomorrow,” said the shearers, “they may not be so keen,
We can mount three thousand horses, to show them what we mean.”
“Then we'll pack the west with troopers, from Bourke to Charters Towers.
You can have your fill of speeches but the final strength is ours.”

“Be damned to your six-shooters, your troopers and police,
The sheep are growing heavy, the burr is in the fleece.”
“Then if Nordenfeldt and Gatling won't bring you to your knees.
We'll find a law,” the squatters said, “that's made for times like these.”

To trial at Rockhampton the fourteen men were brought,
The judge had got his orders, the squatters owned the court.
But for every one that's sentenced, ten thousand won't forget,
Where they gaol someone for striking, it's a rich man's country yet.

Trevor Lucas

The Bushwackers

Helen Palmer

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 10 Sep 20 - 08:45 PM

R-J I didn't even reach 50% recognition, but it is pleasing to note the inclusion of the classic kriol rendition of 'Waltzing Matilda' by Darwin girl, Ali Mills. Thanks to a posting a decade ago by Rob Naylor, we have the lyrics.

WALTJIM BAT MATILDA

one balla carrdia bin cum up langa billabong
im bin chid on a groun langa coolibah tree
im bin chingum but corobree watchim but him billy boil
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me

waltjim bat matilda, waltjim bat matilda,
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me
im bin chingum but corobree watchim but him billy boil
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me

bum bye datun maaa bin cum up langa billabong
carrdia bin gatchim wholly maaa ngee ngee
im bin put im dtun maaa inchide langa ducker bag
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me

waltjim bat matilda, waltjim bat matilda,
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me
im bin put im dtun maaa inchide langa ducker bag
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me

bum bye datun marrdagee bin cum up langa dimina
pleetjaman bin cum up one, two, three
where datun maaa you bin putim langa ducker bag
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me

waltjim bat matilda, waltjim bat matilda,
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me
where datun maaa you bin putim langa ducker bag
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me

bum bye datun carrdia bin jump in langa billabong
you gan gatchim me libe one ngee ngee
and im pirit jere chingin out inchide langa billabong
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me

waltjim bat matilda, waltjim bat matilda,
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me
and im pirit jere chingin out inchide langa billabong
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me

waltjim bat matilda, waltjim bat matilda,
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me
and im koodook (spirit) jere chingin out inchide langa billabong
you balla cum n waltjim bat matilda langa me

Dibmorr diborr dibmorr diborr dibmorr diborr – whee

Youtube clip

Mudcat thread

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 10 Sep 20 - 09:44 PM

Yay!! Beats that feckin 'AAF' hands down!!
Miss seeing Ali, June, and the girls in those regular Brown's Mart shows, e.g. - it's rather different here in provincial Qld ...........
R-J :(


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 11 Sep 20 - 12:27 AM

Here is one of many excellent compositions from the late Kiwi-Quoinslander, Mark Gillet.


Little England

Our pioneers, many generations lost in time,
Sail away, made a home across the world
They took this land, transformed it with blood and iron
Above it all, the flag of England unfurled

They saw clouds like white cliffs on the horizon
Above a land that was clean, green and new
But when they came they bought Little England with them
And it lives on inside me and inside you

Ch.
And in the lion and the unicorn,
Cricket oval and a croquet lawn
Carol singers and a hunting horn
Little England
And though I know it’s just a state of mind
Little England can be so unkind
I’ll sail away and see what I can find
In Little England

Echoes from, my childhood so far away
The cradle songs, my mamma sang to me
Oh Little England when will I let you go
Your cradle songs, keep haunting me

The beating drum, there’s red coats marching in the square
Keeps us in chains, stop our souls from flying free
Oh Little England when will you let us go
Your beating drums keeps driving me

Chorus .....
I’ll sail away and see what I can find
In Little England

I can see clouds, like white cliffs on the horizon
Above a land that‘s clean, green and new
But I can’t go Little England’s got this hold on me
Till everyone can sail away too



More about Mark can be read in the Mudcat "In Memorium" thread.
Thanks to his mate, Noel Gardner, for these lyrics. Noel has been learning Mark's 'LE' song of late, for his next CD.

Here is a YT clip of Mark singing "Little England" that I only just discovered : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SmVXeq4Jus


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 11 Sep 20 - 02:49 AM

THE DROVER'S BOY   ~   Ted Egan


They couldn't understand why the drover cried
   as they buried the drover's boy,
For the drover had always seemed so hard
   to the men in his employ.
A bolting horse, a stirrup lost, and the drover's boy was dead
The shovelled dirt, and a mumbled word
And it's back to the road ahead
And forget about…..the drover's boy.

They couldn't understand why the drover cut
   a lock of the dead boy's hair,
Put it in the band of his battered old hat
   as they watched him standing there.
And he told them "Take the cattle on; I'll sit with the boy awhile"
A silent thought, a pipe to smoke
And it's ride another mile,
And forget about …..the drover's boy.

They couldn't make out why the drover and the boy
   always camped so far away,
For the tall white man and the slim black boy
   had never had much to say.
And the boy would be gone at the break of dawn; tail the horses, carry on                        
While the drover roused the sleeping men
Daylight - hit the road again,
And follow…..the drover's boy.

In the Camooweal pub they talked about
   the death of the drover's boy,
They drank their rum with the stranger who'd come
   from the Kimberley round Fitzroy.
And he told them of the massacre in the West; barest details, guess the rest
Shoot the bucks, grab a gin,
Cut her hair, break her in,
And call her a boy…..the drover's boy.

So when they build that stockman's hall of fame
    and they talk about the droving game,
Remember the girl who was bedmate and guide
Rode with the drover side by side
Watched the bullocks, flayed the hide
Faithful wife, but never a bride
Bred his sons for the cattle runs
Don't weep…..for the drover's boy,
Don't mourn….. for the drover's boy,
But don't for-get! The Drover's Boy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJ9a0qr7ORY

Great song; great story; great bloke. I'm sure it's been discussed on The Cat before.


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 11 Sep 20 - 03:05 AM

THE RUSTY FORD CORTINA ~ Mark Gillett


The vinyl on the dashboard has all faded
And I can’t believe the speedo’s reading true
Coz it’s been 10 long years today
        Since I purchased this old station - wagon
An’ I’ll drive this hack till the driving’s done.

Ch.
For the rain always falls on my rusty Ford Cortina
Bits keep falling off and get left behind
And the muffler’s mighty roar
   Always causes a sensation
An’ I’ll drive this hack till the driving’s done.


Seems when I start it up each morning
That it’s gonna take me half the day
For there’s only one headlight
   And it isn’t very bright
An’ it bucks & jumps and handles like a dray.


Sometimes I think, I’ll buy myself a new one
But they cost so much, I always change my mind
And the tailgate rattles on and on
   And the front end’s most peculiar
But I’ll drive this hack till the driving’s done.


Mark wrote this parody c.early 80s - with apologies to Hugh McDonald!

Here is Hugh's song and his amended story of the writing of "The Diamantina Drover" :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoWJWEr7DO4


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 11 Sep 20 - 03:23 AM

BILL AND THE BEAR - John Thompson

1. Come listen now, good people here
To a story of renown
of the day a hundred years ago
when the circus came to town
Mr Wirth and all his gallant crew
They raised the big top high
And all the folk for miles around
Gathered under a canvas sky

Ch.
And were you there in the clear night air
when William Sinclair he fought the bear
Were you there to see William Sinclair
When he wrestled the bear to the ground

2. There were dancing ponies and tumbling clowns
The best you ever did see
A lion tamer and a high wire act
A girl on the flying trapeze
There was a fat ring-master in a big top hat
And he slashed his whip through the air
With a roar and a growl, a cage went clang
It was Samson the mighty bear


3. He was ten feet high, he was nine feet wide
A mountain of muscle and fur
A mighty beast just as black as the coal
The ground shook with his roar
Then the man with the whip He called for quiet
not a sound from those who were there
I've a crisp ten pounds for any man here
Who's brave enough to wrestle a bear.


4. Bill and his family had come to see the show
his youngest newly born
The strongest man to ever walk the range
He'd carry his weight in corn
he sized up the beast, with a glance at his wife
he slowly raised his hand
"I'll have a go", he heard himself say
then up struck the band

5. Stripped to the waist, bill entered the ring
Circling and bouncing round
First left, then right, 'til he lunged right in
The crowd didn't make a sound
They twisted and they turned as they wrestled and they grappled
At the skin and the muscle and the hair
With a mighty roar, Bill threw Samson down
He raised his fist in the air

6. You've never heard a roar quite like it
The shouts split the midnight air
Bill was raised above all the heads of the crowd
to the cheers of everyone there
And to this day, when you see the name
of the famous Bill Sinclair
Raise your glass and drink to the health
Of the only man to ever beat the bear.


The true story of a Glaswegian emigrant to Australia, William Sinclair, who became famous in the Maleny District of South-East Queensland for defeating a bear in a wrestling match when a circus visited Landsborough in the early 20th Century.

John says his post is dedicated to Bill's grandson, Leslie Norman ("Nugget") Sinclair who died at the age of 92 on 26 August, 2011.

With a good chorus for joining in on, this track is on Cloudstreet's 'Circus of Desires' album; but this is a link to a local(ish) live performance of John & Nicole & Emma : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnWcE0ukutU



Landsborough is just a few Kays down the bottom of the hill from me, in Qld's Sunshine Coast Hinterland!!

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 11 Sep 20 - 04:23 AM

SUN ARISE ~ Rolf Harris & Harry Butler

Sun arise, she bring in the morning.
Sun arise, bring in the morning, fluttering her skirts all around.
Sun arise, she come with the dawning.
Sun arise, come with the dawning, spreading all the light all around.
Sun arise, on the kangaroo paw.
Sun arise, on the kangaroo paw, glistening the dew all around.
Sun arise, filling all the hollows.
Sun arise, filling all the hollows, lighting up the hills all around.

Sun arise, come with the dawning, Sun arise, she come every day.
Sun arise, bring in the morning, Sun arise! Every, every, every, every, day.

She drive away the darkness.
Every day, drive away the darkness.
Bringing back the warmth to the ground.
Sun arise, oh, oh, Sun arise, oh, oh.
Spreading all the light all around.
Sun arise, bring in the morning.
Sun arise, bring in the morning,
Sun arise, bring in the morning,
Spreading all the light all around.


Regardless of the circumstances of Rolf’s recent falling from grace and his consequent punishments, I have always maintained that this 1960 song was important, in that it introduced the feel and sound of Aboriginal music to a wide audience, both in Oz and the UK. Remember that Aboriginal music - as heard by the general populace - in those days, was pretty much limited to Jimmy Little’s country style “Royal Telephone” and Harold Blair’s classical singing. After all, The Authorities considered The Aborigines as “a dying race” (or so they seemed to hope.....) But as a West Australian growing up in the ‘burbs of the 50s-60s, I really loved this song (as did my Mother!) – and we weren’t alone – it was often heard on the radio and it is still popular today and has been covered by many artists.

“ In his autobiography Rolf Harris recalls the writing of Sun Arise:

Another song from that time was 'Sun Arise' which was inspired by the Aboriginal music that Harry Butler had introduced to me. (pp. 159-160)
Harry Butler and I wrote 'Sun Arise' together, trying to capture the magic of Aboriginal music by reproducing the repetition of lyrics and music that make it so mesmerizing.
The lyrics of the song came from a story Harry told me about Aboriginal beliefs. Some tribes see the sun as a goddess. Each time she wakes in the morning, her skirts of light gradually cover more and more of the land, bringing back warmth and light to the air. (p. 161)

- Rolf Harris, Can You Tell Me What It Is Yet? London, Bantam Press, 2001 “

Here is a clip using mostly scenes of nature and Aboriginal life to illustrate – perhaps try to maintain some perspective and not let the odd pic of Rolf disturb your sensibilities : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwtnBm8glPE


And with that, I’m taking a break for the night (to await the sun arise - coz "Che gelida manina" :)
Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Andrez
Date: 11 Sep 20 - 10:12 PM

Another great one from days gone by.

Turning Steel (The Factory Lad)
A song by Colin Dryden ©Colin Dryden 1969

You wake up in the morning, the sky's as black as night,
Your mother's shouting up the stairs, you know she's winning the fight,
You hurry to the breakfast table and grab a bite to eat,
Then out the door and up the road, and through the factory gate.

Chorus:
Turning steel how do you feel, as in the chuck you spin.
If you felt like me you'd roll right out and never roll back in.

Cold and dark the morning as you squeeze in the gate.
As you clock in, the bell will ring - eight hours is your fate.
Off comes the coat and up go the sleeves and "right lads" is the cry.
With one eye on the clock, the other on your lathe, you wish that time could fly.

But time can't fly as fast as a lathe, and work you must -
The grinding, groaning spinning metal, the hot air and the dust.
And many's the time I'm with me girl and we're walking through the park,
While gazing down at the spinning steel or the welder's blinding spark.

Well, old Tom, he left last week - his final bell did ring.
His hair as white as the face beneath his oily sunken skin.
But he made a speech and he said "good-bye" to a life time working here,
As I shook his hand, I thought of hell - a lathe for forty years.

When my time comes, as come it must, why then I'll leave this place.
I'll walk right out past the chargehand's desk and never turn my face.
Out through the gates, into the sun, and I'll leave it all behind,
With but one regret for the lads I've left, to carry on the grind.

Cheers,

Andrez


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 11 Sep 20 - 10:26 PM

Barry Skipsey is a singer/songwriter and professional photographer from Alice Springs. He has written many fine songs. This one is a session favourite in the Northern Territory.

OCEAN LINER
(Barry Skipsey)

When I was fishing back in the west
Rollin’ on the foamin’ sea
I dream of them pretty girls back on the shore
And I wish they was here with me

Chorus
Step on board the ocean liner
Step on board without delay, me lads
Step on board there’s nothin’ finer
And together we’ll sail away

Well, I made up me mind to take to the wave
On hearing of a good return
So the very next mornin’, I found myself prawnn’
Me stomach it began to churn

Chorus

I was workin’ twenty four hours a day
Me eyes hangin’ out of me head
Twenty four hours barely makin’ a wage
I wish I was back in me bed

Chorus

Seven cents a kilo for kings, they said
Eight cents a kilo endeavours
At ten cents a kilo for tiger prawns
For that they want the best out of you

Chorus

I’m a long way from mother out here on the waves
A long way from family
And a bloody long way from being a tap dancer
That my mother so wanted me to be

Chorus

The skipper is a big man, he stands so high
His head pokes up through the riggin’
And a crew of old dragons and they’re so high
I think they’ve left the land of the living

Chorus

So I’m eatin’ and thinkin’, and sortin’ prawns
Till they flamin’ well come out of me ears
And the cook gives me the shits in more ways than one
So I think I’m on my very last run

Chorus

Here is a rendition at Top Half Folk Festival in Alice Springs - ragged but right.

Youtube clip

It's hard to believe that prawns (or shrimps as they are called in the US) were ever that cheap. These days, you almost have to take out a bank loan to purchase a box.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Andrez
Date: 11 Sep 20 - 10:33 PM

Link to Factory Lad by Colin Dryden.

https://soundcloud.com/nomeshome/factory-lad-turning-steel-by

Cheers,

Andrez


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 11 Sep 20 - 10:45 PM

Here's another one from the NT. Wendy Baarda was a long-time resident at the Yuendumu Aboriginal community out from Alice Springs. Bloodwood, a well-regarded bush band from Alice Springs, adapted a poem that she wrote many years ago. It relates to the serious problem of illegal grog-running into the community.

YUENDUMU FLAGON WAGON
(Wendy Baarda/Bloodwood)

(Chorus)
Engine roarin’, tailpipe draggin’
Yuendumu flagon wagon
Made it home again

Every time, rain or shine
Cops are waitin’ far behind
Kids clear out and the women are cryin’
Daddy’s comin’ home with a load of wine

Airstrip out and the road is clay
Rain coming down every night and day
No tucker in the store but they dropped in the pay
There’s a big mob of flagon in the camp today

Chorus

Flagon wagon caught in a bog
Rain comin’ down, no jack, no log
No food, no fire, no blankets, no dog
Seven day living off nothing but grog

Chorus

Every time, rain or shine
Cops are waitin’ far behind
Kids clear out and the women are cryin’
Daddy’s comin’ home with a load of wine

Copper up ahead, too late, cut short
‘Hey black feller, what’s that you bought’
Ten jerry cans full of Four Crown port
Talk about it two weeks later in court

Chorus

A hundred dollar down, hey man you’re on
Win this round, get a car and I’m gone
Another flagon wagon doin’ the run
Up and down the Track to Aileron

Chorus

Every time, rain or shine
Cops are waitin’ far behind
Kids clear out and the women are cryin’
Daddy’s comin’ home with a load of wine

The song may be found on the 2-CD set 'Bloodwood: the Collection'.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 11 Sep 20 - 11:21 PM

Stewie, do you have WABO's "The Timbercutters Song" that Tropical Ear used to sing??
("Keep them logs rolling boys, Down to the mill my boys, Keep them logs a-rolling down ....")

How about "Matt Savage - The Boss Drover" - Ted Egan/Bloodwood???

Cheers, R-J


BtW, someone mentioned "The Year of the Drum"
"This song from Wendy Joseph describes the tragic effects of the World Wars on several generations of the people of Mannum and the use of music to entice young men to war. Mannum is a small town on the lower Murray River and has the distinction of having lost more men per head of population in both World Wars than any other town in South Australia."

Here is Wongawilli's version : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dj7g5v-891s


"The Year of the Drum" ~ Wendy Joseph

My name is Jack Gresham, I grew up in Mannum,
That river boat town I loved well,
I married Meg Davis, we had us two children,
One day our family bliss turned to Hell.
For in nineteen fourteen, 'twas the year of the drum,
The guns and the Government called me to come,
Past melaleuca and tall shining gums,
I drifted away down the Murray.

My name is Meg Davis and I work down at Shearers,
Making wagons and stirrups and hames,
The war it is raging, the men are all fighting,
The women toil here making fuel for the flames.
For it's nineteen fifteen and the men have all gone,
They're fighting in Europe so we carry on,
We're keeping the candles lit bright here at home,
To light their way back up the Murray.

My name it is Mary and I am an orphan,
My father was killed in the war,
My mother Meg Davis, an upstanding lady,
She drowned in the Murray the year I turned four.
It was nineteen sixteen when the telegram came,
The death of her soldier its message proclaimed,
My Mum lost her footing due to tears and the rain,
She slipped on the banks of the Murray.

My name it is Billy and I am a soldier,
I just got my orders to-day,
My wife's name is Mary, she's as fair as a sunset,
I hate to be leaving her lonely this way.
But the year's forty two, 'tis the year of the drum,
The guns and the Government call me to come,
Past melaleuca and tall shining gums,
I'm drifting away down the Murray.

But the year doesn't matter, there's always a drum,
The guns and the Governments call men to come,
But the town still grows strong in her tall shining sons,
While her daughters light lamps by the Murray.


RjB


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 12 Sep 20 - 12:34 AM

R-J, I had the WABO album, but I gave it to Pembo years ago to convert to CD. He never got a 'round tuit' and I don't know what has happened to his stuff.

I have the words to 'Matt Savage' in one of Ted's songbooks. I'll type them out tomorrow.

Here is a link to a spirited rendition of 'The Rabbiters' for which Sandra posted the lyrics earlier in this thread. Beaut song.

Mucky Duck BB

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:12 PM

A simple happy song for Sunday, to be sung by saints and sinners alike!!

Pass the Song Along ~ Bernard Carney.

You can Sing and I can Sing
So let’s all Sing together
Lift your voice and pass the song along,
Sing your joy, Sing your love
And we can Sing forever
Lift your voice and pass the song along.

Share a simple melody
When you hit some nasty weather
Lift your voice and pass the song along,
Don’t care what you sound like
If we’re singing it together
Lift your voice and pass the song along.

Pass the song along, the song is loud, the song is strong
The song is old, the song is new, the song is free,
The song is helping someone out,
The song is laugh and dance and shout
The song is anything you want the song to be.

So you can Sing and I can Sing
So let’s all Sing together
Lift your voice and pass the song along,
Sing your joy, Sing your love
And we can Sing forever
Lift your voice and pass the song along.
Lift your voice and pass the song along.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmKTzRrEBmA

Bernard has over 40 years working full-time in the Oz entertainment industry, with numerous overseas and interstate gigs (he resides in WA), has released many CDs, and also works with the “Spirit of the Streets” choir and “Working Voices” combined unions choir.   http://www.bernardcarney.com/


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:19 PM

KALGOORLIE PIPELINE ~ Alan Ferguson / trad Irish tune


Ch.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Way Way over the desert, the daylight is fading
The camp fires grow bright at the close of the day
And over the Darlings, our loved ones are waiting
Beyond the Great Ocean, in Ireland far away.


Way out in the diggings, the miners are toiling
Dry blowing gold in the bright blazing sun
They're cursing the price of the water they're drinking
And praying O'Connor will get the job done.

300 miles we have toiled for O'Connor
Swinging our hammers and heaving the lines
A desert in front and a pipeline behind us
And C. Y. O'Connor will get there in time.

chorus.....

Political wrangles have led to this pipeline
And I cursed the day that I joined on meself
To Kalgoorlie, soon, the water is flowing
But that damned Irish foreman will see me in Hell.

From Mundaring we're known as the wild pipeline navvies
We sing and we booze 'round the campfire at night
Through all the long days of typhoid and sickness
Laying this pipeline for O'Connor's lone fight.

Ch.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Way over the desert, the daylight is fading
The camp fires grow bright at the close of the day
And over the Darlings, our loved ones are waiting
Beyond the Great Ocean, in Ireland far away.


A song from the pen of Alan Ferguson - half of The Settlers (with Sean Roche) from WA and from their 1979 album "Bound for Western Australia" for WA's 150th anniversary celebrations.
The original LP had a wonderful accompanying history/lyric booklet, which sadly, the later CD edition lacked.
SUCH a shame that this whole record has not been placed online.

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:31 PM

THE DEATH OF BEN HALL

Come all Australian sons with me, for a hero has been slain
Cowardly butchered in his sleep, upon the Lachlan Plains.
He never robbed a needy man, as all the records show
Staunch and loyal to his mates, and manly to the foe.
No brand of Cain e’er stamped his brow, no widow’s curse did fall
When tales are read, the squatter’s dread, the name of bold Ben Hall.
When first he left his trusty mates, the cause I ne’er did hear
The bloodhounds of the law heard this, and after him did steer.
Then savagely, they murdered him, those cowardly bluecoat imps
Who were led on to where he lay, by informing peelers’ pimps.
No more he’ll mount his gallant steed, or range the hills so high
The widow’s friend in poverty, bold Ben Hall – goodbye.
Pray do not stay your seemly grief, but let the teardrops fall
For all Australia mourns today, the death of bold Ben Hall.


It’s a pity that the version poignantly sung (in my memory!) by TONY LAVIN (Wild Colonial Boys) does not appear to be online. It was on their 1971 “Glenrowan to the Gulf” LP.
WCB were Jacko Kevans, Bob McInnes, Jim Fingleton, Bill Morgan, Tony Lavin, and originally, Declan Affley.

They all had a bit part in Tony Richardson’s 1970 film “Ned Kelly” (yes, the Mick Jagger version) – did they even get credited??
IMHO, t’would have been better if they had featured in the soundtrack instead of the Yanks (i.e. Shel Silverstein comps with Waylon Jennings & Kris Kristofferson & Tom Ghent singing, FFS!!!!)
But yes, it’s all a long time ago now - and the remakes of Ned just keep on coming :)


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:49 PM

MATT SAVAGE: BOSS DROVER
(Ted Egan)

At the six-mile in Wyndham the word passed around
Matt Savage, the boss drover, has just come to town
His plant's on the common, he's looking for men
'Cos he's taking a mob into Queensland

He's a legend in the outback, he's a man among men
Matt Savage, the boss drover, and he's riding again
Two thousand store bullocks, wild ones at that
That's the mob that he's taking into Queensland

Chorus:
Matt Savage, the boss drover, he'll take a mob over
Taking the bullocks to Queensland, ah ha!
Matt Savage, the boss drover, he'll take a mob over
Taking the bullocks to Queensland

Six of us ringers with cigarette swags
Signed up by Matt Savage and we've each got six nags
The cook's all hung over but the boss drover knows
That he'll travel ok into Queensland

First night, star bright, cattle travelling well
Hear the jingle of the hobbles, hear the Condamine bell
Sing a song as we watch them, make the buggers lie down
Or they'll rush all the way into Queensland

Chorus

Meat for the packbags as we pass through Wave Hill
There's a big Vestey's bullock so we're in for the kill
Grilled rib-bones tonight by the campfire's light
We'll be fit when we finally hit Queensland

But we're haunted by ghosts on the Murranji Track
Dead men, dead bullocks, cursed outback
Cattle dry-staging and the boss drover's raging
Hard times on the way into Queensland

Chorus

The Murranji's dry but at Newcastle Waters
We'll be dancing in the bar with old Bullwaddy's daughter
Then it's back in the saddle, keep pushing them cattle
Gotta take 'em along into Queensland

And when the bullocks all rushed, led by the big roan
Matt Savage on the night-horse, he turned them alone
He's been on the road now for about forty years
Boss drover on the stock routes to Queensland

Chorus

Four months on the road and the Tableland's bare
And it's heat, and it's dust, and there's flies everywhere
But when we get to Camooweal, we won't give a damn and we'll
Go riding along into Queensland

And there's the railway, there's the siding, delivery Dajarra
Then as quick as a flash we'll be into the bar
Of the pub for a blowout and a gutful of rum
'Cos we just brought a mob into Queensland

Ted noted:
Bullwaddy Bates was a legendary figure who came on to the Barkly Tableland, acquired several Jingili women as concubines and set up Beetaloo and OT Stations. Unlike many of his contemporaries, Bates (or Bathern, which was his correct name) recognised his mix-race children and bequeathed the properties to them when he died.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:52 PM

WARATAH AND WATTLE ~ Frances Patterson (& Henry Lawson)


Though poor and in trouble I wander alone
With a rebel cockade in my hand
Though friends may desert me and kindred disown
My country will never do that!
You may sing of the Shamrock, the Thistle, the Rose
Or the Three-in-a-Bunch, if you will
But I know of a country that’s gathered all those
And I love the Great Land where the Waratah grows
And the Wattle bough blooms on the hill.                  

In Dreamtime, they tell us, the Great Spirits came
They wandered and traveled the land
They raised up the mountains and flattened the plains
They laid down the rocks and the sand
They carved out a course for the long river’s way
They planted the forests in shade
The great power of forming is joined to their way
And the tracks that they traveled are still here today
Under the roads we have made.                                         

Now under the Wattle I wander alone
And I think of the loss and the gain
To the land where we live we no longer belong
Although it is held in our name
This great earth which has borne us we want to disown
We have deserted our land
We are separate now and we live quite alone
And we try to grow roots in a place that we own
And bitterly don’t understand
   And bitterly, we won’t understand.


I learnt this great song in the 80s from the singing of Lynne Tracey (now back to being Lynne Muir), who is a most beautiful artist - calligrapher in Victoria and now sings classical music rather than folk.
Though the first verse is Lawson's, Frances Paterson of Sydney, wrote the next two and composed the music. If you find Lawson's poem being sung on YT, it's pretty dire, and the tune definitely does not fit this song.
Frances recorded her song in 1987 on an album of originals called "Sol Y Sombra" - I cannot find the song online, but I have ordered the LP from EBay!
Frances was also in bands like "Okapi Guitar Band" performing "AfroPop" - great-sounding dance music. She died in 2018.



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 12 Sep 20 - 11:19 PM

I am still interested in finding songs relating to C.Y. O'Connor, the brilliant Irish-born engineer who planned/built the Goldfields Water Supply Scheme (aka The Kalgoorlie Pipeline - from Mundaring in the Darling Range of Perth), 1896-1903,
amongst other projects in West Aussie and New Zealand. He was hounded to take his own life less than 12 months before the taps were successfully turned on, by MSM rants (esp The Sunday Times) and politicians like Alexander Forrest (though his brother, John Forrest, was a supporter).
I have posted songs I have found so far in the following thread :

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48647&messages=31#4071699

Cheers, R-J

(not sure why the Blicky Machine doesn't work for Mudcat threads - I only get 404 messages!)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 12 Sep 20 - 11:35 PM

Some additional information re 'Waltjim bat Matilda' posted above. Ali Mills is the grand-niece of the late Val McGinness who had an old-time string band in pre-WW2 Darwin. Val was the writer of 'Waltjim but Matilda' (original had 'but' not 'bat') and Ali adapted it by adding some Gurindji and Larrakia words. Jeff Corfield, who lived in Darwin for many years, wrote a book in tribute to the life and music of Val McGinness whom he described as 'one of the last of Darwin's old string band musicians: 'String Bands and Shake Hands'. Val died in 1988. Shortly before Val's death, Jeff made extensive recordings of his songs and tunes and these have been deposited in the Northern Territory Archives. Val's brother, John (Jack), was also a musician. In relation to 'Waltjim but Matilda', Val told Jeff in 1988:

We (Johnny and I) would start off singing 'once a jolly swagman camped by a billabong' and the rest of the band would play with us. When we'd finish that first verse, I'd come in and say 'hey you fella, you chingim that song wrong way!' (and they'd say) 'yeah, which right way you chingim?' and I'd say 'you blow that bamboo (that didgeridoo) and I'll chingim proper way for you' ... and Johnny would get the guitar and he'd go dung dung a dung - make noise like a didgeridoo and I'd sing it see!

Here is one of Val's songs. His brother wrote the music.

ADELAIDE RIVER
(V.McGinness/J.McGinness)

Have you been on the beautiful Adelaide River?
Have you ever seen kangaroos and wallabies at play?
Trees are ever green on the beautiful Adelaide River
That is where my heart is and where I long to stay

Bamboo trees sway in the breeze while moon is rising high
Waters rolling, lovers strolling, just like you and I
Night birds calling, shadows falling, over silver streams
Oh how grand to hold your hand just like I do in dreams

We fell in love on the beautiful Adelaide River
Moon rose above, lighting love's glorious way
You were in my arms on the beautiful Adelaide River
Darling, I love you for ever and a day

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 13 Sep 20 - 02:25 AM

Thanks Stew! I'm very fond of Val's "Adelaide River' song!! Hopefully one day it will make it online.

Here is the sound of the regenerated Darwin String Bands in The Darwin Rondalla and the famous Shake Hands dance :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ol4XPSNHT7E

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 13 Sep 20 - 02:49 AM

RANGITIKI   [© BOB WILSON 2014]


1.        Life was spartan in England years after the war
Few jobs, low wages, prospects were poor
No better in Scotland or Ireland too
Uncle Jim emigrated so we joined the queue
It was life on the prairies or in old Sydney town
Dunedin was mentioned, with a worrisome frown
Nine families, one bathroom, it was not hard to choose
Except for the day they told their parents the news.

ch.
When the Rangitiki, Rangitane, Rangitata sailed upon the seas
They carried troops in the war, then took migrants to the colonies                                                                                                   
The commonwealth of nations welcomed them with open arms                                                                           
They brought teachers and tradesmen and laborers to work the farms.

2.        My dad said “they’ll take us if we’re breathing and warm.”
There was ice on the windows, it was a terrible storm
He had one small piece of paper to say who we were
Paid five english pounds for the seagoing fare
We all got vaccinations and smallpox scars
Stayed with auntie in London, saw the changing of the guard
She drove us to Tilbury on a drizzly day
With sad music playing, we sailed away.

Ch.
When the Rangitiki, Rangitane, Rangitata sailed upon the seas                                                                                                                                                
They carried troops in the war, then took migrants to the colonies
The commonwealth of nations welcomed them with open arms
They brought teachers and tradesmen and laborers to work the farms.

   People in the new land helped put us at our ease
   They made fun of our accents but no-one called us refugees
   Yet we sought asylum in our modest anglo-saxon way
   Now one in four is born somewhere else, or so they say,


3.        There are pictures of her children hanging on the wall
Wearing academic gowns, standing proud and tall
Some have been to England, some have been to France
One moved to Manitoba, a refugee romance
Sometimes with her family gathered all around
She thinks of what we got for those five english pounds
We work and we save and we give what we can
To those seeking refuge from their troubled lands.

   We work and we save and we give what we can
   To refugees from Sri Lanka and Afghanistan
   From Burma, Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan, (spoken)


Ch.                                                                                                   
When the Rangitiki, Rangitane, Rangitata sailed upon the seas,
When the Rangitiki, Rangitane, Rangitata sailed upon the seas,
When the Rangitiki, Rangitane, Rangitata sailed upon the seas.


Here is the link to The Goodwills YT presentation of this song :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idnXHKWl01A&t=297s

And here is Bob's Blog where he explains the background story :
https://bobwords.com.au/rangitiki-migrants-story/

This track is from their latest CD "The Last Waterhole" and their previous recording "Loungeroom Legends", has another great favourite of mine : "Impressions of New Zealand" - a companion migrant song to this one. Watch their YT presentation :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3gCGksoS_8

Bob Wilson [The Goodwills] is a lovely songwriter and The Goodwills (now of Warwick, Qld) have 4 CDs , which contain mostly Bob's originals. He paints great pictures with his words and gentle humour.



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 13 Sep 20 - 04:20 AM

When you posted "On the Death of Harold Holt" by JS Manifold, Stewie, I had clean forgotten that it was already up on Paul's YT channel at his 15th National Folk Festival concert in Brisbane at Easter 1981 :))
(I said I thought I was going ga-ga :(

It was quite a few posts back, so I'll repeat the lyrics :


HAROLD HOLT***   
poem by John Streeter Manifold
music by Paul Oswald Lawler


Only a week before Christmas
The happiest day of the year
They held a wake for Harold Holt
And the big wig guests came here

Bonny Prince Charlie came o’er the sea
With Wilson who never smiles
And L B J from the U S A
And the king of the cannibal isles

Chaps from Siam and South Vietnam
And the Philippines too I think
Some for the sake of the free free world
And some for the free free drink

They made long speeches and shed loud tears
To propitiate Harold’s ghost
And the king of the cannibal isles got up
To propose a final toast

He said we have had such a splendid time
Such generous Christmas cheer
We hope you’ll be able to drown
A Prime Minister every year

***JSM’s title was “On the Death of Mr Holt”        

The track is at 12:55 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kGADIvdG_c


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 13 Sep 20 - 05:14 AM

GREEN AMONG THE GOLD ~ Steve Barnes


1.   Dusty plains and iron chains met Erin's sons and daughters
Cast upon a barren land, a far-off distant shore
They dreamed of misty mountains and their home across the water
They sang of Connemara and the home they'd see no more.
Now limestone walls are all that's left of times of pain and failure
This country yields the secrets of the beauty that it holds
And the tunes of Erin's Isle are now the music of Australia
For Irish hands have woven strands of green among the gold.

Ch.
And so beneath the southern cross they sang their songs of Ireland
Who sent her sons and daughters there in the hungry days of old
They play their jigs and reels beneath the skies of their new homeland
For Irish hands have woven strands of green among the gold.

2.   Times were hard at home and so they took a crazy notion
To start a brand new life upon the far side of the globe
And now they find their hearts are stranded somewhere in mid ocean
Though their days are full of sunshine and their future's full of hope,
Their children sing of a droving life, of shearers, and bushrangers
They learn to play the music and to dance the steps of old
Though their hearts are in Australia they never will be strangers
To the land they left behind them; they're the green among the gold.


I didn’t find a recording by WA composers Steve & Ros Barnes, so here is an a cappella version by the Germany-based trio IONTACH :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yx1Slp02jE0

Steve Barnes was for many years the Artistic Director of Fairbridge Folk Festival, at Pinjarra in Western Australia.


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 13 Sep 20 - 07:37 AM

ORE TRAIN BLUES
© BOB WILSON 2013


V.1   He got a job way out west carting iron ore
From the outback mines of the Pilbara to the West Australian shore
The hours were long, but the pay was good, but there wasn’t much to do
Except strum the ukulele and sing train songs with the crew.

CH.1
and they sang:
   Freight train, Graveyard train, Blow that Lonesome Whistle train
   The Indian Pacific and the Abalinga Mail
   Night train, Morning train
   Roll in m’Baby’s Arms train
   Picking up the tempo with the rattling of the rails.


V.2   Now the bosses and the union called a meeting in the yard
They had heard about this trio with the engineer and guard
“It’s workplace health and safety, it’s like talking on your phone.”
But he knew it wasn’t the music, they just didn’t like the tone.

CH.2
and they sang:
   Ghost train, Poison train, not bound for glory, This train
   And they all sang la la la la, when They Drove Old Dixie Down
   Bridal train, Salvation train, Get on Board Little Children train
   He could have been the King of the Road but he never got the crown.


V.3 The boss bought high-tech robots from Korea and Japan
And the maiden hands-free journey went pretty much to plan
They said: “It’s a boring job, we’ll find you something else to do.”
Now he’s in a control room, sharing train songs with the crew.

CH.3
and they sang:
   Freight train, Graveyard train, Blow that Lonesome Whistle train
   The Indian Pacific and the Abalinga Mail
   Night train, Morning train
   Roll in m’Baby’s Arms train
   Picking up the tempo with the rattling of the rails.


CH.4
and they sang:
   Mail train, Slow train, Desper-ados Waiting for a Train
   Homeward Bound, John Henry, Engine Engine Number Nine
   Peace train, Freedom train, Robert Johnston’s Love in Vain
   And they all sang like Dylan: well, I'm walkin' down the line
   And they all sang like Dylan: well, I'm walkin' down the line.



For all you lovers of Train Songs - another from Bob & Laurel Wilson (aka The Goodwills) and a great one to try and sing along, esp with the 4 chorus variations!!

You'll find it here :
https://www.thegoodwills.com/store/music-by-the-goodwills/the-last-waterhole/
on their latest CD "The Last Waterhole".


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 13 Sep 20 - 07:48 AM

Sorry if Stewie and I have put anyone else off from posting, but there's just so much good music out there (much of it not heard outside of Oz festivals or folkclubs), and when the spirit moves you, well, ya just gotta let it take ya :))

But I think I'm having a break for a coupla days now anyway ....

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 13 Sep 20 - 09:40 AM

does that mean I have to get back to work?


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 13 Sep 20 - 08:52 PM

R-J, well said. Thanks for posting a link to Val McGinness's 'Shake Hands Dance'. Lovely.

Sandra, yes.

PIONEERS
(F.Ophel/R.Rummery)

They said, 'Now here is gold
The cloth of gold unrolled
Lies spread about our feet
Now fortune smiles and sweet'
The mulga hid the face of fate
Watching with ruthless eyes of hate

'Now wealth is ours', they said
'Great wealth and riches red
Our journeying is done
Guerdon and gold are won'
Red were the written words they signed
And scenting blood the wild dog whined

They said, 'Now ours is fame
And honoured glorious name -
The name of pioneers
And honour as of seers'
They turned to take the homeward track
And dreamed a joyous welcome back

No man knows where they lie
None heard their last death cry
Unmarked their grave by mound
But at the last trump sound
Perchance some god who all things hears
Will give them praise as pioneers

This one is on Bob Rummery's 'Man with the concertina' CD.

Bob's note:

A poem written by Frederick Ophel in June 1906. A story on WA's goldfields in the early 1890s told that the first prospectors to peg Coolgardie found pegs in the ground with indecipherable writing in red ink. No one knows who pegged the ground'.

You can find a rendition at about the 45-min mark of Chloe and Jason's tribute to Bob.

Youtube

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 13 Sep 20 - 09:50 PM

THUNDERBOLT'S DREAM
(Trad/Anon)

One night in Uralla scrub as I lay
Strange fancies came o'er me and I thought it was day
I thought it was day yet I knew it was night
My dreams they all vanished and I woke in a fright

I saw scenes of a picnic in a faraway town
Of music and dancing and sports all around
My mother and father enjoying the fun
And schoolmates with whom I once ventured to run

Yes my dreams they all vanished and I woke with a jolt
To find myself still the outlaw Thunderbolt
But the music kept playing, there was a dance on nearby
No one would know me so I strolled on inside

We were having a spell, we'd just finished a dance
When a trooper rode up and his horse it did prance
I could tell by his looks he was more than a colt
So I thought to myself, 'You'll suit Thunderbolt'

While the trooper engaged in having a dance
I made for the door, to the horse I soon pranced
I sprang to the stirrup, in the saddle with one bound
I said, 'My young fellow a rider you've found'

Over rivers and valleys and mountains we flew
And from the green grass swept the bright morning dew
The trooper gave chase but he hadn't a chance
With his head hanging down he rode back to the dance

To that young policeman a lesson I've taught
No more he'll be heard in any police court
It was a hundred good miles I made on that colt
They put a thousand bright sovereigns on bold Thunderbolt

The song is the opening track of Bob Rummery's 'Man with the concertina'. Here is less spirited rendition than Bob's - Bob's nephew, Mark Rummery, and Barry McDonald.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 13 Sep 20 - 09:59 PM

Uralla is just an hour north of here, their local museum has an excellent Thunderbolt display.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 13 Sep 20 - 10:07 PM

Bob Rummery put a tune to Ian Mudie's poem about Australian soldiers in New Guinea in WW2.

NEW GUINEA CAMPAIGN
(Mudie/Rummery)

Are you there, Peter Lalor, are you there?
Ghost with gold-dust in your hair
And lean Stuart do you ride to seek your northern tide?
Where in greens they're slowly swinging
Through the mud, too tired for singing
Where the poison of New Guinea fills the ai

Are you there, untiring Eyre, are you there?
With your heart beyond compare
Are you there, you brave wild Kellys where heroes on their bellies
Through the jungle now are creeping
May their women have no weeping
When snipers from their tree-tops cruelly stare?

You ghosts that walk beside
Do you watch them now with pride?
As through green hell and glory, they carry on your story
Where in mud their feet are sinking
And in dreams they're always thinking
Of their homes and of the cobbers who have died

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Sep 20 - 08:52 PM

As sung by Martyn Wyndham- Read.

TOMAHAWKING FRED

Now some shearing I have done, and some prizes I have won
Through knuckling down so close against the skin
But I'd rather tomahawk every day and shear a flock
For that's the only way to make some tin

Chorus
I am just about to head for the Darling River shed
To turn a hundred out I know the plan
Just give me sufficient cash and you'll see me make a splash
For I'm Tomahawking Fred, the lady's man

Put me on a shearing floor and I’ll lay you five to four
That I'd give any ringer ten sheep start
Oh when I’m on the whipping side then away from me they glide
Just like any bullet or a dart

Chorus

Oh of me you might have read for I'm Tomahawking Fred
In shearing sheds me fame has travelled far
I'm the don of the Riverine, amongst the shearers cut a shine
And our tar-boy says I never call for tar

Chorus

Wire in and go ahead, for I'm Tomahawking Fred
In a shearing shed, my lads, I cut a shine
There is Roberts and Jack Gunn, shearing laurels they have won
But my tally's never under ninety-nine

Chorus

Youtube clip

This belter of a shearing song was preserved for us by the self-styled 'last of the bushrangers', Jack Bradshaw, who had done a bit of shearing when he wasn't horse stealing or planning bank robberies. He served 20 years from 1880 for bank robbery and some business over a stolen cheque. In jail, he put together his 'Highway Robbery Under Arms Without Shedding Blood' and 'Twenty Years of Prison Life in the Gaols of NSW'. These included a number of traditional songs, including this one. It appears in Stewart and Keesing' edition of 'Old Bush Songs' under the title 'Some Shearing I Have Done'. Evidently, the ballad is based on a music hall song 'Fashionable Fred'.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 14 Sep 20 - 09:43 PM

Once again, I forgot to login.

Of course, this Lawson poem should be among any collection of Australian 'folk songs'.

FREEDOM ON THE WALLABY
(Henry Lawson)

Australia's a big country
An' Freedom's humping bluey,
An' Freedom's on the wallaby
Oh! don't you hear 'er cooey?
She's just begun to boomerang,
She'll knock the tyrants silly,
She's goin' to light another fire
And boil another billy.

Our fathers toiled for bitter bread
While loafers thrived beside 'em,
But food to eat and clothes to wear,
Their native land denied 'em.
An' so they left their native land
In spite of their devotion,
An' so they came, or if they stole,
Were sent across the ocean.

Then Freedom couldn't stand the glare
O' Royalty's regalia,
She left the loafers where they were,
An' came out to Australia.
But now across the mighty main
The chains have come ter bind her –
She little thought to see again
The wrongs she left behind her.

Our parents toil'd to make a home –
Hard grubbin 'twas an' clearin' –
They wasn't crowded much with lords
When they was pioneering.
But now that we have made the land
A garden full of promise,
Old Greed must crook 'is dirty hand
And come ter take it from us.

So we must fly a rebel flag,
As others did before us,
And we must sing a rebel song
And join in rebel chorus.
We'll make the tyrants feel the sting
O' those that they would throttle;
They needn't say the fault is ours
If blood should stain the wattle!

There are plenty of renditions available on the Net. Unfortunately, my favourite is not - Bob Rummery singing it on Loaded Dog 'Dusty gravel road'. Loaded Dog faithfully keep to Lawson's text.

Decades ago, I put together the following intro for a themed concert of Oz songs. It may be of interest:

The depression of the early 1890s led to an explosion of the antagonisms that had been simmering between capital and labour. Strikes and lockouts were the order of the day. The shearers' strike of 1891 brought Australia close to the brink of civil war at a time when working people throughout the world were demanding social justice, better pay and improved working conditions. The powerful squatters were aided and abetted by colonial governments, the military and the police. At Barcaldine, over 1500 troopers with cannon and gattling guns confronted 1000 armed shearers who were attacking a train loaded with scabs. This led to hundreds of shearers being arrested and woodsheds being burned to the ground. Lawson published 'Freedom on the Wallaby' in 'The Worker' in Brisbane on 16 May 1891. It was his comment on the use of the military to put down the shearers' strike and some stanzas were read out in the Queensland parliament amid calls for his arrest for sedition. The poem took to the bush and grew itself a tune. A.G. Stephens once said of one of Lawson's poems and would have said of many 'this is not high poetry, but the passion, the grip of it, make it valuable and, in Australia, memorable. It is interesting to note that, as early as 1889, Lawson was writing: 'I don't think I'd live for a week under the freedom or tyranny of unionism, universal brotherhood, glorious liberty or whatever you like to call it'.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 14 Sep 20 - 10:16 PM

Here's another Lawson poem for which Bob Rummery provided a tune:

THE SHEARERS
(H.Lawson/R.Rummery)

No church-bell rings them from the Track,
No pulpit lights their blindness–
‘Tis hardship, drought, and homelessness
That teach those bushmen kindness:
The mateship born, in barren lands,
Of toil and thirst and danger,
The camp-fare for the wanderer set,
The first place to the stranger.

They do the best they can today–
Take no thought of the morrow;
Their way is not the old-world way–
They live to lend and borrow.
When shearing’s done and cheques gone wrong,
They call it “time to slither”–
They saddle up and say “So-long!”
And ride the Lord knows whither.

And though he may be brown or black,
Or wrong man there, or right man,
The mate that’s steadfast to his mates
They call that man a “white man!”
They tramp in mateship side by side–
The Protestant and Roman–
They call no biped lord or sir,
And touch their hat to no man!

They carry in their swags perhaps,
A portrait and a letter–
And, maybe, deep down in their hearts,
The hope of “something better.”
Where lonely miles are long to ride,
And long, hot days recurrent,
There’s lots of time to think of men
They might have been–but weren’t.

They turn their faces to the west
And leave the world behind them
(Their drought-dry graves are seldom set
Where even mates can find them).
They know too little of the world
To rise to wealth or greatness;
But in these lines I gladly pay
My tribute to their straightness

It can be found on Loaded Dog 'That there dog o' mine' CD.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Steamshuttle
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 12:46 AM

Hi Mudcatters

Sandra Nixon alerted me to this thread and suggested I post on Steamshuttle and my songs. The easiest way to access all this is from my music blog at

https://sealsongs.blogspot.com/

I have a selection there, arranged by song title (lyric, link to an audio recording). Just click on the button and it takes you to the recording on my Soundcloud site.

There is also a button for Steamshuttle, which takes you to a selection of tracks from the LP, a bit of info about the band, as well as some unreleased tracks intended for a follow-up that didn’t happen.

Happy to answer any questions (g.seal@curtin.edu.au) and keep up the good work on a great project.

GS


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 01:53 AM

Seal Songs - Songs by Graham Seal

Seal Songs - Stream Shuttle bio & tracks

Steam Shuttle at Sydney Opera House, 2nd Bush Music Festival 1979

Review of Steam Shuttle LP, 1977


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 03:55 AM

Excellent! I look forward, Graham, to working my way through listening to your tracks.
R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 03:59 AM

WARRANDYTE MORNING ~ Mark Leehy (PARADIDDLE)

Dragonfly morning in the summer heat
You bring no warning anytime you feel,
And we’ll drift through the air with a tumbling motion
And we’ll sift through the sands of an endless ocean.

Warrandyte morning in the summer haze
If you catch me yawning, wake me up today,
And we’ll drift through the air with a tumbling motion
And we’ll sift through the sands of an endless ocean.

    I’ve had the days of dreaming, but today they’ve all gone home
    I’ve never really had to ramble, but I feel I’m coming home.

Dragonfly morning in the summer haze
You bring the dawning of my summer days,
And we’ll drift through the air with a tumbling motion
And we’ll sift through the sands of an endless ocean.

      I’m coming home
      But I’ve felt times when I was far beyond my mind…….

In a Warrandyte morning in the summer haze
If you catch me yawning, wake me up today.


From their “Wait Till the Word Gets Around” - 1st of 3 LPs :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Db0v2nnUSgY

Warrandyte is an old town in a beautiful area about 25kms NE of Melbourne’s CBD . Dunno if it is now possibly a little suburban?? - but the pics still show it as lovely! (if a little bushfire-prone…..)

Mark Leehy was a member of Paradiddle folk band from 1978 and he and some other members are part of Bushfire Press. Plus, I believe Mark is still connected with Music in Schools programs and bush dances.


Cheers, R-J
(this song was a great favourite of my late partner, Paul Lawler)…….


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 04:04 AM

Bring Out The Banners

©1997 John Warner

In faded photo, like a dream,
A locomotive under steam
Rolls with the ranks of marching feet
And union banners on the street.

Ch.
Bring out the banners once again,
You union women, union men,
That all around may plainly see
The power of our unity.

I've seen those banners richly made
With symbols fair of craft and trade,
The union's names in red and gold,
Their aspirations printed bold.

Boilermakers, smiths and cooks,
Stevedores with cargo hooks,
Declare their union strong and proud,
Rank on rank before the crowd.

They won the eight-hour working day,
They won our right to honest pay,
Victorious their banners shone,
How dare we lose what they have won?

Today, when those who rule divide,
We must be standing side by side,
Our rights were bought with tears and pain,
Bring out the banners once again.


(Tune: Oxford or See Amid The Winter's Snow by John Goss. 1800-1880)

As a good lefty folkie :) My Paul loved to sing "BOTB" in Maleny; this is how they honour John’s song and its sentiments in Minneapolis, MN : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x9EqdD7_toA


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 04:08 AM

The Miner’s Way ~ Sally Harris (Gone Molly)

Cold tunnels, black as night
That’s The Miner’s Way
Toiling by the candlelight
Half a shilling in my pay.

Pick and hammer, wedge and wheel
That’s The Miner’s Way
Blackened lungs that never heal.
Half a shilling in my pay.

        Born to the yoke of misery
        Not enough to feed our families,
        While the rich are counting out their pounds
        We must send our children underground.

Working for the rich man’s purse
That’s The Miner’s Way
Poverty, the worker’s curse
Half a shilling in my pay.

12 long hours in the deep
That’s The Miner’s Way
Still we face a famished sleep
Half a shilling in my pay.

         Born to the yoke of misery
        Not enough to feed our families,
        While the rich are counting out their pounds
        We must send our children underground.

When the land no wealth reveals
That’s The Miner’s Way
Parting wages bankers steal
Half a shilling in my pay.

Cast out like a deadly blight
That’s The Miner’s Way
Lords and Ladies dance tonight
That’s the bloody miner’s way,
That’s the bloody miner’s way,
That’s ….. The Miner’s Way.


Gone Molly were a delightful duo (singer-songwriter Sally Harris and Rebecca Wright on cello and vocals) and are now a delightful trio with the addition of Lachlan Baldwin on vocals and multi instruments.
Sally’s songs often have that quality of making you wonder if it’s traditional :) and are also often great for singing along with!

Listen here : https://gonemolly.bandcamp.com/track/the-miners-way They have a CD and an EP so far.

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 06:04 AM

Since 16th August we have posted 144 songs, well done, us!
-----------

1. Date: 16 Aug 20 - 11:00 AM   ANDERSON'S COAST © John Warner 8/5/93

2. Date: 18 Aug 20 - 10:41 AM   "Now I'm easy" (no words)

3.   Date: 18 Aug 20 - 08:11 PM    Battler's ballad

4. Date: 18 Aug 20 - 08:53 PM    Do You Think That I Do Not Know?

5. Date: 18 Aug 20 - 10:00 PM   SERVICE SONG   lyrics and Music: Harry Robertson Arranged by Evan Mathieson

6 & 7 - Date: 19 Aug 20 - 02:12 AM   One of the has-beens by Don Henderson & One of the has-beens (trad)

8 + 9 Date: 19 Aug 20 - 02:44 PM Where the Brumbies Come to Water + Reedy Lagoon

10. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:04 PM He fades away Alistair Hulett

11.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:21 PM   Suicide town Alistair Hulett

12. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:37 PM   Rabbit Trapper

13.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 08:48 PM    WHERE THE CANE FIRES BURN   (Bill Scott)

14. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:02 PM   HEY RAIN (Bill Scott)

15.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:33 PM    Brown skin baby

16.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:59 PM   Phyl Lobl has written so many great songs lyrics

17.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:00 PM   Dorothy Hewett's SAILOR HOME FROM THE SEA

18. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:11 PM   Dorothy Hewett's Weevils in the flour + original poem

19.   Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:16 PM   BARE LEGGED KATE   words: John Dengate

20. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:48 PM   My apologies, the transcription that I posted above of 'Sailor home from the sea' needs severe correction. I copied and pasted it from a Mudcat thread. Martyn's version varies a little from Hewett's original, but this is what he sings:   SAILOR HOME FROM THE SEA

21. Date: 19 Aug 20 - 11:35 PM   THE BROKEN-DOWN SQUATTER   (Charles Flower)

22.   Date: 20 Aug 20 - 07:36 AM    MY DEAR DARWIN       © Paul Lawler, 1983            

23.   Date: 20 Aug 20 - 09:40 AM   Australian version of Stephen Foster's 'Gentle Annie'.

24.   Date: 20 Aug 20 - 10:17 AM JOHNNY STEWART DROVER (Chris Buch)

25. Date: 20 Aug 20 - 10:45 AM   Will Ogilvie, WHEN THE BRUMBIES COME TO WATER

26.   Date: 20 Aug 20 - 11:02 AM    Waltzing Matilda

27. Date: 20 Aug 20 - 11:04 AM
I've just made a quick list of traditional songs, collected & re-popularised in the revival of the 50s/60s.
They were all published by the Bush Music Club in Singabout (1956-67)
Maggie May, Nine Miles from Gundagai, The Neumerella Shore, The Wild Colonial Boy, The Black Velvet Band & The Old Bark Hut, The Drover's Dream, Wild Rover, Old Black Billy (written in 1938 but thought to be trad. when it was collected),
and a couple of other classics which strangely enough were not published in Singabout! - Moreton Bay & Reedy River lyrics & video of Chris Kempster singing

28. Date: 20 Aug 20 - 11:46 AM   Gerry Hallom   The Outside Track

29.   Date: 20 Aug 20 - 08:48 PM   AND WHEN THEY DANCE (Roy Abbott)

30. Date: 20 Aug 20 - 09:19 PM    WATCHERS OF THE WATER   (Paul Hemphill)

31. Date: 21 Aug 20 - 07:56 AM   very famous songs in copyright Redgum - I was only 19 lyrics I was only 19 video    Paul Kelly & Kev Carmody - From little things big things grow

32. Date: 21 Aug 20 - 08:22 PM   TIME IS A TEMPEST   John Broomhall / John Thompson

33. Date: 21 Aug 20 - 08:30 PM   John Dengate   The Answer's Ireland (Tune Rody McCorley)

34.   Date: 21 Aug 20 - 08:59 PM    AFTER ALL (Henry Lawson/Garnet Rogers)

35.   Date: 21 Aug 20 - 09:42 PM   THE SLIPRAIL AND THE SPUR (Henry Lawson)

35.   Date: 21 Aug 20 - 10:08 PM   THE SWAGGIES HAVE ALL WALTZED MATILDA AWAY (Alistair Hulett)

36. Date: 21 Aug 20 - 10:22 PM      PAST CARIN’   (Henry Lawson)

37. Date: 21 Aug 20 - 11:52 PM    THE REEDY LAGOON    (post 50)

======================

39. Date: 22 Aug 20 - 10:23 PM Ted Egan's 'Sayonara Nakamura'

40. Date: 22 Aug 20 - 10:44 PM Back to Broome - Ted Egan

41. Date: 23 Aug 20 - 10:17 PM NORTHWARD TO THE SHEDS (Will Ogilvie)

42. Date: 24 Aug 20 - 10:02 PM    LAST COAL TRAIN   (Paul Wookey)

43.   Date: 24 Aug 20 - 10:24 PM    SERGEANT SMALL

44.   Date: 24 Aug 20 - 11:21 PM    DUSTY GRAVEL ROAD (Alan Mann)

45. Date: 24 Aug 20 - 11:37 PM   THE POISON TRAIN (Michael O'Rourke)

46.   Date: 25 Aug 20 - 12:19 AM    PADDY'S BACK    (Alan Ralph)

47. Date: 25 Aug 20 - 09:08 PM   CALL OF THE NORTH (J.Sorensen/R.Rummery)

48. Date: 25 Aug 20 - 09:25 PM   THE WINDMILL RUN (Alan Mann)

49. Date: 25 Aug 20 - 10:07 PM   DOWN THE RIVER (H. Lawson/I. MacDougall)

50. Date: 25 Aug 20 - 10:41 PM   KITTY KANE   (John Warner)

51. Date: 25 Aug 20 - 11:15 PM   ON THE DEATH OF MR HOLT   (John Manifold/Paul Lawler)

52. Date: 26 Aug 20 - 10:57 PM   THE SHAME OF GOING BACK   (Henry Lawson)

53.   Date: 27 Aug 20 - 12:37 AM    THE PEOPLE HAVE SONGS   (Miguel Heatwole)

54. Date: 27 Aug 20 - 01:25 AM    THE SIEGE OF UNION STREET (words & music by Alistair Hulett)

55.   Date: 27 Aug 20 - 10:50 PM   WINNIPEG IN WINTER   (Alan Mann)

56.   Date: 27 Aug 20 - 11:41 PM   AWAY TO TINTINARA   (Mike O'Connor)

57. Date: 28 Aug 20 - 09:04 PM   WHEN YOU'RE FLUSH   (T.Brittain/R.Rummery)

58.   Date: 28 Aug 20 - 09:53 PM   MENZIES' SHOUT (HAVE A DRINK ON ME)   (Alan Mann)

59. Date: 28 Aug 20 - 11:20 PM   SONG OF ARTESIAN WATER   (Paterson/O'Sullivan)

60.   Date: 29 Aug 20 - 01:35 AM   WITH THE CATTLE   (Paterson/Hallom)

61. Date: 29 Aug 20 - 10:04 AM      Kevin Baker - Snowy River Men - video

62. Date: 29 Aug 20 - 10:52 AM    Kevin Baker - Superstar

63. Date: 29 Aug 20 - 11:08 AM    THE RABBITER   Words and music: Stan Wakefield

64. Date: 29 Aug 20 - 10:37 PM    BRUNSWICK ROAD   (Steve Groves & Danny Bourke)

65. Date: 29 Aug 20 - 11:03 PM    SHEARING IN A BAR   (Duke Tritton)

66. Date: 30 Aug 20 - 07:14 PM   LEWIS ISLAND LUGGER   (M.Murray & L.Silvester)

67. Date: 30 Aug 20 - 07:57 PM   BENEATH ULURU   (Dave Oakes)

68. Date: 30 Aug 20 - 10:36 PM   SHIP REPAIRING MEN   (Harry Robertson)

69. Date: 30 Aug 20 - 11:14 PM    HOMELESS MAN   (Harry Robertson)

70. Date: 30 Aug 20 - 11:43 PM WEE POT STOVE (Harry Robertson)

71. Date: 31 Aug 20 - 12:27 AM    Reedy River.

72. Date: 31 Aug 20 - 07:37 AM    Weevils in the Flour by Dorothy Hewitt in 1962    (post 100)

=====================

73. Date: 31 Aug 20 - 07:29 PM   SONG OF THE WHEAT   (Paterson/Hallom)

74. Date: 01 Sep 20 - 07:08 PM   This one, relating to the red centre, is by a Scot.   SINGING LAND (Dougie Maclean)

75. Date: 01 Sep 20 - 07:21 PM   BAW BAW BIG BILL   (Terry Piper)

76. Date: 01 Sep 20 - 07:54 PM   HANGING ON FOR THE RAIN    (Anne Infante)

77. Date: 01 Sep 20 - 08:59 PM    FROM LITTLE THINGS BIG THINGS GROW    (Paul Kelly/Kev Carmody)

78. Date: 01 Sep 20 - 09:22 PM   NO MORE BOOMERANG   (Kath Walker)   Oodgeroo Noonuccal

79. Date: 02 Sep 20 - 08:25 PM    THIRTY TON LINE    (Don Henderson)

80. Date: 02 Sep 20 - 11:31 PM   RAKE AND A RAMBLING MAN    (Don Henderson)

81. Date: 03 Sep 20 - 08:44 PM    BONNIE JESS   (T.Spencer/G.Shearston)

82. Date: 03 Sep 20 - 08:59 PM    GIRLS IN OUR TOWN    (Bob Hudson)

83.   Date: 03 Sep 20 - 09:24 PM   NED KELLY'S FAREWELL TO GRETA    (Traditional)

84.   Date: 03 Sep 20 - 10:39 PM IRISH GIRLS (WILL STEAL YOUR HEART AWAY) (Gary Shearston)

85. Date: 04 Sep 20 - 07:50 PM THE KELLY'S TURNING   (Larry King)

86. Date: 04 Sep 20 - 08:29 PM    SONG OF THE SHEETMETAL WORKER   (John Dengate)

87. Date: 04 Sep 20 - 09:12 PM    DIAMENTINA DROVER   (Hugh McDonald)

88. Date: 04 Sep 20 - 09:40 PM   I WAS ONLY NINETEEN (A walk in the light green)   (John Schumann)

89. Date: 06 Sep 20 - 12:48 AM    COURTING THE NET    (Bob Wilson)

90.   Date: 06 Sep 20 - 08:20 PM    THE MAN WITH THE CONCERTINA    {Stewart/Rummery/Kevans)

91.   Date: 06 Sep 20 - 09:31 PM    THE GLENBURGH WOOL    (Jack Sorensen)

92. Date: 06 Sep 20 - 11:18 PM    JAIL AWAY FREMANTLE    (W.Evans/A.Ferguson)

93. Date: 07 Sep 20 - 10:50 PM    THE TOWN OF KIANDRA (THE WEE ONE)

94.   Date: 07 Sep 20 - 11:44 PM    HUMPING THE DRUM    (Steam Shuttle)

95 & 96. Date: 08 Sep 20 - 03:51 AM    Back of the Milky Way (Humping the Drum) - lyrics & audio Lyrics to Graham's songs, all with audio.
The Country Knows The Rest by Graham Seal with audio link.

97. Date: 08 Sep 20 - 08:18 PM    Enda Kenny's Earl Grey

98.   Date: 08 Sep 20 - 09:28 PM      THE SANDY HOLLOW LINE    (Duke Tritton)

99. Date: 08 Sep 20 - 09:49 PM    THE STREETS OF FORBES (THE DEATH OF BEN HALL)

100. Date: 08 Sep 20 - 10:39 PM   THE PUSH ON THE CORNER

101. Date: 08 Sep 20 - 11:26 PM    BOURKE STREET ON SATURDAY NIGHT    (P.C. Cole & Fred Hall)

102. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 12:54 AM   NORTHWARDS TO THE SHEDS    (W.Ogilvie/G.Hallom

103.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 02:08 AM   Gurindji Blues Ted Egan

104.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 02:38 AM    the bush girl    (henry lawson)

105. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 03:21 AM    YIL LULL ~ Joe Geia

106. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 04:19 AM    THE GREEN MAN ~ John Thompson

107. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 05:36 AM   DAVEY LOWSTON

108.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 06:06 AM    COONAWARRA [HAS] THREE SHADOWS   ~ Judith Crossley (post 200)

=============

109. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 07:36 AM    FANNIE BAY ~ Doug & Andy Tainsh / and possibly David Charles

110.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 08:00 AM    Miner’s Washing ~ John Warner

111.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 08:26 AM    THE STATION COOK ~ trad Oz

112.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 09:03 AM    NZ -   PACKING MY THINGS ~ Phil Colquhoun

113. Date: 09 Sep 20 - 08:53 PM   THE FREE SELECTOR'S DAUGHTER   (Lawson/Hallom)

114.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 09:58 PM   THE FIZZER   (Gerry Hallom)

115.   Date: 09 Sep 20 - 10:13 PM    BOSS LADY   (Bob Sharp)

116. Date: 10 Sep 20 - 08:14 PM    THE BALLAD OF 1891    (H.Palmer/D.Jacobs)

117. Date: 10 Sep 20 - 08:45 PM    WALTJIM BAT MATILDA   (Ali Mills)

118.   Date: 11 Sep 20 - 12:27 AM    Little England    by late Kiwi-Quoinslander, Mark Gillet.

119. Date: 11 Sep 20 - 02:49 AM    THE DROVER'S BOY   ~   Ted Egan

120. Date: 11 Sep 20 - 03:05 AM   THE RUSTY FORD CORTINA ~ Mark Gillett

121. Date: 11 Sep 20 - 03:23 AM    BILL AND THE BEAR - John Thompson

122. Date: 11 Sep 20 - 04:23 AM    SUN ARISE ~ Rolf Harris & Harry Butler

123.   Date: 11 Sep 20 - 10:12 PM   Turning Steel (The Factory Lad) © Colin Dryden 1969

124.   Date: 11 Sep 20 - 10:26 PM       OCEAN LINER   (Barry Skipsey)

125.   Date: 11 Sep 20 - 10:45 PM    YUENDUMU FLAGON WAGON (Wendy Baarda/Bloodwood)

126. Date: 11 Sep 20 - 11:21 PM   "The Year of the Drum" ~ Wendy Joseph

127.   Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:12 PM   Pass the Song Along ~ Bernard Carney.

128.   Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:19 PM    KALGOORLIE PIPELINE ~ Alan Ferguson / trad Irish tune

129.   Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:31 PM    THE DEATH OF BEN HALL

130.   Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:49 PM    MATT SAVAGE: BOSS DROVER    (Ted Egan)

131. Date: 12 Sep 20 - 09:52 PM    WARATAH AND WATTLE ~ Frances Patterson (& Henry Lawson)

132. Date: 12 Sep 20 - 11:35 PM    ADELAIDE RIVER    (V.McGinness/J.McGinness)

133.   Date: 13 Sep 20 - 02:49 AM    RANGITIKI   [© BOB WILSON 2014]

134.   Date: 13 Sep 20 - 05:14 AM    GREEN AMONG THE GOLD ~ Steve Barnes

135. Date: 13 Sep 20 - 07:37 AM    ORE TRAIN BLUES   © BOB WILSON 2013

136. Date: 13 Sep 20 - 08:52 PM    PIONEERS    (F.Ophel/R.Rummery)

137. Date: 13 Sep 20 - 09:50 PM    THUNDERBOLT'S DREAM   (Trad/Anon)

138.   Date: 13 Sep 20 - 10:07 PM    NEW GUINEA CAMPAIGN    (Mudie/Rummery)

139.   Date: 14 Sep 20 - 08:52 PM   As sung by Martyn Wyndham- Read.   TOMAHAWKING FRED

140. Date: 14 Sep 20 - 09:43 PM    FREEDOM ON THE WALLABY    (Henry Lawson)

141.   Date: 14 Sep 20 - 10:16 PM    THE SHEARERS    (H.Lawson/R.Rummery) (post 200)

===============

142.   Date: 15 Sep 20 - 03:59 AM    WARRANDYTE MORNING ~ Mark Leehy (PARADIDDLE)

143.    Date: 15 Sep 20 - 04:04 AM   Bring Out The Banners    ©1997 John Warner

144.   Date: 15 Sep 20 - 04:08 AM    The Miner’s Way ~ Sally Harris (Gone Molly)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 06:18 AM

Oh, I'm so glad you've done that, Sandra!!
I kept thinking I should "make a list" soon, but couldn't quite summon the energy to start!!
Excellent Post.

Thanks, R-J :)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 06:51 AM

it took me 2 days! I've emailed it to you as a doc - easy to search

sandra


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 09:24 PM

Well done, Sandra.

Despite queries from Mysha and R-J, we still haven't had an answer as to whether this thread's focus could be expanded to include songs from our Kiwi brothers/sisters in arms. I reckon it would be a good idea. It would be good to hear in this regard from our thread mediator or Joe.

R-J has already posted 'Packing my things'. it should be noted, however, that the attribution to 'Phil Colquhoun' is incorrect. The author of the song is unknown. It was collected by NEIL Colquhoun who reconstructed the music from material collected. His informant was Alistair Swan.

In respect of corrections, I had a yarn with Phil Gray of Loaded Dog about 'Glenburgh Wool' by Jack Sorensen the lyrics of which I posted on 6 September. He rejects the addition of the Wendy Evans chorus. He argue that it is inappropriate to the subject of the song. The song is about transportation of wool by camel trains, not about shearers. I agree. Chuck out the chorus!

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 09:32 PM

Bernard Carney, a West Australian singer/songwriter, has written a delightful song for his grand-children - Tian, Joe and Dan. R-J has already posted one of his songs.

THE FEATHER FOOT FAIRY
(Bernard Carney)

Now gather ‘round folks, I’ll sing you a song
Of a feather foot fairy named Tian

Chorus:
She never grew old and she never grew young
She knew every song that had ever been sung
And she played in the moon and the stars and sun
And she was there when the world began
The feather foot fairy named Tian

The feathers on her feet were oh so fine
She could fly through the mists of time
She’d fly ten zillion years or more
And she often had lunch with a dinosaur
And the dinosaur’s house had the strangest things
There were butterfly bats with rainbow wings
And the hills were covered in purple trees
Where the starfish bird sang delicussly
Now ‘delicussly’ is not a real word
But it’s often used by the starfish bird
And if you’re wondering how I know
Well the feather foot fairy told me so
And she should know - ‘cos

Chorus

Now the feather foot fairy named Tian
She was there when the world began
And she watched all the oceans come and go
And her only friend was a fossil named Joe.
Now Joe was asleep for a million years
’til she woke him up with her feather foot tears
And they played in the sands of time so free
And they slept upstairs in the fossilott tree
Now the fossilot tree in quite absurd, 
But it’s often used by the starfish bird
And if you’re wondering how I know
Well the featherf oot fairy told me so
And she should know - ‘cos

Chorus

Now Tian took Joe on the trout sea trail
In a plastic boat with a polythene sail
And they dived to the bottom in an old tin can 
And met with a big seahorse called Dan
Now Dan had a pancake stuck to his bum 
And he brewed his tea in a kettle drum
And he knew every horse that lived in the sea
And he talked to them equifishously
Now ‘equifishously’ is not a real word
But it’s often used by the starfish bird
And if you’re wondering how I know
Well the feather foot fairy told me so
And she should know - ‘cos

Chorus

Now the feather foot fairy and seahorse Dan 
Took fossil Joe to the big trout dam
And they all held hands and disappeared
And travelled ahead 10 thousand years.
The future all looked a little bit blurred
But the first thing they saw was the starfish bird 
And if you’re wondering how I know
Well the feather foot fairy told me so
And she should know - ‘cos

Chorus

Yutube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 10:32 PM

Cathie O'Sullivan put a tune to this lovely poem by John Shaw Neilson.

STONY TOWN
(J.S.Neilson/C.O’Sullivan)

If ever I go to Stony Town, I’ll go as to a fair
With bells and men and a dance-girl with a heat-wave in her hair
I’ll ask the birds that live on the road; for I dream (though it may not be)
That the eldest song was a forest thought and the singer was a tree

Oh, Stony Town is a hard town! It buys and sells and buys
It will not pity the plights of youth or any love in the eyes
No curve they follow in Stony Town, but the straight line and the square
And the girl shall dance them a royal dance, like a blue wren at his prayer

Oh, Stony Town is a hard town! It sells and buys and sells
Merry men three I will take with me, and seven and twenty bells
The bells will laugh and the men will laugh, and the girl shall shine so fair
With the scent of love and cinnamon dust shaken out of her hair

Her skirts shall be of the gossamer, full thirty inches high
And her lips shall move as the flowers move to see the winds go by
The men will laugh, and the bells will laugh, to find the world so young
And the girl shall go as a velvet bird, with a quick step on her tongue

She shall cry aloud that a million moons for a lover is not long
And her mouth shall be as the green honey in the honey-eater’s song
If ever I go to Stony Town, I’ll go as to a fair,
And the girl shall shake with the cinnamon and the heat-wave in her hair

Youtube clip

John Shaw Neilson

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 10:56 PM

Jeez, I finally realised that again I hadn't signed in.

And Neilson's best-loved poem.

THE ORANGE TREE
(Neilson/O'Sullivan

The young girl stood beside me.
I Saw not what her young eyes could see:
A light, she said, not of the sky
Lives somewhere in the orange tree.

Is it, I said, of east or west?
The heartbeat of a luminous boy
Who with his faltering flute confessed
Only the edges of his joy?

Was he, I said, borne to the blue
In a mad escapade of Spring
Ere he could make a fond adieu
To his love in the blossoming?

Listen! the young girl said.
There calls no voice, no music beats on me
But it is almost sound: it falls
This evening on the orange tree

Does he, I said, so fear the spring
Ere the white sap too far can climb?
See in the full gold evening
All happenings of the olden time?

Is he so goaded by the green?
Does the compulsion of the dew
Make him unknowable but keen
Asking with beauty of the blue?

Listen! the young girl said. For all
Your hapless talk you fail to see
There is a light, a step, a call
This evening on the orange tree

Is it, 1 said, a waste of love
Imperishably old in pain
Moving as an affrighted dove
Under the sunlight or the rain?

Is it a fluttering heart that gave
Too willingly and was reviled?
Is it the stammering at a grave,
The last word of a little child?

Silence! the young girl said. Oh, why
Why will you talk to weary me?
Plague me no longer now, for I
Am listening like the orange tree

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 10:58 PM

STORYTIME:
Back in 87, I was performing with the Darwin mob at the 21st National Folk Festival in Alice Springs, NT. It was only the 2nd time The Nash had happened outside of a capital city and the 1st was also in The Alice, in 1980.
(BtW, it only happened twice more : 1989 was Maleny, Qld and 1990 was Kuranda, Qld, and both of which were financially very successful, somewhat unusual for NFFs up til then).

Our lad from The Top End, Paul Lawler, entered into the Declan Affley Songwriting Award competition, his semi-autobiographical song “Son of Rome”***. We all had high hopes for Lawls’ excellent entry.

Imagine our chagrin, when a bloody ‘Quoinslander’ walked away with the prize!!!

One “Noel Gardner” had come west, to sing his mate’s song in the comp. His mate was Mark Gillett, a Kiwi-born-and-raised Queenslander, and the song was “Watching The Obi Flow”.

Many years later, with Paul and I living together in Maleny, Qld and running the ABOFOTS folkclub (where the afore-mentioned Mark Gillett was often welcomed!), well, my sister Alex (who was also at that Alice National),
took up with a Sunshine Coast bloke who was a singer-songwriter ..... and now, Noel Gardner is my Brother-in-Law!!

The winning song is below.

Oh, and Paul’s ‘pipped’ song*** will be posted soon :)


WATCHING THE OBI FLOW ~ Mark Gillett (Hinterland Band)


The city no longer gave me thrills, so I thought I’d move up to the hills
Draw the dole to pay my scratch, sing my songs and tend my patch and
Watch The Obi Flow, I’d Watch The Obi Flow
Sing my songs and tend my patch and Watch The Obi Flow.

Well this countryside had eased my mind, I thought I’d left my cares behind
But I have found what many knew : the city will catch up with you
No matter how far you go, it doesn’t matter how far you go
The city will catch up with you no matter how far you go.

Coz down in the gorge where the trees were tall, they’ve gone and built a mighty wall
And from a lake that’s dark and still, turned The Obi through the hills
To the Sunshine Coast below, to the Sunshine Coast below
They’ve turned The Obi through the hills to the Sunshine Coast below.

Well, Maleny’s sewage flows right through, and the cow sheds drain to The Obi – POOH!!
The water looks a trifle rough, you wouldn’t want to drink the stuff
But my, the lawn should grow, my my, the lawns will grow
You wouldn’t want to drink this stuff, but my, the lawns will grow.

Now down in the gorge where the waters flow, or on the slopes where the bunyas grow
Once they bulldoze, burn, and wreck, no earthly power will bring it back
And the kids will never know, you can tell’em but they won’t know
No earthly power will bring it back and the kids’ll never know.

Well, my little house was high and dry, till the Shire Inspector he dropped by
Said this house should never have been, tear it down and start again
Before the next big blow, it’ll fall down in the next big blow
Tear it down and start again, before the next big blow.

So I’ll move to Maroochy by the sea, get me a job in a factory
And when I come home to my flat, I’ll just turn on my kitchen tap
And Watch The Obi Flow, I’ll Watch The Obi Flow
I’ll just turn on my kitchen tap and Watch The Obi Flow.

I’ll Watch The Obi Flow, I’ll Watch The Obi Flow
Just turn on my kitchen tap and Watch The Obi Flow.



And Watch The Obi Flow, I’ll be Watching The Obi Flow
Just turn on my kitchen tap and .....
(spoken) : Watch The Obi Obi Flow : drip - drip - drip


First track of 4 from The Hinterland Band’s EP “Against the Flow” c.1985 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFoIDwyZ0XA    with Mark Gillett (also on banjo), Noel Gardner, Jim Maloney, Paul Vella.
This song is still in Noel Gardner’s repertoire, but doesn’t seem to be recorded elsewhere. The posthumous CD of Mark’s recordings (Mark Gillett, 1953 – 2007) proposed by friends at his Wake, is apparently still a work-in-progress .....

PS        The Obi Obi Creek [which drops around 435m over its 53.2km length], was named after a noted warrior of the local Aboriginal ‘Kabi Kabi’ people.


Cheers, R-J
(and yes, OK, it's a top little number!!! Thanks to Noel for correcting my lyrics :)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 15 Sep 20 - 11:40 PM

THE DECLARATION
(Neilson/Wyndham-Read)

Now I shall love you till the birds
Have lost the way to sing
Until there be no tenderness
Upon the face of spring

And I shall love you till a babe
Shall neither laugh nor cry
When men no more are wanderers
And women’s tears are dry

And I shall love you till the trees
Know neither sun nor rain
When morning brings no mystery
And love can leave no pain

And I shall love you till there be
No grace in hearts of men
When a girl’s eyes will glow no love
I’ll love you until then

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 12:49 AM

Ah, that's a noice one, Stew; never heard it before. R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 01:23 AM

Noel Gardner won the Dale & John Dengate Parody competition at Illawarra Folk Festival in 2018 & also appeared at the 2020 Memorial zoom get-together

Speaking of excellent Australian songs - the winners of the Illawarra (2014-20) & Gulgong (2017-20) Parody competitions are available to download here


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 01:25 AM

I tried to correct the date of Gulgong FF competition but it wouldn't take.

The winners of the Illawarra (2014-20) & Gulgong (2017-19) Parody competitions are available to download

sandra


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 09:12 PM

Impressions of the outback in the late 19th century don't come better than this.

ACROSS THE WARREGO
(Jim Grahame)

I dreamt some dreams of dried up streams
Streams that never flow
Of men and things misfortune brings
Across the Warrego

And I could see old faces there
Old faces grim and sad
Old mates of mine that tramped with me
And some are tramping yet

And I dreamt then of other men
All trudging to and fro
With empty bags and cruel swags
Across the Warrego

And most of them looked straight ahead
A few were looking back
The bush had claimed their souls and left
Their bodies on the track

And in my sleep I saw the sheep
Heard them bleating low
The ringing flocks, the stringing flocks
Across the Warrego

The young and strong were in the lead
The old and weak behind
With lagging feet and dragging feet
And some of them were blind

And in my dreams I saw the teams
The teams I used to know
The long long teams, the strong strong teams
Across the Warrego

And lurching wool bales strained the ropes
That lashed them fore and aft
And every ounce of horse flesh pulled
From leader to the shaft

I dreamt of nights by campfire lights
The flicker and the glow
The great white moon, the black gin’s croon
Beyond the Warrego

And I could hear the bullock bells
A-ringing on the plains
And thirsty kangaroos loped in
And bounded out again

And in the scrub I saw a pub
A name I do not know
But it was there to cash the cheques
Across the Warrego

A graveyard stood right out in front
Two pepper trees were near
The goats were camping underneath
A skillion at the rear

And in my dreams a camel team
Was winding in and out
Its swaying packs and blistered backs
The messengers of drought

And as they crossed the sandy ridge
The sun went down below
I saw them on the skyline then
Beyond the Warrego

And in the night I woke in fright
My pulse was far from slow
I thought that I was on the road
Beyond the Warrego

I thought a mirage danced ahead
A dry plain at my back
And I was trudging trudging on
Alone along the track

Youtube clip

In 1890, Lawson went to work in Brisbane for 'The Boomerang'. When that collapsed in the depression of 1890-91, he decided to go up country in search of work. With a mate, Jim Grahame, he swagged it to Bourke and out to Hungerford. They worked as house painters and around the sheds as pickers-up, pressers or scourers when shearing was on. Although it was not a long trip, Lawson drew extensive copy from it. Jim Grahame (spelled with and without an 'e'), whose real name was James Gordon, came from Creswick in Victoria and is said to have been born 'under the flap of a tilted cart'. He had intended to become a jockey, with the help of
Adam Lindsay Gordon, but went jackarooing instead. The outback certainly made a deep impression on him.

Grahame on Lawson

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 10:12 PM

I can't believe I did it again.

Anyhow, despite no answer re Kiwi songs, if R-J can post one, so can I. Here is my favourite - it has an Australian connection with Cobb & Co. Phil Garland put a tune to Peter Cape's lovely poem.

THE STABLE LAD
(Cape/Garland)

When Cobb & Co ran coaches from the Buller to the Grey
I went for a livery-stable lad in a halt up Westport way
And I gave my heart to a red-haired girl, and left it where she lay
By the winding Westland highway from the Buller to the Grey

There's Neatsfoot on my fingers, and lamp-black on my face
And I've saddle-soaped the harness and hung each piece in place
But my heart's not in the stable, it's in Charleston far away
Where Cobb & Co goes rolling by from Buller to the Grey

There's a red-haired girl in Charleston, and she's dancing in the bar
But I know she's not like other girls who dance where miners are
And I can't forget her eyes and everything they seemed to say
The day I rode with Cobb & Co from Buller to the Grey

There's a schooner down from Murchison, I can hear it in the gorge
So I'll have to pump the bellows now and redden up the forge
And I'll strike that iron so very hard she'll hear it far away
In the roaring European that the road runs by from Grey

Some day I'll be a teamster with the ribbons in my fist
And I'll drive that Cobb & Co Express through rain and snow and mist
Drive a four-in-hand to Charleston, and no matter what they say
I'll take my girl up on the box and marry her in Grey

There's a graveyard down in Charleston where the moss trails from the trees
And the Westland wind comes moaning in from off the Tasman seas
And it's there they laid my red-haired girl, in a pit of yellow clay
As Cobb & Co went rolling by from Buller to the Grey

Youtube clip

Back in the day, I once introduced with the following - I can't remember where I got the info.

This tragic love story of a stable hand and saloon girl is set against the colourful background of Cobb & Co coach travel. Freeman Cobb, an American, began Cobb & Co in Australia in 1853. From small beginnings, it became the biggest and best transport system in the world with branches in all Australian states (except Tasmania) and in NZ, South Africa and Japan. The red-haired girl in the poem is obviously Catholic. There are 2 graveyards in Charleston, one on a hill to the north and the Catholic one by the roadside where camper-vans of Japanese tourists go rolling from the Buller to the Grey River Valley. The 2-storey, corrugated-iron European Hotel eventually collapsed in the 1970s. Cobb & Co passengers all travelled one class, but travellers often paid big money to sit on the 'box seat' next to the driver to listen to his yarns, poetry and songs. Sometimes the box seat was auctioned to the higher bidder.

You can find more information here:

Click

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 16 Sep 20 - 11:19 PM

This one was a favourite in the Darwin folk scene.   Martyn Wydham-Read put a tune to Matt O'Connors' poem.

THE SHEARER'S LAMENT
(O'Connor/Wyndham-Read)

We finished shearing sheep
Out west of the Paroo
But now it's rained three inches
We don't know what to do.
A week ago the sand was loose
And dust blew every day
But now the mud is three feet deep
And we can't get away

I've just been talking to the boss
You all know Hector Cole
He says the Bulloo's two miles wide
To cross it there's no hope.
You hear a lot of people swear
About the dough we make
But they forget the price of beer
And all the combs we break

Well, why I took this job on
I just can't understand,
If the bloody sheep ain't waterlogged
The cows are full of sand
A man is doubled up all day
Half-blinded by his swea;
And when the darkness comes around
Cooped up in a mozzie net

It might have been a good job once
Those old hands had their breaks
They pushed a bike from shed to shed
And lived on johnny cakes
They had more time to do the job
They worked nine hours a day
And after paying for their grub
One pound a hundred paid

I think I'll give this job away
I'm sick of being a greasy
I've heard about a fencing job
They tell me it's dead easy

Youtube clip

Martyn noted: 'Some bush poems definitely invite a tune. "A shearer's lament" came from Matt O'Connor who contributed the odd ballad to the "Singabout" magazine in the 60s. This was his last contribution prior to his death in 1965.'

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 02:24 AM

DECLAN AFFLEY SONGWRITING AWARD :

After mentioning the NFF’s 1987 winner, Mark Gillett, a few posts ago, I thought : “Now there’s a go! Probably many other winners of this competition should have their entry in Mudcat’s Aussie thread!”

Well, that was another idea and much time, lost down the rabbithole.

When I googled, many artists are proudly claiming to have been a winner (or a runner up) - and rightly so. However, where are the details of this award? Where is the List of previous winners and entries? How does one enter? Is it even still being awarded???

I could find no information on the current National Folk Festival (Australia) website about awards/comps – until, that is, I opened the 2019 Program Book, where a half page was devoted to the idea. It seems that ‘The Declan’ is no more and that the current thing is the Alistair Hulett Memorial Award for the best ‘social justice’ song, which follows on from the original British award. (but where now, do the writers of worthy non-social justice material go?!)

OK, there now appears to be a number of other awards (as well as the post-1994 Lis Johnston Awards, for vocal excellence) – but who would know that you have to add “/festival-awards/” up to the main URL, to be able to locate any info on the NFF website?? (and that’s just for 2019!)

Surely there should at least be some easily accessible, permanent page of The Nash’s website which acknowledges and celebrates past award winners, and their great music?

Because if not there, where is that info? At present it appears that it’s purely up to the actual artist to inform or remind us - IF they still have an online presence, that is – and IF we happen to come across their web data!!

So, can any regular Nash attenders (Sandra, Gerry, Graham et al), shed any light on this situation??!!


Cheers, R-J :)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 02:40 AM

BOONAROO

Don Henderson, 1968

Ch.
Oh, who will man the Boonaroo?
Who will sail her, be the crew,
sailing on the Boonaroo?

Is there food and is there store
to feed the hungry, clothe the poor?
In this world their number isn't few.
In her cargo would you find
any way for one mankind,
sailing on the Boonaroo.

Is there bandage by the reel?
Is there medicine to heal?
Christ knows, there's healing work to do.
In her cargo would you find
any way for one mankind,
sailing on the Boonaroo?

Would the hull be filled with material to build,
perhaps a bridge for a world that's split in two?
In her cargo would you find
any way for one mankind,
sailing on the Boonaroo?

Or jam packed in the hold,
is there grief and death untold
and asked "Why?" have to answer true.
In her cargo would you find
any way for one mankind,
sailing on the Boonaroo?


Thanks to Mark Gregory's Union Songs site : http://unionsong.com/u260.html

Don Henderson wrote:

"Australian seamen have manned the Australian National Line M.V.s Boonaroo and Jeparit sailing to Vietnam 'under strong protest'. In the case of the Boonaroo, which has already completed one round trip, the crew's continued hostility to the U.S. aggression in Vietnam, and the friendly contacts they established with Australian troops engaged in the war, are already a small part of Australian working-class history."



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 02:58 AM

Another song from the pen of Hendo (I remember this played regularly on the radio) :

Put a Light in Ev'ry Country Window"

DON HENDERSON

Ch.
Put a light in every country window
High-speed pumps where now the windmills stand
Get in and lay the cable so that one day we’ll be able
To have electricity all over this wide land.


Miners tunnel to feed the fires at Wangi
While others scrape the brown coal at Yallourn
Turbine blades are yielding to the tumbling tons of Eildon
And the Snowy will be finished before long.


The little farms and giant outback stations
They all are mechanised today
For milking cows and shearing sheep to do it fast and do it cheap
Electrically is the modern way.


The old Coolgardie and the red-hot woodstove
They all have seen their day at last
For now the ice and fire that is coming on the wire
Has made them all relics of the past.


Ch.
Put a light in every country window
High-speed pumps where now the windmills stand
Get in and lay the cable so that one day we’ll be able
To have electricity all over this wide land.


Here is Gary Shearston's version : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6NScBO_JWU

Who knows if in another 50 years, Electricity will still be "the modern way"?!


Coolgardie Safe : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coolgardie_safe



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 03:31 AM

Alistair Hulett winners

https://www.alistairhulett.com/alistair-hulett-memorial-fund/songs-for-social-justice-award-aus/ (2019 & 2020 winners are not yet on the website, so I contacted one of the organisers)

Winner of the 2020 Songs for Social Justice Award: Karen Law for Wildflower Woman. (Qld newspaper)

Winner of the 2019 Songs for Social Justice Award: Penelope Swales for Cambridge Analytica (NFF website)

Winner of the 2018 Songs for Social Justice Award: Teri Young for ‘Fishing at Okehampton Bay’

Winner of the 2017 Songs for Social Justice Award: Miguel Heatwole for ‘Better Times’

Winner of the 2016 Songs for Social Justice Award: Tony Eardley for ‘Sally Cross the Water’

Winner of the 2015 Songs for Social Justice Award: Paddy McHugh for ‘The Snowmen’

Winner of the 2014 Songs for Social Justice Award: Miriam Jones for ‘Post Post Feminist Revolution’

Winner of the 2013 Songs for Social Justice Award: The Lurkers for ‘Mining Man’

Winner of the 2012 Songs for Social Justice Award: Steph Miller for ‘The Riverside’


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 03:39 AM

Greg Hastings - lyrics

Greg began his musical career as a founding member of the Mucky Duck Bush Band in 1973, 3 years after he migrated to Australia from Wales. In 1976 the band turned professional and rose to great heights of success in Western Australia. At the beginning of 1979 Greg launched his solo career, travelling to New Zealand, America, Canada, United Kingdom and Europe. He then returned to Australia for a year before setting off once more around the world in 1982. On his return to Australia in 1983, he began touring the continent extensively. For 25 years he has toured almost continually playing Festivals, Clubs, Tourist Resorts, Schools etc.
GGreg has traversed over 400,000 kilometres of this vast continent amassing a unique knowledge of Australia and Australians, including some of the most respected elders of the Aboriginal people. Learning to play the didgeridoo from them on his first tour of the Kimberley Aboriginal communities in 1988.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

After seeing many a night 'ruined' by mismanaged sound systems, Greg penned this song.

TESTING 1, 2, 3 by Greg Hastings

For many years I've sung in places all around the world
No sweeter than the human voice in chorus can be heard
But now with our technology all reason has been lost
Sometimes I wonder if the end defeats the cost.

CHORUS
Cos it's testing, testing 1, 2, 3
We don't need electricity
Don't need a microphone to sing a song
So nice to hear the music back where we belong.

Once not long ago if you had a mind to sing
Friends would gather round you and make the rafters ring
But now with these amps they run in mortal fear
With the booming of a microphone ringing in their ear

CHORUS

Now the local musos gather round
With their ultra quado phonic sound
The crowd was stunning nearly yelled for more
When one he counted up to four !
His quiet little voice was made to sound
Just like Michael Jackson in the London underground
With digital delays, effects by the score
Just one check blew his audience through the door

CHORUS

I stayed at that club till just a few were there
Speakers the size of tea chests standing on a chair
I checked, it buzzed, everything went wrong
When I finally got to singing, the audience had gone.
Saying why can't you just sing to me
Without this testing 1, 2, 3
We long for the day you can do without
Because it's far too loud and it hides your mouth.

CHORUS

Yes, I feel acoustic music is music of the soul
Sharing it in harmony should always be our goal
The way things are going it's very plain to see
Before we can speak we'll have to test 1, 2, 3
But they'll flick a switch and they won't say when
Before you know we'll have to sing again
But I can sing to you and you can sing to me
There'll be no more testing 1, 2, 3



Copyright Greg Hastings ©
https://www.greghastings.com/asongs.html#top

m


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 03:40 AM

Greg Hastings - lyrics

Greg began his musical career as a founding member of the Mucky Duck Bush Band in 1973, 3 years after he migrated to Australia from Wales. In 1976 the band turned professional and rose to great heights of success in Western Australia. At the beginning of 1979 Greg launched his solo career, travelling to New Zealand, America, Canada, United Kingdom and Europe. He then returned to Australia for a year before setting off once more around the world in 1982. On his return to Australia in 1983, he began touring the continent extensively. For 25 years he has toured almost continually playing Festivals, Clubs, Tourist Resorts, Schools etc.
GGreg has traversed over 400,000 kilometres of this vast continent amassing a unique knowledge of Australia and Australians, including some of the most respected elders of the Aboriginal people. Learning to play the didgeridoo from them on his first tour of the Kimberley Aboriginal communities in 1988.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
reg's humorous, environmental protest song

COCA COLA CAN

T'was on the Canning Stock Route, by the Kannanagi Well
I parks the four wheel in the shade, the sun was hot as hell
I thought that I would have a leak where no man had before
But as I strolled off in the bush, imagine what I saw;
There were kangaroos, all sweat and flies, playing football in the sand
And the ball they were using was a Coca cola can.

CHORUS:
Why must I always be second (Mate)
It can't be part of the plan
Why must I always be second
To a Coca Cola Can

While Climbing up Ben Nevis on a cold and freezing day
The sun was falling lightly, so I took an easy way
And as I trudged up to the top, the sky began to clear
Just my footprints in the snow, no-one else was there.
Then I stood in silence, the horizon to scan
I spotted below me, a Coca Cola can.

CHORUS (Jimmy)

Now in the great Grand Canyon, on an early summer's morn
I thought if I climbed the side, I could watch the dawn
I struggled through the cactus, it must have been 5 miles
Thought that when I reached the top, I'd sit there for a while.
But as I reached that one last time, I felt beneath my hand
Yep, you guessed it, a Coca Cola can.

CHORUS (Yee Ha)

I thought I'd found an island where no man had ever been
No footprints in the sand, the water was so clean
So I went in for a swim, to wash the dust away
And as I swam down to the rocks to watch the fishes play
There, right below me, half buried in the sand
Was that red and white monstrosity, a Coca Cola can

CHORUS (By Jingo)

So if you're walking or you're riding or sailing on the sea
Don't throw your empties overboard and leave them there for me
I wouldn't come to your place, chuck me rubbish on the lawn
And if I did I'm sure you'd be the one to moan
But, if you didn't you wouldn't understand
Why I don't like coming second to a Coca Cola can

If we looked into the future, I wonder what we'd see
In a thousand years from now, I wonder where we'll be
For since the world begun, many places man has trod
Some believe in Einstein, some believe in God
But if whoever started it could reveal the plan
I am sure it would not include a Coca Cola can

Copyright Greg Hastings © 1980


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 03:52 AM

Greg Hasstings on didgeridoo traveling down Highway 1 (no words!)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:05 AM

Greg Hastings! OMG Sandra, I rem'ber when his family first arrived - in Perth - with their Welsh accents and great songs - his shy young sister Val, in particular, had a lovely voice : COCKY BELL is a good song, which I think she wrote .....


But I have to add this one for Stewie!

THE GIN AND RASPBERRY

Written by Martin Curtis, c.1980

While hunting for fox we first came this way
From Lake Pembroke township took many long days
We cut through the bush and we found a new rush
With a mine called the Gin and Raspberry

Ch.
Oh, but it's hard, cruel and cold
Searching Cardrona for nuggets of gold
An ounce to the bucket and we'll all sell our soul
For a taste of the gin and raspberry

The rumors went out and the thousands poured in
A handful grew rich but many grew thin
They all hoped to find their own patch of tin
As rich as the Gin and Raspberry

At first it was summer and we all thought it grand
No shirts on our back as we sluiced and we panned
But then came the snow and the southern wind's blow
And there's ice down the Gin and Raspberry

Now Billy McGraw he worked hard and worked long
Ready to smile and to give us a song
But then he struck gold and was found dead and cold
Down in the Gin and Raspberry

So I'll work at the mine and I'll stay out of strife
I'll save all me gold to send home to me wife
And when the gold’s won I’ll leave at the run
And to hell with the Gin and Raspberry


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwN5A1zeROk
Martin Curtis singing his own song.

My GGGrandfather left Lancashire in 1857 for a new life in Victoria, but by the early 1860s he was in Sth Isle EnZed in these very same goldfields.   He found enough to buy a couple of pubs!
Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:08 AM

another NZ song that used to be heard around the Sydney sessions years ago
Folksong NZ site

The chocolate Song by Marcus Turner (sound) bite of Chocolate

    When you're tired and depressed, and feeling lonely,
    When your chequebook's in the red, and you are blue,
    When you've left the freezer open,
    or your rubber band is broken,
    Or you've dropped the toilet paper down the loo,

    If you feel a sudden urge to wash the bread-knife,
    Or to sniff at the exhaust-pipe of your car,
    Or to farewell those you love 'n'
    take a nap inside the oven,
    STOP!... Salvation's just a sup from where you are!

      Chorus:
       When you're feeling down, the best way up is chocolate:
       It's the answer that will get you through the day.
       Let me get my teeth around
       something small and square and brown,
       And I'll masticate until I feel O.K.

    Now, when God had finished making all the heavens,
    And the valleys and the mountains and the seas,
    And the weather, and the weasels,
    and the squid, and German Measles,
    And the gherkins, and Hong Kong, and all the fleas,

    On the seventh day, as he was sitting resting,
    He was feeling in a very chipper mood.
    There came one more inspiration
    for one last divine Creation:
    Something fit to please a God, that could be chewed!

    Ch.

    When I see a bar of chocolate lying idle,
    It always seems to find its way inside my jaws.
    It's a shame to mess about,
    'cos it tastes better in than out,
    And it's going to a very worthy cause.

    And although it won't endear me to my dentist,
    And my doctor will be worried for my health,
    And it's given me a skinful
    of enormous oily pimples,
    I'm still feeling very good about myself!

    Ch.

    Just remember, if it's chocolate, you can eat it:
    Chocolate eggs and chocolate fish and chocolate chips,
    Chocolate steak and mousse and frogs,
    chocolate beans and mice and logs,
    Let a chocolate bomb explode across your lips!

    Some is crunchy, and is filled with Hokey-pokey,
    Some is thrown about by cowboys, and is white.
    There's a whole world out there waiting:
    don't just sit there salivating,
    Pull your socks up, brace yourself and Bite! Bite! Bite!

    Ch.

    You will never have a bad trip eating chocolate.
    And it's tastier than sex, and much more fun.
    Keep your pills and dope and glue,
    and your gin and whiskey too,
    'Cos there's no buzz like a chocolate Buzz - Bar none!

    If you really, really love me, give me chocolate,
    Give me chocolate 'till it's coming out my ears.
    All I crave is just enough
    so I can indolently stuff
    myself for years and years and years and years and years!

    Ch.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:12 AM

Both Sides Now (known as The Toast Song)
(Chris Clarke) - former Mudcatter Canberra Chris

In morning time when I arise
My breakfast fare is no surprise,
I pour the cornflakes, make the tea
And then reach for the bread.
I turn the gas on, light the grill,
And think this time I really will
Stay wide awake, make perfect toast
and start the day well-fed -

I'll lightly toast it both sides now,
Both up and down
To golden brown,
The toasting time I will recall,
I really can make toast
After all.

But then I read, to pass the time,
The cornflakes advertising rhyme,
I hear the news, but don't take in
A single item read.
And then an old, familiar smell
Invades the dreamworld where I dwell,
and fills the room with flames and smoke
and fumes of burning bread -

I've burnt the toast on both sides now,
Both front and back
To charcoal black,
The toasting time I don't recall,
I really can't make toast
After all.

And so I scrape it in the bin
Which makes the slices rather thin,
Then wipe the knife upon the cloth
Back in my dream-like state.
I butter it with marmalade,
Then to correct the mess I've made
Spread butter on the other side
And stick it to the plate -

My toast is buttered both sides now,
Both left and right,
I'm none too bright,
The buttering I don't recall,
I really can't make toast
At all.

Written in Perth, Western Australia, early 80s.
Chris Clarke


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:16 AM

Randwick Races    John Dengate   (Tune: "The Galway Races")

(D) We arrived at Randwick races, by (Em) taxi from Clovelly.
I had (C) money in my trousers, boys, and (G) schooners (D) in my (G) belly.
(G) Well the bookies (d) saw us (D) coming and they (Em) panicked in a crisis;
They (G) tinkered with the odds and they (Em) shortened (D) all their (G) prices.
Chorus: With my (D) whack, fol the do, fol the (Em) diddley idle (Em) day

Well the hunger it was gnawing and the thirst was in us rising
While the crowd's excited roaring reached a level quite surprising.
Oh, we swallowed several middies and demolished pies and sauces
And we set to work comparing prices, jockey's weights and horses.
Chorus: With my whack, fol the do, fol the diddley idle day

Denis Kevans said, "I reckon we will finish rich as Pharaoh
If we back the chestnut filly from the district of Monaro.
She's a trier, she's a flier, never knock her or decry her -
She's sixty-six to one; when she wins we']] all retire."
Chorus: With my whack, fol the do, fol the diddley idle day

There was every kind of punter from illiterates to scholars;
I struggled throuah the betting ring and wagered twenty dollars -
Then the horses were away; from the barrier they thundered
And we hoped that very day to collect the thirteen hundred.
Chorus: With my whack, fol the do, fol the diddley idle day

We shouted in despair; Denis Kevans tore his hair,
O'Dea began to swear at the filly from Monaro.
She was struggling in the pack and our very hearts were bleeding;
She was falling further back and the favourite was leading.
Chorus: With my whack, fol the do, fol the diddley idle day


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:28 AM

2 songs from the Shiny Bum Singers (Canberra Chris was a founding member)


I am Speaking [C] – Tune: Frere Jacques

I am speaking
I am speaking
And I’m right
And I’m right
You shut up and listen
You Shut up and listen
Or we’ll fight
Or we’ll fight
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There’s No Paper Here (tune: A Pub With No Beer) (words ©ShinyBumSingers 2020)

It's lonesome away, from your kindred and co.
In the throne-room at night, where we all have to go
But there's nothing so lonesome, so morbid or drear
Than to stand in an aisle, when there’s no paper here

Now the public is anxious, for the quota to come
There may not be paper, for a-wiping their bum
The Mums are all cranky, and the staff’s acting queer
What a terrible place, when there’s no paper here

Then the stock man rolls up, with his pallet shrink-wrapped
Overtaken by hoarders, he screams “Holy Crap!”
A mad glint in their eyes, as the rolls disappear
As with locusts to Egypt, there’s no paper here

There's a Dad on the dunny, for his shopper he’ll wait
But she’s a non-starter, having left it too late
She searches forlornly, despair ever near
There’s no place for a shopper, when there’s no paper here

Old Gilly the Greenie, first time in his life
Has run out of paper, and now he’s in strife
He’d settle for NewsCorp, but the irony’s clear
It’s a “digital” world, when there’s no paper here

(NewsCorp, Rupert Murdock's papers in Australia)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 04:59 AM

I'm going thru my folder of songs - did you know there are 828 species of birds in Australia, one in 10 of the world's 10,000 or so living bird species.

BIRD SONG
    Words and Music John Broomhall

Adelaide Hills, it's early mornin', through the window see them yawnin',
Lonesome travellers wind their way back home;
Misty valleys, lofty ranges, signposts mock our weary strangers:
Pack a road map mate next time you roam!

There's a Kookaburra, Cuckoo, Bronzewing, Budgerigar,
Lorikeet, Cat Bird, Currawong, an old Galah;
Frog Mouth, Magpie, Miner, and a White-Winged Chough,
A Babbler, a Warbler, and even a bird called Rough.

Somewhere up in Northern Queensland, sunshine bright, golden sea sand,
We're lyin' on the beach the way that dreamers do.
Paradise Lost, ah poor John Milton, he didn't get to stay at the Douglas Hilton,
I guess he missed Mossman, Kuranda, and Cooktown too.

Seagull, Plover, Petrel, and Ocean Tern,
Albatross, Grebe, Shearwater and Frigate Bird;
Cormorant, Pelican, Gannet and Cockatoo,
Cassowary, Egret, Heron and Jabiru.

Life's a breeze in the centre of Australia, corroboree's the only regalia,
Wide brown land, and a sky that's big and blue;
Camel Drivers wearin' turbans, nothin' here you'd call suburban,
They're all dinkum Aussies through and through.

Curlew, Drongo, Falcon, Emu, Wren,
Brolga, Spoonbill, Duck and Native Hen;
Spinebill, Thrush and Lark up in the sky,
Swallow, Butcher, Robin, Silver-eye.

Soldier, Shoe Maker, Coot and Sooty Owl,
Buzzard, Booby, Bell and Mallee Fowl;
Rainbow, Sparrow, Crow and Whistling Kite,
A Wedge-tailed Eagle and a Boobook late at night.

(c) Copyright J. Broomhall 1991


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 05:41 AM

THE WHALE (Terry Fielding and Fred Dyer) - Fred used to post on Mudcat youtube

(Am) (G) (Am)
Di Di Di Di DA Di DE Di Di

(Am) They sailed from port one morning the (G) weather it was (Am) fair
A gentle breeze it pushed them and (G) no one gave a (Am) care
They sang and danced and (Am7) laughed that night and D opened up a (E) keg
They're (Am) out to catch the monster whale that (G) took the captain's leg
(Am) Di Di Di Di Da (G) Di DE Di (Am)Di

(Am)The Captain said "a piece of gold for (G)him who sees me (Am)whale"
So bend your backs and row me boys I(G) know that we won't (Am)fail

Chorus (chords as Verse1)

So bend your backs and row me lads and take me to me whale.
Tonight we'll sing and dance and tomorrow night we'll sail.
We'll sail into the harbour no prouder man there'll be;
We'll show them all we captured the monster from the sea
Di Di Di Di Di Da Di Di

They saw the whale one morning the weather it was fair
the men were white as ghosts, the Captain didn't care
I'll take this whale meself he cried the weak can stay behind
The strong can share my glory and tonight they'll share my wine
Di Di Di Di Di Da Di Di

The whale it came so close it was bigger than the sky
they lowered down the longboat and they heard the captain cry

Chorus
Bend your backs and row me lads and take me to me whale.
Tonight we'll sing and dance and tomorrow night we'll sail.
We'll sail into the harbour no prouder man there'll be;
We'll show them all we captured the monster from the sea
Di Di Di Di Di Da Di Di

Chorus

The whale it came so close it almost tipped the boat
The captain took his spear and he rammed it down it's throat
the whale it gave a mournfull cry and lifted it's great tail
and brought it down a crushing their small boat like a gale

(spoken)
Now 100 years have passed since the Captain and his men
went below to spend their days in Davy Joneses' den
The whale it goes on living but inside it bears a scar
And if your ever near that place a voice calls from afar

Chorus twice, last line:
We'll show them all we captured the monster from the sea


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 07:58 PM

I AM A TOLERANT MAN

anon (from WA Goldfields)

I don't mind blokes who digs or stokes,
Who fettle or work on derricks;
I can even stand a German band,
But I draw the line at clerics.

Ch.
Why strike me pink, I'd sooner drink
With a cove sent up for arson,
Than a rain-beseeching, preaching, teaching,
Blanky, cranky, parson.


I snort and jibe at the whole of the tribe,
Whatever their sect of class is -
From lawn-sleeved ranters to kerbstone canters,
From bishops to Army lasses.


Give me the blaspheming, scheming, screaming,
Barracking football garcons -
In preference, to the reverent gents,
The blithering, blathering parsons!


I couldn't get John Thompson's recording to play on his Oz Folksong a Day website, so here is one from "Les Wayfarers" :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTm8_8MvRtc

"Words from John Lahey's Great Australian Folk Songs (1965) via Mudcat, where Bob Bolton notes that it is from the Western Australian goldfields."
Apparently an early poem in the "Kalgoorlie Sun" newspaper; music by John Lahey.




Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 08:03 PM

R-J, I remember Martin Curtis from his days in Tennant Creek back when the world was young.
Sandra has also now posted a song by a Kiwi. Let's go for it - our conspicuously absent moderator can always chuck 'em out!

Sandra, thanks for the Marcus Turner song. I posted the lyrics of his magnum opus, 'When the boys are on parade', over a decade ago. It is one of finest songs ever about armed forces. Andy Irvine's made it known outside NZ, but my favourite rendition is by Michael Black on his wonderful self-titled CD on Compass Records.

Michael Black

WHEN THE BOYS ARE ON PARADE
(Marcus Turner)

Here they come marching past the houses, shiny boots and khaki blouses
Stiff as the creases in their trousers, standing tall and straight and strong
And they all keep in step together, glint of steel and flash of leather
Braving every kind of weather as they boldly march along
You may dismiss it as a ploy for the enlistment of the boys
Who’ll be impressed to see the toys and play the games that can be played

Refrain:
And you may well prefer abstention but I feel compelled to mention
You’d do well to pay attention when the boys are on parade

Look at your sons before they’re older they’ll be stronger, they’ll be bolder
Just the thing to make a soldier and we’ll turn them into men
And they’ll be taught to follow orders, keep the peace and guard the borders
To protect us from marauders and defend us to the end
But the position they’ll be filling is to be able and be willing
To be killed or do the killing when there’s a price that must be paid

Refrain

In the pursuit of a community of decency and unity
And equal opportunity, we stand prepared to fight
And if there’s a threat to our position from aggressive opposition
Then, with guns and ammunition, we’ll repel with all our might.
We’ll dehumanise and hate them, send in the troops to decimate them
As in the name of the nation all it stands for is betrayed

Refrain

Merely the whim or intuition of an elected politician
Makes a melee without conditions as the monster quits the cage
It’s a machine that knows no quarter, dealing death and sowing slaughter
Raping mothers, wives and daughters in an all-consuming rage
We may well decide we need it and we’ll pay to arm and feed it
Can you tell me who will lead it when a decision must be made?

Refrain

Instrumental break

Some will wonder what’s to fear and say there is no danger here
But there has never been a year when soldiers haven’t been at war
And the eternal executions and the bloody revolutions
And the ultimate solutions, too, have all been seen before.
And there’s always someone scheming and some nights when I am dreaming
In the distance, I hear screaming and in my heart I feel afraid

Refrain

Here they come marching past the houses, shiny boots and khaki blouses
Stiff as the creases in their trousers, standing tall and straight and strong
And is it any cause for pride that now the women march beside them
Will they have wiser gods to guide them in discerning right from wrong?
‘Cause every step is a reminder of the threat that lies behind
If we forget the ties that bind us when the decisive game is played

Refrain

And as the procession passes by, consider the sight before your eyes
‘Cause it’ll be you they’ll kill and die for when called to the crusade
And you may love them and adore them, you may hate them and abhor them
But, for God’s sake don’t ignore them, when the boys are on parade

The late Marcus Turner was fine songwriter. One of his close friends wrote: ‘Multi-instumentalist, singer-songwriter, Marcus Turner, is a New Zealand folk music icon, regularly guesting at folk festivals and clubs for over 30 years … He is renowned for his astute song-writing from the dark to the endearing, from the political to the exceedingly funny’.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 08:25 PM

The inimitable Kath Tait was also a NZ icon before fleeing to London. Here's one of her best:

THE RIVER OF LIFE
(Kath Tait)

She was born in a middle-class town
She could have gone up, she could have gone down
But she just went around and around
On a downward spiral
One morning so fair and fine
She stole away while the moon did shine
Strayed on down the wayward line
Southwards of survival

(Chorus)
She could have been a lady
She could have been a wife
But she fell into the river of life
Swimming in a pool of trouble and strife
She really loved the danger
But the river of life it rolls and flows
Down by the banks where the brambles grow
Swimming around in trouble and strife
Way down low in the river of life

Over hills of thorns and valleys of scorn
Rambling like she was gypsy born
Travelling on through weather and storm
Without a thought for danger
But she was young and looking for fun
And dreaming of things she'd never done
So lost in sweet oblivion
She welcomed in the stranger

But the stranger he was a wanton rake
For he took her money and he called her a fake
And he shook her around like an old earthquake
And left her there for plunder
Now a heart gone down might never be found
Might lie in the dirt and roll around
But she was always on the rebound
And she never would go under

Chorus

Now the woman of character wins in the end
The river of life will be your friend
Not frail of heart, but a true upstart
The river of life has made her
And like a flood she did surely rise
High as the hills and the clear blue skies
She never was a lady but she was wise
And nothing much would change her

Chorus

Lin Van Hek and Joe Dolce did a beaut rendition for their 'Difficult Women' project.

Youtube clip

Kath Tait has been described as ‘the diva of the dysfunctional’. She departed New Zealand to live in London. The 'Waikato Times' noted:

It was inevitable she left New Zealand, having insulted most of her family and friends in her songs. Behind the cheerful guitar and sweet voice lie lyrics of barbed wire. The ironies of modern life are her inspiration, the contrast in her disarming delivery and often explicit words, is her charm.

--Stewie


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 08:40 PM

Way back in this thread (on 19 Aug) Mysha mentioned 'By the dry Cardrona'. Here ya go:

BY THE DRY CARDRONA
(James K. Baxter)

Oh I can tell where the cherries grow
By the dry Cardrona
Where I picked them long ago
On a day when I was sober
On a day when I was sober

My father wore a parson's coat
By the dry Cardrona
He made a tally of the sheep and the goats
But I was never sober
I was never sober

My mother sewed her Sunday skirt
By the dry Cardrona
They say she died of a broken heart
For I was never sober
I was never sober

I loved a young girl, and only one
By the dry Cardrona
She up and married the banker's son
For I was never sober
I was never sober

I courted a widow of forty-nine
By the dry Cardrona
She owned a stable and a scheelite mine
But I was never sober
I was never sober

Lay my bones till the judgement crack
By the wild Cardrona
A blanket swag all on my back
To pillow me drunk or sober
Pillow me drunk or sober

All rivers run to a rimless grave
Even the wild Cardrona
But never a one will come my way
Till I am stone cold sober
Till I am stone cold sober

I can tell where the cherries grow
By the wild Cardrona
Where I picked them long ago
On a day when I was sober
On a day when I was sober

One of New Zealand’s best-known poets, James Keir Baxter, featured his poem,'By the Dry Cardrona', in his 1958 radio play, 'Jack Winter’s Dream'. The dry Cardrona is a symbol of the spritual aridity of his early life in contrast with the life-giving? springtime snowmelt waters of the wild Cardrona that nourish the cherry trees along its banks. Scheelite, which is mentioned in the poem, is an important source of tungsten, a very hard metal.

English folkie, Steve Turner, always did it justice:

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 09:23 PM

Here's a tour around NZ. R-J, I think you sent me a copy of the album by 'When the cat's been spayed".

TEA AT TE KUITI
(Ken Avery)

I'm havin' tea at Te Kuiti with my sweetie
Then a row at Rotorua on the waves
Do a tour of Turangi
When the Maoris have a hangi
Then I'll wind up in the old Waitomo caves

I'm gonna tread the narrow path at Ngar'awahia
And dash to Dannevirke before the beer is cut
I'm going to town at Taum'runui
Wander down the Wangernewy
Then I'm go'ng'ta live it up at Upper Hutt

I'm gonna chat about the Chateau Tongariro
I'm gonna talk about the Tokomaru Bay
And when I tell a man or two
About the Manawatu
They'll wonder why I ever went away

I'm gonna crow about the good old Coromandel
And tell them where I'd like to see Waiwera shore
Although it sounds like Taranaki
When I'm shooting at Wairakei
I can always hit a geothermal bore

I'm gonna have a cuppa tea on Kapati Island
And a cup of coffee in Kawhia town
Drink a handle or a schooner
When I tack at Takapuna
Where the Waitamata never lets me down

I want to eat a pie at old Paekakariki
See the wishing well in Wellington and then
When we pull in to Kaiwhara
There's a fiver I can borrow
So I'll turn around and do it all again

Interlude   Been there … etc

I'm gonna travel in by car to Invercargill
Then I’ll meet a man at Manapouri Lake
Though I'm not the one to boast
I've been toasted on the coast
And washed ashore at Taylor's Big Mistake

I've eaten oysters in the stew at Stewart Island
And met a mutton-birder down at Foveaux Strait
I've tried to bluff them at the Bluff
Each time I said I'd had enough
They put another dozen osters on my plate.

I'm gonna canter on the plains at Canterbury
I'm gonna rue the day I leave ol' Oamaru
I'll spend the winter on the inter -
Island ferry, makin' merry
An' wait for North and South to come in view

Now you can see a lot that's new in ol' New Zealand
You c'n keep your Port of Spain an' Mexico
But if if you plan to go away
Down A-o-tee-a-ro-a way
A Kiwi always tells you where to go
- "Look out for Trentham" -
A Kiwi always tells you where to go

My source for this little ditty is an all-female Kiwi group entitled ‘When the cat’s been spayed’. It is from the pen of Ken Avery from Dunedin who was known for his novelty songs featuring wordplay and exotic names – classics such as 'The dog dosing strip', 'When the scrum is on the ball' and 'The way she handled the clutch'.

NZ Sheilas

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 09:45 PM

STRONG WINDS FOR AUTUMN
(Bob McNeill)

Strong winds for Autumn
Better bring those engines up
No sail can carry my love
No words will guide her
The calling voice is silent

And I watched them make turns for ten knots
I went each day to the end of the dock
Till the day my Annie sailed
On the last boat down the weeping loch

When the sickness came
I suffered with my friends
One day I thought the world would end
In the dark I called her name
The others there heard nothing

And I watched them make turns for ten knots
I felt her wake with my feet in the surf
Till even that was calm
And the last boat had gone

Sail away my Annan love
No breeze can catch you now
It's all clear
There's only memories here
This year will know no winter

[Instrumental break]

And I watched them make turns for ten knots
The cries of the gulls filled the air as I watched
The day my Annie sailed
On the last boat down the weeping loch

Chorus (X2)

Strong winds for Autumn
Better bring those engines up

Bob McNeill moved from Glasgow to New Zealand in 1998 and established himself as one the country’s foremost singer-songwriters. He has twice won the Recording Industry of New Zealand’s award for ‘Best Folk Album’. In relation to his best-known song, 'Strong Winds for Autumn' about a community off the coast of Scotland, he noted:

In small coastal communities, there was sometimes a delicate balance between the number of people in the community and the amount of work needed to feed them. If many people died from illness at one time, often this left too few people to get enough food in to enable the community to survive the winter. In the song, a village is evacuated for this reason. The story is told from the perspective of a man who died from the sickness.

You can hear Bob introducing and singing this song at about the 5-minute mark of this set:

Youtube

Emily Smith did a fine cover:

Emily

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 10:14 PM

This one was always a great favourite at the gun turret in Darwin back in the day.

GUTBOARD BLUES
(Dave Jordan)

Well I'm off down the road every mornin' 'bout eight
Down on the job, and it's a job (that) I hate,
Hackin', cuttin' mutton gut on a contract basis
I climb into my overalls and take my place as
The boss comes along and he tells me that
I’ve got to strip and clip a stomach every second flat
So I bust a gut just to get the job all done
Hackin', cuttin' mutton gut until the cows come home
   
Sling 'em here, sling 'em there
Them guts keep a-comin' in from ev'rywhere
I’ve got more trouble than I’m able to use
I've got hackin', cuttin', bust-a-guttin' gutboard blues

Now down through the 'chute with a slosh and a slop
Them sheep guts drop and never seem to stop
So I grab me a stomach and I split it wide
Then I trim it and I scrape it till it's clean inside
Then I turn on the hose and let the water run
Chuck it on the pile, and that's another one done
The pace is hot, I stop a spot and mop my brow,
And my face has all been covered up with digested grass by now

Sling 'em here, sling 'em there
Them guts keep a-comin' in from everywhere
I need the money and a beggar can't choose
I got the sloshin', sloppin', never-stoppin' gutboard blues

Now there's hydrochloric acid eatin' into my head
My hair's turnin' green and I’ll smell like I'm dead
There's jokers all around me sloshin' juice on my knees
And the temperature's a-hittin' 'bout a hundred degrees
I've had a gutsful of guts, I'm tellin' you true
I don't think that I could stomach one more ewe
It's a way of makin' money and a living, but --
Sheep, I hate your guts!

Sling 'em here, sling 'em there
Them guts keep a-comin' in from everywhere
How else can I afford to live the life that I choose
Without them acid-burnin', stomach-churnin'
Money-earnin' gutboard blues

Go drop dead!

The gutboards referred to in Dave Jordan’s 'Gutboard Blues' are now called ‘viscera tables’. At the time, sheep guts earned New Zealand $50 million a year exported as sausage skins. As one freezer said, ‘It’s sometimes what you have to handle that is the guts of the matter’. Dave explained:

I worked at Fielding Freezing works in the summer holidays of ’65 and ’66, but as a point-switcher on the mutton/lamb grading lines. My best mate at the time, Graeme Cowley, was on the gutboard. I wrote the song out of sympathy for him after asking him one time why the skin was coming off his hands and his toes appeared to be rotting off, and why he smelled like vomit all the time.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 17 Sep 20 - 11:44 PM

Ah yes! Fond memories of Batey singing 'Gutboard Blues' at the Turret!!

My experience of EnZed songs is sadly not much more than Phil Garland and Martin Curtis concerts at the Turret, back in the 80s.

Though I recall liking Paul Metser's Farewell to the Gold plus :
Hills of Coromandel / Bright Fine Gold / Farewell to Geraldine / Wind Among the Tussocks? / Tuapeka Gold / Long and Friendly Road / Packing My Things, of course as posted ...... and there's always Peter Cape's She'll Be Right Mate!


I have to get back to werk now, I'll check in in a few days!
Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 02:14 AM

An Ozzie favourite for you -

"Christmas has been cancelled" by Paul Mortimer (nowadays found in the Gaelic Club & at Irish sessions, wot a loss to the folk world!)
(Tune: Lili Marlene) K-Tel records were around in the 60s & 70s & Toltoys distributed (original) Star Wars toys.

Christmas has been cancelled,
Santa Claus is dead.
When the scandal broke
He put a bullet through his head.
Pinned to his chest they found a note
Admitting what - the papers wrote:
That he was on the payroll
Of Toltoys and K-tel.

It was bigger still than Lockheed
Worse than Watergate.
Kids throughout the world
Called for his head upon a plate
The myth was destroyed and in its wake,
Old Santy stood there a callous fake.
And evidence is mounting
That he was C.I.A.

The Church it tried to brand him
A charlatan and worse.
The Pope said 'Keep off Christmas, mate,
We used that number first,
As a time when all good Christians sing
Of Jesus Christ and cribs and things.
Of course it's only bulldust
To get the faithful in.'

Further allegations
Have made the papers wail,
That Santa's love for children
Was way beyond the pale,
He always liked to give out toys
To little girls and little boys.
It seems that he was harmless
But some don't understand.

Well we can still be jolly
And celebrate New Year,
And we'll be nice to other folks
More than once a year.
With no tinsel trees or plastic snow
Or jingle bells or yo ho ho's.
And no more f***ing reindeer
Or little drummer boys.

Repeat first verse.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 02:17 AM

another of Kevin Baker's great songs

Aunty Rooney's on a Sunday

Getting up on Sunday morning I can hear my parents talking
Saying how it's been a long time and it doesn't look like rain
And I know it's Aunty Rooney's where my feet will soon be walking
First to mass at Kogarah then to Banksia by train
And I think Mass will never end, O'Farrell's in the pulpit
And I wonder how my father felt to find his mother gone
But Aunty Rooney raised him when his mother went to Heaven
With the help of Aunty Mary and Uncle Pat and John

Soon the Mass is over and to Kogarah we will amble
Waiting on the platform looking down the track for trains
We spot it in the distance and soon on it we will scramble
My sister grabs the window-seat and off we go again
We get off at Banksia station with it's many beds of flowers
The Station-Master tells us he's won a prize or three
We find our way to Short Street but it seems to take us hours
As we watch out for the wooden house with it's Frangipani tree

Chorus -
And they're formerly of Redfern and late of County Galway
They tend the Celtic home-fires with a kind of loving hand
With each new generation they extend the celebration
And keep the green of Ireland growing in this golden land

Aunty Rooney tends the oven; Aunty Mary sets the places
They take their turns in scolding John who hit the grog last night
Uncle Pat returns the book he reads to one of his book-cases
And greetings break upon us as we step into the light
And after we've had our dinner comes the time that's most exciting
All the chairs go in a circle; Uncle Kev is asked to sing
He gives us Kevin Barry then my father's up reciting
Today I'll play the mouth organ my mother let me bring

Chorus

Well everyone did something with sometimes some harmonising
Though Colleen blushed and giggled and her sister wasn't keen
"No politics" calls Mary but just hear the voices rising
John has started something with "The Wearing of the Green"
So it's "Children to the backyard. Go! Come on now, use your nouses"
We'd rather stay inside but still the yard is parent-free
We roll and run for hours until Aunty Rooney rouses
"Now who has knocked that branch down from my frangipani tree?"

Chorus

Soon five-o'clock comes round and now the winter sun's declining
Grown-ups are startled by the time start straining to get home
John says: "Why not stop for tea?" but mum says she's got ironing
And things to do before her tribe is fit next week to roam
And home in bed before I sleep I catch my memories to me
And all those lovely moments get entangled in my dreams
And I hope I never get too old to go to Aunty Rooney's
To eat and laugh and sing with friends and raise the old roof-beams

chorus


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 09:21 AM

PERILOUS GATE (cut down from a 35-verse poem published in 1877)

The Darling Downs Gazette and General Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld. : 1858 - 1880) Sat 29th Dec 1877 refers to the Christmas issue of "The Queenslander" which has a supplement that includes a poem by the author of 'Craddock Head,' entitled 'The Perilous Gate;' (Craddock Head is a 4-part story!)

PERILOUS GATE Words & Music: Phyl Lobl audio

A tale I tell of a narrow gate upon the eastern coast
Of many wrecks and ruins this narrow gate can boast,
Beneath Newcastle Harbour waves lie rotting hulls and sailor's graves,
Heroes tombs are hidden caves below the Nobby's post.

It is a pretty entrance but when you're homebound sail,
I'd rather stand far out to sea when it blows a stiffish gale.
Blowing from the South or East each huge wave a crest of yeast
Comes roaring like a wounded beast and mounts the rolling rail.

The sixth day of November round eighteen fifty eight,
The Eleanor Lancaster was caught entering the Perilous Gate,
We watched those huddled at the top with nothing but a slender prop
Which at each blow we thought would drop and all her timbers fail.

An awful sea was running and not in all that crew
Was one who thought boats could be brought those boiling breakers through
But then a little fair haired man pushed and panted as he ran
And urged us all the waves to scan and to our mates be true.

'Now lads', he shouted shrill and clear 'Who'll venture it with me?
Each minute lost a life might cost in such a tumbling sea.
With four good men I’ll wager I'll bring them all to shore
Come who will try?' ,three answered 'Aye' and I sir made up four.

It was a roughish kind of trip but Chatfield steered us well
I see him there with sea drenched hair facing what befell,
And when we'd brought them all to shore he shook us by the hand once more.
'I've met no braver men before, the truth to you I tell.'

For ten good years the Oyster Bank was beaconed by a spar
That stood in witness of the storm that sank the Lancaster
Five fathoms deep that rotting shell up reared the slender spar to tell
Of brave deed done so nobly well upon that very bar.

Then t'ward the close of winter, hard blowin' all the night
The great seahorses tearing high raced madly past the bight
Many a man came down to see if inbound craft there chanced to be
And sailor's wives watched anxiously out on the surging flood.

The 'Carrwarra' was coming in, I knew her bow so well
We watched her as she struggled on and battled with the swell
We stood there watching through the blast and hoped that once the Nobby's past
The Harbour she might make at last, none but the god's could tell.

She tried to turn again to sea but a snow white whiff of steam
Told us that her fires were spent, she drifted on her beam,
The engines by the waves were quenched, the men by those same waves were
drenched,
Watcher's hearts were sorely wrenched with hope a fading gleam.

No boat stood out to rescue those still clinging to the deck
Though one was there with sea drenched hair who now stood on the deck
The beacon pointing to the sky urged us not to let him die
But his same noble feat to try no man would risk his neck.

Many's the time at midnight I've heard the tempest roar
I've lain awake and wished that I could have the chance once more,
To be the one to leave the crowd and call his name out clear and loud
And free from Neptune's salty shroud bring him back to shore.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 09:23 AM

When the Wind Blows (Eric Bogle) video

The evening air lies heavy and sleep it still escapes me
A night where hope and courage are still-born
Outside the lurking shadows they press against my windows
And wait for the coming of the storm
       They dance, those shadows
       When the wind blows

The shadows are advancing over all the earth they're dancing
And everywhere they dance they shall bring death
All the priced and even pages that we've written through the ages
Shall vanish in the shadow's poisoned breath
       The story book will close
       When the wind blows

Suddenly I'm frightened, I wish this room were lightened
Can no-one light a candle in the dark
For I hear the sullen murmour of far-off threatening thunder
I feel its menace chill me to the heart
       Where can I hide, where can I go
       When the wind blows

There is no-one that can save you and nowhere you can run to
No shelter in a world that's gone insane
In this world that we created in our arrogance and hatred
Stand naked 'neath the gentle deadly rain
       There will be no rainbows
       When the wind blows

In the darkness I am trembling, this night seems never ending
It seems the morning sun will never rise
And the crashing of the thunder it split my head asunder
And lighting burs and heats into my eyes
       And oh how the darkness grows
       When the wind blows

In a thousand searing flashes the world shall turn to ashes
Whirling like a burning coal in endless space
This good earth we did inherit we shall leave a smoking desert
A headstone for the heedless human race
       To mark our final flows
       When the wind blows

Oh I must be dreaming for I thought I heard a screaming
Like a billion lost souls falling into hell
In a thousand tongues bewailing at indifferent fate a-railing
Each one calling on the saviour as they fell
       Shall we reap what we did sow
       When the wind blows

You can call upon your saviour it you think that is the answer
But you've called on him so many times before
Call on Allah, Buddah, Jesus, I doubt if they can hear us
For we let the devil loose, now hear his roar
       Hell shall overflow
       When the wind blows

----------------------------------------------------------------------
recorded by Eric Bogle.
Copyright Larrikin Music)

"This song was inspired by the book of the same name by Raymond Briggs.
It's a chilling little book. I'd like to lend a copy to the world leaders,
it might frighten them. It certainly frightened me, and this song is
the result" - Eric Bogle

(The book was also made into an equally chilling animated movie)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 09:27 AM

that makes 195 songs.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 07:49 PM

New spin on an old favourite by pommie pair:

Aldridge and Goldsmith

At a more familiar pace:

The Bushwackers

From the forum database:

TRAVELLING DOWN THE CASTLEREAGH

I'm travellin' down the Castlereagh, and I'm a station-hand
I'm handy with the ropin' pole, I'm handy with the brand
And I can ride a rowdy colt, or swing an axe all day
But there's no demand for a station-hand along the Castlereagh


So it's shift, boys, shift, for there isn't the slightest doubt
That we've got to make a shift for the stations further out
With the pack-horse runnin' after, for he follows me like a dog
We must strike across the country at the old jig-jog


This old black horse I'm riding, if you notice what's his brand
He wears the crooked R, you see, none better in the land
He takes a lot of beatin', and the other day we tried
For a bit of a joke, with a racing bloke, for twenty pounds a side


It was shift, boys, shift, for there wasn't the slightest doubt
That I had to make him shift, for the money was nearly out
But he cantered home a winner, with the other one at the flog
He's a red-hot sort to pick up with his old jig-jog


I asked a cove for shearin' once along the Marthaguy
"We shear non-union here," says he. "I call it scab," says I
I looked along the shearin' floor before I turned to go
There were eight or ten non-union men a-shearin' in a row


It was shift, boys, shift, for there wasn't the slightest doubt
It was time to make a shift with the leprosy about
So I saddled up my horses, and I whistled to my dog
And I left his scabby station at the old jig-jog


I went to Illawarra, where my brother's got a farm
He has to ask the landlord's leave before he lifts an arm
The landlord owns the countryside - man, woman, dog and cat
They haven't the cheek to dare to speak without they touch their hat


It was shift, boys, shift, for there wasn't the slightest doubt
Their little landlord god and I would soon have fallen out
Was I to touch my hat to him? was I his bloomin' dog?
So I makes for up the country at the old jig-jog


But it's time that I was movin', I've a mighty way to go
Till I drink artesian water from a thousand feet below
Till I meet the overlanders with the cattle comin' down
And I'll work a while till I make a pile, then have a spree in town


So it's shift, boys, shift, for there isn't the slightest doubt
We've got to make a shift for the stations further out
The pack-horse runs behind us, for he follows like a dog
And we cross a lot of country at the old jig-jog


Notes

First published in the Bulletin in 1892 This poem of Banjo Paterson's ('The Bushman's Song') has grown a number of tunes in its time in the bush. Meredith collected three tunes in NSW, and two tunes are given in the Queensland Centenary Pocket Songbook while in his Big Book of Australian Folk Song Ron Edwards gives another two. The most commonly sung tune was collected separately by Geoff Wills and John Manifold. Manifold got it from Mr Hines of Donald, Victoria, and it is in his Penguin Australian Song Book.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 08:37 PM

This is another old favourite that Danny Spooner recorded on his final CD. I first heard it sung by a good mate, Ian White, who recorded it on his LP 'Songs from a Busker's Bag'.

Here are the lyrics as printed in the booklet to Danny's 'Home' CD.

ANOTHER FALL OF RAIN

The weather has been sultry for a fortnight now or more
And the shearers have been driving might and main,
For some have got the century who ne'er got it before
But now we all are waiting for the rain.

Chorus (after each verse):
For the boss is getting rusty and the ringer's caving in,
His bandaged wrist is aching with the pain,
And the second man I fear will make it hot for him
Unless we have another fall of rain.

Now some had taken quarters and were keeping well in bunk,
When we shore the six-tooth wethers from the plain.
And if the sheep get any harder some other blokes'll flunk
Unless we have another fall of rain.

But the sky is clouding over and the thunder's muttering loud
And the clouds are driving eastward o'er the plain.
And I see the lightning flashing round the edge of yon black cloud
And I hear the gentle patter of the rain.

So, lads, put on your stoppers and let us to the hut
And we'll gather round and have a friendly game,
While some are playing music and some play ante up
And some just a-gazing at the rain.

Some cockies come here shearing, they would fill a little book
About this sad dry weather for the grain.
But here is lunch a-coming, make way for Dick the cook,
Old Dick is nigh as welcome as the rain.

But now the rain is over let the pressers spin the screw,
Let the teamsters back their wagons in again.
We'll block the classer's table by the way we push them through,
For everything goes merry since the rain.

So it's, “Boss bring out the bottle” and let us wet the final flock,
For the shearers here may never meet again.
While some may meet next season and some not even then,
And some they will just vanish like the rain.

Final Chorus:
And the boss he won't be rusty when his sheep they all are shore,
And the ringer's wrist won't ache much with the pain
Of pocketing a season's cheque for a hundred quid or more—
And the second man will press him hard again.

Danny's note:

Also known as 'Waiting for the Rain', John Meredith collected a version from wharfie Leo Dixon, who had been a bush worker and shearer and was born at Eugowra. Meredith stated that the words were written by John Neilson of Penola, a bush worker, farmer, and balladist, and the father of John Shaw Neilson. The last verse in this version was sent me by email and comes from Dave de Hugard"s record 'Freedom on the Wallaby'.

Martyn Wyndham-Read recorded it on his 'Starlit Skies' album at a more leisurely pace.

Martyn's note:

A song that goes back many years for me. Just recently I played it with a different rhythm and it took on a new life. The beauty of these old songs is that they will stand any interpretation and still come back to the same shape and form. The song may be based on the poem by Australian poet John Shaw Neilson to a tune of his time 'The Little Low Log Cabin in the Lane'.

Wyndham-Read

Was it written by John Shaw Neilson or his dad?

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 08:46 PM

In New Zealand, loggers and forestry workers were known as bushmen. In 1976, Phil Garland collected 'The Dying Bushman' from Ken Hart of Palmerston North who first heard it from bushmen in the Otaki area during the 1930s. Apparently, it is still sung by a younger generation of bushmen.


THE DYING BUSHMAN
(Anon)

I've knocked around the logging camps since early boyhood days
I've seen the famous axemen come and go
Now me chopping days are over, I shall swing that axe no more
On the hillsides where the native timbers grow

(Chorus)
For me slasher is all rusty, and my axe handle's broke
I've laid them both behind the whare door
For the rata and the rimu have got so goddamn tough
That I really cannot cut them any more

The tramways in the valley, I shall never tread again
No more I'll hear the hauler's whistle blow
Well, oft times I look back as I travel down the track
Please don't take me from the only home I know

Chorus

I'm a poor old worn-out bushman and my chopping days are done
Soon this world shall know I'll be no more
Down the valley of the shadow, I'll soon be on the track
Where oft times I've seen bushmen go before

Chorus

And when I sleep that last long sleep, I pray that it may be
Where the tawa and the matai and the pine
And the hinau and the ngaio and the koromiko tree
Grow forever by that lonely grave of mine

Chorus

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 18 Sep 20 - 08:54 PM

R-J, here's one of your Kiwi favourites.

FAREWELL TO GERALDINE
(J.Fleming/Trad/P.Garland)

(Chorus)
Oh, fare well to you, old Geraldine
I am now upon the track
I'm travellin' down that long and weary road
With a swag all on me back

I'm headin' towards Temuka town
And if work I cannot find
I'll make me way on towards Washdyke
Leave Temuka far behind

Chorus

Perhaps I'll call in at Timaru
And round there take a look
But if no farmer should want me there
I'll drop on down to the Hook

Chorus

I'll push ahead then to Oamaru
Ngapara and Duntroon
Where farmers often work late at night
By the pale light of the moon

Chorus

When harvest days are over
And corn is in the sack
I'll shoulder bluey once again
By the rattler I'll be comin' back

Chorus

Joe Fleming was a swagger poet who roamed through South Canterbury and North Otago. He always wintered in the town of Geraldine. His little rhymes would appear on hut doors throughout the countryside. Joe died along the track, a frozen corpse by the side of the road. He left the itinerary of his regular round which Phil Garland set to a traditional tune.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 01:32 AM

From Phyl - I wrote it because my father Roy Vinnicombe went to the Somme aged 18 and was injured a couple of years later. He recovered or I would not be writing this e-mail. He went to WW 2 when I was 3 and was invalided home but died when I was 8.

A recording of my lyrics accompanied on Uilleann pipes played by Declan Affley is freely available on my web site website The recording was made somewhere in the 80’s I think. It was performed at a concert in the Sydney Town Hall.

BATTLE OF THE SOMME, Sung by Phyl Lobl with Pipe accompaniment from Declan Affley

Words: Phyl Lobl   Tune: Pipe Major William Laurie adapted by Phyl Lobl.


The lark in the evening she drops to the ground now
Bidding farewell to the long summer day.
High on a ridge hear a gun hit the silence,
Flames like a flower brighten the sky.
Dugouts are quiet we wait for the morning
Feeling a thrill as the battle draws near.
As dawn with her pale flush, silvers the grey sky
Sharp tongues of shell fire call up the day.

Glory, vain glory, you beckoned us onward,
Kitchener’s call and your light led the way.
Then just when we seem to be near
You turn into darkness
Splashed with the mud and the pain of the day.

The lines they are formed and the orders are given
While General Haig sends his prayers to the sky.
As we move onward our bayonets before us
We know that those prayers were no better than lies.
Rising and twisting the smoke curls above us
I see by the green glow there's gas in its domes.
We stumble and fall through the craters and shell holes,
Watching the bombs turning trenches to tombs.

We're over the rise now, the line is before us,
Enemy gun fire taking its toll
What hope have the bayonets and the rifles we carry
Against a machine gun here on the Somme.
Day's nearly done now the battlefield empties,
The living are hidden the dead lying still.
The wounded are calling for someone to save them
But no one can help them, no body will.

*‘What's to be said of the life-time of man now,
Shifting from sorrow to sorrow again.
You button up one cause for man kind's vexation
Only to find there's another undone.'*
Each generation has freedom to fight for,
Choose between gun fire or words for your tools.
Freedom's a phantom but reason could find her.
Honour and glory a haven for fools.

• Words between the stars are a direct quote from the book.
The rest are mine distilled from the revelations of people Guy Chapman interviewed for his book.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 01:47 AM

DEVLIN'S GENERAL STORE, words: © John Warner 19/10/93
tune: John Warner/Margaret Walters

Where can I get a cross-cut saw?
Devlin's General Store.
You can get a cross-cut saw
And anything else you're looking for,
It's been there since '94,
Has Devlin's General Store.

Where can I go to collect me mail?
Devlin's General Store
There you can collect your mail
That came from Melbourne town by rail
You can get a cross-cut saw [etc]

Where can I get a dozen eggs?
Devlin's General Store
You can get a dozen eggs
A washing line, some dolly pegs
There you can collect your mail [etc]

[And so on until the last verse:]

Where can I get some sly grog, mate?
Devlin's General Store,
You can get some sly grog, mate,
We just sold some to the magistrate,
* You can get a length of fuse
Several types from which to choose
You can get some gelignite,
Samsonite or dynamite,
* You can get some 12 gauge shot,
Powder, wadding, they've got the lot
You can get a liquorice strap,
A tupenny bunger, a rabbit trap,
You can get a carbide lamp,
A miner's pick or a ha'penny stamp,
You can get a set of spurs,
Flannel underwear, his or hers,
You can get a dozen eggs,
A washing line, some dolly pegs,
There you can collect your mail
That came from Melbourne town by rail,

You can get a cross-cut saw,
And anything else you're looking for,
It's been there since '94,
Has Devlin's General Store.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 01:48 AM

now we are 200!


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 07:26 PM

THE DUST OF URUZGAN
(Fred Smith)

In the ring they called me ‘Warlord’ my mother calls me ‘Paul’
You can call me ‘Private Warren’ when you're filing your report
As to how I came to be here, this is what I understand
In this hospital in Germany from the dust of Uruzgan

I had just turned twenty eight, just bought a new car
When you joined the first Battalion of the Big 1 RAR
We were next up for deployment into South Afghanistan
To combat the insurgence in the dust of Uruzgan

It took seven months of training just to get into the joint
There were push-ups and procedures, there was death by powerpoint
Then the RSO&I course in Ali Al Salaam
But nothing can prepare you for the dust of Uruzgan

Me and Benny sat together flying into Kandahar
Sucked back on our near beers in the Camp Baker Bar
Then up at 05:30 and on the Herc and out
In twenty flying minutes, we were in to Tarin Kowt

We shook hands as the boys ripped out from MRTF one
And pretty soon were out patrolling in the Afghan summer sun
Walking through the green zones with a Styer in my hand
Body armour chafing through the dust of Uruzgan

We started up near Chora working fourteen hours a day
Mentoring a Kandak from the Afghan 4th Brigade
Down through the Baluchi into eastern Dorafshan
Working under open skies in the dust of Uruzgan

It's a long, long way from Townsville not like any place you’ll see
Suddenly you're walking through from the fourteenth century
Women under burkhas, tribal warlords rule a land
Full of goats and huts and jingle trucks in the dust of Uruzgan

And the Education Minister can neither read nor write
And the Minister for Women runs a knock shop there at night
They've been fighting there forever over water, food and land
Murdering each other in the dust of Uruzgan

There's nothing about the province that's remotely fair or just
But worse than the corruption is the endless fucking dust
It's as fine as talcum powder on the ground and in the air
And it gets into your eyes and it gets into your hair

And it gets in to your weapon and it gets in to your boots
When bureaucrats all show up there, it gets in to their suits
It gets in the machinery, it foils every plan
There's something quite symbolic about the dust of Uruzgan

Still the people can be gracious and they’re funny and they’re smart
And when the children look into your eyes, they walk into your heart
They face each day with courage and each year without a plan
Beyond scratching for survival in the dust of Uruzgan

But the Taliban are ruthless, they keep the people terrorised
With roadside bombs and hangings and leaving letters in the night
And they have no useful vision for the children of this land
But to keep them praying on their knees in the dust of Uruzgan

It was a quiet Saturday morning when the ’2 Shop’ made a call
On a compound of interest to the east of COP Mashal
We had some information, they were building IEDs
So we cordoned and we searched it in accord with SOPs

I was on the west flank picket, propped there with Ben
There to keep a watchful eye out while the other blokes went in
We knew what to look for from the TTPs we'd learned
But the Nationals were moving back and forth without concern

We'd been standing still for hours when I took a quick step back
Kicked a small AP mine and everything went black
I woke up on a gurney, flat out on my back
I had to ask them seven times just to get the facts

I lived to tell the story through a simple twist of fate
The main charge lay ten foot away from the pressure plate
You see the mine was linked by det cord to a big charge laid by hand
Hidden under Benny by the dust of Uruzgan

I was a Queensland champ Thai Boxer now I look south on my knee
And all I see is bed sheets where my right foot use to be
Benny's dead and buried underneath Australian sand
But his spirit's out there wandering through the dust - the dust of Uruzgan

Now I'm going back to Townsville, it's the city of my birth
Some go back to Ballarat and some go back to Perth
I'll be living with my mother who's still trying to understand
Why we're spending blood and treasure in the dust - in the dust of Uruzgan

Youtube clip

Fred noted:

In July 2009, passing through the United Arab Emirates on my way into Afghanistan, I attended a memorial service for Ben Ranaudo, a young guy from Springvale, Victoria. This was the first of over a dozen memorial services and ramp ceremonies I went to in my 18 month stint working for Foreign Affairs in Uruzgan Province, Southern Afghanistan. You never really get used to them, but I had just arrived and was unprepared. In the months that followed, through conversations with staff in the headquarters of the Mentoring and Reconstruction Task Force, I developed some understanding of what happened on the morning of 18 July, 2009, when Ben was killed. I read the unclassified version of the Commission of Inquiry Report into the incident when it was released in December that year, and found myself imagining an interview between the colonel who wrote the report and one of Ben’s mates, a guy called Paul.

You can find explanations of acronyms in the glossary at this site which details Fred's Afghanistan experiences:

Click

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 09:38 PM

The late John Munro lived for a time here in Darwin towards the end of his life. He was a very fine musician and singer, but I must admit that not many of his original songs sparked my clod. However, I really loved this one.

SNOWDROP
(John Munro)

It’s minus six as Alex stands in line
The grim procession that’s motionless in time
He’ll wash and share some bread
But there’s no warmth, there’s no bed
At Sanitation Station Number 9
And he thinks about the harsh words with his son
But there’s no way back, the damage has been done
His thinking’s not so clear now
From the vodka and the beer now
And not a living soul goes where he’s gone

And when all the snows have melted
All the papers blown away
There you are, there you are
Just another snowdrop blooming in the spring
A silent voice without a song to sing
And this brave new world you fought for
Didn’t turn out like you thought
For all the lost and lonely snowdrops in the spring

Now Alex knows a place where he can go
A quiet stair-well where there’s shelter from the snow
And as he makes a bed, does he think what lies ahead
Or is lying down his head all that he knows
There’s money now but Alex wouldn’t know
But the news is good, the papers tell us so
But for all the lies he stood for, now all the news is good for
Is a blanket that won’t quite keep out the cold

And when all the snows have melted
All the papers blown away
There you are, there you are
Just another snowdrop blooming in the spring
A silent voice without a song to sing
And this brave new world you fought for
Didn’t turn out like you thought
For all the lost and lonely snowdrops in the spring

Alex sleeps and sleeps and never dreams
And passes out of life somewhere between
The darkness and the light, the daytime and the night
Unnoticed, unremarked, unloved, unseen

And when all the snows have melted
All the papers blown away
There you are, there you are
Just another snowdrop blooming in the spring
A silent voice without a song to sing
And this brave new world you fought for
Didn’t turn out like you thought
For all the lost and lonely snowdrops in the spring

I transcribed the lyrics from John's singing on Eric Bogle's 2009 album 'The Dreamer'. Corrections welcomed.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 10:02 PM

In 1840, around two-thirds of New Zealand was still covered in forest and this provided the basis for a strong indigenous timber industry for more than 100 years. A fine timber industry song, 'The Mill', was first published in Neil Colquhoun’s excellent ‘Song of a Young Country’ in 1977. It is attributed to a C.H. Winter about whom nothing is known.

THE MILL
(C.H. Winter attributed)

Beside a clump o’ needlewood we anchored down the mill
The engine’s by the blue-clay tank and further up the hill
The men are marking out the trees and the chips are on the wing
So early in the morning you can hear the axes ring

(Chorus)
With a jigger and a jemmy and a shigger and a shammy
And the sawdust in the sky
I keep thinking will he gimme up all of me money
Or wait till the big ‘uns lie

We’ve laid the bench and trued the saw and given her one spin
The benchman eyes his pet with pride and pats the packing in
He chocked the engines rolling wheels and backed the watercart
And heaped a stack of shortening wood in readiness to start

Chorus

We have no tearing vertical, we run no twin saws here
No clanking winches, swinging cranes, no wealth of yankee gear
No office clerk with collar white, no gangs of many men
We run a simple clearing mill and number nine or ten

Chorus

We grease the transports, oil the trucks, the benchman gives a sign
The engine starts, the big belt flaps and saw begins to whine
The sun comes out a scorcher and the bullocks raise the dust
The waterbags gets covered and our throats begin to rust

Chorus

The hill is looking strange and bare, the bigger trees are cut
And through the gaps we catch a sight of some gum digger’s hut
The ground is scoured by dragging logs, the grog is put to rout
And now it’s just a few more days and we’ll be all cut out

Chorus

At first, some timber was milled near the logging site. Logs were jammed into position on a platform over a pit. They were then cut by 2 men using a crosscut saw, one standing on top of the log and one beneath. Pit-sawing, however, could not keep up with demand for timber and, after 1865, steam-driven mills were developed with steam generated by burning wood waste. The logs were hauled by bullock teams or rolled by means of timber jacks.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 19 Sep 20 - 11:16 PM

FALZIBAD
(Fred Smith)

Falzibad, the post-modern muslim
Had a thing for those modern women
Started out feeling sentimental
Left us feeling so existential

Falzibad, Falzibad (after each stanza)

Falzibad though he was Islamic
Liked his vinegar pure balsamic
Playing tennis like Boris Becker
Kept forgetting to pray to Mecca

Falzibad he went to Karachi
Met a woman like Greta Scacchi
Sang her the song of the mariachi
All the mullah got very touchy

Muslim boys should not sing in Spanish
‘Falizad’, they said, ‘you are banished
To a land where there’s no falafel’
As for english, well he knew stuff all

So Falzibad he went into exile
Selling rugs and imported textiles
Driving down to the hippy market
In a porsche and there he’d park it

All the women said, ‘Hey habibi
You’re the one we’ve seen on tv
But we find you more appetising
Than the rugs you’ve been advertising’

Falzibad he went to a disco
Spanish quarter of San Francisco
Wound up with a Latino dancer
Woke up wondering where his pants were

And as he awoke from his bender
There were kisses wet, warm and tender
The dancer’s body was long and slender
Some uncertainty as to gender

Falzibad he was a chick magnet
Pulled them in like he had a dragnet
Plain to see he’d forgotten Allah
Lying there in the massage parlour

God so terrible, god so frightening
Struck poor Falzibad down with lightning
’That’ll teach you’, he said, ‘for messin’
‘Round with women without my blessin’’

One of my favourite Fred Smith songs. I reckon the best recording of it is on his album with the Spooky Men's Chorale - 'Urban Sea Shanties' - but that track is not available on YT.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 05:18 AM

Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 20 - 04:16 AM Randwick Races
There are more verses. Do you have them, Sandra? I learnt the song from a recording so there will be some differences from the words in my head and those originally written, but I can post mine if you don't have them.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 09:33 AM

Gidday, Richard

I copied a post from this thread http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=79383 but it only had 5 verses, I hadn't noticed. A later post on that thread lists the entire song copied from John's first book - which I have & just used to count the verses, so I know there are 8.

I'll ask Joe if he can add the extra verses to my original post so it's perfect!

The Randwick Races
(Words: John Dengate - Tune: "The Galway Races")

We arrived at Randwick races, by taxi from Clovelly.
I had money in my trousers, boys, and schooners in my belly.
Well the bookies saw us coming and they panicked in a crisis;
They tinkered with the odds and they shortened all their prices.
CHORUS:
       With my whack, fol the do, fol the diddley idle day.

Well the hunger it was gnawing and the thirst was in us rising
While the crowd's excited roaring reached a level quite surprising.
Oh, we swallowed several middies and demolished pies and sauces
And we set to work comparing prices, jockey's weights and horses.
CHORUS:

Denis Kevans said, "I reckon we will finish rich as Pharaoh
If we back the chestnut filly from the district of Monaro.
She's a trier, she's a flier, never knock her or decry her -
She's sixty-six to one; when she wins we'll all retire."
CHORUS:

There was every kind of punter from illiterates to scholars;
I struggled through the betting ring and wagered twenty dollars -
Then the horses were away; from the barrier they thundered
And we hoped that very day to collect the thirteen hundred.
CHORUS:

We shouted in despair; Denis Kevans tore his hair,
O'Dea began to swear at the filly from Monaro.
She was struggling in the pack and our very hearts were bleeding;
She was falling further back and the favourite was leading.
CHORUS:

It seems the filly heard us for suddenly she sprinted.
She raced around the ruck with a purpose quite unstinted.
At the ledger she was third, oh you should have seen her flying;
I got so damned excited that I choked upon my pie, singing –
CHORUS:

They stormed into the straight like cavalry invading;
The filly was improving and the favourite was fading:
"She's won it by a nose ... but a protest has been entered;
The stewards have upheld it; curse the day they were invented!'
CHORUS:

We walked back to Clovelly from the blasted Randwick races,
With ulcers in our bellies, boys, and gloom upon our faces.
We cursed the filly's jockey and we cursed the Randwick stewards
Then drowned our disappointment in a flood of amber fluids.
CHORUS:


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 07:21 PM

I posted this one to the forum almost 20 years ago. At the height of the 'revival' in Oz, the first 3 interstate guest singers we had to the Top End Folk Club in Darwin were Declan Affley, Danny Spooner and Bernard Bolan.

UNCLE FRED
(Bernard Bolan)

My uncle Fred retired last week at the age of 82
So we thought it only proper to prepare a little do
My uncle Fred's a lawyer and he works in Sydney town
At the offices of Brindle, Bogle, Trimble, Cock and Brown

It had always been intended I should follow in his steps
And not become a parson or else one of Waltons' reps
So I studied for my exams though it nearly split my head
And soon I took my proper place alongside Uncle Fred

Uncle Fred is 82 today
Time to take his specs off and put his books away
Time to say farewell to Torrens title and the courts
And no more thinking complicated excise duty thoughts

Mr Bogle brought the gin and Bogle brought the beer
But Trimble, Cock and Brown had not been round for many years
The office girls appeared in pearls and some with purple eyes
And, in the usual fashion, I was sent to get the pies

A wooden chiming clock was bought at very great expense
And a little card with flowers on cost petty cash 10 cents
At the office bar, with a pencil jar, the cashier lost his head
And drank lemonade and a razor blade to the health of uncle Fred

Uncle Fred is 82 today
Time now for the Law Society's pension fund to pay
No more hereunto, aforesaid, thee and thou
But time to pay attention to the herein after now

Mr Bogle had begun his speech in praise of uncle Fred
When he choked upon a cherry and he turned a fearful red
They beat him on the back until his teeth fell on the floor
And in the pandemonium no one saw the office door

But standing there as large as life was a banker known as Max
For whom old Fred had once prepared a scheme for saving tax
He said, 'So Fred is leaving, I am glad he hasn't gone
'Cos I just got out of jail this week and I'd like to join the fun

Uncle Fred is 82 today
Time to say goodbye to all his friends up in Long Bay
No more telling clients that adultery is wrong
And tracking correspondents down and wishing he was young

After Max came Mr Phelps who lives at Wollongong
He bought a flat in Wollstonecraft but Fred had got things wrong
Then poor Herbert Wilkins' missus shedding floods of tears
On a speeding charge he'd gone to Fred and he'd got him 14 years

But then a hush fell over all as from the ground beneath
Came smoke and flames and 20 names framed in a fiery wreath
'God bless you Fred from the grateful dead', Satan's chorus sang,
'For down in hell are the clientele that you managed to get hanged'

Uncle Fred, you're 82 today
Time to hang your wig up and to give the game away
Time to leave your office in the middle of the town
With the compliments of Brindle, Bogle, Trimble, Cock and Brown

Youtube clip

A tribute concert to the great man:

Click

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 08:02 PM

ROSE BAY FERRY
(Bernard Bolan)

Every morning at 8:25
Down to the Rose Bay wharf I drive
Park my Humber underneath a tree
Pop along the gangplank and then I'm free
Free says you, but how can that be?
When you always finish up at Circular Quay
So doubting Tom I shall explain
When I get on board I sing this sweet refrain

Where are we going today, Mr Nicholson?
Where is it the going to be?
Don't turn left, turn right down the harbour
And out to the open sea
Throw away your compass, right hand down
And it's out through the heads we’ll go
Yo ho! let's be merry on the Rose Bay ferry
If we run out of petrol, we'll row, yo hoYo Ho!
If we run out of petrol, we'll row

Monday Java, Tuesday Spain
Wednesday's it's Tokyo and back again
The only trouble is, there isn't any Gents
But what do you want for 20 cents?
Off with me raincoat and me woolly vest
See the naked ladies on my chest
Today is Friday, so hold on tight
'Cos it’s off to Trinidad and back tonight

Where are we going today, Mr Nicholson?
Where is the going to be?
Don't turn left, turn right down the harbour
And out to the open sea
Pull up your anchor, pull your finger out
And wave goodbye to your home
We're off to Nantucket, so give that man a bucket
'Cos it's choppy when you're out on the foam, yo ho
It's choppy when you're out on the foam

Now sometimes if I get up late
I only reach the jetty at half past 8
But that doesn't ruin my world-wide trip
'Cos the 8:37 is a battleship
Off on the dot with our guns on high
Mince up Manly as we pass by
We need another rocket so just pop upstairs
We can get 'em from the chappy who collects the fares

But now, left turn’s right today, Mr Nicholson
Trouble in town, you see
Let's hear three cheers, we're brave buccaneers
The saviours of Circular Quay
With patch on high and brollies to the sky
Every pollie from his folly must flee
With knuckles and chuckles, we'll swash their buckles
If they bugger up Circular Quay
Then we'll heave to (or three) at Circular Quay

Bernard's original final chorus was:

Where are we going today, Mr. Nicholson?
Where is the going to be?
Don't turn left, turn right down the harbour
And out to the open sea
For though we look like dudes and doctors
At heart we are men of the sea
Yo ho, let's be merry on the Rose Bay ferry
Until we get to Circular Quay
We finish up at Circular Quay

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 08:28 PM

FAREWELL TO THE GOLD
(Paul Metsers)

Shotover River, your gold it is waning
It's weeks since the colour I've seen.
But it's no use just sitting and Lady Luck blaming
I'll pack up and make the break clean

(Chorus)
Farewell to the gold that never I found
Goodbye to the nuggets that somewhere abound
For it's only when dreaming that I see the gleaming
Down in the dark deep underground

It's nearly two years since I left my old mother
For adventure and gold by the pound
With Jimmy the prospector, he was another
For the hills of Otago we were bound

Chorus

Well we worked the Cardrona's dry valleys all over
Old Jimmy Williams and me.
They were panning good dirt on the winding Shotover
So we headed down there just to see

Chorus

We sluiced and we cradled for day after day
Barely making enough to get by
'Til a terrible flood swept poor Jimmy away
During six stormy days in July

Chorus

One of the best-loved New Zealand folk idiom songs. It was written by Paul Metsers, but popularised by Phil Garland, Nic Jones, Gordon Bok and others. Metsers wrote about its composition:

I'm afraid there is no mystery source for the song, no distant broadside or doggerel from which it gained its inspiration. It's all out of my head as it happens. I got hold of a pictorial history of gold mining, a small but fascinating book called ‘The Goldfields of Central Otago’. When I read of the tragic flash flood of July 1863, I knew I had the basis of a story.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 08:33 PM

Then there's the splendid parody by the late Marcus Turner.

HUNG OVER LIVER
(Marcus Turner)

Hungover liver. my head it is aching;
It's weeks since the daylight I've seen
I'm sitting here thinking "This shit I've been drinking
Is rotting a hole in my spleen."

Farewell to the gold that never I've seen.
Goodbye to the acres of New Zealand green.
I'm feeling quite plastered; my brain is half-masted.
Put me down, you don't know where I've been.

It's nearly two weeks since I left my old lady
To have a quiet beer with the boys
With Acid Head Jimmy and crazy Marie
And Zelda with her rubber toys.

Farewell to my house, my family and wife.
I knew I was heading for all kinds of strife.
We really were raving, I knew I was having
The best bloody time of my life.

We spent the next fortnight in acts of perversion,
Old Jimmy Williams and me
'Til we heard of a party where no one had clothes on
So we headed down there just to see.

We drank and we chundered for night after night.
Jug after jug we threw down
'Til two great big p'licemen took Jimmy away
In a bust in the east end of town.

Farewell lovely Zelda wherever you are.
Your knickers are still in the back of my car,
And thanks for the games with Marie and with James
And I hope the rash doesn't spread far.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 08:49 PM

The late great John Clarke was a national treasure on both sides of the Tasman. Before relocating to Australia in 1977 and starting anew as a political satirist, Clarke had created an enduring Kiwi icon in the imagination of New Zealanders – the hilariously laconic, black-singleted, gumbooted farmer, Fred Dagg. Billy Connelly had modified a traditional song, 'The Work of the Weavers, to create his 'Welly Boot Song'. In turn, Clarke transmogrified Connelly’s piece into 'The Gumboot Song', one of Fred Dagg’s greatest hits.

THE GUMBOOT SONG
(John Clarke aka Fred Dagg)

[Spoken] Kick it in the guts, Trev ...
                           
Gumboots, they are wonderful, gumboots, they are swell
'Cos they keep out the water, and they keep in the smell
And when you're sittin' round at home, you can always tell
When one of the Trevs has taken off his gumboots

(Chorus)
If it weren't for your gumboots, where would ya be?
You'd be in the hospital or infirmary
'Cos you would have a dose of the flu, or even pleurisy
If ya didn't have yer feet in yer gumboots

Now there's rugby boots and racing boots, and boots for drinkin' rum
But the only boots I'm never without, are the ones that start with ‘gum’
I've got short ones and long ones, and some up to me belt
I'm never dressed 'till I've got on me gumboots

Chorus

Whenever I sing at the opera, my gumboots are a must
They help me hit the high notes, and protect me feet from dust
They keep the water well away, so me voice won't get no rust
You will not never see me without me gumboots

Chorus

Now Rob Muldoon and Rowling, they haven't made a hit
They're ruining the country, more than just a bit
If they keep on the way they're going, we'll all be in turd
So you'd better get yer feet up yer gumboots

Chorus   (x2)

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 09:08 PM

good one, Stewie

I have no idea when I last heard it, but I remember the chorus, I'll probably be singing it all day.

sandra


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 20 Sep 20 - 10:05 PM

How about "Basingstoke" by Bernard Bolan? Poor old Basingstoke......very funny.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 21 Sep 20 - 01:19 AM

here 'tis https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=105012 Date: 24 Sep 07 - 10:05 AM

& here's Bernard singing Basingstoke in 1981

BASINGSTOKE
© Bernard Bolan

I've got a cat called Basingstoke. he's a cat you must admire.
He's black and white, or he was, till the night that he jumped into the fire.
What a night! The tale it must be told,
So grip your seat, for you're in for a treat that will make your blood run cold.
Basingstoke, he used to be so furry
Till he tried to kung-fu the canary.
Up he jumped, soaring ever higher,
Then the soaring stopped and down he dropped in the middle of the fire.

In flames and smoke my Basingstoke went roaring round the room.
His fiery tum and his blackened bum appeared to spell his doom.
What a cat! Whoever would have guessed
He could stick his rear in a pint of beer while beating out his chest?
Basingstoke, he truly is a trier.
It takes guts to sing when you're on fire.
What a cat! You should have seen him strain,
Stuck like glue in the bottom of the loo and trying to pull the chain.

Now life's no joke for Basingstoke; so runs the ugly rumour
That the fiery hob did not just rob him of his sense of humour.
Poor old chap! The prospect it appals.
Just one jump and down with a bump and he's burnt off all his undergrowth.
Basingstoke, his tale is truly tragic.
Fire and smoke, they have robbed him of his magic.
The former spring-pawed terror of the tiles
Just sits and sighs with tears in his eyes 'cause he only raises smiles.

Basingstoke, he used to be a charmer.
Now ladies joke, they talk of fried banana.
Poor old chap! He was too young to retire.
Once he was happy, handsome and hairy,
Just a red-blooded pussy with a taste for canary.
Now he comes somewhere between a fritter and a fairy
Since he walked the fire.

Bernard & friends in the 2019 Bernard Bolan tribute concert


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 21 Sep 20 - 08:12 PM

THE WOOL COMMANDEER
(George Meek w/Frank Fyfe t)

The commandeer is under way, and blimey what a fuss
The blinkin’ din and clatter sure would make a parson cuss
There's covees tearing up the floors and blokes in overalls
Slap-dapping cans of whitewash on the rafters and the walls

(Chorus)
Well it’s come from Haka Valley and it's come from Sunny Peak
It's come from up the river and down Waitaki Creek
She’s come from the back of nowhere up the wild McKenzie way
And a clip from Tipperary will get here any day

There's stackers swinging bale hooks and there's barrows shifting wool,
There's covees humping baskets, some half empty, some half full
There's classers squealing loudly for more bales of wool to class
And someone yelling,’Where do you want this wool from Dansey's Pass?’

Chorus

There's wool on every siding and there's wool on every street
There's wool on every lorry and every bus you meet
There's wool on every trailer and there's wool on every train
And the stock-and-station diggers have got it on the brain

Chorus

There's wool on every corner and there's wool on every floor
There's wool dumped in the basement and jammed behind the door
There's wool in the old dairy and there's wool down at the dump
There's wool in the old freezer and still more bales to hump

Chorus.

There's shaggy bales and baggy bales, there's fadges, sacks and bags
Thank heavens Wally Nash cut out the blinkin’, stinkin’ dags
There's belly wool and smelly wool and wool, well spare me days
And the old jumbuck that grew it, I'll swear's seen better days.

Chorus

In 1940, the New Zealand government decided to commandeer all available wool bales and store them for eventual use in the war effort. George Meek of Oamaru was amused by this huge stockpiling and subsequently wrote this ballad. It was set to music by Frank Fyfe.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 21 Sep 20 - 08:20 PM

MY MAN’S GONE NOW
(Anon)

My man’s gone now, he had to go
Couldn’t find no work around this town
Not for ages, used his wages
Got up this morning and he was gone

Monday morning, it starts to rain
Around the curve there comes a south-bound train
Under a tarpaulin rides a bum called John
He was a strange man, but now he’s gone

Morning sunshine, the rooster crows
Along the highway where, goodness knows
Where’s John sleeping, how’s he keeping?
When will he take the homeward road?

Repeat stanza 1.

A few months after the 1929 Wall Street crash, farm produce prices in New Zealand collapsed. Since the economy depended almost entirely on farm exports, the effects were disastrous. By 1931, over 50,000 New Zealand men were walking, looking for work. A sad effect of the upheaval was the break-up of family life. This little song was collected by Neil Colquhoun from May Simpson.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 21 Sep 20 - 09:39 PM

ON THE WALLABY
(Henry Lawson)

Now the tent poles are rotting, the camp fires are dead,
And the possums may gambol in trees overhead;
I am humping my bluey far out on the land,
And the prints of my bluchers sink deep in the sand:
I am out on the wallaby humping my drum,
And I came by the tracks where the sundowners come.

It is nor'-west and west o'er the ranges and far
To the plains where the cattle and sheep stations are,
With the sky for my roof and the grass for my bunk,
And a calico bag for my damper and junk;
And scarcely a comrade my memory reveals,
Save the spiritless dingo in tow of my heels.

But I think of the honest old light of my home
When the stars hang in clusters like lamps from the dome,
And I think of the hearth where the dark shadows fall,
When my camp fire is built on the widest of all;
But I'm following Fate, for I know she knows best,
I follow, she leads, and it's nor'-west by west.

When my tent is all torn and my blankets are damp,
And the rising flood waters flow fast by the camp,
When the cold water rises in jets from the floor,
I lie in my bunk and I list to the roar,
And I think how to-morrow my footsteps will lag
When I tramp 'neath the weight of a rain-sodden swag.

Though the way of the swagman is mostly up-hill,
There are joys to be found on the wallaby still.
When the day has gone by with its tramp or its toil,
And your camp-fire you light, and your billy you boil,
There is comfort and peace in the bowl of your clay
Or the yarn of a mate who is tramping that way.

But beware of the town—there is poison for years
In the pleasure you find in the depths of long beers;
For the bushman gets bushed in the streets of a town,
Where he loses his friends when his cheque is knocked down;
He is right till his pockets are empty, and then—
He can hump his old bluey up country again.

Above is the Lawson poem. As a song, the title is usually 'The tent poles are rotten' with a variety of changes to the text - eg the possums 'ramble' and the 'spiritless dingo' becomes 'the spirit it tingles in my toe ...'. In all the recordings that I have (de Hugard, Loaded Dog, Wyndham-Read, Spooner) the third stanza is omitted.

Danny Spooner's note in booklet to his 'Ard Tack' album:

This song by Henry Lawson appears in Chris Kempster's tribute to the poet, The Songs of Henry Lawson with Music (Viking O'Neil 1989). Chris cites three tunes and I probably sing a combination of the first two. The song was first collected by Stan Arthur, Bob Michell and Ken McGoldrick in the 1960s from the singing of E. and A. Nesbitt of Bundaberg, Queensland, and Dave de Hugard has adapted that tune. The words explore the toils and rewards of the itinerant life—so much a part of the Australia's nineteenth century culture and identity.

Here is a live rendition by Wyndham-Read

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 21 Sep 20 - 10:29 PM

This piece of nonsense was popular.

FERGIE TRACTOR
(Peter Pentland)

Well I run a few acres, pays a few quids rent
And I overcome troubles when they be sent
Be they flood or drought or some other factor
I takes them in stride on me fergie tractor

(Chorus)
Oh me beaut little fergie tractor
Be dad she goes like the clappers
I can plough me fields and increase me yields
Even comes with a silage extractor
Me beaut little fergie tractor

The fergie she's a wondrous machine
I love to sniff her exhaust because she always runs clean
There's no other machine I e’er took a jack to
As fewer times as me fergie tractor

Chorus

Well the missus was naggin’ at me for years
Her mouth was always flapping’ around me ears
She’d nag about me, me dog and me farm
So I ran over her on me ferguson

Chorus

I once had this milk maid working for me
And the material in her blouse filled me with glee
I gave her a wink, but I then had to sack her
For although she liked me, she hated me tractor

Chorus

Now some folk say that I'd be an idiot
And if brains be lightbulbs that I'd burned out me filament
But people like that I just turn me back to
And I go in the shed and I sit on me tractor

Chorus

Recording of a live performance at the Dan O'Connell in Melbourne in 1979.

Youtube

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 22 Sep 20 - 01:15 AM

Thank you for the Fergie tractor song, Stewie, I haven't heard it for ages! A small village half an hour north of here has a "Grey Fergie Muster" every three years - would have been due next March, but due to the covid plague has been put off to 2022.

Mind you, the Fergies at the Muster aren't all grey......I have seen bright pink, lurid purple......


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Sep 20 - 07:44 PM

THE BROKEN-HEARTED SHEARER

I'm a broken-hearted shearer and ashamed to show my face
For the way that I've been treated is a shame and a disgrace
Now I’ve got me cheque together and I thought that it would do
So I went down to Bendigo to spend a week or two
Now I knew I wasn’t flat so resolved to cut it fat
And I dressed meself from top to toe, put a pugg'ree round me hat
Then I went to get a nobbier at a certain house in town
Where the barmaid was a caution for to lamb a shearer down

She had all the slang and flash talk that was going round the town
And she'd sling it at me right and left while I was lambing down
Well me money being nearly spent, I resolved to know my fate
So I asked that pretty barmaid if she would be me mate
“Well the fact is this, young man, on my feelings don't encroach
I'm a decent married woman and my husband drives the coach"
So I’ve sold me good old horse and I'll get some work, I hope
I've a pipe and some tobaccy and half a bar of soap

So I’m leaving Sandhurst now with me billy and jackshay
And a pair of old torn leggings and a jar of Holloways
That’s why I’m a broken-hearted shearer and ashamed to show me face
For the way that I’ve been treated is a shame and a disgrace

This is the version sung by Martyn Wyndham-Read. Martyn noted that he got it from David Lumsden who learnt it from his grandmother who spent much of her childhood in the Riverina. The tune is 'The wearing of the green'. 'Lambed down' was the term given to a luckless shearer after the barmaid had prised the last drop out of his cheque. A 'pugg'ree' is a thin muslim cloth (from the word for a turban). 'Holloways' was a family ointment sold in a earthenware jar.

Youtube clip

The first publication of the song in 1886 here:

Click

On Thompson's blog, you can find a different version collected by Meredith.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Sep 20 - 08:54 PM

Another little ripper from the pen of Kath Tait.

STEEL-HEARTED ANNIE
(Kath Tate)

Steel-hearted Annie came home from work
Through the park in the dark where the rapist lurked
Behind the bushes and about to attack
With the cold winds whistling across his back
He pounced on Annie 'cos she was slim
'Cos she looked so frail and feminine
But he wouldn't have done it if he only knew
That she was a master of kung fu

(Chorus)
Steel-hearted Annie with an iron will
Looks about as frail as a daffodil
But you don't take a chance on a small thin dame
With a punch like a piston on a steam train

Steel-hearted Annie don't like to pose
Like a trembling victim in a movie show
She gets mad when she's in distress
Like an animal in the wilderness
There's nothing that she wouldn't do to survive
She's got a strong desire to stay alive
And she looks cute in pink or blue
But she is a master of kung fu

Chorus

Steel-hearted Annie lived near a jail
Where a psycho killer was released on bail
He crept stealthily through the night
He broke into her house to give her a fright
And a cold wind whistled 'round the window frames
Made a sound like a ghost rattlin' chains
But the psycho killer ran for his life
When he saw Annie coming with a carving knife

Chorus

Steel-hearted Annie told all her friends,
'We've got to stand up to violence'
She went to classes and learned to fight
Now she's not afraid to walk around at night
She's a great big shark in a little tin can
A little fire-cracker with a great big bang
So just be careful what you do,
'Cos she is a master of kung fu

Kath Tait:

'Steel-hearted Annie' came from watching Doris Day in an Alfred Hitchcock movie behave in such a pathetic manner that it seemed out of character with the fact that she was quite a tall, well-built woman and at least as strong as the male character who was pursuing her.

We should remember that a hell of a lot of people live risky, adventurous lives and don't have lots of bad things happen to them. We don't want to let stories of victimisation scare us into leading excessively safe and boring lives. Therefore I try to make the characters in my songs survivors rather than victims.


Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Sep 20 - 09:41 PM

Phil Beck and I have been known to recite a beaut poem by Jim Haynes titled 'Dipso Dan' which we got via Campbell the Swaggie whom many Oz folkies would know. Here is another splendid bit of nonsense from Haynes.

SINCE CHERYL WENT FERAL
?(Jim Haynes)??

Watching ’60 Minutes’ one night?
As soon as it was over we got into a fight?
Because Cheryl said alternative was the way to go?
And the very next day she bought a sarong?
A sheepskin jacket and a brand new bong?
And before I knew it we hit the road??

Since Cheryl went feral?
Everything's weird?
And all our friends have disappeared?
She shaved her head and I've grown a beard?
Since Cheryl went feral??

It took us ages to hitch our way?
From Pennant Hills up to Byron Bay?
If we’d left those kids at home, we'd have been all right?
Well living off the land is all very well?
But the mung bean diet was giving me hell?
And I had to put that wigwam up each night??

Since Cheryl went feral ?
Everything's crook?
And all our food is now uncooked?
I'd kill for a burger or a piece of chook?
Since Cheryl went feral??

Our little girl was called Narelle?
And we had a little boy called Bruce as well?
But now she's Crystal Flower and he's Leaf?
But Leaf's pretty happy since we left home?
Because he hasn't seen a bath or a shower or a comb?
And it's been three months since he brushed his teeth
?
Since Cheryl went feral
Everything's changed?
And I'm quite sure I've become deranged?
And I can't remember anyone's name?
Since Cheryl went feral??

Cheryl took a vow of celibacy?
She said she needed no input from me?
She got her navel pierced and stared at it all day long?
So I read the tarot with Leaf and Flower?
And dreamed about a nice cold shower?
While I waited for my turn on the bong??

Since Cheryl went feral?
Everything's pierced?
Rings through me nose and rings through me ears?
I haven't been this pierced for years?
Since Cheryl went feral??

I began to change me tune?
As soon as we joined that big commune?
And everyone took their clothes off straight away?
Their cosmic philosophy appealed to me?
It's multiple serial polygamy?
And I think the feral lifestyle's here to stay??

Since Cheryl went feral?
There's a real traffic jam?
Of naked women in our wigwam?
And I'm pretty happy right where I am?
Since Cheryl went feral

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Sep 20 - 09:44 PM

I don't know where in the hell all those question marks came from in my previous post.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 22 Sep 20 - 10:17 PM

Perhaps Cheryl is one of those women who talk with an upward inflection? Making every sentence into a question?

Well done, Stewie......I haven't heard that one for ages.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Sep 20 - 10:56 PM

Well, that's an interesting theory, Jennie.

Here's one from my mate Dave Evans of Bloodwood fame. There was a YT clip of Bloodwood performing this, but it seems to have disappeared. It is always a favourite at Top End festivals.


PLAY SOMETHING WE KNOW MATE
(Dave Evans)
   
I've a fan who follows me everywhere I go
He's always there at the club waiting for me to show
If you want to know what I mean and how the hell I tell
I grab my guitar, move to the bar and this voice begins to yell

(Chorus)
Play something we know mate so we can sing along
None of your foreign rubbish mate just give us an Aussie song
Waltzing Matilda, Ryebuck Shearer, plenty of guts so we can hear yer
We'll sing the chorus - play something we know mate

It's Sunday night in Alice Springs, the folk club's on tonight
Guitar in hand I'm feeling grand, I think I'll do all right
But just as I begin to sing, a voice decides me fate
From across the floor, comes a terrible roar - play something we know mate

Chorus

This fellar's really getting me down, he follows me all day long
Waiting for that moment for me to sing me song
I took my wife out to tea for a little tête-à-tête
When across the room came a terrible boom - play something we know mate

Chorus

I summoned all my courage up late one Sunday night
Left my guitar and went to the bar, spoiling for a fight
But he floored me with his very first words, he left me all irate
"I don't like to boast but I'm deaf as a post & I can't sing a note, mate"

"No I can't sing a note, mate, or even hum along
As for your foreign rubbish, mate, well I'm a bloody Pom
Waltzing Matilda Ryebuck Shearer, loud as you like 'cos I can't hear yer
As for the chorus, it'll probably bore us - play something we know mate"

Repeat chorus

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 04:44 AM

Some great songs here, thanks guys!

The Jim Haynes song reminded me of another favourite by Jim called "Mow Ya Lawn". Used to hear it on the 'Australia All Over' radio show, but I can't find it on youtube or elsewhere.

Has anyone got the lyrics?

cheers, Ian


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 07:40 PM

LEAVING THE LAND
(Eric Bogle)

It's time to go now, Jenny
No need to close the door
What if the dust gets in the house
It doesn't matter any more
You and the dust have been at war for far too many years
Now the war is over Jenny dear

(Chorus)
Leaving the land
Leaving the land
Leaving all I’ve ever been and everything I am
Leaving the land

Remember when I brought you here
Those long bright years ago
For all that time you've been my heart
But this land has been my soul
The long bright days are over now though still the heart beats on
But, Jenny dear, the soul is gone.

And all I see around me
Seems to me of the best
For generations loved this land
Never thought I’d be the last
All that toiling, all that dreaming, birth and death and joy and pain
It was all for nothing, all in vain

Chorus

It’s time to go now, Jenny
Drive quickly down the track
We'll never see what lies ahead if we keep on looking back
Behind is just an empty house
Old memories and ghosts
And our small dreams gathering dust

Chorus

Going far away, far away

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 08:01 PM

THE SHEARING’S COMING ROUND
(Wright/Jessett)

There's a sound of many voices in the camp and on the track
And letters coming up in shoals to stations at the back
And every boat that crosses from the sunny other side
Is bringing waves of shearers for the swelling of the tide

(Chorus)
And the shearing's coming round, boys, the shearing's coming round
The stations of the mountains have begun to hear the sound

They'll be talking up at Laghmor of the tallies that were shore
And the bloke who broke the record is remembered at Benmore
And the yarns of strikes and barneys will be told till all is blue
And the ringers and the bosses will be passed in long review

Chorus.

The great Orari muster and the drafting of the men
Like a mob of ewes and wethers will be surely told again
And a lot of heathen places that will rhyme with kangaroo
Will be named along with ringers and the things that they can do

Chorus

At last the crowds have gathered for the morning of the start
And the slowest of the jokers will be trying to look smart
And a few will get the bullet, and high hopes will have a fall,
And the bloke that talks the loudest stands a show of looking small

Chorus

With the arrival of Australian shearers working under contract on high country stations during the 1890s, NZ locals were exposed to Australian songs and especially the verse of Lawson and Paterson. The latter inspired Kiwi balladeers such as David McKee Wright who has been described as New Zealand’s ‘outback laureate’. His fine poem, 'The Shearing’s Coming Round,' references 3 large Canterbury stations – Laghmore, Benmore and Orari Gorge. The tune is by Michael Jessett.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 08:16 PM

BLUE SMOKE
(Ruru Karaitiana)

Blue smoke goes drifting by into the deep blue sky
And when I think of home, I sadly sigh
Oh I can see you there, with loving tears in your eyes
As we fondly said our last goodbyes
And as I sailed away with a longing to stay
I promised I'd be true and to love only you

Blue smoke goes drifting by into the deep blue sky
My memories of home will never die

Spoken [Women’s part]
Smoke drifts away high into the sky
And the memories come flooding back. ‘Aue!’
Those overwhelming feelings, and the tears
" ... You are going, you are going ...
I travel with you on the wings of my love
Oh Tama, my love is all for you."
Smoke drifts away high into the sky
I will never forget you.
I will never never forget you.

And as I sailed away with a longing to stay
I promised I'd be true and to love only you
Blue smoke goes drifting by into the deep blue sky
My memories of home will never die

Ruru Karaitiana served in the Middle East in WW2 with the 28th New Zealand (Maori) Battalion. He wrote 'Blue Smoke' on a troop ship in 1940 when a friend drew his attention to some passing smoke. In 1947, he formed an Hawaiian-style quintet and recorded it with singer, Pixi Williams. It was the first song written by a New Zealander to be recorded and released on a New Zealand record label. It was a massive hit locally and was later recorded by Dean Martin and other overseas luminaries. It is a tad sentimental but as G.K Chesterton wisely pointed out ‘sentimentality is simply having feelings and not troubling to invent a new way of expressing them’.

This recording omits the spoken women's part:

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 09:57 PM

SON OF ROME ~ © Paul Lawler, 1984

Born and bred, reared and rutted
The Parish Priest, over me he muttered
Water on the head, salt on the tongue
For ensuing pain, this song is sung.

      Five years old, can’t understand schism
      Catechism, cataclysm
      Peter, Judas, rise up Zach
      Days of religion, minutes of math ...

Seven years of age, church seasoned
Can you beat the Jesuits’ reason
Hymns and bells, indoctrination
Another name, confirmation.

        Through the skin and through the bone
        You are now a Son of Rome
        Square one starts at sixty four
        Other views – close the door …

Hindu, Protestant, Muslim, Jew
Can’t you see it’s the same for you
Steeped in doctrine, day and night
Have you really seen the Light?

        Heretics, skeptics, sages, witches
        Burned and scorned, so history teaches
        Dared to question Life above
        Murdered by a mythical dove …

Don’t look behind your stained glass window
Your gods are here, they’re all around you
Love your neighbour, love him fair
Love him just because he’s there.        


Here is an early folkclub recording of Paul’s “semi-autobiographical” composition “Son of Rome”, before a couple of lyric adjustments! GO TO 20:47 ---- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7PsCsWL6Pk&t=3s



Stewie has previously posted Dorothy Hewitt’s lovely poem “Sailor Home from the Sea”. Known as “Cock of the North” in the Top End, where folks used Martyn Wyndham-Read’s tune, down here in Queensland around Briso, they use Chris Kempster’s tune. But here is a Darwin folkclub recording from Paul, slightly folk-processed :) GO TO 03:54 ---- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZVIJ3zc-M4                 

Helen (via Sandra) has also already posted “One of the Has-Beens” (Robert Stewart/Trad) and here is a Darwin folkclub recording of Paul singing it (similarly folk-processed :) GO TO 28:20 ---- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZVIJ3zc-M4


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 10:10 PM

NB   I confess I lifted this whole section (lyrics, notes, clip) from Evan & Lyn Mathieson's very excellent homage website to the music and memories of Queenslander, Harry Robertson, and for his widow Rita, and family.
http://www.harryrobertson.net/NorfolkWhalers.html

Some great stuff on there and I trust they will forgive me if I similarly add a couple more favourites too!


NORFOLK WHALERS
Lyrics and Music: Harry Robertson

(As performed by Marian Henderson on Harry’s 1971 LP “WHALE CHASING MEN”)

High on the cliffs of Norfolk’s green isle,
Women and children are waiting the while,
Far down below the whale boatmen row,
As after the Humpback the Norfolk men go.

Each man in the boat strains hard at his oar,
They head for the whale, and away from the shore,
Up at the bow the harpoon man stands,
A steel-shafted harpoon clutched tight in his hands.

Chorus
Row, my love row, and bring back to me,
The king of the ocean, the prize of the sea.

Ship the oars lads, and quiet as we go,
The harpoon strikes deep, and the blood starts to flow,
Then hell’s violent furies break out on the waves,
One blow from its tail could mean watery graves.

For hours the whale drags the boat through the sea,
And tires from its effort to break the rope free,
Exhausted at last, it floats in the sun,
Sharp lances complete what the harpoon begun.

Chorus

Back to the island, ’twill be a long row,
If darkness comes down, the lantern will glow,
For high on the cliffs the Islanders stand,
And wait for their men to return to the land.

With backs nearly broken, and blistered hands sore,
The boatmen at last reach the isle’s rocky shore,
The joy on friends’ faces, what pleasure to see,
Their loved ones return with the prize of the sea.

Chorus

© Harry Robertson,
and subsequently ©1995 Mrs Rita Robertson, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA
Registered with APRA/AMCOS www.apra-amcos.com.au

Click to play the track by [the late and great] Marian Henderson
http://www.harryrobertson.net/sound/WCM_Norfolk_Whalers.mp3


NORFOLK WHALERS
"The first thing I noticed on my arrival at Norfolk Island was the number of people who lined the cliff tops, some three hundred feet high at Cascade Bay, to watch our arrival. As a penal settlement, Norfolk Island had been the scene of brutal floggings and inhumane treatment of desperate prisoners condemned for stealing a loaf of bread, or poaching a rabbit ? capital crimes no doubt! Eventually the scene of the crime was changed by removing the prisoners to be ill-treated elsewhere, and the island was granted to the descendants of the Mutineers of the fine ship ‘Bounty‘, who had, by this time, begun to overpopulate Pitcairn Island. Like most migrants, some settled there, and some returned to Pitcairn Island.
During my visits ashore to the homes of various people on Norfolk Island, I learned that we were not the first whaling company to operate there. Later, on a visit to Ball Bay, I saw the remnants of what had been large cooking pots and various other debris. Apparently this whaling venture terminated suddenly one night when the plant caught fire and burned down. Cause of the fire ? unknown.
One night while in conversation with one of the older inhabitants, I learned of whaling expeditions by the Islanders themselves ? using rowboats and hand harpoon. He described how the whale, once harpooned, would sometimes drag the boat so far away that by the time the whale was killed and towed back to land ? the sharks had almost eaten the lot! Were they fortunate enough to get a whale to the shore in good condition, then the Islanders would descend from the cliff tops, where they had watched their men chase and kill the whale, and each person would carry pieces of blubber, meat etc to the top of the cliff where it was cooked.
To me, the cliff top vigil was a repeat of history.
You will find the story as it was told to me, in my song ‘Norfolk Whalers’.
HR

http://www.harryrobertson.net/NorfolkWhalers.html


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 10:23 PM

Great stuff, R-J. Lawls was a very fine singer.

PO ATA RAU
(Anon/tune based on Swiss Cradle Song}

Pö atarau
E moea iho nei
E haere ana
Koe ki pämamao

Haere rä
Ka hoki mai anö
Ki i te tau
E tangi atu nei

Now is the hour
When we must say goodbye
Soon you'll be sailing
Far across the sea
While you're away
Oh please remember me
When you return
You'll find me waiting here

In New Zealand, the opening theme of a piano piece, 'Swiss Cradle Song', composed in Australia by Clement Scott was modified for the singing of Po Atarua to farewell WWI Maori soldiers. In 1920, 'This Is the Hour' verse was added. On a visit to NZ in 1945, Gracie Fields learned the song and her version, known as 'Now Is the Hour', became a world-wide hit in 1948.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 11:29 PM

LIFT #2 :
NB   I confess I lifted this whole section (lyrics, notes, clip) from Evan & Lyn Mathieson's very excellent homage website to the music and memories of Queenslander, Harry Robertson, and for his widow Rita, and family.
http://www.harryrobertson.net/index.html

Some great stuff on there and I trust they will forgive me if I similarly add a couple more favourites too!



THE ANTARCTIC FLEET

Lyrics and Music: Harry Robertson

I went down south a-whaling, to the land of ice and snow,
And eight-and-twenty pounds a month, was all I had to show,
For being on a little ship like a sardine in a can,
And eating salty pork and beef, they stewed up in a pan.

Chorus
Heigh-ho! Whale-oh! Wi’ the Antarctic fleet,
I’ve got a drip upon me nose and I’m frozen in the feet.

South Georgia is an island, it is a Whaling Base,
And only men in search of whales, would go to such a place,
No entertainment does exist unless you make home brew,
Then we would have some singing and, we’d have some fighting too.

Chorus

Our gunner came from Norway, like many of the crew,
And others spoke wi’ Scottish tongues, as whalers often do,
But when the ship was closing in to make the bloody kill,
The Scotsmen and Norwegians worked, together with a will.

Chorus

We sailed down to the Weddell Sea, where the big Blues can be found,
We chased between the icebergs and, we chased them round and round,
And when they couldn’t run no more, and fought to draw their breath,
Our gunner shot harpoons in them, ’til they floated still in death.

Chorus

For months we sailed the ocean, and wearied with the toil,
Of slaughter and of killing just to get that smelly oil,
And when the savage storms blew and snow kept falling down,
I often wished that I was back, in dear old Glasgow town.

Chorus

It’s twenty years since I’ve been there, and I won’t go there again,
I didn’t like the climate but, I liked the whaling men,
And even in the sunshine now when I walk along the street,
I’ve got a drip upon me nose, and I’ve still got frozen feet.

Chorus

© Harry Robertson,
and subsequently ©1995 Mrs Rita Robertson, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA
Registered with APRA-AMCOS   www.apra-amcos.com.au

Click to play the song :
http://www.harryrobertson.net/sound/WCM_The_Antarctic_Fleet.mp3




THE ANTARCTIC FLEET
"I finished taking the slack out of a bottom end bearing on the main engine at St Vincents, Cape Verde Islands, just off the west coast of Africa, our first stop since leaving Britain and our last before we reached Leith Harbour Whaling Base on the island of South Georgia. While fuel and stores were being taken on board, I joined my shipmates in buying, begging, bartering, or stealing, flagons of ‘alco pura’ (gutrot booze) from the ‘Bumboat’ men. Otherwise it would be a dry trip through the ‘Roaring Forties’ degrees south where the weather is worse than any government’s policy — though not consistently so — to the grog-dry Whaling Station and even drier Whaling Men who had spent the winter there. They knew we were coming, we knew they were there and the traditional obligation of bringing supplies must be honoured.
Stand your watch, oil the engines, retell old incidents — for news is scarce now.
Quite suddenly, out of the mist one morning, appeared the ice-cragged peaks of South Georgia — conversation sparkled once more as we threaded our way towards Leith Harbour and all its majestic squalor."
HR

http://www.harryrobertson.net/TheAntarcticFleet.html


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 11:37 PM

LIFT #3 :
NB   I confess I lifted this whole section (lyrics, notes, clip) from Evan & Lyn Mathieson's very excellent homage website to the music and memories of Queenslander, Harry Robertson, and for his widow Rita, and family.
http://www.harryrobertson.net/index.html

Some great stuff on there and I trust they will forgive me if I similarly add a couple more favourites too!


QUEENSLAND WHALERS

Lyrics and Music: Harry Robertson

I’ve sailed the North Atlantic, where ice blows in the breeze,
And roamed the Dutch West Indies in the calm blue sunny seas.
When I think of ships and seamen, my thoughts return again,
To a season spent in Moreton Bay with Queensland Whaling Men.

Chorus
Sing Ho! You Queensland whalers, who have cut the sugar cane,
And drove the herds of cattle o’er the dry and dusty plain,
You’ve dug the ore at Isa, laid countless miles of rail,
And now you’ve come to Moreton Bay, to catch the Humpback whale.

For men who’ve chased the brumbies, caught bullocks by the tail,
It really is no problem to catch a Humpback whale.
Just spur your iron seahorse, put the gun through rigging struts,
And when he runs from the coral scrub, you belt him in the guts.

Chorus

The man up in the crows nest, as whaling legend goes,
Looks out across the water and then cries, “Thar she blows!”
But here in sunny Queensland you’ll sometimes hear them shout,
“There goes a bloody beauty, mate, so get your finger out!”

Chorus

From Moreton to Caloundra, bronze whaler sharks abound,
They wait like dingoes in the scrub for a wounded beast that’s down.
But their taste for blood and savagery, it never could compare
With the bite that Inland Revenue took from our bonus share.

Chorus

When fuel tanks were running low, we’d sail to Brisbane town
And at the nearest boozer our sorrows we would drown,
With beer and fiery whiskey and plonk of vintage rare
We’d steer a steady zigzag course without a blasted care.

Chorus

Hooray, the season’s over and we can all return,
To greet our wives and sweethearts and have a little fun,
We’ll rant like cattle drovers, we’ll roar like whaling men,
But when the season starts next year you’ll find us back again.

Chorus

© Harry Robertson,
and subsequently ©1995 Mrs Rita Robertson, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA
Registered with APRA/AMCOS www.apra-amcos.com.au

Click to play the track
http://www.harryrobertson.net/sound/WCM_Queensland_Whalers.mp3

QUEENSLAND WHALERS
"I listened to the words of the song,
“And Captain Logan he had us mangled,
At the triangles of Moreton Bay”.
That such a placid sunlit place was once the scene of inhuman brutality, was hard to believe.
Later I walked along Logan Road named after the bloody Captain and I have since wondered just how many historical and present-day bastards are immortalised in such a manner.
Perhaps debasement is easier to remember than achievement.
Personally I prefer achievement.
Consequently, in the following song ‘Queensland Whalers’, I once again refer to the adaptability of men who had indeed worked at everything prior to stepping on board the whale ships.
The early fires of struggle in Australia surely forged a metal of its own. I found the temper of this metal in the character of the ‘Have-a-go, Aussies!’ when I whaled at Moreton Bay."
HR

Click to play the introduction
http://www.harryrobertson.net/QueenslandWhalers.html


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 11:45 PM

LIFT #4 :
NB   I confess I lifted this whole section (lyrics, notes, clip) from Evan & Lyn Mathieson's very excellent homage website to the music and memories of Queenslander, Harry Robertson, and for his widow Rita, and family.
http://www.harryrobertson.net/index.html

Some great stuff on there and I trust they will forgive me if I similarly add a couple more favourites too!


WHALING WIFE

Lyrics and Music: Harry Robertson

(As performed by Marian Henderson on Harry’s 1971 LP “WHALE CHASING MEN”)

Aye! I’m waiting here at hame and I always feel the same
Whenever my guid man goes tae the whaling,
Seven months he’ll be awa’ doon amongst the ice and snow
And there’s times my lonely heart is nearly breaking.

Now it’s time the kids were fed, and I’ll put them into bed,
And to them a story then I might be telling,
That their Daddy’s gone tae sea, to buy food for them and me,
And it’s many whales we hope he will be catching.

If the whaling catch is fine, we will have an easy time,
New clothes and food we ought to have in plenty,
But if the blubber’s thin on the Blue Whale and the Fin,
Then for us between the seasons could be scanty.

So it’s waiting that I am, and I’m thinking of my man,
And the pleasure when I know that he’s returning,
But in case ye should forget — he hasna’ come hame yet,
And wi’ tears my eyes at times are fairly burning.

© Harry Robertson
and subsequently ©1995 Mrs Rita Robertson, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA
Registered with APRA/AMCOS www.apra-amcos.com.au

Click to play the track by [the late and great] Marian Henderson
http://www.harryrobertson.net/sound/WCM_Whaling_Wife.mp3


WHALING WIFE
"I often thought as I watched whaling men working, what brought most of them down south year after year. Some knew little else — others had backgrounds of a professional nature and yet all of them seemed to have one thing in common — an attraction to the bleak wilderness of Antarctica. The financial motive existed in all and a keen eye was kept on the production figures — yet one suspected that money was the secondary motive — it could perhaps be explained that without being ‘Shackeltons’ or ‘Scotts’ they still sought new frontiers — or rather — the avoidance of existing ones in cities, towns, etc. Whatever the reason, there they were, and probably would be back the following year. Such a pattern often led me to wonder, not only about the whalers, but about the other people in their lives.
A great number of people connected with the Whaling Industry never go whaling. In 1950-51 some twelve thousand men of various nationalities operated in the Antarctic season. Surely they each left at least one friend behind. So we find, scattered throughout the world, thousands of people who know of, and depend upon, the return of whaling men and the result of a good catch — such is the — ‘Whaling Wife’."
HR

Click to play the introduction
http://www.harryrobertson.net/WhalingWife.html



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 12:34 AM

THE YOBBO’S REQUEST ~ Jean Memery

Ch.
Sing us a song please, Mr Folksinger
Sing us the one we forgot
You know the one, it’s a bloody humdinger
And better than hit parade rot.

Sing us a song about life in the bush
Make us all proud to be Aussies
You know the one, you sang it last week
It’s all about blowflies and mozzies.

Sing us an Irish one, all full of tears
All about torture and pain
And drunkards and rebels and famine and fears
And then sing it all over again.

Sing us a protest song, lay it on thick
Tell us what bastards we are
Thoughtless and greedy and selfish and sick
It was guilt that made Bogle a star.

When there’s a chorus, we’ll all sing along
It must drive you stark-staring mad
Though we can’t hold a tune and the words are all wrong
Our intentions are not wholly bad.


Jean Memery is a Beechworth (Victoria) resident – poet and retired English teacher – who taught all over, including the NT, which I presume, is how this song became popular up there!   
It is sung to the tune of the traditional old timey (or even earlier) song “All the Good Times (are past and gone)”, but rather more using the Bob & Carolanne Pegg (aka Mr Fox) variations (though a bit faster than this rendition!)   
I recall it was good for late, end-of-night harmonies!!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_IYnKhgdGw


Was it a Bloodwood number, Stew?? I just can’t recall. Also, why are there practically no Bloodwood tracks on YT?? (pretty tragic)

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 01:52 AM

RIGHT OF THE LINE ~ Dermott Ryder


Where are you going me fine young blade,
With your bright blue jacket and your red cockade,
Hauling the gun in the sun and the shade,
For to fight 'for the right' in the morning.

Sold your soul for the shilling of the king.
To follow the gun in the winter & the spring
And fight for the crown the sceptre and the ring
And the 'right of the line' in the morning.

Fired the gun in Germany and France
On the wild raw veldt where the Zulu dance
They buried your body with hardly a glance
Where you died 'for the right' in the morning.

Stable belt hangin' on a wagon wheel
Red for the blood and blue for the steel
Gold the gunners who made the bastards reel,
For 'the right' and the glory in the morning

The guns stand silent as you march away
to the Jungle green, at the break of day.
'Everywhere', I can hear you say,
for the right and glory in the morning.

Battle honours wove in steel and gold
Fought for the youth of a nation sold
In the snow and the rain & the heat and the cold
For the 'right of the line' in the morning.

The pastures are green where the guns once stood
The trees grow tall on nations blood,
Spilled and mixed with tears and the mud,
Where 'the right' was won in the morning.

Remember the battles you fought and won,
for God and for Country, and for duty done.
In freedom's cause your time will come,
when you fight for the right in the morning.

Where are you going my fine young blade,
with your bright blue jacket and your red cockade?
Hauling the gun in the sun and the shade,
for to fight for the right in the morning.



Click for recording by Andy Saunders & Phyl Lobl :
https://phyllobl.net/songs/on-my-selection-album/right-of-the-line/

Phyl writes : “In the British Army the Royal Artillary had the first right to movement of guns and troops in the battle line. Dermott Ryder who wrote the song served in the British Army and informed me that 'red cockade' refers to a bloodstain on a head bandage.”

(the late) Dermott Ryder “says he wrote “Right of the Line” not as an anti-war song, as some singers assert, but rather as a pro-peace song because I believe that the secondary role of the military of a Christian Nation is to justly gain and humanely maintain the democratic peace……”

See also “Dermott’s Last Ride” by Paul Hemphill : https://howlinginfinite.com/2015/03/05/dermotts-last-ride/



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 03:59 AM

THE CONSERVATIONISTS

by Mick Flanagan, c.1970s?

The year was 1964 when Morgan found the nickel ore
And the miners headed westward with a will
From Rum Jungle, Broken Hill, Leigh Creek and Collinsville
The western lands they soon began to fill, began to fill
The western lands they soon began to fill.

First the Durkin Shaft went down, and up sprang Kambalda town
With employment for a thousand mining men
Be you Aussie, Scot or Turk, you were well-paid for your work
Whether underground or working in the mill, in the mill
Whether underground or working in the mill.

Next Poseidon made a find, the stock market it went wild
As the trading reached a fever on the floor
Soon the brokers' knees grew weak as Poseidon hit its peak
For the like of it they'd never seen before, seen before
The like of it they'd never seen before.

Now the shafts are sinking fast and they're spreading through the West
The beasts of nature don't know what to do
Soon the emu and the ‘roo, there will be no room for you
Your extinction seems to be so close at hand, close at hand
Your extinction seems to be so close at hand.

Conservationists they say, if we carry on this way
There's no doubt that we are headed for our doom
For the big companies don't mind if the minerals they find
For the Dollar God, it rules them every day, every day
The Dollar God, it rules them every day.

So stand up while you can, think of your fellow man
And the children that will follow after you
For I'm sure they'd like to see all the animals that we
Are killing every day throughout the land, throughout the land
Are killing every day throughout the land.                                                                                          


Though born in Galway, Mick Flanagan now resides in Georgetown, Tasmania.

Click this link for a recording by John Thompson :
http://ozfolksongaday.blogspot.com/2011/01/conservationists-song.html


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 04:36 AM

FOUR LITTLE JOHNNY CAKES

Hurrah for the Lachlan, boys, and join me in a cheer
That's the place to go to make an easy cheque each year
With a toad-skin in my pocket I borrowed from a friend
Oh, isn't it nice and cosy to be camping in the bend?

Ch.
With my little round flour-bag sitting on a stump
My little tea-and-sugar bag looking nice and plump
A little fat cod-fish just off the hook
And four little johnny-cakes, a credit to the cook

I've a loaf or two of bread and some "murphies" that I shook
Perhaps a loaf of brownie that I snaffled from a cook
A nice leg of mutton ... just a bit cut off the end
Oh, isn't it nice and jolly to be whaling in the bend?

I have a little book and some papers for to read
Plenty of matches and a good supply of weed
I wouldn't be a squatter as beside my fire I sit
With a paper in my hand and my old clay lit

When shearing-time comes, I'm in all my glory then
I saddle up my moke and I soon secure a pen
I canter through the valley and gallop o'er the plain
I shoot a turkey, stick a pig, and off to camp again

Last Chorus
With my little round flour-bag sitting on a stump
My little tea-and-sugar bag looking nice and plump
A little fat cod-fish just off the hook
And four little johnny-cakes, I'm proud to be the cook!


“collected by” Banjo Paterson .
There are a couple of Mudcat threads that discuss this song and the meanings/derivation of the lyrics.

Mark Gregory’s book notes : “Printed in Paterson's Old Bush Songs, Johnny Cakes are small dampers or scones cooked in a pan rather than in the ashes of a camp fire.
Recipe : Mix 250 g of flour with 1 tablespoon of baking powder and a little salt.   Slowly mix enough water to make a dough.    Divide the dough into small cakes and fry for about 10 minutes each side.   
Serve cold with jam, honey or cockies' joy (golden syrup)”

I was after Dave de Hugard’s singing of it, but sadly,found very little of his online :(
However, here is the late Bill Berry, one-time Queenslander, and sounding of course, very authentic!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiAVO0ZDs8Q



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 05:22 AM

Well, the way things are heading in Americal with Roe Vs Wade, someone had better crank this little device into production, pronto!


THE I.P.D. Song

By Sue Edmonds

I'll sing you all a song about a wondorous new device
The nation's latest contraceptive plan
That funny little object they call the I.U.D
Has recently been changed to fit a man.

Ch.
The I.P.D., the I.P.D.
It may not feel too good to you, But it's not hurting me
So every time the pain begins to fill your eyes with tears
Remember I put up with it for years.

They tested it on whales and tried it out on mice
They used it in the poorer parts of town
It's the cleverest invention since the automatic lift
Guaranteed to never let you down.

It was proven to be safe for the average human male
Though testing showed some minor side affects
There were two died from infection and six were sterilized
But only ten percent were too depressed.

Ah, but you know some people are never satisfied
So scientists are working once again
They've got something even better than the good old IPD
It’s called the morning-after pill for men.

It's the pill – it’s better than the IPD
It may not be too safe but we'll just have to wait and see
So put away your worries and put away your fears
And remember I put up with it for years!


Here is Sue Edmonds singing with her Ovarian Sisters in Tasmania, from their 1980 LP “Beat Your Breasts” :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otJ-SUmWCdI

And another version by Judy Small : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDRrTFxVs60


Cheers! R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 05:33 AM

Darn! I forgot to say that on the Ovarian Sisters recording, GO TO 03:20 for the song, coz the whole LP is there.
R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 06:07 AM

Well, after that, reckon we could all do with a nice Cup of Tea, eh!


Billy of Tea

From The Native Companion Songster, c.1889

You can talk of your whiskey, talk of your beer,
There's something much nicer that's waiting us here.
It sits on the fire beneath the gum tree:
There's nothing much nicer than a billy of tea.

Ch.
So fill up your tumbler as high as you can,
And don't you dare tell me it's not the best blend.
You can let all your beer and your spirits go free,
I'll stick to my darling old billy of tea.

I rise in the morning as soon as it's light
And go to the nosebag to see it's alright,
That the ants on the sugar no mortgage have got
And straight away sling my old black billy pot.

And while it is boiling the horses I seek,
And follow them down as far as the creek.
I take off their hobbles and let them run free,
Then haste to tuck into my billy of tea.

And at night when I camp, if the day has been warm,
I give to my horses their tucker of corn.
From the two in the pole, to the one in the lead,
A billy for each holds a comfortable feed.

Then the fire I make and the water I get,
And corned beef and damper in order I set.
But I don't touch the grub – though so hungry I be –
I wait 'til it's ready; the billy of tea.


This version by Bruised Knees : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHwYolLLuIc


Cheers! (and it's Time for Tea), R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 09:42 PM

MOUNT OUSLEY BREAKDOWN
(Robin Connaughton)

I drove from Austral’s in my little Commer knocker
Two coils of reject copper going back to ERS
She was slightly overloaded and the brakes needed relining
But I didn’t think it mattered, only one trip more or less
I detoured through the suburbs, missed the mermaids down at Sutherland
Hammered on past Helensburgh, then out through Maddens plains
Screaming sixty down the hills, like the one past Appin turn-off
And chugging back to twenty going up the slope again

Chorus:
Nearer my God, nearer my God, nearer my God to thee
I was going down Mount Ousley doing eighty miles an hour
Singing, ’Nearer my God to thee’

I changed to third at Ousley, but when I went in for second
The preselector gearbox locked out any cog but top
I pulled left and hit the anchors, but the front brakes stripped their linings
Four miles of hill, ten tons of coil, no bloody way to stop
I scraped the kink at fifty, missed the safety ramp at sixty
The Commer’s engine knocking like a demolition drill
Then it’s through the shute and down the straight, there’s nothing left but houses
And the traffic light T-junction at the bottom of the hill

Chorus

You can lose speed through the cutting if you scape the truck against the side
They’ve never bloody tried it doing eighty miles an hour
You hit the edge too hard, the load just keeps on going
Ten tons of copper coil would press me flatter than a flower
I went through the intersection like an angel with its arse on fire
Cannoned off a Morris and a Holden lost its back
When the front wheels hit the gutter, the cabin left the chassis
I could hear the chain links breaking as the coils took up the slack

Chorus

Suddenly it’s silent, I am sitting in a paddock
Crying like a baby, ‘cos I’m still alive to cry
Sitting in the wreckage of the cabin of me Commer
Between two copper carpets, stretching pink towards the sky
And thanking God almighty for that canny little loader
Who’d chocked the coils off-centre when he’d chained them down, you see
So that when I hit the gutter and the coils came smashing forwards
Well, one went right and one went left and both of them missed me

Chorus (x2)

From The Roaring Forties 'We Made the Steel'. The tune is 'Wreck of the Old '97'.

Mt Ousley descent

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 10:32 PM

I DON’T GO SHEARING NOW
(Woods/Wyndham-Read)

So you're off to Riverina where the sun is shining clear
The ewes and lambs are bleating calling shearers far and near
The musterers are busy where the grass is always high
And the July fogs are climbing up the sunbeams to the sky
And the carpenters are busy fixing gates and pens and bins
While the pressers just to kill time press in bales the winter's skins
I have been there in the past and I know exactly how
The shearing sheds'll get you—though I don't go shearing now
No I don't go shearing now

Three clear days if you are lucky you'll be there before the roll
And the splendour of the springtime will suffice your youthful soul
And you'll pay an early visit to your working pen I'll bet
Perhaps upon your own old rig the oil rag's lying yet
And you'll wander up and down the silent boards with heart quite full
As you smell old recollections when you sniff the greasy wool
Ah my lad you needn't smile for I know exactly how
These little things affect you—though I don't go shearing now
No I don't go shearing now

Each man his neighbour watching noting well the other's pace
As you move a little faster feeling fitter for the race
And the pace begins to quicken and the sweat soon starts to drop
Each man has found his pacer and is going at his top
But ere many days are over weak ones fall down one by one
Hit by chips and flying bullets from the boss's little gun
I've been there in the past and I know exactly how
The fight gets fairly started—though I don't go shearing now
No I don't go shearing now

How I'd love to travel with you where the Murrumbidgee flows
Where the days are always sunny and the noisy quirking crows
Are flying round the washpen and the sweating pens are full
And to have some tea and damper and be all among the wool
Every year I get this longing when the shearing time draws nigh
But to saddle up and slipper and to have another try
But these days are now behind me for I know exactly how
The rheumatism gets me so I don't go shearing now
No I don't go shearing now

Martyn Wyndham-Read took this poem by Walter William Woods (aka John Drayman) from Stewart and Keesing's Australian bush ballads collection. He noted that he 'penned it in and clipped it short' to make it more singable.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 11:05 PM

R-J, thanks for posting the songs by Ryder and Flanagan - they are definitely old favourites. I am always amazed by Mick Flanagan's memory - he sings Irish ballads that rival Icelandic sagas.

Dermott Ryder wrote a piece on Colin Dryden which should be of interest to some Mudcatters. It took me a while to re-find a copy on the Net. It was titled 'North Country Gentleman'.

Ryder on Dryden

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 25 Sep 20 - 12:54 AM

okay, so we've made 300 posts - who'da thunkit!
R-J :)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 25 Sep 20 - 01:10 AM

Mention of Colin Dryden reminded me of the VERY prolific songwriter and YT poster, Daniel Kelly, down in Yass.

I can't keep up with all he does, but I did rather like his song "The Frederick" about which he says :
"I caught a bit of this interview with Peter Grose about the book he has written called Ten Rogues, covering the story of 10 convicts that stole a ship from the camp on Sarah Island in 1834 and sailed to Chile: https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/..."

Listen here :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ae7BAeyTKAM

Check out his other vidclips here : https://www.youtube.com/c/DanielKellyFolkMusic/videos


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 25 Sep 20 - 08:14 PM

FAREWELL TO ANZAC
(C.F Smith/M.Wyndham-Read)

Oh, hump your swag and leave, me lads, the ships are in the bay
We've got our marching orders now, it's time to come away
And a long goodbye to Anzac Beach where blood has flowed in vain
And we're leaving, leaving, leaving it and game to fight again

But some there are who will not leave that bleak and bloody shore
And some that marched and fought with us will fight and march no more
Their blood has bought 'til judgment day the slopes they stormed so well
And we're leaving, leaving, leaving them lying where they fell

Australia's sons are lying there, the bravest and the best
We're leaving them behind us now, their days have come to rest
We've done our best with yesterday, tomorrow's still our own
And we're leaving, leaving, leaving them lying all alone

Oh they are gone beyond it all, the praising and the blame
And many a man will win renown, but none more fair a fame;
They showed the world Australia's sons knew well the way to die
And we're leaving, leaving, leaving them quiet where they lie

We will leave these lads behind us now lying where they died
They are in our hearts and in our minds, their glory and their pride.
Round them the sea and barren land, over them the sky
Oh we're leaving, leaving, leaving them quiet where they lie
We are leaving, leaving, leaving them quiet where they lie

Martyn Wyndham-Read put a tune to this poem by English poet, Cicely Fox Smith. He made some alterations to the original text. His studio version on his album 'Back to you':

Click

A live rendition with lengthy, but interesting, introduction:

Click

Mudcatter, Charley Noble, also put a tune to the poem. You can find it here:

Mudcat thread

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 25 Sep 20 - 09:19 PM

BELLS AND BULLOCKS
(M.Gilmore/R.Rummery)

Ben the bullocky sits by the fire
On the long slow hours adrift
Bowed is the back that could never could tire
Whatever the hoist or lift.
Ask him stories of the teams, only get him talking
He will waken from his dreams, on the roads go walking.

There, though the body sags to the knees
His mind is out on the road
Watching the play of the axle-trees
Marking the swing of the load
'Bullocks, ay I knowed them then - no one knowed ‘em better
Spelt them just the same as men, letter after letter'

Once in a while we ask if he hears
The sound of Mennecke’s bells
Deep in the pits of his ancient ears
Repeating their olden spells
'Mennecke’s bells', then he'll say, 'never heard none like ‘em
Mennecke, he had the way, no one else could strike ‘em'

Bred to the yoke, old Bullocky Ben
Bullock-boy, that was his start
Says with a laugh, remembering men
'Them were the days- they were smart'
Written in his own queer way, bullock-whip the scriber
He made history in his day – Ben the bullock driver

Chloe and Jason Roweth sing this poem by Mary Gilmore on their tribute to Bob Rummery concert - go to 10:55 mark.

Yutube clip

Menneke bell

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 25 Sep 20 - 09:37 PM

A hugely popular song for many years - and one of the earliest Australian folksongs that I loved and learnt.


Springtime Brings on the Shearing

EJ Overbury / trad

Oh the springtime it brings on the shearing
And it's then you will see them in droves
To the west country stations all steering
A seeking a job off the coves.

Ch.
With a ragged old swag on my shoulder
And a billy quart pot in my hand
I tell you we'll astonish the new chums
To see how we travel the land.

You may talk of your mighty exploring
Of Landsborough McKinley and King
But I feel I should only be boring
On such frivolous subjects to sing.

For discovering mountains and rivers
There's one for a gallon I'd back
Who'd beat all your Stuart's to shivers
It's the men on the Wallaby Track.

From Billabone Murray and Loddon
To the far Tartiara and back
The hills and the plains are well trodden
By the men on the Wallaby Track.

And after the shearing is over
And the wool season's all at an end
It is then that you will see those flash shearers
Making johnny cakes round in the bend.


This clip of Tina Lawton & Marian Henderson singing, is taken from the ABC-TV production "The Restless Years" in 1967, (which is available online…..) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VcBGopVHd7g

and as the YT channel says : “You can call it dated, you could possibly call it twee - but it's also a rare duo performance by two of Australia's most respected female folk singers of the 1960s. Both were also quite under recorded, and certainly film of either artist is very rare nowadays.”

But the version that was dearest to my teenage heart was this one by Gary Shearston from 1965 : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXpNx2bWjnI&list=OLAK5uy_nZIa73rGV7M3pNuDYzwsv37qbQS1e_jXg

Consequently, I think I learnt just about every lyric from his LP “The Springtime it Brings on the Shearing” :)


John Thompson, on his Oz Folksong a Day website, says : “The following notes are from the liner notes for this song from Gary Shearston's CD re-release of earlier recordings "Here and There: Now and Then".

"One of the best known of all Australian folk songs, this was collected in Victoria by Dr. Percy Jones. John Meredith found a rather different version in New South Wales, and most of Dr. Jones' words turn up in some verses called The Wallaby Track, which were published by a bush poet called E.J. Overbury in 1865. Maybe some bush singer read Overbury's words and set some of them to a tune; that was a common habit with bush singers. Maybe Overbury heard a bush song, and took some of the words into one of his own poems; that was a common habit with bush poets.

coves: station managers or owners.

billy quart pot: an indispensable item of the bush nomads' gear; a can, here of quart capacity, in which water could be boiled and food cooked.

new-chums: newly arrived immigrants.

Flash shearers making johnny-cakes round in the bend: a contrast in the lot of the shearer at different seasons of the year is implied; during the shearing season he is fl ash (shows an exaggerated sense of his own importance), because he is earning good wages and respect for his skill; when the shearing season is over, and he is unemployed, he is reduced to camping out in the open by some river bend, and living on a diet consisting mainly of camp-made bread (a johnny cake is, roughly speaking, a kind of small damper).

Note: from the original album notes by Edgar Waters, supplemented by Stuart Heather.”




Now the springtime Down Under means I must get off the 'puter and go and werk!!
Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 25 Sep 20 - 09:49 PM

TIMELESS LAND
(Phyl Lobl)

Once she was a timeless land
Where time ran on forever
To the dreaming people there
She was land of never-never
Fish and fowl she had in plenty
And her stones were given worth
In their hearts they held her holy
And they thought of her as earth

Once she was an open land
Where few would bow to bosses
And the working people there
Thought they called or barred the tosses
Where the convict and the settler
Earned their freedom by their toil
In their hearts they freely thanked her
And they thought of her as the soil

Once she was a lucky land
Where living easy came
And the clever people there
Learned to play the power game
Soon they sold her stony hillsides
Then she lost her very heart
In the greed of their intentions
They thought of her as dirt

Now she is a changing land
Upon the point of turning
Where she'll go it's hard to say
Are we wise or lost in learning?
For the ones who are to follow
She's the land we hold in trust
Will she be to them the earth
Will they call her only dust?

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 26 Sep 20 - 06:53 AM

egads, I come back after 24 hours of no internet to 22 new songs - now we have 239, one of which was a song I wanted to post (after the writer sent me the lyrics, which he hasn't done yet)

well done OzCatters!


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 26 Sep 20 - 10:18 PM

I first heard this Kiwi classic on Declan Affley's LP of the same name.

THE DAY THE PUB BURNED DOWN
(Bob Edwards/Anon)

Pull up a stump and lend an ear and a story I'll relate
About a sinful waste of beer I will elucidate
I'll tell of how calamity struck Wapakiwi town
And caused a gruesome tragedy, the day the pub burned down


The boys had gathered in the bar upon that fateful day.
By horse and foot and motor-car they all had made their way
While listening to Manuka Jones, New Zealand's finest liar
They heard a cry that chilled the bones: ‘The flamin' pub's on fire!’

There'd been a drought for weeks and weeks, the wells and tanks were dry
No water flowed along the creeks, we had no town   supply
The blazing sun, without relent, turned all the green to brown
Imagine our predicament, the day the pub burned down

Through smoke and flame, we dragged the booze to safety out the door
Then thought of what we stood to lose and rushed back in for more
‘Stand by - the fire brigade is here!’ (those men of high renown)
‘Oh, fireman, fireman, save the beer and let the Pub burn down!'

They bashed the tops of barrels in while strong men knelt to pray,
Shoved their flippin' hoses in and shouted ‘Pumps away!’
They fought with beer and lemonade, that raging fire to drown
And we fought and cursed the fire brigade, the day the pub burned down

Now moreporks haunt the old pub site 'round Wapakiwi town
And shikkers roam the hills at night to hunt the firemen down
They curse the cash they cannot spend, their raging thirst to drown
Dry horrors drove them 'round the bend, the day the pub burned down

Youtube clip

Neil Colquhoun included it at p53 of his 'Song of a young country'. He also included this delightful excerpt from a poem by James K. Baxter, the author of 'By the dry Cardrona'. The poem is 'Lament for Barney Flanagan: Licensee of the Hespeus Hotel'.

Flanagan got up on a Saturday morning
Pulled on his pants while the coffee was warming
Didn't remember the doctor's warning:
'Your heart's too big, Mr Flanagan ...'

Barney Flanagan ripe for the coffin
Eighteen stone and brandy rotten
Patted the house-maid's velvet bottom
'Oh, is it you, Mr Flanagan ...'

While publicans drink their profits still
While lawyers flock to be in at the kill
While Aussie barmen milk the till
We will remember him, Flanagan


Colquhoun also references James McNeish's 'Tavern in the town' as well worth reading in respect of country pubs. There is no such town as Wapakiwi.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 26 Sep 20 - 10:43 PM

THE OTHER OLDER NATION
(Louisa Wise)

In Australia towns have an avenue of trees
Each poplar planted for a young man fallen
In a whiteman's war faraway
There's just such a town
Near here where we stand
And there's a marsh hard by the avenue of trees
Where men and women and children were killed one day
In a one-sided war that was very much here to stay

And where are the trees for these dark-skinned fallen
Do they merit a tear or a tree?
If we planted a tree for each dark one fallen
The wetland would give way to woodland

The killings avenged a killing before
A white landowner died by the spear
Of a black man who had come to take back his wife
Take her on back from the whiteman's service
The service of flesh - if she would give it or no

And for this the people died
They were all chased down
To the marsh by the road
That would be planted with trees
Some time in the next generation
Trees for the boys of the nation
But what of the other nation?
The other older nation?

And where are the trees for these dark-skinned fallen
Do they merit a tear or a tree?
If we planted a tree for each dark one fallen
The wetland would give way to woodland

I got the song from Bob Rummery's 'The Man with the Concertina'. I reproduced the line structure as printed in the booklet for that CD. I presume Bob got it directly from Louisa. As Bob points out, this one incident in WA was replicated across the country.

Lest we forget.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 26 Sep 20 - 11:39 PM

I first came across 'The New Road' on a limited edition CD titled 'The Guilford Tapes' given to me yonks ago by Keryn Randall, a fine singer. The recording was of its author, John Beavis, performing at the Guilford Folk Club in Victoria. The song has been recorded by Danny Spooner on his 'Emerging Tradition' CD and by Martyn Wyndham-Read on his 'Oceans in the Sky' CD. Martyn calls it a 'gypsy hymn' and reflects that it is about 'the redemptive pattern of human nature'. Even us non-believers can recognise it as a good'un.

THE NEW ROAD
(John Beavis)

You who puzzle on the saviour’s deeds
Won't you stop and listen where the new road leads
First born child of the refugees
He was raised in Nazareth, schooled in charity
And found salvation on His knees.

Manhood brought him to the Jordan shore
Where the baptist shivered in the rags he wore
Plunged his cousin in the pilgrim stream
And the dove descended and the old oad ended
And the new road wakened from a dream

Red sun sinking over Galilee
Saw the stranger walking by an inland sea
Four young fishermen around entwine
For the new road heading to a Canaan wedding
Where he turned the water into wine

Thousands listened on the mountain slope
As they dined on miracles and breathed in hope
Blind men followed with the light restored
As the sightless Pharisees condemned as heresies
The wide-eyed workings of the lord

Alleluja, how the people cheer
The palm leaves rustle as the king draws near
Woe, Jerusalem, the truth you shun
And your sins ensuing are your own undoing
Till your stones lie broken in the sun

Thirteen gathered in an upstairs room
As the high priest plotted for the saviour’s doom
Blood and body in the wine and bread
Then he kissed his enemy in sweet Gethsemane
Twelve hours later he was dead.

Mary wondered at the stone flung wide
And the tomb rang hollow as she stepped inside
Angels seated where the christ had lain
Bid her quit the prison for the son had risen
And would speak in Galilee again

Show by living what the lord had done
In the selfless giving of his only son
Chart this passage to the last amen
For the climb is steady if the pilgrim’s ready
The new road reaches out again

Here's a live recording of Martyn Wyndham-Read. He omits the final stanza.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 27 Sep 20 - 06:24 AM

Among The Refugees by Pat Drummond dateline: Port Headland, W.A. 16/01/02

Matthew, 1 - 28
The angel came to Joseph late one night
And said, "You must be gone
gather up your wife and infant son
for you must leave this place
Herod seeks you, death awaits
through Israel's dark and bloodstained gates
to Egypt you must flee"
Jesus was a child when he became a refugee

Chorus:   
At The Mercy of the stranger
Seeking shelter from the fates
Fleeing certain death and danger
uncertainty awaits
Speak to me, my country
Tell me what you see
Underneath the razor wire
In those same dark and frightened eyes
Tell me do you recognize
Who is that refugee?

The Bible tells us Herod slew
each child below the age of two years old
to save his dynasty
political expediency
really isn't something new
politicians always do
what their ambitions tell them to
and truth is sacrificed
but shame is all a nation buys
when children pay the price

Bridge:
They didn't speak the language
but they prayed God would provide
through the kindness of the stranger
until the day the tyrant king had died
Perhaps sold all they that owned
to pay for their escape
look at your children,
And if you love them
tell me then
which of you would hesitate?

600 children, heaven sent
living in imprisonment for years
for the crime of being poor
fleeing famine, poverty and war
I hear you say to me
"It's not our responsibility
They came unasked across the sea"
Yes, and so did we.
And if you lived back in Egypt when
that family fled from Herod's men
Would we have imprisoned them
among the refugees?

Chorus:
At The Mercy of the stranger
Seeking shelter from the fates
Fleeing certain death and danger
uncertainty awaits
Speak to me, my country
Tell me what you see
Underneath the razor wire
In those same dark and frightened eyes
Tell me do you recognize
Who is that refugee?


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 27 Sep 20 - 08:54 PM

Here is Martyn Wyndham-Read's version of Sally Sloane's 'The banks of Claudy'. There are minor changes to the text as printed in Meredith & Anderson 'Folk Songs of Australia'.

THE BANKS OF CLAUDY

It was on a summer's morning all in the month of May
Down by the banks of Claudy I carelessly did stray
I overheard a fair maid in sorrow did complain
All for her absent lover who ploughed the raging main

I stepped up unto her and gave her a big surprise
I hoped she would not know me, I being in such disguise
I said, ‘My pretty fair maid, my joy and heart's delight
How far do you mean to wander this dark and dreary night?’

‘It's to the banks of Claudy, if you'll be kind to show
Take pity on a fair maid who knows not where to go.
I'm searching for a young man, and Johnnyis his name
And on the banks of Claudy I'm told he does remain’

‘These are the banks of Claudy, fair maid, you’re standing on
But don’t depend on Johnny for he's a false young man
But don’t depend on Johnny for he'll not meet you here
But tarry with me in yon green woods, no danger need you fear’

‘If Johnny he was here this night, he’d keep me from all harm
He's in the field of battle, all in his uniform
He's in the field of battle and his foes he does destroy
Like the loyal king of honour all on the walls of Troy’

‘It's six long weeks and better since Johnny left this shore
A-crossing the main ocean where thundering billows roar
A-crossing the main ocean for honour and for fame,
But I'm told his ship was wrecked nigh to the coast of Spain’

Now when she heard this dreadful news, she flew in deep despair
A-wringing of her hands and a-tearing of her hair
Saying, ‘If my Johnny’s drowned, no man alive I'll take
Through lonesome shades and valleys I'll wander for his sake’

When he saw her loyalty, he could no longer stand
He flew into her arms, crying, ‘Betsy, I'm your man’
Crying, ‘Betsy, I'm the young man, the cause of all your pain
Now since we've met on Claudy banks, we'll never part again’

Youtube clip

For a discussion of the song's provenance, see this Mudcat thread:

Click

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 27 Sep 20 - 10:18 PM

THE CATALPA

A noble whale ship the Catalpa
Set out from New Bedford one day
She sailed off to Western Australia
And took six poor Fenians away

Chorus
So come all you screw warders and jailers
Remember Perth regatta day
Take care of the rest of your Fenians
Or the yankees will steal them away

Seven long years they had served here
And seven long more had to stay
For defending their country old Ireland
They were ta’en and transported away

You kept them in Western Australia
Till their hair had begun to turn grey
When a brave whaling ship and commander
Came out here and stole them away

Now all the Perth boats were a-racing
And making short tacks for the spot
But the yankee tacked into Fremantle
And took the best prize of the lot

The Georgette she sailed out with guns ready
Intending the yankee to take
But they hoisted their star-spangled banner
And left the Georgette in their wake

So remember those six Fenians heroes
Who escaped o’er to Amerikay
And join in a toast the bravery
of the yankees who stole them away

Now they've landed safe in New York harbour
And the crowd there to greet them did cry
’So we’ll hoist up the green flag and shamrock
For old Ireland we’ll fight or we’ll die

There are many versions of 'The Catalpa'. I reckon the above is a good'un.

Youtube clip

For info on publications, check out Mark Gregory's site:

Click

Mudcat thread

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 27 Sep 20 - 11:51 PM

RED FOX
(Lynne Muir)

Where the red fox runs, we will hunt him down
We will chase him o’er the mountains ‘till the sun goes down,
Poor old fox, we mean no harm
But the fire’s in our blood and so we must follow far from the lights of home

Chorus
For we’re men of the bush
And we’re part of the land
And we do not kill for pleasure
That we’d have you understand.
With the sun on our brow or the moonlight on our path
We will follow the tracks of our fathers gone before

We roam the plains and we’ll set a rout
Be it fair or stormy weather, we will seek and hunt him out
Where the rabbit runs, we will set our snare
But you must not think us heartless men or men who do not care

For we do not thrill to the blood and the kill
But we live from the land and so we will eat from it when we can,
We’re tired old men on a worn-out trail
When the tables are turned, maybe the fox will be hunting for the man

Danny Spooner recorded this on his 'Emerging Traditions' and 'The Fox, the Hare and the Poacher's Fate' CDs. There is also a live recording on the 'Guilford Tapes' CD that I referred to above.

Danny's note:

Lynne Muir wrote this great hunting song about her grandfather in 1986. Geoff Muir had spent most of his life in the shadow of Hanging Rock in Victoria and like most country-bred men he knew the best places in the area to fish, shoot and trap. These skills often helped keep families fed, especially during times of Depression. Lynne's song is her tribute to her grandfather and his values.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 12:26 AM

SIXTEEN MILLION PEOPLE
(Don Henderson)

Have you ever had the feeling, being introduced to someone
You think that you’ve already met
But you really can’t be certain, 'cause the names aren't familiar
But there’s something about the face you can’t forget
And it turns out that really, after quite a bit of talking
You went to kindergarten and such
And the people that surround you, there’s only sixteen million
And sixteen million people isn’t much

Well you walk into a bar and a bloke says, 'G’day Charlie'
And you tell him that Charlie’s not yer name
And he says that he is sorry but he thought yer name was Charlie
But he reckons that he knows yer just the same
And it turns out that his sister’s married to your uncle’s second cousin
Yes, of course now he remembers you
You were seated four rows down at the table in a grey suit
At the wedding in nineteen fifty-two

Well, you’re at the country-dance and you’re dancin’ with a stranger
To tell the truth you wouldn’t know from Eve
But with faint heart and all that stuff you say, 'aven’t we met somewhere?'
And she says, 'Why yes! I do believe'
And it turned out that once you were on a train to Brisbane
And it didn’t have a dining car, don’t cry
And she was the waitress at South Grafton Station
And you ordered black coffee and a pie.

Well, you are in the one horse town and the horse has long since bolted
There’s nothing but a hotel and a jail
And a copper and a publican and a liver-coloured kelpie
And the dog comes up to you and wags his tail
Now it turns out that really the dog’s never met yer
Just thought that he’d come over and say hi!
But the copper and the publican, they reckon they both know yer
But they didn’t want to say so, they were shy

Another one that Danny recorded on his 'Emerging Tradition' CD. Danny's note:

I remember falling about myself when I first heard Don Henderson sing this at the Troubadour in Sydney when Australia only had sixteen million population. The experience of being mistaken for someone else might be common enough, but Don's exquisite sense of humour and imagination suggests endless possibilities.

This is the only rendition I could find on the Net:

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 06:36 AM

When Stewie posted “The Catalpa”, it reminded me that I’d never seen or heard a song about Sam Isaacs and Grace Bussell’s gallant rescues via horseback, in December 1876 (think West Aussie’s own “Grace Darling”).

So I was pleased to come across this recent piece by WA’s current 11-man Shanty group, “The Lost Quays”.

Their song, “The Georgette”, was apparently a product of The Great Covid Scare of 2020, as can be seen here :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPXYvmpQzs4

“Heave Away, Haul away, the Georgette’s going down, me boys
Heave Away, Haul away, the Georgette’s going down”


It tells of Aboriginal stockman, Sam Isaacs, sighting the distressed SS Georgette (built 1872, 211 tons, steam/sail), from the clifftops around Calgardup Bay (her cargo of mainly jarrah timber had shifted and holed the vessel and the incoming water stuffed the boilers). Sam ran the 20 Kms to Wallcliffe House where 16 year old Grace Bussell then joined him and together they rode their horses back and forth from ship to shore for around 4 hours (and remember, West Aussie does rather a good line in sharks!), and rescued many of the 50 or so remaining passengers (some had drowned, but some had already made it to shore). I sure hope the horses were okay. Grace was naturally and rightly claimed a heroine (Australia’s youngest) and plaques and citations followed.   
As can be expected, recognition for Sam, took somewhat longer…………..

WA’s generally inhospitable coastline, with its tricky winds, strong surf and currents, chilling water and unusual underwater topography, is (literally) littered with shipwrecks and “lost vessels” that will probably never be found. However, the Georgette’s final resting place is at Redgate Beach, near Margaret River, in about 5metres of water.

https://www.tracesmagazine.com.au/2013/11/saving-grace-western-australias-shipwreck-rescuer-grace-bussell/


The Lost Quays, formed in 2015, can currently be found here, on Shore Leave :
https://www.facebook.com/TheLostQuays/
http://www.thelostquays.com/

Also, they have been known to perform, on occasion, with those ballsy Ladies of the Sea : SHE SHANTS :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZaHkorfvK0

The LQ’s also have a (more country-sounding) song which commemorates Dutchman, Dirk Hartog, in the Eendracht, and his visit to West Aussie over 400 years ago, in 1616; the second recorded European landing on the continent, but the first on the Western coastline (he left an inscribed pewter plaque as proof - the Hartog Plate - in the Shark Bay region). He also mapped much of the northern WA coastline :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CN4_82y1lzA&t=116s

The Lost Quays have written too, of the grisly Batavia shipwreck story (if and when I find the Batavia number, I’ll post the links), and the City of York, wrecked off Rottnest : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAoARak1IjA&list=PLIogTlAtxC8F2h-mqxJGS0yL4VqYylUqA&index=6

Here is their 2017 song “Holes in the Nets” : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojiNjXvoXWQ
and about which they say :
“Our new song "Holes in the Nets" is a whimsical take on the seriously scary subject of ocean fish depletion. It makes reference to the classic dystopian film "Soylent Green" (1973) in which the population subsist on an allegedly algae-based protein ... which is of course made from people!”


I also found reference amongst Lost Quays, to another West Aussie duo Tingley Turner (Jennifer Tingley & Nick Turner) and in particular his song “Shackleton” about the explorer Ernest Shackleton and his Antarctic expeditions :
https://www.reverbnation.com/tingleyturner
They had a 2012 CD called “Heroes & Dreamers”, but I’m yet to locate more info on that.        
                
        
Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 06:47 AM

THE WITCHES AND THE WHALES, John Warner © 18/10/2010      
 
A friend loaned John a Scottish heritage magazine in which he read a story of bay whalers being outwitted by a trio of women who mysteriously disappeared …
 
The whaleboat came when the mist was thin,
And drifted up the bay.
Upon the tide she ghosted in,
Where the whales all feeding lay x 2
 
They’ll trap the whales on the falling tide,
Upon the shingle beach,
And slay each one for the oil and bone,
When the sea is out of reach x 2
 
So softly then they drove the whales,
Up from the heaving sea,
But down the wind came a small, small craft,
And aboard were women three,
 
One was a fair and shapely maid,
The older nursed a child, oh,
The oldest grinned a gap-toothed grin,
And they all sang drunken wild, oh.
 
Swift did she go, though none did row,
Her gaps and splits gaped wide,
And as she rolled such a music came,
A drifting up the tide x 2
 
For those on board sang drunken songs,
That echoed round the bay,
And no man nigh dared raise a cry,
For fear he start the prey x 2
 
The angry whalers waved their hands,
To bid the three be still,
But louder yet they clashed their cups
And aye they sang more shrill x 2
 
One was a fair and shapely maid,
The older nursed a child, oh,
The oldest grinned a gap-toothed grin,
And they all sang drunken wild, oh.
 
The youngest seized on an iron pot,
And beat it without rest,
The older chanted ribaldry,
As the child nursed at her breast x 2
 
The oldest blew on a great bagpipe,
A reel to rouse the dead,
And at that sound, the boat turned round,
And towards the whales it sped x 2
 
The frightened whales turned up their tails,
And dived beneath the swell,
And from the three in the reeling tub,
Came a fierce triumphant yell,
 
One was a fair and shapely maid,
The older nursed a child oh,
The oldest grinned a gap-toothed grin,
And they all sang drunken wild oh.
 
And in that moment a burst of spray,
Hid all the three from sight,
But aye what mocking laughter rose,
To fade in the gathering night x 2
 
The whaling men cried out in rage,
And brandished stave and fist,
But the night was still, for the boat and all,
Had vanished like the mist x 2
 
And down that steep and rocky coast,
They say, who hear such tales,
The threefold Goddess rides that boat,
And thus she guards the whales.
 
One was a fair and shapely maid,
The older nursed a child oh,
The oldest grinned a gap-toothed grin,
And they all sang drunken wild oh


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 07:24 AM

WESTERN AUSTRALIA FOR ME

Composed by an Irish Australian Lawyer in 1831

NB all info taken from the WASONG website : https://wasong.com.au/wasong/

The song ‘Western Australia for me’ was written by the Irish Lawyer George Fletcher Moore. It was first sung by George Fletcher Moore at the first Ball at the governor’s house in 1831 enjoyed by 180 ladies and gentlemen to the wee hours of 6 a.m.

”Swans were so abundant on the river when first discovered as to give the name Swan River Settlement. I dare not say that I christened the colony, but certainly after the above song, the name of Western Australia was adopted.”

George Fletcher Moore graduated in law in Ireland in1820. Seeing little prospect of advancement he decided to pursue a legal career in the English colonies. He sailed from Dublin to Western Australia on board the Cleopatra, arriving at the Swan River Colony on 30 October 1830. In February 1832, he was appointed a Commissioner of the Civil Court. Rewarded with land and a regular salary, Moore purchased stock and by 1833 he had one of the largest flocks of sheep in the colony.

Moore was unusual amongst his contemporaries in a number of ways. He was vocal about the colonies economic problems being brought about by mismanagement. His criticisms made him unpopular with many of the colonies establishment.

Moore also developed friendly, lasting relationships with the Indigenous Australians of the area. He began to take a scholarly interest in their language and customs and in1833, Moore published in the Perth Gazette the first account of the customs of the Aborigines of the area. He later co produced a book with John Hutt called A Descriptive Vocabulary of the Language in Common Use Amongst the Aborigines of Western Australia.

Moore was an active explorer and the Moore River (near New Norcia) was named after him.

In about 1878, the editor of The West Australian, Sir Thomas Cockburn Campbell, sought and was granted permission to serialise Moore’s letters. The letters appeared in the West Australian in 1881 and 1882. On seeing them in print, Moore decided to republish them in book form. They were published in 1884 as Diary of Ten Years Eventful Life of an Early Settler in Western Australia.


Graphics and text from Wikipedia.


".....We have come to explore,
the wilds of this Western Australian Shore,
In search of a country, we’ve ventured to roam,
and now we’ve found it, let’s make it our home.
And what though the Colony’s new, Sirs,
And inhabitants may be few, Sirs,
We see them increasing here, Sirs,
So Western Australia for me.

With care and experience, I’m sure ’twill be found,
Two crops in the year we may get from the ground;
There’s good wood and good water, good flesh and good fish,
Good soil and good clime, and what more could you wish.
Then let everyone earnestly strive, Sirs,
Do his best, be alert and alive, Sirs,
So Western Australia for me.

No lions or tigers we here dread to meet,
Our innocent quadrupeds hop on two feet,
No tithes and no taxes we now have to pay,
And our Geese are all Swans, as some witty folks say,
Then we live without trouble or stealth, Sirs,
Our currency’s all sterling wealth, Sirs,
So here’s to our Governor’s health, Sirs,
And Western Australia for me.”


The song is sung on Vimeo, by St Hilda’s Choir at : https://wasong.com.au/wasong/


I note that two of my forebears preceded Mr Moore into the Swan River Colony. Sadly however, they did not have his kind of money and education.
Actually, I’m not so sure they had any of either necessity – as one was an indentured servant (i.e. female white slave) on the Rockingham, and one was an emancipated East End convict,
who was doing all right - until he married the Rockingham female!!   C’est la Vie.


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 08:12 AM

COCKY (COCKIE) BELL

By Val Hastings

You took up your selection west of Karlowin Well.
You ploughed the land and fenced it in. The seasons did you well.
In '29 you were sowing wheat with a horse team of the best
When a combine point came springing down and stabbed you through the chest.

CH.
Cocky Bell, you were a tough man, one of our pioneers.
You were a wheatbelt cocky for only fourteen years.
You were a cocky through and through
Though it was the death of you, Cocky Bell.

For two long days and freezing nights you lay out on the ground.
Your faithful team of horses never moved nor made a sound;
But you were getting weaker as in the dirt you lay.
You prayed to God to give you strength to see another day.

Well, when your neighbour found you, you couldn't even cry,
For the blasted ants of our fair land had eaten out your eyes;
And as he held you in his arms, he marvelled at your pluck.
Then it's eighty miles to a hospital bed on the back of a Chevrolet truck.

You held hard, hard to the hand of a mate and you swore for evermore,
You swore an oath that if you lived you'd kill every ant you saw;
But your beaten body couldn't take any more. It'd had just about enough.
Cocky Bell, it got the best of you, but by Jesus, you were tough!


Catter Bugsy (Peter Bugden), tracked down the lyrics in this Mudcat thread : https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=97418&messages=18#4073450

“This song was sung in memory of those farmers out on the WA wheatfields who in days gone by, used their tractor with a rope slung over to fell trees but often the tractor would flip and they would be trapped underneath -often stuck out in the isolated paddock maybe for days and if they were lucky somebody found them.........”

I can relate to this not uncommon occurrence in my own Family History, where my G-Grandmother’s brother was impaled by his own harvester, in rural Victoria :(

“…..Cocky / Cockie arose in the 1870s and is an abbreviation of cockatoo farmer. This was then a disparaging term for small-scale farmers, probably because of their habit of using a small area of land for a short time and then moving on, in the perceived manner of cockatoos feeding…..” A.N.U.


NB   Does anyone know of a copy of this song anywhere online???                                


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 09:00 AM

BRIDAL TRAIN

The Waifs

A telegram arrived today, It’s time to catch the Monterey
Cause the man I wed he waits for me, and a daughter that he's yet to see.

The U.S. Navy beamed its message, we'll deliver brides on a one-way passage
It made big news across the nation, the bridal train leaves from Perth station.

All the girls around Australia, married to a yankee sailor
Your fare is paid across the sea, to the home of the brave and the land of the free,
From west to east the young girls came, all aboard the Bridal Train
It was a farewell crossing over land, she's gone to meet her sailor man.

No time for sad goodbyes, she held her mother as she cried
And then waited there in the Freo rain, to climb aboard the bridal train.

Well she was holding her future in her hand, yeah the faded photo of a man
Catch a sailor if you can, yeah the war bride leaves her southern land.

All the girls around Australia, married to a yankee sailor
Your fare is paid across the sea, to the home of the brave and the land of the free,
From west to east the young girls came, all aboard the Bridal Train
It was a farewell crossing over land, she's gone to meet her sailor man.

This is the story of the starry nights, through desert plains and city lights
Through burning sun and driving rain, she left aboard the Bridal Train.

All the girls around Australia, married to a yankee sailor
Your fare is paid across the sea, to the home of the brave and the land of the free,
From west to east the young girls came, all aboard the Bridal Train
It was a farewell crossing over land, she's gone to meet her sailing man.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3k7OncTVHkI


“It is estimated that between 12,000 and 15,000 Australian women married American servicemen during World War Two.
Some made a life in the USA, while others returned to Australia with or without their husbands in the years following the war.
While public perception about war brides paints a narrow picture, it is clear that there are many different reasons why Australian women married American servicemen……

https://www.sea.museum/discover/online-exhibitions/war-brides



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 09:48 AM

(What Will We Do With) Maud Butler

by John Thompson

Maud Butler had a brother in the army
And so she made her way to Sydney town
At 17 she knew her mind
She wouldn't just be left behind
And so Maud tried to join the army

Chorus:
Oh, what will we do with Maud Butler?
She dresses as a soldier and she wants to go to war
She jumped a ship to cross the foam
Better than any stay-at-home
The prettiest little soldier-boy the Army ever saw.

A lovely farmer's daughter from old Kurri Kurri town
When she tried to sign on as a nurse they turned the poor girl down.
So she bought herself some soldier's gear
Cut her hair and wiped her tears
And she climbed up a rope to board a transport

Three days in a life-raft with not a bite to eat
Til bold as brass she walked the decks, the sailor-boys to meet
An officer saw her walking about
Her boots were wrong, they found her out.
Poor Maud was put ashore in dear old Melbourne

Only two months later, Maud was back on board again
Another attempt to see the front, in the company of men
“I'll do my bit to help the war”
She told them when she was back on shore
"I just want to be a soldier"

This young girl's an example to all of those who shirk
Where other's would have given up, Maud Butler went to work
A lesser girl would have had enough
But Maud was made of sterner stuff
So raise a cheer and sing of Miss Maud Butler


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Wtxja9EX0A

Notes by John Thompson :
Mark Cryle was kind enough to tell me about the amazing Maud Butler, a seventeen-year-old girl who was so keen to help the war effort in 1915, that she bought up a uniform one piece at a time and then stowed away on a troop ship. Twice!

Her amazing story is well worth telling. There are some especially good links online to original news stories about her exploits:


http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/129568967?

and for her persistent offending:


http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109949097?




Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 09:54 AM

THE TIMBERCUTTERS SONG

W,A, Bush Orchestra

at long last, here is the song link :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1jw_7_7wjEc

The chords are online, but not the lyrics.
(and I no longer have the energy! My little truckle bed is calling me :)


R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 08:56 PM

R-J, great posts. I was unaware of the Georgette rescue story. 'Bridal Train' and the Waifs' early albums are great favourites of my wife.

I recently recovered my 'West Australian Bush Bands' LP from its long-borrowed status. Alas, there is no insert or sleeve notes. However, Phil Beck has the lyrics for 'Timbercutters Song' and will send them to me.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 09:18 PM

NOVEMBER
(Junior - Adelaide band)

There’s no colour like blood, there’s no feeling like sun on your skin
There’s no place like home after all the things we’ve seen
One more for the road, one more you can carry me home
Pour me another, I don’t want to be alone

There’s nobody like you and there sure ain’t nobody like me
Not a single soul can know what we feel or see
When you wake at dawn, love the light you see
‘Cos if you see the light, there’s a chance for you and me

Jacarandas in November
All the colours I’ll remember
Lined up down your street in springtime
When the air tastes sweet
Jacarandas in November, I’ll remember
Oh, I - I’ll remember you

The eleventh hour, last stand, you went down
We had our plans just like every man
You and me and Desie in Sydney when we’re free
We made it there in nineteen fifty-three

Jacarandas in November
All the colours I’ll remember
Lined up down your street in springtime
When the air tastes sweet
Jacarandas in November, I’ll remember
Oh, I - I’ll remember you

And your slouch hat and your photographs
Only me you left behind
I’ll never forget you, you’re forever young
In my mind, forever young

Jacarandas in November
All the colours I’ll remember
Lined up down your street in springtime
When the air tastes sweet
Jacarandas in November, I’ll remember
Oh, I - I’ll remember you

There’s no colour like blood, there’s no feeling like sun on your skin

I reckon 'November' is a ripper little song, but I'm probably prejudiced because I was born and raised in Adelaide before moving to Darwin. It is from folk rock group Junior's 'Fibro Majestic' CD. You can listen to the CD on Spotify.

The above is my transcription from YT video. I don't know which member or members of the band wrote the song. It's a beaut video of jacarandas.

Youtube clip

Junior bio

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 10:44 PM

R-J, Phil excelled himself - lyrics arrived an hour after my request. Great song.

THE TIMBERCUTTERS SONG
(Alan Mann)

In the timber tall and green along the line
You can hear the magpies call and the crickets sing
These sounds the steel will join as the bush saws scrape and whine
You’ll hear the echoes as our axes ring

The teamster all too soon he moves on in
And the logs we cleared to the line he moves away
Eight horses four-be-two and the two-wheel wooden whim
And that axle groans at least six times a day

(Chorus)
Keep those logs rolling boys, down to the mill me boys
Keep those logs a-rolling down
And we'll push the cross cuts through just to show what we can do
And we’ll pave all the streets of London Town

Well the mill train sweats and strains most all the day
Down the twenty mile of track that feeds the mill
Stoker keeps the firebox full with the off-cuts from the day
So later on she’ll make the three-mile hill

And at the mill first tails grip and bark the logs
And then roll them to the benchman standing by
And he’ll slip the mill saw through ne'er care she slips or bogs
And it's then you’ll see the chips and sawdust fly

Chorus

And the planks to the world we’ll ship away
When the weather’s fine, they'll go the Hamelin side
When the nor-wester comes on in, then it’s round by Flinders Bay
On that rolling surf you’ll see the good ships ride

Spare a thought for those chaps who're workin' hard
Next time you walk the streets of London Town
In the forest, at the mill, on the line or in the yard
Just keeping those logs a-rolling down

Chorus


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 28 Sep 20 - 11:27 PM

A BUSHMAN CAN'T SURVIVE
(John Williamson)

A city girl is happy with her friends and family life
Appreciates a wine with him at night
She tries to find the sparkle, she searches but it's gone
With lots of love she hopes he'll be alright

Her man has gone all quiet, he's not at ease
He doesn't feel at home, he's hard to please
He gets itchy feet, he's tired of noises in the street
He needs to walk for hours through the trees

CHORUS
No a bushman can't survive on city lights
Opera, rock and roll and height of heights
His moon shines on the silver brigalow
Shimmers down the inland river flow
Out there where the yellow belly bites

He's working with his hands today on a building site
He can smell the cypress on the floor
It takes him to a sandy ridge out amongst the pines
No shearin’, no ploughin' anymore

His kelpie dog is tired and fast asleep
Sick of searchin' gardens for the sheep
His master doesn't whistle tunes, he's not in the mood
His love for open spaces runs too deep

Chorus

He tries to please his woman, the lady of his life
He's standing at a party with a plate
She finds him on the balcony staring at the moon
An old familiar face he can relate

His moon shines on the silver brigalow
Shimmers down the inand river
Out there where the yellow belly bites

My friend, Scott Balfour, made a moving recording of this on his 'Mother Land' CD. He said the song had particular poignancy for him because it encapsulates the spirit of his friend Bill Hayes of Deep Well Station - the consummate bushman - who died tragically in a mustering accident.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 12:06 AM

COOTAMUNDRA WATTLE
(John Williamson)

Don't go lookin' through that old camphor box woman
You know those old things only make you cry
When you dream upon that little bunny rug
It makes you think that life has passed you by
There are days when you wish the world would stop woman
But then you know some wounds would never heal
But when I browse the early pages of the children
It's then I know exactly how you feel.

(Chorus)
Hey it's July and the winter sun is shining
And the cootamundra wattle is my friend
For all at once my childhood never left me
'Cause wattle blossoms bring it back again

It's Sunday and you should stop the worry woman
Come out here and sit down in the sun
Can't you hear the magpies in the distance
Don't you feel the new day has begun
Can't you hear the bees making honey woman
In the spotted gums where the bellbirds ring
You might grow old and bitter cause you missed it
You know some people never hear such things

Chorus

Don't buy the daily papers any more woman
Read all about what's going on in hell
They don't care to tell the world of kindness
Good news never made a paper sell
There's all the colours of the rainbow in the garden woman
And symphonies of music in the sky
Heaven's all around us if you're looking
But how can you see it if you cry

Chorus

This lovely song always reminds me of the late Chris Pemberton who would trot it out from time to time at the gun turret. Chris was a very fine singer and he had Mississippi John Hurt's guitar style down to a T.

Here is a live rendition from John Williamson. I can relate to the background sound - we often have lorikeets carrying-on in our garden.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 12:29 AM

Geez, Stewie.......You have started the fingernails-on-a-blackboard thing, for me. I can't stand that Cootamundra wattle song. A long-ago bloke used to call me "woman"; I hated it then, and I still hate it now.

But that's all right. The world would be a dull place indeed if we all sang the same songs.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 01:27 AM

LoL JennieG!    I know what you mean though. An ex often called me "Missus" but that didn't really worry me. But "Woman" is somehow "different"...... :)

Stew, thanks so much to you and Phil for Alan Mann's comp. Paul-the-Stockman digitised the LP and offered it up on his Blog of 11 May 2015, but mentions the lack of liner notes. Have to get WA's super-sleuth Becky back onto it!! :
http://australianfolk.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2015-08-10T21:00:00%2B10:00&max-results=10&start=40&by-date=false

Plus, I was wondering if you have any of Phil's comps that could be featured on this thread???

Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 02:22 AM

TENTERFIELD SADDLER

By Peter Allen

The late George Woolnough worked on High Street and lived on Manners
52 years he sat on his veranda and made his saddles
And if you had questions about sheep or flowers or dogs
You just ask the saddler, he lived without sin; they're building a library for him.

Ch.
Time is a traveller, Tenterfield Saddler, turn your head
Ride again Jackaroo, think I see kangaroo up ahead

The son of George Woolnough went off and got married and had a war baby
But something was wrong and it's easier to drink than go crazy
And if there were questions about why the end was so sad
Well George had no answers about why a son, ever has need of a gun

Time is a traveller, Tenterfield Saddler, turn your head
Ride again Jackaroo, think I see kangaroo up ahead

The grandson of George has been all around the world and lives no special place
Changed his last name and he married a girl with an interesting face
He'd almost forgotten them both because in the life that he leads
There's nowhere for George and his library, or the son with his gun, to belong - except in this song

Time is a traveller, Tenterfield Saddler, turn your head
Ride again Jackaroo, think I see kangaroo up ahead
Time is a meddler, Tenterfield Saddler, make your bed
Fly away cockatoo, down on the ground emu up ahead
Time is a tale teller,Tenterfield Saddler, turn your head …………………



The late Peter Allen (singer/songwriter/dancer and all-round entertainer), was married for a while to Liza Minelli (“the girl with an interesting face”!).

My Sister and B-in-Law do a lovely harmony version of this, but it’s not on-line yet. Many recordings available are overloaded by loud, intrusive instrumentation.
So I have chosen this lovely version by Rick Price. Hope you enjoy this song; I never seem to tire of it!                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtM4a3bheIU


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 09:20 AM

NOT MANY FISH

By Bernard Bolan

From Mortlake to Mosman for thirty-five years,
In a twenty-six footer I’ve sailed.
It paid for me grub and a couple of beers,
But not now since the fishing has failed.
There used to be Blackfish there used to be Bream,
And there used to be Jewies to tame.
But now there’s old beer cans and polythene bags,
And things too repulsive to name.

Ch.
But the sun is still shining and the sky is still blue,
You can still taste the salt on the spray.
Me lines are all baited and me net’s over too,
But there’s not many fish in the harbour today.

Once the catches you’d get nearly made your boat sink,
And the three of you filling the barge.
But now all you get is terrible stink,
With typhoid at no extra charge.
What you need is a craft that can sail the high seas,
Where the Herring and King Fishes play.
All you bring up in the Harbour is dead dogs and cats,
Not to mention that Mrs MacRae.

So go for a sail with your Sally and Sue,
Take Roger and Rufous as well.
Remember to throw (chuck) your muck over the side,
Then complain of the hideous smell.
Well a fisherman’s known for not getting upset,
When he sails through the wind and the rain.
But a man can but think when he’s sailing through this,
What a pity you can’t pull the chain.


Here is Bernard Bolan singing : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqRfyPekBEo

(NB   apparently Sydney Harbour is much cleaner, these days!)



Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 11:07 AM

we now have 258 songs.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 11:31 AM

A very popular song at sessions, it was the winner of the Parody mug at the inaugural John & Dale Dengate Parody Competition at Illawarra Folk Festival in 2014, a very appropriate winner as John had loved it. Dale giving Cathy the box it came in.

PRECIOUS GIFT (The Tony Abbott Song) by Cathy Rytmeister, February 2010

When I was a young girl, pure and whole
I lived the clean life of a virgin
I had no idea that my precious gift
Was important to some politicians.
So when I turned 18 and the boy up the road
Said hey, how about it? I didn't say "no".
But dear Tony Abbott, if only I'd known
I'd have waited at least one more fortnight.

For I was now bereft of true value
By choosing a life full of sin
My precious gift gone, just a memory in song
All I've left is the box it came in.

And well I remember relief on those days
That my blood stained the sheets and the blankets
I took many risks but was mostly OK
I look back and for that I'm most thankful.
But I wonder, if only I'd kept meself nice,
Wore lippy and heels and played sugar and spice –
I'd have landed a man who'd have treated me right –
Someone just like that hypocrite Tony.

For I was now bereft of true value
By choosing a life full of sin
My precious gift gone, just a memory in song
All I've left is the box it came in.

I grew older and wiser and carried a pack-
et of three, just in case I got lucky
And I did pretty well, despite no advice
From Abbott or Andrews or Tuckey.
Johnny Turk he was ready, he'd primed himself well,
But that wasn't enough, I had Tommy as well
And Paddy, and Jock, and Pierre and Manuel
I had a right multicultural party.

With my precious gift thoroughly squandered
I still somehow managed with men
I swore and I drank and I danced and I skanked
While the band played Wild Rover Again.

Now I've settled down, with a rather good bloke,
Who with second-hand gifts seems delighted.
And I've a daughter myself, of that age when you might
Give advice, about life to enlighten.
I've told her to give what she wishes and when
To respect herself and be respected by men
And above all before she is settled and wed
To make sure she gets plenty of practice.

For a woman is more than a hymen
She has much more to offer the world
And if Abbott can't see all that we wish to be
He can keep his advice to himself.

For I've filled my life with true value
By choosing to live it in sin
My precious gift gone, just a memory in song
But I've still got the box it came in!


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 05:30 PM

One of my favourites, Sandra!


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 07:43 PM

JennieG, I know what you mean about 'woman' in the Williamson song. I can sympathise with your experience with an insensitive sod. However, given the song's structure, what other term could he have used? You wouldn't want the American 'babe' or 'baby' - 'darling', 'wife', 'love', 'dear' et alia wouldn't really work either.

Back on 15 September (it seems so long ago), I noted that Phil Gray of Loaded Dog opposed the insertion of a Wendy Evans chorus about shearers in Sorensen's 'Glenburgh Wool' which is about the transportation of wool not shearing. Phil has recently recorded the song sans the inappropriate chorus and with his own tune. He recorded it in the shearer' kitchen at Glenbugh Station. His note for the clip:

This is a set of verse by Jack Sorensen - I put my tune on it. In early September Yvonne, myself and our trusty Border Collie Cobber, did a 'mini tour' up through the Gascoyne and Murchison regions of Western Australia. I played at Gascoyne Junction, Glenburgh Station and Murchison Settlement. One of the pleasures of my life was to record this in the Shearers' Kitchen at Glenburgh Station, where Jack Sorensen spent time shearing, and to tread where he trod and probably ate 80 years ago. In Jack's words .......'and from those roaring yesterdays the echoes linger yet'.....

Youtube clip

The text of all of Sorensen's poems may be found here:

Click

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 09:40 PM

Gerry Hallom put a tune to Banjo Paterson's 'By the grey gulf water'. He made multiple changes to make it more accessible as a song. A good'un.

BY THE GREY GULF WATER
(Paterson/Hallom)

Far to the north there lies a land
A wonderful land where the winds blow over
And none may guess or understand
The charm it holds for the restless rover
A wild grey land, a land half made
Where nature craves a share of slaughter
Many indeed are the nameless graves
Where victims sleep by the grey gulf water

Slowly, slowly those grey streams glide,
Drifting along with languid motion
Lapping the reed on either side
Wending their way to the northern ocean
And the strength of a man is a young child’s strength
In the face of that mighty plain and river
And the life of a man is a moment’s length
To the life of a stream that runs forever

And so it comes they take no part
In life’s small cares - each hardy rover
Rides ahead like Bonaparte
The plains around and the blue skies over
Way up above a brown lark sings
The songs the strange wild land has taught her
Full of joy her sweet song rings
I wish I were back by the grey gulf water

Way up above a brown lark sings
The songs the strange wild land has taught her
Full of joy her sweet song rings
I wish I were back by the grey gulf water

Youtube clip

The original poem as published in 'The Bulletin':

Click

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: JennieG
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 09:55 PM

Perhaps 'woman' in the song actually has a name which could be used? Certainly better than 'darling', 'darl', 'sugar', 'honey', etc.

Actually, I must admit to not being much of a Williamson fan. I know his songs are popular, he has sold a squillion gold records and stuff like that, but there are other writers I prefer - probably sacriligeous to say given that we live in Tamworth, but there you go.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 10:07 PM

JOG ALONG TILL SHEARING

The truth is in my song so clear
Without a word of gammon
The swagmen travel all the year
Waiting for the lambin'
Now when this dirty work is done
To the nearest shanty steerin’
They meet a friend, their money spend
Then jog along till shearing.

Chorus
Home sweet home
That is what they left it for
Their home sweet home

Now when the shearing season comes
They hear the price that's going
New arrivals meet old chums
And then they start their blowin’
They say that they can shear each day
Their hundred pretty handy
But eighty sheep is bloody hard
When the wool is close and sandy

When the sheds are all cut out
They get their bit of paper
To the nearest pub they run
They cut a dashing caper
They call for liquor plenty
They're happy when they're drinkin’
But where to go when the money's spent
It's little they are thinking.

Sick and sore next morning
They are when they awaken
To have a drink of course they must
To keep their nerves from shakin'
They call for one and then for two
In a way that's rather funny
Till the landlord says, ‘Now this won't do
You blokes have got no money’

They're sleeping on verandahs
They're lounging on the sofas
Then to finish off their spree
They're ordered off as loafers
They've got no friends, their money's spent
And at their disappearing
They give three cheers for the river bend
And jog along till shearing.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 10:32 PM

R-J, I just remembered that, courtesy of Colin Smiley, I have a CD of the Lost Quays - 'Live at the Whalers' Tunnel'. The concert was recorded in the Whalers' Tunnel as part of Fremantle's Heritage Festival in 2016. The tunnel was excavated by convicts shortly after the first whale was taken in the area in 1837, and not long after the founding of the colony. The concert consisted almost entirely of shanty warhorses. However, they did adapt 'Bound for South Australia' for a Fremantle flavour.

FREO GIRLS
(Lost Quays)

Freo girls ain’t got no combs
Heave away, haul away
They combs their hair with cod fish bones
And we’re bound for Australia
Heave away me bully, bully boys
Heave away, haul away
You gotta make a noise
And we’re bound for Australia

Well Freo lads ain’t got no frills
They drink their beer with cod fish gills

Well Freo kids ain’t got no sleds
They slide downhill on cod fish heads

Well Freo mums don’t bake no pies
It’s tofu king with toasted chives

Well Freo dads don’t brew no stout
There down at Clancy’s hanging about

Well Freo Dogs ain’t got no bite
If their bark don’t scare, the Sharks just might

Well Freo cats ain’t go no tails
They lost them all to the south-west gales

The Freo doctor’s got no pills
She blows from the west our sails to fill

Heave away, haul away …

Above is my transcription. I couldn't make out the 'tofu' line - can someone correct it?

For non-Aussies, the Dogs and Sharks are Fremantle football teams. Clancy's is a popular Fremantle pub and the Fremantle doctor is a cooling afternoon sea breeze.

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 11:26 PM

JennieG, fair point - a name would work. I'm not much of a Williamson fan either, but I like a handful of his songs. He was a featured guest at a Top Half Festival in Alice Springs a few years ago. He no attempt to mix with other performers and punters or join in any sessions. Sod him!

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 11:34 PM

I forgot to login again. I'll have to cease clearing my website data during the day.

Anyhow, it gives me a chance to correct an error in my 'Freo Girls' transcription. In the 'dads' stanza, it should read 'they're' not 'there'.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 30 Sep 20 - 08:08 PM

Stewie, Perhaps that Tofu line is something to do with Lattes and Chai - his gravelly voice sure is hard to understand!!
Cheers, R-J :)


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 30 Sep 20 - 08:18 PM

THE GIFT OF YEARS
(Eric Bogle)

Well, old friend, here I am
I told you I'd be back
And as usual, mate, I'm bloody late
It's seventy-five years down the track
For the last time, here I stand
In this familiar foreign land
Back with the mates I left behind
Fixed forever in their time

And of all the ghosts of all the boys
That haunt this lonely place
Only one of them wears your cheeky grin
And your Queensland joker's face
And as I drown in old and bloody dreams
Of helpless young men's dying screams
I feel your hand give my arm a shake
And your voice say, "Steady, mate!"

And the country that you died for, mate
You would not know it now
And the future that we dreamed of, mate
Got all twisted up somehow.
The peace that we were fighting for
The end to stupid senseless war
So it couldn't happen to our kids
Well, old mate, it did!

And thank you for the gift of years
And the flame that brightly burns
For the time you bought and the lessons taught
So often wasted and unlearned
"Lest we forget," cries the multitude
As if I ever, ever could
So forgive an old man's tears
And thank you for the years

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 30 Sep 20 - 09:16 PM

WHERE SILENCE REIGNS
(Woods/Wyndham-Read)

Out back where silence reigns on the great grey western plains
The sunlit plains of Clancy's where it hardly ever rains
Where the traveller's always thirsty and the water never near
The creaking of the saddle is the only sound you hear

Where the quart pot doesn't rattle, the stirrup doesn't clink
And the emu stalks in freedom and it's far too hot to think
Where the tracks are dry and dusty, the air is seldom clear
The creaking of the saddle is the only sound you hear

Where the fences reach to sundown and are mostly made of wire
And the sun goes down each evening like a glowing ball of fire
Where the water-bag is empty and the tucker dry and drear
The creaking of the saddle is the only sound you hear

In shades of gidgee bushes lies a great red kangaroo
Asleep in the noonday sunshine while a doleful-looking crow
With a voiceless gape salutes us as we come and disappear
The creaking of the saddle is the only sound you hear

In sultry shades of silence bounded by a shimmering sky
Make a man feel very lonely, very small and very dry
I would cry in desolation but I cannot shed a tear
The creaking of the saddle is the only sound you hear

Another poem by Walter Woods that Wyndham-Read clipped and adapted. The full poem may be found at page 207 of Stewart and Keesing's 'Australian Bush Ballads'. The full text of the previously posted 'I don't go shearing now' may be found at page 245 - it is indeed a saga that stretches over 3 pages. Woods was an interesting character - a journalist and politician. Read about him here:

Click

Where silence reigns

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 30 Sep 20 - 10:35 PM

NEW LIFE, NEW LOVE
(Lawson/Wyndham-Read)

The breezes blow on the river below
the fleecy clouds float by
And I mark how the dark green gum trees match
The bright blue dome of the sky
The grass is green where rains have been
And the earth is bare and brown
I see the things that I used to see
In the days ere my heart was down

I've seen the light in the long dark night
Brighter than stars or moon
I've lost the fear of the winter drear
the sadness of afternoon
Here let us stand while I hold your hand
With the light on your golden hair
And I feel the things that I used to feel
In the days ere my heart was dead

The storms are by and my lips are dry
The old wrong rankles yet
Sweetheart or wife, I must take new life
From your red lips warm and wet
So let it be, you may cling to me
There is nothing on earth to dread
For I'll be the man that I used to be
In the days ere my heart was dead

Youtube clip

This was also recorded on 'All Around Down Under', an album by Martyn and Danny Spooner. Liner note:

Henry Lawson wrote the poem in 1903 and Martyn put the tune to it. Australia's best known balladist for 20 years, in middle age, Lawson was drinking heavily and living a hand-to-mouth existence. He had a love and a marriage behind him at this stage when he was taken in hand by Mrs Isobel Byers and penned this in a tone of promise.

R-J, I believe you've nailed 'lattes' and 'chai' but there's something else after 'tofu'.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 30 Sep 20 - 11:27 PM

Gordon Bok recorded a couple of Kiwi songs on his 'In The Kind Land' CD. The text of this one differs from the version printed in 'Song of a Young Country' and also the version recorded by Phil Garland but, as they say here in the Territory, good but.

BRIGHT FINE GOLD
(Anon/music reconstructed by N.Colquhoun)

Spend it in the winter
Or die in the cold
One apecker, Tuapecka
Bright fine gold

Bright fine gold, bright fine gold
One apecka, Tuapecka
Bright fine gold

Two little children lying in bed
Both of them hungry, lord
They can't raise up their heads

Bright fine gold, bright fine gold
One apecka, Tuapecka
Bright fine gold

Some are sons of fortune
And my man came to see
But the riches of the river
Are not for such as he

Bright fine gold, bright fine gold
One apecka, Tuapecka
Bright fine gold

I'm weary of Otago
Weary of the snow
Let my man strike it rich
And then we'll go

Bright fine gold, bright fine gold
One apecka, Tuapecka
Bright fine gold

Repeat stanza 1 and chorus

Gordon's note:

Because of the NZ gold rush in the 1860s, the Tuapecka River in Otago Province became the richest place in New Zealand. The results were the same as other gold rushes, mostly misery and poverty. I think that Phil Lobl taught it to me when she came to Maine many years ago.

Bok

Garland

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 30 Sep 20 - 11:56 PM

HOW GILBERT DIED
(Paterson/Roweth)

There's never a stone at the sleeper's head
There's never a fence beside
And the wandering stock on the grave may tread
Unnoticed and undenied
But the smallest child on the Watershed
Can tell you how Gilbert died

For he rode at dusk with his comrade Dunn
To the hut at the Stockman's Ford
In the waning light of the sinking sun
They peered with a fierce accord
They were outlaws both and on each man's head
Was a thousand pounds reward

They had taken toll of the country round
And the troopers came behind
With a black who tracked like a human hound
In the scrub and the ranges blind
He could run the trail where a white man's eye
No sign of track could find

He had hunted them out of the One Tree Hill
And over the Old Man Plain
But they wheeled their tracks with a wild beast's skill
And they made for the range again
Then away to the hut where their grandsire dwelt
They rode with a loosened rein

And their grandsire gave them a greeting bold
"Come in and rest in peace
No safer place does the country hold
With the night pursuit must cease
And we'll drink success to the roving boys
And to hell with the black police."

But they went to death when they entered there
In the hut at the Stockman's Ford
For their grandsire's words were as false as fair
They were doomed to the hangman's cord
He had sold them both to the black police
For the sake of the big reward

In the depth of night, there are forms that glide
As stealthily as serpents creep
And around the hut where the outlaws hide
They plant in the shadows deep
And they wait till the first faint flush of dawn
Shall waken their prey from sleep.

But Gilbert wakes while the night is dark
A restless sleeper aye
He has heard the sound of a sheep dog's bark,
And his horse's warning neigh
And he says to his mate, "There are hawks abroad
And it's time that we went away."

Their rifles stood at the stretcher head
Their bridles lay to hand
They wakened the old man out of his bed
When they heard the sharp command
"In the name of the Queen ,lay down your arms,
Now, Dunn and Gilbert, stand!"

Then Gilbert reached for his rifle true
That close at hand he kept
He pointed straight at the voice and drew
But never a flash out-leapt
For the water ran from the rifle breech
It was drenched while the outlaws slept

Then he dropped the piece with a bitter oath
And he turned to his comrade Dunn
"We are sold," he said, "we are dead men both
Still, there may be a chance for one
I'll stop and I'll fight with the pistol here
You take to your heels and run."

So Dunn crept out on his hands and knees
In the dim, half-dawning light
And he made his way to a patch of trees
And was lost in the black of night
And the trackers hunted his tracks all day
But they never could trace his flight

But Gilbert walked from the open door
In a confident style and rash
He heard at his side the rifles roar
And he heard the bullets crash
But he laughed as he lifted his pistol hand,
And he fired at the rifle flash

Then out of the shadows the troopers aimed
At his voice and the pistol sound
With rifle flashes the darkness flamed
He staggered and spun around
And they riddled his body with rifle balls
As it lay on the blood-soaked ground.

There's never a stone at the sleeper's head
There's never a fence beside
And the wandering stock on the grave may tread
Unnoticed and undenied
But the smallest child on the Watershed
Can tell you how Gilbert died

Youtube clip

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: rich-joy
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 02:54 AM

SOMETIME LOVING

By Gary Shearston

I don't want your sometime lovin'
That falls like summer's rain
Coz I've slept through two long winters
And love's been where my head has lain.

When you’ve travelled with the North wind
Blowing on your window pane
When you’ve found the warmth she brings you
Come and find me once again.

And when you've wandered through the snowfall
Through the pines on which she's lain
When you've seen the way she holds them
Come and hold me once again.

And when you've heard a river laughing
As she bends the rocks and sand
Seen her wave crossing an ocean
Come and take me by the hand.

And when you've seen a hungry grassland
Reach out to kiss the rain
When you've seen how strong her kiss is
Come and kiss me once again.

And when the earth has turned her season
And her love has brought the grain
If you find that love inside you
Come and live with me again.



The late Gary Shearston’s 1967 rendition : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wb4nd5lryAU

A long-time favourite and possessed of a timeless beauty, I feel.   Apparently when Peter, Paul & Mary sang it in concert in Australia, they introduced it as “the most beautiful song that has ever been written” ……


Cheers, R-J


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Subject: RE: Rise Up Mudcat Songbook - Australia
From: Stewie
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 10:01 PM

SHE’LL BE RIGHT
(Peter Cape)

When you're huntin' in the mountains
And your dogs put up a chase
And this porker's comin' at you
And he doesn't like your face
And you're runnin' and he's runnin'
And he's crowdin' on the pace
Don't worry mate, she'll be right            

She'll be right, mate, she'll be right                           
Don't worry mate, she'll be right
You can get your feed of pork
When he slows down to a walk
So don't worry mate, she'll be right