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The French 'Voice of the People' set

DigiTrad:
ALOUETTE
AUPRES DE MA BLONDE
CHEVALIERS DE LA TABLE RONDE
FRERE JACQUES
LE TEMPS DES CERISES


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Desert Dancer 30 Jun 10 - 11:22 PM
Desert Dancer 30 Jun 10 - 11:32 PM
Desert Dancer 30 Jun 10 - 11:33 PM
Desert Dancer 05 Jul 10 - 09:12 AM
GUEST,Ed 05 Jul 10 - 09:20 AM
Jack Campin 05 Jul 10 - 11:25 AM
Anglo 05 Jul 10 - 12:50 PM
Joe Offer 05 Jul 10 - 01:10 PM
brezhnev 05 Jul 10 - 01:11 PM
Monique 05 Jul 10 - 01:43 PM
McGrath of Harlow 05 Jul 10 - 02:06 PM
Matthew Edwards 05 Jul 10 - 03:03 PM
dick greenhaus 05 Jul 10 - 03:37 PM
Richard Mellish 05 Jul 10 - 04:39 PM
Jack Campin 06 Jul 10 - 08:22 AM
katlaughing 14 Nov 10 - 02:55 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:03 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:04 PM
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Mr Happy 21 Dec 10 - 03:15 AM
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Monique 21 Dec 10 - 07:00 AM
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Subject: Une Anthologie des Musiques Traditionelles
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 11:22 PM

Catching up on my Musical Traditions reading, I came on the review by Rod Stradling of this 10-cd set that has only gotten one passing mention here: Une Anthologie des Musiques Traditionelles, Frémeaux & Associés FA 5260.

Says Rod, "This is not so much a review as a brief overview of this fabulous 10-CD set of the traditional music of France ... a French Voice of the People, as its compiler, Guillaume Veillet, described it to me a few years ago when he had just received the go-ahead on the project."

The set divides the music up geographically
1. Bretagne
2. France de L'Ouest
3. Auvergne et Limousin
4. Centre France
5. Sud Ouest
6. Méditerranée
7. Alpes, Nord et Est
8. Corse
9. France d'Outre-Mer
10. Français d'Amérique

There are many RealAudio clips in the article, which I couldn't get to work on my Mac, even with a freshly downloaded version of RealPlayer. Bummer, because I don't think I'll be able to acquire this any time soon. But I may have to start saving my pennies.

Available at: www.audio-archives.com/en/catalogue/fiches/e_world_music_france_FA5260.htm for just €80 with free shipping worldwide. And you can find full details, track lists, etc at: www.fremeaux.com.

~ Becky in Tucson


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 11:32 PM

Undoubtedly Dick Greenhaus of Camsco can get it for you; a web search also brings up CDRoots, which will special order it for $119 plus shipping, Borders online, too.


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 11:33 PM

A more direct link to the page at the Fremeaux site: click


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 09:12 AM

refresh


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: GUEST,Ed
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 09:20 AM

Lokks really interesting, Becky.

Thanks for the heads up.

There are many RealAudio clips in the article, which I couldn't get to work on my Mac, even with a freshly downloaded version of RealPlayer.

I couldn't get them to work in Windows either, for what it's worth.

Quite why Rod doesn't use mp3s is a mystery. RealAudio is pretty much out of date as far as I can tell.


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Jack Campin
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 11:25 AM

I sent an email to Rod Stradling, and got a rather unhelpful reply saying to google for the free RealPlayer application.

I am rather unwilling to do that, as I have used a few versions over the years and they were all an utter fucking nightmare, making themselves the default application for situations where they weren't wanted and displaying intrusive "pay up for the registered version" dialogs every time you wanted to listen to anything. I thought I might still have it on this machine (Intel Mac Mini, MacOS Tiger) but mercifully it seems to have got lost in an upgrade.

So I was hoping there might be a third-party app that can play this stuff with less hassle. VLC can't (it can handle most other audio formats); neither can Miro, iTunes, Spotify or Vox. Ideas?


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Anglo
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 12:50 PM

I haven't managed to play Rod's sound samples for some time, and I've been using the latest Mac version of the "official" Real Player app, the free one. I'm certainly not going to pay for their upgrade to test that out. What I have will not play them and Rod knows that, and has attempted to explain why he insists on still using that format. (Perhaps it does work on the PC version).

I do the recommend the French set. Lots of things here, some great singing, odd parade music, a lot of instrumentals, some of it quite weird. And lots of non-mainstream "French" from Corsica and former (maybe some current, my political geography isn't up to date) French colonies. I think I got it from the Fremaux site. I forget whether shipping was free or reasonable (to the US), but I thought it was a bargain.

If anyone wants to hear a specific track or two, PM me with an email address. The site does have a track listing.


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 01:10 PM

The Mustrad article is here (click). I did't have any trouble playing the RealAudio clips. I'm using Windows 7 with the free version of RealPlayer. You may have better luck if you download the clips, and then attempt to play them.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: brezhnev
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 01:11 PM

you can hear samples of all of the tracks on amazon.


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 01:43 PM

I can hear the whole of it on Musicme though I don't know if you can from outside France but it might be worth a try.
UPDATE - APRIL 10 2011 The link above is dead.


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 02:06 PM

Only thirty-second samples evidently available outside Francvia Musicmee, without signing up for a premium account. But that's still a way to hear some great stuff.


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 03:03 PM

I don't recall having signed up to any sort of premium account with Musicme, but I've just been able to listen to the whole 8min plus of the Breton ballad 'Skolvan' sung by the magnificent Marie-Josèphe Bertrand and I'm in England. Also I've been able to listen to the RealAudio clips on the MT website without RealPlayer taking over as default player.

But I bought the CD collection anyway last year on the strength of Rod's enthusiastic notice and I'd very strongly recommend it as a great resource for anyone interested in traditional songs and tunes. There is a tremendous diversity of styles that is fascinating to explore. Vic Smith gave it a great review in March 2010 fRoots magazine.

The texts for the songs can be found on the Fremeaux website linked to by Becky above, but it would be really helpful to have a resource like the Musical Traditions 'Voice of the People' Suite with more information about the songs, the tunes, the singers, the musicians and the traditions they represent.

Matthew


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 03:37 PM

CAMSCO will be carrying the set---as soon as I can establish contact with an English-speaking distributor.


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 04:39 PM

Apropos Real Audio: Rod recommended "Real Alternative" to me and it certainly allows me to hear the MusTrad clips. Just Google for it.

Richard


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Jack Campin
Date: 06 Jul 10 - 08:22 AM

I went to the Real Alternative site.

It's Windows-only.

I give up.


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: katlaughing
Date: 14 Nov 10 - 02:55 PM

Just followed Monique's link. I'd missed this thread. Wow! Dick, I'll be calling you for this one, for sure!


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Subject: ADD:Approchez pour entendre la chanson d'une fille
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:03 PM

Here are the lyrics and a translation to the first song of the 1st CD, i.e. Brittany. The translations are just what the lyrics mean, no more and I hope no less!

Link to the Frémeaux's leaflet of this CD

APPROCHEZ POUR ENTENDRE LA CHANSON D'UNE FILLE
(French)

Approchez pour entendre la chanson d'une fille (bis)
La chanson d'une fille belle comme le jour
C'est son coquin de frère qui veut lui faire l'amour.

Son père aussi sa mère vont à la promenade (bis)
Appelait sa (1) servante d'aller voir au chemin
D'aller voir si son père ou si sa mère revient.

L'a pris, l'a embrassée (2), l'a montée dans sa chambre (bis)
En lui disant : "Petite, quoique tu es ma sœur ,
Il faut que je te dise, où (3) j'aurai ton honneur !"

"Pensez à Dieu, pensez, pensez à Dieu mon frère (bis)
Pensez à Dieu mon frère, au grand Dieu tout-puissant
Aurais-tu le courage d'y mélir notre sang ?"

Le bruit fut entendu par tout le voisinage (bis)
Il fut jugé à pendre, à pendre ou à tuer
Dans la ville de Nantes, le jour d'un grand marché.

Coirault : 9711 Le frère amoureux de sa sœur I
RADdO : 05296.
COME CLOSER/NEAR TO HEAR THE SONG OF A GIRL


Come closer/near to hear the song of a girl,
The song of a girl as beautiful as the day
The rascal of his brother wants to make love to her.

His father and his mother go to have a walk
He told (called) his/her servant to check the way
To go to see if his father or if his mother comes back.

He took her, kissed/hugged her, took her in his bedroom
Telling her "Little one, though you are my sister,
I must tell you, where I'll have your honor!"

"Think of God, think, think of God, my brother
Think of God, my brother, of great God all-mighty
Would you have the courage to mix our bloods?"

The noise was heard by all the neighborhood
He was sentence to be hung, be hung or killed
In the town of Nantes, on a day of great market.


(1) As in all the Romance languages, we only know whether it's his or her by the context and here I'd say it's her. Ditto for the bedroom.
(2) In those old songs you can never know for sure the meaning of the verb "embrasser". It originally meant "to hug" "to take in one's arms" (Cf Sp. "abrazar") while to kiss was the verb "baiser" (hence the noun "un baiser" = a kiss). The meaning of the verb "baiser" came to mean "to fuck" though the meaning of the noun kept its original meaning so far, so the verb "embrasser" passed to mean "to kiss" while to hug needed to be formulated as "to take in one's arms". The shift happened before the end of the 17th century because Molière used the double entendre in one of his play, but you don't know how old those songs are –at least I don't- and when did the shift in the meaning happen outside the capital. The verb is as rude as its English equivalent.
Well, it could be that he kissed her or that he hugged her though I suppose that he first hugged her and not kissed her before taking her in his/her bedroom for she'd have protested before but who knows for sure?
Later I've been thinking that "L'a prise, l'a embrassée, l'a montée dans sa chambre" could also translate as "He took/grabbed/seized her, kissed her, carried her upstairs in her/his bedroom" which would explain that he kissed her and didn't protest wildly. Btw, I copied it as "l'a prise, l'a embrassée..." while it's copied as "l'a prit...". It can't be. Either it's "La prit", preterit tense (= took her) or it's "l'a prise", present perfect tense (lit.= "has taken her"). In Fr. the past participle conjugated with "avoir" (to have) agrees with the direct object when the latter is placed before the verb the same way it does in Oc and Italian. Besides, unlike in the other Romance languages (though I don't know about Romanian) the preterit tense in Fr is now only used in literature, songs included but you can find both tenses in the same song with no difference as to the aspect of the verb, it's just about rhyming and the number of syllables.
(3) I really can't figure out what this "où" stands for: though "I must tell you where I'll have your honor" indeed has a meaning, it doesn't make sense. I'd rather think this "ou" sound is the result of some mishearing or some misinterpretation, it could be "oui, j'aurai ton honneur", it'd make more sense. Unless it'd imply "the 'where' is here".


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Subject: ADD: Passet eo gouel ar rouaned
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:04 PM

PASSET EO GOUEL AR ROUANED
(Breton)

Passet eo gouel ar rouaned ha tostaad 'ra da Veularjez,
Ha 'vo gwelet an dud yaouank 'tond da zañsal war ar hê.

Ar re goz hag ar veleien, troet int gand ar zermonio,
O klask lakaad an dud yaouank da zilezel an dañso.

O ni a gano hag a zañso hag a raio goab anê,
Barz ar bed-mañ ni a zañso, er bed all ni ray ive.

Evid diskenn barz ar zal vraz e oa kalz a varchennou,
A oa leun a dachou melen, traoñ ha kreh, ha penn-da-benn.

Hag eno 'oa diou renkad diaoulou, unan anê 'beb tu d'ar zal,
Oa gate beb a 'forh houarn, 'vid o brochou da zañsal.

RADdO : 06376.
THE TWELFTH NIGHT IS OVER


The Twelfth Night is over, Fat Tuesday is getting near
And we'll see the young people come to dance on the quay

The old people and the priests are inclined to moralize,
Trying to bring the youths to abandon dances

Oh, we'll sing, we'll dance, we'll laugh at them,
Down here we'll dance, in after-life, we'll do too.

To go down to the great hall, there were many stairs
Full of yellow nails, at the bottom, at the top and all along (all the way)

There, there were two rows of devils, one on each side of the room
To put them on a spit and make them dance.


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Subject: ADD: Apportez-nous à boire
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:05 PM

APPORTEZ-NOUS À BOIRE
(French)

Apportez-nous à boire,
Faites venir Fanchon. (1) (bis)
Apportez du vin de Champagne,
Nous en boirons tant qu'il est bon.

Le vin n'est pas un crime,
Dieu ne le défend pas. (bis)
Il aurait fait des arrosoirs
S'il fallait qu'on n'en buvait pas.

Les moutons vivent d'herbage,
Les papillons de fleurs. (bis)
Et toi z'et moi, chère mignonette,
Viverons-nous de cœur en cœur ? (2)

L'amour n'est pas un crime,
Dieu ne la défend pas. (bis)
Il aurait fait des cœurs de marbre,
S'il fallait qu'on ne s'entraimait pas.

Coirault : 1516 Aimer n'est pas un crime
RADdO : 00529.
BRING US SOMETHING TO DRINK


Bring us something to drink
Have Fanchon come here
Bring us wine from Champagne
We'll drink some while it's good.

Wine is not a crime
God doesn't forbid it
He would have made watering cans
If we must not drink any (wine)

The sheep live from grass,
The butterflies (live) from flowers
And you and me, dear cutie one,
Will we live from heart to heart?

Love is not a crime,
God doesn't forbid it,
He would have made hearts of marble
If we must not love each other /one another.


(1) Fanchon is a pet name for Françoise. A more Breton pet name for it is "Soizic"
(2) "Viverons-nous" (standard "vivrons-nous", I suppose it was to make the lyrics match the tune) "de cœur en cœur": I don't fully understand what the author really meant, maybe it meant "will we live going from one heart to another", i.e. "will we live going from one lover/sweetheart to another without ever coming together?"


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Subject: Lyr Add: LAVAR DIN ME 'TA PAOTR YAOUANK
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:06 PM

LAVAR DIN ME 'TA PAOTR YAOUANK
(Breton)

Lavar din me 'ta paotr yaouank
Rigodo fardifardo
Peur e skrivi da embannoù ? Falarinette.
Rigodo falifardo falarino

Na pa vezo e Plougerne
Merc'hed mouzhet diouzh ar c'hafe.

Na pa vezo mui na bagoù
Na moukled e pont Treglonou.

Na pa vezo 'barzh e Plougin
Polotrez diouzh ar gwez sapin.

Na pa vezo 'barzh e Bourc'h-Wenn
Un tammig berroc'h o lostenn.

Na pa vezo e Gwiproñvel
Dresoc'h he c'hoef gant Gabrielle.

Na pa vezo e Plabenneg
Ul litrad gwin 'vit daou wenneg.

Na pa vezo e Plouvian
Kafe ha te da verenn-vihan.

Na pa vezo e Lesneven
Kavet brennig e-touez ar foenn.

Pa vezo e Lanhouarne
Drebet ar bleiz, gant Sant Herve

Na pa vezo e Kerlouan
Añdiv en iliz o tiwan.

Na pa vezo e Lilia
Tout ar c'hezeg o vrennika.

Na pa vezo ar baotred vat
Diskroget diouzh ar chopinad.

RADdO : 06377
TELL ME YOUNG MAN


Tell me, young man
Rigodo fardifardo
When will you call the banns? Falarinette.
Rigodo falifardo falarino

When there are in Plouguerneau
Women frowning upon their coffee.

Where there are neither more boats
Nor mussels at Tréglonou bridge.

Where there are in Plouguin
Plums to (hanging from) the fir trees.

When, in Bourg-Blanc, they wear
Shorter skirts.

When, in Guipronvel,
Gabrielle's bonnet is more upright.

When, in Plabennec, there is
One liter of wine for two pence*.

When there is in Plouvien,
Coffee and tea for tea-time.

When in Lesneven
We'll find limpets among the hay.

When in Lanhouarneau
The wolf is eaten by Saint-Hervé.

When in Kerlouan
Endives grow within the church.

When in Lilia
All the horses are gathering limpets.

When the good boys
Have dropped their glasses/bottles of wine.

* "sou" small currency, worth 1/20 franc

You can listen to this song here


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Subject: Lyr Add: À DIX HEURES DANS CES VERTS PRÉS
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:06 PM

À DIX HEURES DANS CES VERTS PRÉS
(French)

À dix heures dans ces verts prés,
Quat' patates, un brin d' porée, (bis)
Crénom de Diousse !*
Quat' patates, un brin d' porée, ça fait d'la bonne soupe. (bis)

À neuf heures dans ces verts prés…

RADdO : 06378.
AT TEN O'CLOCK IN THESE GREEN MEADOWS


At ten o'clock, in these green meadows
Four potatoes, some chard(s) (x2)
God damn it!
Four potatoes, some chard(s), it makes good soup (x2)

At nine o'clock, in these green meadows….

* The whole form of "Crénom de Diousse" is "sacré nom de Dieu" (God's holy name), "diousse" being used instead of "Dieu" to avoid blasphemy unless it was borrowed from elsewhere and written the French way (could be from us Occitan, but it's only an idea of mine)

Sheet music
This song and the two songs below are Rond Saint Vincent dancing songs. You can see rond St Vincent danced


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Subject: Lyr Add: Y A SIX ÉPILLES DANS MA COURONNE
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:07 PM

Y A SIX ÉPILLES DANS MA COURONNE
(French)

Y a six épilles dans ma couronne,
La fleur du genet s'envole.
Rossignolet du bois joli,
Les amants qui s'entraiment
Se marieront-ils ? Oh oui !

Y a cinq épilles…

RADdO : 06379.
THERE ARE SIX (WHEAT) EARS IN MY GARLAND


There are six (wheat) (1) ears in my garland (2)*
The broom flower flies away.
Little nightingale from the pretty wood,
Will the lovers who love each other
Get married? Oh yes!

There are five ears…

(1) actually, "ears" of anything, it's not mentioned, but just "6 ears" sounded weird to my ears
(2) couronne is a crown or a wreath or any round garland.

You have a slightly different version with lyrics, midi, mp3 rendition here. Scroll down till you find "Pays de Redon" in green near the middle, then click on the 3rd song "J'ai dix épilles à ma couronne".


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Subject: Lyr Add: IL A PASSÉ PAR ICI TROIS FILEURS DE LAINE
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:08 PM

IL A PASSÉ PAR ICI TROIS FILEURS DE LAINE
(French)

Il a passé par ici trois fileurs de laine (bis)
Le premier qui passera file file filera
Le premier qui passera filera la laine

Il a passé par ici deux fileurs de laine…

RADdO : 06380.
THREE WOOL SPINNERS


Three wool spinners passed by here
The first who will pass will spin, spin, spin
The first who will pass will spin the wool.

Two wool spinners passed by here…


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Subject: Lyr Add: SKOLVAN, SKOLVAN, ESKOB LEON
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:09 PM

SKOLVAN, SKOLVAN, ESKOB LEON
(Breton)

Skolvan, Skolvan, eskob Leon
a zo deuet da greiz ul lann da chom,

a zo deuet da chom da greiz ul lann
En-kichen forest Kaniskan.

Pan a mamm Skolvan da welet he farkoù
e kavas an tan war ar harzoù.

"Ma bennoezh ha hani Doue
Piv en deus ho lakaet aze
nemet ha ma mab Skolvan a ve ?"

Pan a mamm Skolvan da welet an dour
e kavas ur feunteun e toull he dor.

"Ma bennoezh ha hani Doue
D'an nep en deus ho lakaet aze
nemet ha ma mab Skolvan a ve."

Pan a mamm Skolvan da gousket
Terribl holl e veze okupet.

"Piv a zo aze, piv a da aze
Ken diwezhat-se war ar vale
nemet ha ma mab Skolvan a ve ?"

"Tevet ma mamm, ne ouelet ket
Ho mab Skolvan a zo daet d'ho kwelet."

"Mag eo ma mab Skolvan a zo aze
Ma malloezh dezhañ da vont alese."

ne oa ket he ger perachuvas
E dad paeron a rañkontras.

"Ma filhor paour, din e lâret
Deus a ven a teuet ha men ec'h et ?"

"Deus ar purkatoer donet a ran
Sar an ifern monet a ran."

"Ma filhor paour, deuet war ho kiz
Ha me a c'houlennay evidoc'h iskuiz."

"Ya, seizh vle zo ec'h on war an henchoù
E treso ma gwall basajoù.

O ya toud holl am eus [sedet]
Met hani ma mamm baour n'em eus ket."

"Ma filhor paour, deuet war ho kiz
Ha me a c'houlennay evidoc'h iskuiz."

"Ma c'homer baour, kriat oc'h-c'hwi,
Pa ne bardonet ket ho krouadur."

"Penaos Doue, en pardoniñ
D'ar maleurioù en deus graet din ?

Lazho teir dimeus e c'hoarezed
Ha lâret e oent inosanted,
ne oe ket c'hoazh e oe e vrasañ pec'hed.

Seizh iliz parroz en deus entanet
Ya, [nav bern traoù] en doe poazhet,
ne oe ket c'hoazh e oe e vrasañ pec'hed.

Mont en iliz ha torro holl ar gwer
Lazho ar beleg deus an aoter
ne oe ket c'hoazh e oe e vrasañ pec'hed.

Ma lever bihan en doe kollet
Ya skrivet gant gwad hon Salver
Hennezh a oe e vrasañ pec'hed."

"Tevet ma mamm, ne ouelet ket
Ho lever bihan n'eo ket kollet,

emañ er mor don, tregont gourhed
En beg ur pesk bihan e viret.

Tevet ma mamm, ne ouelet ket
emañ war an daol rond ha eñ rentet
ne faota e-barzh nemet teir feuilhenn c'hlebiet,

Unan gant dour, un all gant gwad,
Unan gant daeroù ho tivlagad."

"Ma bennoezh a ran d'am mab Skolvan
Pan eo kavet ma lever bihan."

Pa gan ar c'hog d'an hanternoz
e kana an aeled er baradoz.

Pa gan ar c'hog da c'houloù deiz
e kana an aeled dirak Doue,
Ha Sant Skolvan a ra ivez.

Malrieu : 0258 Yannig Skolan
SKOLVAN, SKOLVAN, BISHOP OF LÉON


Skolvan, Skolvan, bishop of Léon
Has come to dwell in the middle of a moor,

Has come to dwell in the middle of a moor,
Near the forest of Quénécan.

When Skolvan's mother was going to see her fields
She found the slopes on fire.

"My blessing and God's
To who put you there,
Unless it'd be my son Skolvan"

When Skolvan's mother was going to fetch water,
She found a fountain by her door"

"My blessing and God's
To who put you there,
Unless it'd be my son Skolvan"

When Skolvan's mother was going to bed
She was terribly worried:

Who's here, who comes here
To stroll, so late
If it weren't my son Skolvan?"

"Hush, mother, don't you cry,
Your son Skolvan has come to see you"

"If it's not my son Skolvan here,
Let him leave with my curse."

She hardly had ended her talk
When he met his godfather:

"My poor godson, tell me,
Where do you come from and where do you go to?"

"I come from the purgatory
I'm going to hell."

"My poor godson, retrace your steps
And I'll ask forgiveness for you"

"Yes, I've been on the roads for seven years
To mend my bad steps.

Yes, I've gained all the forgiveness
But my poor mother's"

"My poor godson, retrace your steps
And I'll ask forgiveness for you"

"My poor woman (1), how cruel you are
Not to forgive your child."

"My God, how would I forgive
The misdeeds he did to me?

To kill three of his sisters
And pretend they were innoncent,
It even wasn't his greatest sin.

To set fire to seven churches
And to burn [nine bunches of things]
It even wasn't his greatest sin.

To go to church and break all the stainglass,
To kill the priest in front of the altar
It even wasn't his greatest sin.

He lost my little book
Written with the Savior's blood.
That was his greatest sin."

"Hush, mother, don't you cry,
Your little book isn't lost,

It's thirty fathoms in the depths of the sea,
In the mouth of a little fish that keeps it.

Hush, mother, don't you cry,
It's upon the round table, I gave/brought it back,
Only three wet sheets are missing:

(wet) One by the water, the other by the blood
And one by the tears of your eyes."

"I give my blessing to my son Skolvan
Since my little book was retrieved"

When the rooster sings at midnight,
The angels sing in paradise,

When the roosters sings at daybreak
The angels sing in front of God
And saint Skolvan sings too.

(1) the word "c'homer" which translates in Fr as "commère" -I take it that the word is of Fr origin- is the same that the Sp "comadre". In modern Fr "commère" only means "a gossip" but it also used to mean "woman, neighbor" and it also designated the same as in Sp i.e. what the godfather or the parents of the godchild would call the godmother.

In this version he didn't kill 3 sisters of his, he raped them and then killed their children.
In this document Fañch Postic says that the author of the Barzhaz Breizh mentioned the similarities between this lament and a Welsh poem from the 13th century that can be found in the Black Book of Carmarthen.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LA COMPLAINTE DE SAINT ALEXIS
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:10 PM

LA COMPLAINTE DE SAINT ALEXIS
(French)

Alexis tout aimable
Dès ses plus jeunes ans
Prince très charitable
Son père l' fit s' marier
Avec une noble princesse
Belle comme le jour
L'ornement de la Cour.

Le soir des épousailles
Alexis fut touché
Rentre à son cabinet
Dit adieu-t-à sa femme :
"Il faut que je m'en aille
Aux pays étrangers
Il faut que je m'en aille
Dieu me l'a commandé
Et tiens voilà bague
Ma ceinture à deux tours
Marque de nos amours."

Olympie toute en larmes
Dit à son bien-aimé :
"Auriez-vous le courage
De me laisser z-ici
Dans ce triste veuvage ?
Alexis mon époux
Pourquoi m'épousiez-vous
Mes pleurs et mes soupirs
Ils m'y feront mourir."

Alors il s'embarque
De Thrace en Cilicie
Le grand vent z-et l'orage
Le jeta près d'Ostie
Sur les bords du rivage
Arrive heureusement
À son débarquement.

Aux pauvres il a donné
Ses habits ses richesses
Jusqu'à son bel habit
Galonné de haut prix.

Alors il s'approche
Des valets des carriers
Des valets qui le cherchent
En chemin l'ont trouvé
Mais sans pouvoir le reconnaître
Tant il était changé
Lui ont fait la charité.

Au palais de son père
Il vint se présenter
Sans se faire reconnaître
Il demande à coucher
Dessous un escalier.
"Prince très charitable
Après avoir dîné
Les miettes de votre table
Faites-les moi donner
D'un amour agréable
Je prierai le Seigneur
De bénir vos grandeurs."

Dix-sept ans d' pénitence
Sous ce triste escalier
De jeûne et d'abstinence
Son corps fut mortifié
Les valets et servantes
Crachaient, jetaient sur lui
Les ordures du logis.

Le dévot d'Alexis
Revient prendre l'esprit
Revient prendre l'esprit
Dedans notre logis.

Le pape débonnaire
Au palais est allé
Dans ses mains prend l'écrit
À haute voix la lit
Sa mère de souffrance
Elle pense à mourir
Quand elle eut vu son fils.

Tout le monde regrette
Le dévot d'Alexis
Dévotions parfaites
Viennent de tous pays
Viennent de tous pays
Invoquer Saint-Alexis.

Coirault : 8902 Saint Alexis II (8902).
RADdO : 04087
.
SAINT ALEXIS'S LAMENT


Alexis, very nice,
From his early age,
Very charitable prince,
His father had him married
To a noble princess
As beautiful as the day,
The jewel of the court.

On the wedding night
Alexis was (grace/God) striken,
He entered his study,
Bid (lit. told) his wife farewell:
"I have to go,
To foreign lands
I have to go,
God summons me,
And here is the ring,
My two rounds belt,
Pledge of our love."

Olympia, weeping,
Says to her beloved
"Would you have the courage
To leave me here
In this sad widowhood?
Alexis, my spouse
Why did you marry me?
My tears and my sighs
Will make me die."

Then he embarked/ took to the sea/sailed off
From Thrace to Cilicia
The strong wind and the storm
Threw him near Ostia.
On the sea side
He fortunately arrived
For his disembarkation.(1)

To the poor he gave
His clothes, his wealth
And even his high priced, beautiful habit/coat/jacket/costume????
Trimmed with braid.

Then he goes near
The servants, the quarry-workers.
Servants who were looking for him
Found him on their way
But without been able to recognize him
Because he had changed so much,
They gave him a handout.

At his father's palace
He came to appear
Without aknowledging who he was
He asks to sleep
Under a staircase.
"Very charitable prince,
After you've had dinner,
Have me given
The crumbs from your table.
I'll pray the Lord
To bless your greatness
With a pleasant love.

Seventeen years of penance
Under this sad staircase.
From fast and abstinence
His body was mortified.
The servants and the maids
Would spit and throw at him
The garbage of the house.

The devout Alexis
Comes to give up the ghost,(2)
Comes to give up the ghost
Within our dwelling.

The good-natured pope
Went to the palace.
In his hands, he takes the document/piece of writing
Reads it out loud.
His mother thought to die
From the pain
When she saw her son.

Everybody regrets
The devout Alexis.
Perfect devotions
Come from all countries
Come from all countries
To invoke Alexis.

(1) I don't fully understand it, mostly because it lacks punctuation. Let's say that if there's a period after "Ostie", I take it to mean that he was lucky his trip came to an end on the sea side. If the period is after "rivage", I take it to mean that the boat was thrown on the seaside by the wind and storms and then the disembarkation took place in rather good conditions.
(2) he sings "revient prendre l'esprit" but it makes no sense, there's no "prendre l'esprit" in Fr, while "rendre l'esprit" (also "rendre l'âme") means to give up the ghost, lit. the spirit (l'âme = the soul)

The whole song lacks consistency as to the verbs tenses. It often happens because present tense makes the story more lively and also because French allows to use it for any moment from past to future as far as there's consistency between the main clause and any subordinate clauses within a sentence. Let's say that as far as there's something that can tell you when the event takes place you can say it in the present tense. What you can't do is to use an indicative when a subjunctive is needed –something that English speaking people usually find hard to grab because things are said otherwise in English.

There's a longer version here in the middle of the page.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SAVET D'UR PLAC'HIG YAOUANK A BARREZ SANT
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:11 PM

SAVET D'UR PLAC'HIG YAOUANK A BARREZ SANT KARADEG
(Breton)

Savet d'ur plac'hig yaouank a barrez Sant Karadeg
'Zo ken glas a zaoulagad ha ruz èl ur boked

N'en doa ken 'met pemdek vlez pa lâre d'he mamm, d'he zad
Ma n'garit ket man dimeziñ, me zo 'vont d'ho kuitaat

Gwallik kourz enta, ma merc'h, evit karet ar baotred
N'oc'h ket c'hoazh 'met c'hwezek vlez, na pemdek arruet

Ne oac'h ket-c'hwi c'hoazh ma mamm, 'lâront, e ma oad-me
'Benn m'ho poa lakaet 'n ho soñj da gariñ ma zad-me

Na pa'm behe-me an tu, an tu hag ar moaian,
Na me 'roahe ur ''voiture'', ha rodoù en argant

Na me 'roahe ur ''voiture'', ha rodoù en argant
Na me 'gasahe ma merc'h da Wened d'ar c'houvant

Na me 'gasahe ma merc'h da Wened d'ar c'houvant
'He laoskahen ket dre-mañ get ar baotred yaouank

Na kar ar baotred yaouank a lâront a zo treitour
Hag a lakahe ma merc'h da golliñ hec'h enor

Na lârit-c'hwi din ma mamm petra 'rin er c'houvant
Nemet friziñ an dantel, soñjal en ur galant

Nemet friziñ an dantel, soñjal en ur galant
Ha skriviñ meur a lizher na d'ar baotred yaouank

A-barzh er c'houvant, ma merc'h, 'd eus ket a c'halanted
Nemet beleion yaouank, mestroù ha seurezed

Nag eno e vehet lakaet 'n ur gambrig alc'hwezet kloz
O na ne sortiahet ket na d'an deiz na d'an noz

Landredig a lanla, lâromp ar wirionez,
'Re 'gar ar merc'hed yaouank a zo fall er-walc'h ivez

'Re 'gar ar merc'hed yaouank a rekahe bout puniset
Na ne raont netra bemdez 'met kaozeal ag ar merc'hed

Teodoù ar baotred yaouank zo ken ruz èl an tan
'Zleahe dezhe bout konduiet da greiz (ar) forest da Rouan

Malrieu : 1027 E-barzh jardin ar minor – Ar c'hoant dimeziñ
IT'S ABOUT A YOUNG MAIDEN OF THE ST CARADEC PARISH


It's about a young maiden of the St Caradec parish
Who has blue eyes and is as red as a flower.

She only was 15 when she was telling her mother and father
If you don't want to marry me, I'll leave you.

It's a little early, daughter, to love the boys,
You're not 16 yet, you didn't turn 15.

Mother, you weren't yet my age
When you took it into your head to love my father.

If I had the means
I'd give a car(riage) with silver wheels

I'd give a car(riage) with silver wheel,
I'd take my daughter to the convent in Vannes.

I'd take my daughter to the convent in Vannes,
I wouldn't leave her here with young boys.

For young boys are treacherous
And would take my daughter's honor.

Tell me, mother, what I would do in the convent
I'd only shirr my apron (1), think of a lover,

I'd only ruffle the apron, think of a lover
And write many letters to (the) young boys.

In the convent, daughter, there are no lovers,
Only young priests, masters and nuns.

There, you'll be locked in a little bedroom
And you'll go out neither day nor night.

Langredig a lanla, let's tell the truth
Those who like young girls are bad too.

Those who like young girls should be punished
They do nothing all day long but talking about girls.

The young boys' tongues are as red as fire,
They should be brought to the heart of the Rennes forest/wood.

(1) I haven't the faintest idea of what it can mean if it ever means something but the literal meaning


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Subject: Lyr Add: ME MERH MARIE-LOUISE, UN DÉ 'M ES HÉ...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:11 PM

ME MERH MARIE-LOUISE, UN DÉ 'M ES HÉ HOLLET
(Breton and French)

Me merh Marie-Louise, un dé 'm es hé hollet (bis)
Je l'ai cherchée, je l'ai trouvée, le long de la rivière
Get deu pé tri chiminod yaouank, éh obér en amour

« Me merh Marie-Louise, deit-hui d'er gér me merh. (bis)
- Oh non papa, oh non maman, fillette abandonnée
Avec ces trois jeunes garçons, je suis la bien-aimée


A pe ouiehèh me mamm, peh ken eurus on-mé aman (bis)
Un coupe mon pain, l'autre verse mon vin,
Et l'autre, le verre à la main : "mignonne en veux-tu boire ?"


A pe dostan d'er sul, éh omp hoah eurusoh (bis)
Un fait mon lit, l'autre balaye ma chambre
Et l'autre met mes blonds cheveux à la mode de Paname


Mé hou suppli me mamm, a p'arriùéèt ér gér (bis)
Souhaitez le bonjour à tous les amis, aux garçons du village
Car ils n'ont jamais eu honneur d'avoir mon cœur en gage.


Coirault : 1215. RADdO : 00237.
MY DAUGHTER MARIE-LOUISE, ONE DAY I LOST HER


My daughter Marie-Louise, one day, I lost her
I searched her, I found her along the river
With two or three young vagrants making love to her

My daughter Marie-Louise, come home, my daughter
" Oh no daddy, oh no mommy, abandoned young girl
With these three young men, I'm the beloved (1)


If you knew, mother, how happy I am here
One cuts me bread, one pours me wine,
And the other, with a glass in his hand: 'Cuttie, will you drink any?'


When Sunday comes near, we're even happier
One makes my bed, the other sweeps my bedroom
And the other one dresses my blond air to Paname's fashion (2)


I beg you mother, when you get home
Say hi for me to all my friends, the boys of the village,
For they never had the honor to have my heart as a pledge

(1) this is very literal, you'd rather say "Of these 3 young men I'm the beloved" but it actually means that while she's with these three young men she feels loved, conversely to when she was home with her parents.
(2) Paname is an endearment nickname for Paris. In the early 1900's, Parisians would wear a Panama hat that the workers who dug the Panama Canal brought into fashion


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Subject: Lyr Add: MERC'HED AG AR GÊR-MAÑ NEND EO KET ...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:12 PM

MERC'HED AG AR GÊR-MAÑ NEND EO KET ISTIMET
(Breton)

Merc'hed ag ar gêr-mañ nend eo ket istimet,
'deus ket en o fichetoù prizioù butum malet, klamm !
'deus ket en o fichetoù prizioù butum malet.

Butum en frioù, èl ar bleuñv er valan,
Ar verc'h 'lâre d'ar vamm, brem' e krevo Yehann.

Ur priz butum d'ur gwaz, a zo ken agreapl,
Ur priz butum d'ur vaouez, a zo forzh divourrapl.

Ec'h a Yehann d'ar c'hoad, dre 'r fank ha dre 'r vouilhenn,
Ar verc'h 'lâre d'ar vamm, brem' e krevo Yehann.

Ec'h a Yehann d'ar gêr, dre 'r fank ha dre 'r vouilhenn,
Koll 'he deus he dañter, he c'hoef 'ziàr he fenn.

El-se ec'h arru, g'ar merc'hed digempenn,
Mes genomp-ni heneoazh, 'arruo ket c'hoazh èlkent.

Malrieu : 1223 Ar merc'hed hag ar butun mallet
THE GIRLS FROM THIS VILLAGE ARE NOT RESPECTED/PRAISED


The girls from this village are not respected/praised
They don't have in their headscarves pinches of ground tobacco
They don't have in their headscarves pinches of ground tobacco.

Tobacco in the nose, like the flower to the broom,
The daughter would tell her mother "now Joan will croak"(1).

For a man, a snuff is so pleasant,
A snuff for a woman is not recommended.

Joan goes to the wood in the mud and the muck
The daughter would tell her mother "now Joan will croak".

Joan goes home in the mud and the muck
She lost her apron, her bonnet from the top of her head.

She arrives thus with the careless women
But it won't happen the same to us tonight yet.

(1) slang for "die"


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Subject: Lyr Add: EN PASSANT PAR LE MOULIN BLANC
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:12 PM

EN PASSANT PAR LE MOULIN BLANC
(French)

En passant par le moulin blanc,
J'ai vu la meunière, j'ai vu la meunière,
En passant par le moulin blanc,
J'ai vu la meunière du moulin à vent.

Elle voulait que je la caresse
Et moi qui n'avais pas le temps. (bis)

À tantôt, la belle, à tantôt,
J' t'y caresse et j' t'y caresse
À tantôt, la belle, à tantôt,
J' t'y caresserai comme il faut.

RADdO : 00861.
AS I PASSED BY THE WHITE MILL


As I passed by the white mill,
I saw the miller's wife (1), I saw the miller's wife
As I passed by the white mill,
I saw the miller's wife of the wind mill.

She wanted me to caress her
And I hadn't time to (twice)

See you soon, beauty, see you soon
I'll caress you and I'll caress you
See you soon, beauty, see you soon,
I'll caress you (2) properly.

(1) "meunière" is the feminine form of "meunier" (miller) so it could be a female miller as well though the chances are that in those trad songs it did refer to the miller's wife.
(2) In French the mark of the future lies in the termination of the verb vs the use of "will + vb" in English so the lines 2 and 4 can be understood as "je te caresse-, je te caresse-" with the 4th line having the full form of the verb "je te caresserai" or it can be understood as "je te caresse, je te caresse" present tense "I caress you, I caress you", the last one being the only one in future tense.


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Subject: Lyr Add: CUEILLIR LE LIN, BELLE, CUEILLIR LE LIN
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:13 PM


CUEILLIR LE LIN, BELLE, CUEILLIR LE LIN
(French)
Cueillir le lin, belle, cueillir le lin,
Tant qu'il y aura du chanvre, du chanvre,
Cueillir le lin, belle, cueillir le lin,
Tant qu'il y aura du grain dans le lin.

Tant qu'il y aura du chanvre, du chanvre,
Tant qu'il y aura du grain dans le lin.

RADdO : 06391.
GATHERING FLAX, BEAUTY, GATHERING FLAX


To gather/gathering flax, beauty, to gather/gathering flax
As long as there'll be hemp, hemp
To gather/gathering flax, beauty, to gather/gathering flax
As long as there'll be seeds in the flax

As long as there'll be hemp, hemp
As long as there'll be seeds in the flax.


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Subject: Lyr Add: UNE PELLE BLANCHE
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:13 PM

The six short songs below are songs "à curer les runs/rins". During cod fishing, the fishermen would dig lines in the salt in the ship hold in order to put the cods away. This digging was called "curer les runs" (the "runs" were the lines)
UNE PELLE BLANCHE
(French)

Une pelle blanche, une pelle avec son joli manche,
Pelle en haut tu n'en as guère, pelle en bas, tu n'en as pas.

Deux pelles blanches, deux pelles avec leur joli manche,
Pelle en haut tu n'en as guère, Pelle en bas, tu n'en as pas.

RADdO : 06235.
A WHITE SPADE


A white spade, a spade with its pretty handle
Spade up, you don't have much, spade down, you don't have any.

Two white spades, two spades with their pretty handle,
Spade up, you don't have much, spade down, you don't have any.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MARIE-MARGOT S'ENDORMIT DANS UN PRÉ
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:15 PM

MARIE-MARGOT S'ENDORMIT DANS UN PRÉ
(French)

Marie-Margot s'endormit dans un pré,
Les jambes en l'air et les cuisses écartées,
Tous les corbeaux lui piquent au cul,
Marie-Margot pourquoi t'endormais-tu ?

RADdO : 06382.
MARIE-MARGOT WENT ASLEEP IN A MEADOW


Marie-Margot went asleep in a meadow,
Her legs raised and her thighs spread apart.
All the crows pinch her ass,
Marie-Margot why would you go asleep?


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Subject: Lyr Add: LA MER QUI NOUS BALANCE LE CUL SUR LES...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:15 PM

LA MER QUI NOUS BALANCE LE CUL SUR LES CAILLOUX
(French)

La mer qui nous balance le cul sur les cailloux
Pourvu que j' sauve mes plantes,
Oh j' m'en fous, j' m'en fous, j' m'en fous !

RADdO : 06339.
THE SEA THAT THROWS US WITH OUR ASSES ON THE STONES


The sea that throws us with our asses on the stones,
Let's hope I'll save my plants,
Oh, I don't care, I don't care, I don't care!


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Subject: Lyr Add: HALTE-À-PATTE, SI TU CONTINUES
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:15 PM

HALTE-À-PATTE, SI TU CONTINUES,
(French)

Halte-à-Patte, si tu continues,
Des marins tu n'en trouveras guère,
Halte-à-Patte, si tu continues,
Des marins tu n'en trouveras plus.

RADdO : 06237.
HALTE-À-PATTE, IF YOU GO ON THIS WAY


Halte-à-Patte, if you go on this way
You won't find many sailors,
Halte-à-Patte, if you go on this way
You will find no more sailors.


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Subject: Lyr Add: AS-TU CONNU L'AMIE GRIBOUILLE
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:16 PM

AS-TU CONNU L'AMIE GRIBOUILLE
(French)

As-tu connu l'amie Gribouille
C'était la femme d'un cordonnier,
Elle a manié plus d' paires de couilles,
Que son mari ne faisait d' souliers !

RADdO : 06383.
DID YOU KNOW OLD FRIEND GRIBOUILLE


Did you know old friend Gribouille
She was the shoemaker's wife;
She handled more pairs of ballocks
Than what shoes her husband would make!


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Subject: Lyr Add: PETITE COUTURIÈRE, TON MÉTIER NE VA PLUS
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:16 PM

PETITE COUTURIÈRE, TON MÉTIER NE VA PLUS,
(French)

Petite couturière, ton métier ne va plus,
Les aiguilles sont trop chères,
Il faut jouer du cul !
LITTLE SEAMSTRESS YOUR BUSINESS GOES DOWN


Little seamstress, your business goes down,
Needles are too expensive,
You must use your ass!


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Subject: Lyr Add: C'ÉTAIT PAR UN LUNDI, JE M'EN FUS VOIR...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:17 PM

C'ÉTAIT PAR UN LUNDI, JE M'EN FUS VOIR MA MIE
(French)

C'était par un lundi, je m'en fus voir ma mie
Et là je la trouvis (1), céleste et endormie.

Je lui ai fait le salut, la belle m'a répondu
D'un air si hardiment :
"J'y vois bien qu'à ta mine et qu'à ton air dolent
L'y a du changement."

Je lui ai demandé : "Qu'avez-vous donc la belle ?"
Je lui ai demandé : "Qu'avez-vous donc Françoëse (Françoise) ?"

"Je veux m'y marier, malgré ma volonté
En seriez-vous d'accord ?
Je veux m'y marier, sans m'y faire consentir
J'aime mieux la mort, souffrir."

"Oh de m'y marier, cela n'est point-z-un crime
Car j' voudrais bien aller faire un p'tit tour en ville.
Oh de m'y marier, cela n'est point-z-étrange
Car j' voudrais bien aller faire un p'tit tour à Nantes.

Auparavant d' partir, j' voudrais bien vous parler
Une heure à mes plaisirs."
"Vous savez quand on part, on reste dans l'oubli,
Peut-être sans revenir.

Cher amant je te dis, tu as le cœur volage
Jamais je n'aurais cru qu' t'aurais eu le courage."

"Allez dans nos jardins, le rossignol est là,
Qu'il vous consolera
Qui cherche vos amours, pourquoi les cherchez-vous ?
Elles sont toutes proches de vous"

RADdO : 06384.
IT WAS ON A MONDAY, I WENT TO SEE MY BELOVED


It was on a Monday, i went to see my beloved/sweetheart
And there I found her, celestial and asleep.

I greeted her, she responded me
In a so bold way
"I can see from you face and your painful look
That something has changed".

I asked her "What's the matter, beauty?"
I asked her "What's the matter Françoëse (Françoise)?

"I want to get married, in spite of my will
Would you agree?
I want to get married, without having my consent,
I'd rather die, suffer.

"Oh, my getting married is no crime
For I'd want to go to (wander in) the city
Oh, my getting married is no strange
For I'd want to go to (wander in) Nantes.

Before leaving, I'd want to talk to you
One hour, to my pleasure."
"You know when we leave, we forget (lit. remain forgetting)
Maybe we don't/won't come back.

Dear lover/sweethear, I tell you, you have a fickle heart
I'd never have thought you'd have the courage."

"Go in our gardens, the nightingale is there,
It'll comfort you,
It'll look for your love, why do you look for it (your love)
It's quite near you."

(1) "Je la trouvis" the correct form of the verb "trouver" in preterit tense is "trouvai" but sometimes in songs you find verbs conjugated with the termination of another group. The French verbs are classified in 3 groups, the ones ending in "er" in the infinitive but "aller" (1st group), those ending in "ir" with the present participle in -issant" (2nd group) all the others being in the 3rd group. Here, "trouver" has the termination of the 2nd group.

I find some lines unclear, I suppose that "I'd never have thought you'd have the courage" means "… the courage to tell me the truth about how you feel/the way your are".


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Subject: Lyr Add: YANNIG KONGAR A BLOULIO
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:18 PM

YANNIG KONGAR A BLOULIO
(Breton)
Yannig Kongar a Bloulio
Koantañ paotr yaouank a zo 'barzh ar vro.

Yannig Kongar fleur ar werzed
Karantez an holl dimezelled.

Pa 'h ae Yannig Kongar d'al Lev-Draezh,
'Teue an dimezelled tout er-maez.

Hag a lâre an eil eta d'eben :
"Yannig Kongar zo o tremen !"

Yannig Kongar en devoa d'e vamm laret :
"Mari Dili am eus c'hoant da gavet.

Mari Dili a gavan ar c'hoantañ,
Honnezh a blij din ar muiañ.

Honnezh a blij din ar muiañ,
Honnezh a dimezin mar gallan."

"O ma faotr bihan, ma selaouit,
Na n'en em bresit ket.

Ma am eus klevet lâret alies
E oa Mari Dili un dreitourez !

Bet am eus ivez klevet lâret
Blije dezhi ober goap ouzh ar baotred.

Ha gant se, diwallit diouti,
Betek gouzout vec'hiet tromplet ganti."

"Honnezh eo an hini am eus choazet,
Ha honnezh a rankin kaout da bried.

Ur nombr bras a vadoù a reer ganti :
Ober reer ganti ur gourmanant.
Ober reer ganti kalz a arc'hant.
Ur c'harr houarn a reer ivez ganti,
Pevar a gezeg d'eñ konduiñ."

"Na n'eo ket ar binvidigezh, nag ar c'hoantiri,
Na ra tout ar boneur 'barzh an ti.

Eo pa vez yec'hed da labourat,
Ha d'en em selaou, santimant mat.

Pa 'n em glevet an eil gant egile
Honnezh ez eo ar gwir vuhez."

Añfin Yannig Kongar zo dimezet.
Met un nebeud goude, en em wel tourmantet.

Kaer en devoa ober diouzh e wellañ,
Den ebet na gaozee dioutañ.

Kaer en devoa gwellañ ma c'halle labourat,
Den na gaozee dioutañ, na ober dioutañ selloù mat

He mamm, un devezh, devoa dezhi lâret :
"Me karj Yannig Kongar na n'eo netra :
Na na dalv ket ur c'hlasker bara.

M'az pije pelloc'h, emezi, gortozet,
Welloc'h evitañ 'pije kavet."

"Un den 'm boa karet, emezi, wello'ch evitañ
Met evitañ, diouzhin, emezi, ne c'houle ket.
Hag evit-se gant Yannig Kongar ez on aet."

Un devezh o deus 'n em diskutet,
Hag he mamm he devoa dezhi lâret :

"Diouzh ar c'homzoù deuio deus e benn,
'Teus 'met skeiñ gantañ e groaz-nouenn."
Yannig Kongar a zo laouret !
Ken oa o vont davit dour n'en devoa ket gwelet.

Pa oa o vonet davit dour,
N'en devoa ket 'n em welet klañvour.
Met e-barzh an dour p'en devoa sellet,
E galon neuze a zo rannet.

P'en devoa eta kement-se gwelet,
Da di e vamm eo partiet.

Hag en devoa dezhi neuze lâret :
"M'am bije, ma mamm, ac'hanoc'h selaouet
Gant Mari Dili vijen ket dimezet.

Met na 'm eus netra ebet deoc'h da lâret,
Pa eo me ma-unam am boa he choazet.

Mersi a lavaran deoc'h bepred.
Kar n'en deo ket c'hwi 'poa din lâret.

Met a-raok finisiñ ma buhez,
Savit din bremañ un ti nevez.

Savit din bremañ un ti bihan nevez,
E-barzh en kroaz-hent Plouilio,
Lec'h ma welin prosesion Sant-Kado,

Lec'h ma welin prosesion Sant-Kado,
Hag hini Sant-Yann a-wechoù,

Lec'h ma welin ar groaz kaer alaouret
Pehini meur a wech 'm eus bet anezhi douget.

Malrieu : 1143 Ar c'hoant dimeziñ gant ur gakousez
YANNIG KONGAR FROM PLOUMILLIAU


Yannig Kongar from Ploumilliau,
The most handsome young man of the area (1)

Yannig Kongar, the most handsome of all men,
The love of all the maidens.

When Yannig Kongar was going to la Lieue de Grève
All the maidens would go out of their houses

And would tell one another,
"Here's Yannig Kongar passing by!"

Yannig Kongar told his mother,
"I want (to have) Marie Tilly.

It's Marie Tilly I find the prettiest,
She's the one I like the best,

She's the one I like the best
And I'll marry her if I can."

"Oh, my little one, listen to me,
Have no rush.

I've often heard it said
That Marie Tilly was treacherous!

I've also heard it said
That she like to make fun of the boys.

For this reason, beware of her
In case she'd betray you."

"It's her I chose,
Her I must have for a wife" (lit.spouse)

She has many possessions, from what people tell,
They say she owns a farm,
They say she has much money.
She also owns, they say, an ironed cart
And four horse to draw it."

"Neither is wealth nor beautiful attire
Will make happiness in a house

But enough health to work
And (enough) feelings (love) to get along.

To get along together,
This is real life."

At the end, Yannig Kongar got married
But very soon, he's worried.

However well he could do,
Nobody talked to him.

However well he could work,
Nobody talked to him, nor gave him a good-willing look.

One day, Marie's mother told her (Marie)
"Yannig Kongar is nothing,
He's not worth more than a beggar.

If you'd wanted to wait a little more, she said,
You'd have found better than him"

"I'd have found one, she said, better than him,
But he didn't want me
And this is the reason why Yannig Kongar got me".

One day, they fought
And her mother told her,

"According to what he'll say,
It only to give him the Extreme Unction"
Yannig Kongar is leprous!
He didn't see anything (he wasn't aware) before he went to fetch water.

When he was going to fetch water,
He didn't think he was was ill
But when he saw his reflection in the water,
His heart was broken (lit. split)

When he saw that,
He went to his mother's house.

Then he told her,
"If I'd listened to you, mother,
I wouldn't have married Marie Tilly.

But I have nothing to reproach you
Since I chose her myself.

I thank you anyway,
For it wasn't you who recommended her to me.

But before my life is over (finishing my life)
Have a new house built for me.

Have now a new little house for me.
On the Ploumilliau crossroad,
From where I'll see Saint Kado's procession,

From where I'll see Saint Kado's procession
And sometimes Saint John's.

From where I'll see the beautiful golden cross
That I carried more than once.

Note: It doesn't show in English that mother and son address each other as "c'hwi" (formal you) while Marie Tilly's mother addresses her daughter as "te" (informal you) which I take to tell more about their moral standards than their actual social positions.


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Subject: Lyr Add: JE ME SUIS ENGAGÉ POUR L'AMOUR D'UNE...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:18 PM

JE ME SUIS ENGAGÉ POUR L'AMOUR D'UNE FILLE
(French)

Je me suis engagé pour l'amour d'une fille (bis)
Les gens qui m'ont logé m'ont bien mal renseigné
Ils m'ont dit d' m'en aller sans avoir mon congé.

Dans mon chemin faisant rencontre mon capitaine.
Mon capitaine m'a dit : "Où vas-tu mon ami ?"
"Là-bas dans ces vallons rejoindre mon bataillon."

Là-bas dans ces vallons s'engage une bataille
J'ai mis mon sac à terre, j'ai pris mon sabre en main
Je me suis battu là comme un vaillant soldat.

Du premier coup tirant tua mon capitaine
Mon capitaine est mort mais moi je vis encore
Peut-être avant trois jours ce sera bien mon tour.

Celui qui me tuera sera mon camarade
Tu m'y banderas les yeux avec un mouchoir bleu
Tu m'y feras mourir sans m'y faire trop languir.

Soldats de mon pays ne dites pas à ma mère
Oh dites-lui j' me suis fiancé à la plus belle fille
Qu'il y a dans le quartier
Ah dites-lui plutôt que je me suis engagé
Sur un navire anglais
Qu'elle m'y verra jamais

Coirault : 6803 Le déserteur qui tue son capitaine.
Malrieu : 0723 An dezertour
RADdO : 00205.
I ENLISTED MYSELF FOR A GIRL'S LOVE


I enlisted myself for a girl's love (twice)
The people who accommodated me informed me very badly
They told me to go away without having a leave/furlough.

On my way, I came across my captain.
My captain told me "Where are you going, my friend?"
"There, in that vale, to joint my batallion"

There in these vales, a battle began,
I put my bag on the ground, I took my saber in my hand,
I fought there like a valient soldier.

On the first strike, I killed my captain,
My captain is dead but I still live.
Maybe before three days it'll be my turn.

The one who'll kill me will be my comrade.
You'll blindfold me with a blue handkerchief,
You'll make me die without taking too long.(1)

Soldiers of my land (2), don't tell my mother,
Oh tell her I got engaged to the most beautiful girl
In the neighborhood.
Ah, rather tell her than I enlisted myself
On an English ship,
That she'll never see me again.
(1) "sans me faire trop languir" means "without having me long for it"
(2) "pays" here doesn't mean "country" but land, area, neighborhood, homeplace.

This song can be found all over France though it's said to originate in Berry. Some versions have him asking for his heart to be wrapped in a white napkin and to be brought to his sweetheart and for his mother to be told he's in Bordeaux, made a captive by the English.


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Subject: Lyr Add: NA MAG AN-ME D'AN ARME EVEL MA KONTAN...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:20 PM

NA MAG AN-ME D'AN ARME EVEL MA KONTAN MONET
(Breton)

Na mag an-me d'an arme evel ma kontan monet
e-menn e lakin-me ma dous berjelenn da viret ?"

"Reit-hi din eta ma breur kaer, reit-hi din ma karet
Me he lako e-barzh en kambr gant ma dimezelled,

Me he lako e-barzh en kambr gant ma dimezelled
Peotramant en ur sal vras gant ma itronezed."

ne oa ket aet pell an den yaouank, ne oa ket aet pell deus e di
e oa komañset he c'hoar gaer da ganañ pouilh dezhi.

"Diwisket ho prozhioù gwenn, ho koefoù dantelezet
Ha kerzhet d'ar menez du da viret al loened."

"Me a zo ur verc'h d'un itron gozh deus maner Poullaouen
N'on ket bet akustumet da viret al loened."

"O ma n'oc'h ket akustumet, akustumet e vehet
Amañ a zo ur wialig wenn hag a ray deoc'h-c'hwi kerzhet.

Amañ a zo ur wialig wenn deus an daou-tri seurt plant
A ray deoc'h-c'hwi berjelenn kerzhet ma pez ket c'hoant.

Hag e-pad ar seizh vloaz-se, ar verjelenn a ouele
Pe oa o komañs gant an eizhvet, ar verjelenn a gane.

Pa oa ur c'habiten yaouank distro deus an arme
e klevas ur vouezh, ur vouezhig dous o kanañ war ar menez

"Arestet, marc'hig bihan, arestet ho pazioù
Klevehet mouezh ur verjelenn e-barzh kreiz al lann o kano."

"Añzavet eta berjelenn, añzavet gant gwirionez
Moarvat emañ bet debret ho lein pa ganet-c'hwi ken gae ?"

"Bruzun bara diwar an daol a vez serret da greisteiz
Ma soubenn e skudell ar c'hi a vez trempet din bemdez

* * *

Rikikig ha rikikig, soubenn an anduilhenn
Kig ha kaol ha karotez a vez lakaet d'ober soubenn

* * *

Me am boa choazet ur vestrez, unan kapuchon bras
Pa oan aet da vouchet dezhi e oa chomet ma fenn e-barzh

Ola, me ne n'in ket ken da welet ma gwenedourez
An deiz-all e oa komzet din, ya deus ur fiselez

* * *

Echu eo ma c'hanaouenn, ec'h aomp da droc'hañ da verr (?)
Kar trawalc'h a momp lâret evit daou vab pilhotaer

* * *

Skalfet eo ma muzelloù, aet eo ma beg d'an treuz
N'on ket ken evit kanañ gant ar sec'hed am eus

M'am befe bet ur bannac'h sistr pe ur bannac'h lagoud
Kalz a vat a refe din da lâret ma zraoù toud

M'am befe bet ur bannac'h sistr pe ur bannac'hig rom
Kalz a vat a refe din da echuiñ ma chañson


Malrieu : 0063 An daou vreur. (the two brothers)
IF I JOIN THE ARMY AS I INTEND TO


If I join the army as I intend to,
Who will take care of my beloved shepherdess?

"Entrust her to me, my brother-in-law, if you want to,
I'll put her in the bedroom with my maidens,

I'll put her in the bedroom with my maidens
Or in the great hall with my ladies."

The young man hadn't gone far yet
When her sister-in-law starting harrassing her.

"Remove your white dresses, your lace bonnets
And go to watch the cattle on the black mountain."

"I'm the daughter of an old noble family of the mansion of Poullaouen,
I was never used to watching cattle."

"If you're not used to it, you will,
Here is a white switch that will make you toe the line.

Here is a white switch made of two-three plants,
Shepherdess, that will make you toe the line whether you want it or not."

During seven years, the shepherdess wept,
When the eighth began, the shepherdess sang (1)

While the young captain was going back from the army,
He heard a sweet voice singing on the mountain.

"Stop, little horse, hold your step,
You'll hear a shepherdess's voice singing in the middle of the moor."

"Make a confession to me, shepherdess, tell me the truth,
Did you have breakfast this morning to sing so joyfully?"

"They keep the crumbs of the lunch table for me,
My soup is dunked every day in the dog bowl."

* * *
Rikikig et rikikig, the andouille soup !
To make the soup, you put meat, cabbage and carrots. (2)

* * *

I had chosen a lover/sweetheart who had a large hood,
When I went to kiss her, my head kept stuck in it.

Now then, I won't go to see my Vannes girl any more,
The other day, I've been told of one from the fisel area! (3)

* * *

My song is over, we're going to cut it short
For we told enough for two sons of a ragman!

* * *

My lips are chapped, my mouth is twisted,
I can't manage to sing from being so thirsty!

If I'd had a cup/glass of cider or spirit,
It'd have done me great good to sing all the rest.

If I'd had a cup/glass of cider or rhum,
It'd have done me great good to end my song.
(1) She weeps for seven years and starts singing when the 8th year begins because the soldiers were enlisted for 7 years.
(2):Only an idea of mine but this sounds like the joke children play to one another. The song is about an adouille soup (an andouille is a sausage made of chitterlings) and the ingredients obviouly don't include andouille. So the kid told the story usually asks "What about the andouille?" and is answered "The andouille is you" because an "andouille" is also a dummy.
(3) Pays fisel, the Brittany area of "fisel dance" including 16 towns: Rostrenen, Maël-Carhaix, Bonen, Trégornan, Le Moustoir, Tréffrin, Trébrivan, Locarn, Saint Nicodème, Tréogan, Kergrist-Moëlou, Plouguernével, Duault, Glomel, Paule and Plévin.
The name Fisel is supposed to come to the fashion men had to tie their hats at the back of their heads with a lace or a string (ficelle, in French, hence the name).


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Subject: Lyr Add: N'EV KET RE UHEL
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:24 PM

"N'EV KET RE UHEL ?"
(Breton)

"N'ev ket re uhel?"
"Nann, a hent all ne vo ket moien da heuliañ."
"Montreze ne vin ket klevet ac'kanon?"

D'omp d'an un' tradibidibidi
D'omp d'an un' tradibida
Doull b'an tenn tradibidibidi
Doull b'an tenn tradibida

D'omp d'an daou…

Roudoù Mari-Louiz roud an amitié
Rouli gram chet ho potoù ker'hit d' ar gambr
Kar ma c' houlomp ganti 'po ket e-giz se 'ta !

C'hwi zo minorezig c' hwi vo respektet
Deoc’ h vo laket voulous lec’h a lârehet

Diw vo laket d'an traoñ ha teir vo laket d'an nec'h
Ma ne vo ket trawac'h deoc'h vo laket c'hwec'h.

Fiche fiche logodenn war ar bodig war ar skodig
Fiche fiche logodenn war ar bodig drein
War c'horr' war lein war ar bodig war ar skodig
War c'horr' war lein war ar bodig drein
War c'horr' war dindan war ar bodig war ar skodig
War c'horr' war dindan war ar bodig moan.
"ISN'T IT TOO HIGH?"


"Isn't it too high?"
"No, otherwise we won't be able to follow"
"Maybe they won't hear me?

Let's go to one, tradibidibidi
Let's go to one, tradibida
Doull b'an tenn tradibidibidi
Doull b'an tenn tradibida

Let's go to two…

Let's follow Marie-Louise's trace/remembrance, trace/remembrance of love
Take your shoes off, go to the bedroom upstairs
For if we ask her, you won't get it easily/this way

You are an heir, you'll be respected,
You'll get velvet wherever you ask for it (1)

We'll put two at the bottom and three at the top,
If it's not enough we'll put you six of them

Put, put mouse, on the small branch, the small stump,
Put, put mouse, on the small branch of throrn
Above, on top, on the small branch, the small stump,
Above, on top, on the small branch of throrn
Above, on top, on the small branch, the small stump,
Above, on top, on the narrow, small branch

(1) I got help from some Breton colleagues. One said that the 4th "verse" was wrong and structurally incorrect so I corrected it. I also corrected the translation. About the velvet, he said that the yoke and stripes of velvet on the clothes were a sign of wealth and when one had many, it was a sign that one was a high-ranked person, that one was "rich" (for that time)

END OF CD1

Here you can listen to some Breton music and songs. If you click on the loudspeaker you will hear one file, if you click on the text it will open a small window, you'll want to click on "L'accompagnement musical" and another window will open with several sound files.

Son ha Ton, Breton traditional songs.

You'll also want to have a look at Rassat's Britany page


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 10:38 PM

Wow! Thanks, Monique!


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Mr Happy
Date: 21 Dec 10 - 03:15 AM

.......that last one's reminiscent of 'The Rattling Bog'!!

Connection?


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 21 Dec 10 - 05:29 AM

Well done Monique; thank you very much indeed for the work you have put in here.

Matthew


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Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 21 Dec 10 - 07:00 AM

Now is Holiday Season break and I'll be busy. I'll start translating the lyrics to CD 2 after New Year.


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Subject: Lyr Add: IL EST ARRIVÉ EN PARIS UN VAISSEAU QUI...
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:37 AM

Well, CD 2 will be before Christmas after all

Link to the Frémeaux's leaflet of this CD.


IL EST ARRIVÉ EN PARIS UN VAISSEAU QUI NOUS A SURPRIS
(French)

Il est arrivé en Paris un vaisseau qui nous a surpris
Un vaisseau qui nous a surpris en arrivant sur Seine
Nous rapportant quelques débris de l'île de Sainte-Hélène. (bis)

Ces débris sont un testament fait par Napoléon le grand
Fait par Napoléon le grand à son dernier soupir
Il renvoya son testament aux napoléonistes. (bis)

Son testament fut visité et partagé aux héritiers.
Le prince de Joinville a remporté la redingote grise,
La redingote et les boutons qui font trembler les opinions. (bis)

Ceusses qu'ont trahi Napoléon se frappent la poitrine
Et ils demandaient encore tous pardon aux napoléonistes. (bis)

Souvenez-vous du p'tit chapeau qui n'a jamais tourné le dos
Il n'a jamais tourné le dos, il a toujours fait face :
"Mes soldats et mes généraux, j'ai gagné la bataille ! (bis)

Je veux qu' Napoléon mon n'veu soit monté sur son cheval bleu
Pour s'en aller au champ, sonner, sonner sa vaillance
Et regagner le Mont Saint-Jean, la perte de la France." (bis)

non listed by Coirault; a verse with the mentioned tune is in Millien, I (1906), p. 318.
RADdO : EA 06354.
THERE ARRIVED IN PARIS A SHIP THAT SURPRISED US


There arrived in Paris a ship that surprised us
A ship that surprised us when it arrived on the Seine,
It brought back some shards from St Helen island

These shards were a will made by Napoleon the great,
Made by Napoleon the great at his last breath
He sent his will to the "napoleonists" (his followers, then)

His estate was checked and shared between the heirs,
The prince of Joinville took the gray frock coat (1)
The frock coat and the buttons that makes the opinions shiver.

Those (2) who betrayed Napoleon beat their breasts
And they were still begging the "napoleonists" their pardon.

Remember the little hat that never turned his back
He never turned his back, he always squared up:
"My soldiers and my generals, I won the battle!

I want my nephew Napoleon to be mounted on his blue horse
To go to the (battle) field, to horn, to horn his valiance
And to go back to Mount Saint-Jean, France's loss."
(1) The Fr for "frock coat" is "redingote" from the Eng. "riding coat" (nothing is lost, nothing is created…)
(2) The normal word is "ceux" with a silent "x" at the end but it sometimes happens that it's pronounced –for good or to make fun of some provincial pronunciation- then the spelling may be "ceuss" or "ceusses" to indicate that you must add an "s" sound to it.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MAIS TOUT AUTOUR DE MA PATRIE
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:38 AM

MAIS TOUT AUTOUR DE MA PATRIE
(French)

Mais tout autour de ma patrie,
Mais tout au pied d'un vert buisson,
J'ai rencontré deux p'tits novices
Qui gardaient cinq à six moutons. (bis)

Je leur ai dit : "Mes p'tits mignons,
Vot' papa est-il à la maison ?" (bis)

"Mon bon monsieur, vous pouvez croire
Que de papa nous en avons pas.

Il y a douze ans qu'il est parti,
Qu'il est parti mais pour la guerre.
Il y a douze ans qu'il est parti,
Nous n'avons jamais vu parler de lui." (bis)

J'ai bien connu à cette parole
Que c'la était mes p'tits enfants.
De crainte de leur faire de la peine,
J' m'en suis n'allé tout droit à la maison.

J'ai rencontré ma mie charmante,
C'est elle qui m'a fait tant de peine.
J'ai rencontré ma mie charmante,
Celle que j'ai quittée en partant. (bis)

"Ah, de bonjour ma bonne dame,
Je crains la pluie, je crains l'orage,
Prêtez-moi donc votre maison.
De toute part, oh logez-moi,
Nous vous paierons tout c' qu'il faudra." (bis)

"Mon bon monsieur vous pouvez croire,
Que d' vous loger, nous n'pouvons pas.
Avancez-y trois pas plus bas,
Les voisins n' vous refuseront pas." (bis)

J'ai mis mon p'tit paquet au bas,
Je m' suis assis dans une chaise,
J'ai pris ma femme entre mes bras,
Encore elle m'y connaissait pas. (bis)

"Cessez vos rires, vos badinages,
Je m'écrierai au voisinage,
Cela sera pitié de vous." (bis)

"T'en souviens-tu ma douce amie
D' la marque que j'avais au pied droit.
C'était une envie de raisin,
À présent tu le vois donc bien." (bis)

"Mais reste ici, avant dix heures,
Tu y verras deux p'tits novices,
Tous deux jumeaux et tous deux frères,
Portant le nom de Louis Guerrier.
C'la m'a été tant révoqué,
Qu' j'en ai le cœur tout enflammé." (bis)

Coirault : 5304 La tache de raisin.
RADdO : EA 05304.
(BUT) AROUND MY HOMELAND


(But) around my homeland (1)
(But) at the foot of a green bush
I came across two little apprentices
Who were watching five or six sheep (twice)

I told them, "My little cuties,
Is your daddy home?" (twice)

"My dear sir, you can be sure/take it (lit. believe)
That we don't have a daddy.

He left twelve years ago,
He went (but) to war.
He left twelve years ago,
We never heard (lit. saw) talk about him (twice)

I knew with this talk
That those were my little children.
For fear of hurting them (lit. making them sorrowful),
I went home(2) straight away.

I met my charming beloved, (3)
She was the one who hurt me much (4)
I met my charming beloved,
The one I left when I went away. (twice)

"Ah, good day, my good lady,
I fear rain, I fear storm,
Lend me your house.
Accommodate me anywhere,
I (5) will pay you all that I must (twice)

"My good gentleman/sir, you can be sure (lit. believe)
That we can't accommodate you.
Go three paces farther down the street
The neighbors won't refuse you. (twice)

I lay down my little package,
I sat down on a chair,
I took my wife in my arms
Though she wouldn't know me (bis).

"Stop your laughing and your joking,
I'll call out to the neighborhood,
You'll be a pitiful sight" (6) (twice).

"Do you remember, my sweet beloved,
The mark I had on my right foot.
It was a purple birthmark (7)
Now you can see clearly. (twice)

"(But) stay here, before it's ten,
You'll see two little apprentices,
Both twins and both brothers,
Bearing the name of Louis Guerrier.(8)
This was so much reminded (9) to me
That my heart is all passionate.
(1) "Patrie" is literally "fatherland" but here it just means "my original area" "the place where I belong"
(2) "à la maison" can be understood as "home" or "to the house". Sometimes the soldier was coming back "home" to only discover this wasn't "home" any more!
(3) it may mean that she was the one who hurt him much (most) because she suffered from his absence and he's well aware of it and resented it. It may also mean that he'd felt sorrow because he'd missed her while he couldn't miss his children that he didn't know he had.
(4) "amie" or the short form "mie" in this context means "beloved/sweetheart", not "friend".
(5) lit. "we". It's not the royal "we"! It sometimes happens in old songs that "I" (me, mine) are replaced by the plural with corresponding conjugation of the verb.
(6) … after what they'll do to you.
(7) "une envie de raisin" literally translates as "a craving for grapes". It's about the superstition that said that when you happened to have a craving for something when you were pregnant and were denied it, the baby would have a birthmark of the same color of what you'd craved for.
(8) "Louis Guerrier" Eng. equivalent would be "Lewis Warrior"
(9) Probably a confusion between "évoqué" (recalled) and "révoqué" (dismissed/revoked) for sounding nearly alike.


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Subject: Lyr Add: QUAND J' TIENS LA BRIDE DE MON CHEVAL
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:38 AM

QUAND J' TIENS LA BRIDE DE MON CHEVAL
(French)

Quand j' tiens la bride de mon cheval, (bis)
Pour aller voir ma mie, oh dé, oh do
Pour aller voir ma mie.

J'étais à peine demi-rendu, (bis)
Que mon cheval s'arrête, oh dé…

Tournez la tête de côté, (bis)
J'ai vu ma mie en danse.

Aussitôt qu' la belle m'a t-aperçu, (bis)
Son petit cœur soupire.

"Qu'avez-vous belle à soupirer ? "(bis)
"J'ai perdu ma ceinture.

Si ma ceinture était en argent, (bis)
Pour moi elle serait bien rendue.

Mais ma ceinture elle est en or, (bis)
Pour moi elle sera bien perdue."

not in Coirault. RADdO : EA 06355.
WHEN I HOLD THE BRIDLE OF MY HORSE


When I hold the bridle of my horse (twice)
To go to see my sweetheart, oh dé, oh do,
To go to see my sweetheart.

I was hardly half the way there (twice)
When my horse stopped, oh dé…

Turn your head to the side! (1)(twice).
I saw my sweetheart dance…

As soon as the fair lady glimpsed me (twice)
Her little heart sighed…

"What do you sigh for, beauty?" (twice)
"I lost my belt".

"If my belt was of silver (twice)
It would be returned to me.

But my belt is of gold (twice)
It will be lost to me for good.
(1) Either he speaks to the audience or he has a speaking horse!


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Subject: Lyr Add: SUR LE PONT D'AVIGNON, J'ENTENDS CHANTER.
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:39 AM

SUR LE PONT D'AVIGNON, J'ENTENDS CHANTER LA BELLE
(French)

Sur le pont d'Avignon, j'entends chanter la belle
Qui dans son chant chantait une chanson nouvelle :
"J'ai perdu mes amours, je ne sais où les prendre
A Paris ou à Tours dedans ces vastes plaines."

Sont trois petits pigeons qui ont pris leur volée.
L'ont prise si haut si bas, la grand mer ont passée.
Sur le logis du roi, ils se sont reposés.
De sur la table du roi ils ont pris leur bêchée.

De sur le lit du roi, ils ont «pond » leur couvée.
Ceux qui la trouveront gagneront bonne journée
Gagneront cent francs par jour et en plus la nuitée.
"Ouvrez la porte, ouvrez, nouvelle mariée !"

"Comment je l'ouvrirai-je, je suis au lit couchée
Et mon mari aussi qui m'y tient embrassée
M'y tient et m'y tiendra le long de la nuitée."
"Ouvrez la porte, ouvrez, nouvelle mariée !"

"Vous y viendrez demain dans la mi-matinée
Mon mari n'y s'ra pas, il s'ra t'à sa journée."
"Ouvrez la porte, ouvrez, nouvelle mariée !"

Coirault : 5217 Chanson des Oreillers. RADdO : EA 00962
ON THE BRIDGE OF AVIGNON, I HEAR THE FAIR MAIDEN SING


On the bridge of Avignon, I hear the fair maiden sing
Who, in her singing, sang a new song,
"I lost my love, I don't now where to find him (1)
In Paris or in Tours, in these wide plains".

Three little pigeons took their flight.
They took it so high, so low, they crossed the great sea (2).
They rested on the king's dwelling,
They took their food (lit. beakful) from the king's table.

On the king's bed, they laid their clutch,
Those who will find it will earn a good day's pay.
They'll earn ten francs per day and on top the night stay.
"Open the door, open, you bride!"

"How would I open it, I'm lying in my bed,
And so is my husband who holds me in his arms,
He holds me and will hold me all night long."
"Open the door, open, you bride!"

"You'll come back tomorrow in the mid-morning,
My husband won't be home, he'll be working."
"Open the door, open, you bride!"
(1) In French, "amour" (love) is masculine in singular and feminine in plural. Besides, in songs, you often find "amours" (most often in plural) referring to the sweetheart (whether male or female) with the pronouns corresponding to "amours" and not to the actual sweetheart.
(2) It usually refers to the Atlantic Ocean.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LA VIOLETTE DOUBLE
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:40 AM

LA VIOLETTE DOUBLE
(French)

La violette double,
Doublons-la, ladérira
Le vent la dédoublera.

RADdO : EA 00691
THE DOUBLE VIOLET


The double violet
Let's double it, laderira,
The wind will unfold it.


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