Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


The French 'Voice of the People' set

DigiTrad:
ALOUETTE
AUPRES DE MA BLONDE
CHEVALIERS DE LA TABLE RONDE
FRERE JACQUES
LE TEMPS DES CERISES


Related threads:
Lyr Add: La Laine Des Moutons (trad. France) (3)
Lyr Req: fere jake (frere jacques) (8)
Lyr Req: French translations of familiar songs (38)
Tune Req: Chevaliers de la Table Ronde (25)
ADD: French song, J'ai ma combine - translate? (26)
Lyr Req: Le Petit Mercelot (18)
(origins) Origins: Alouette - various versions (9)
Lyr Req: Auprès de Ma Blonde (10)
Les Chansons de la France (97)
French songs in English translation (36)
Lyr Req: La Vierge Eponine (Freres Jacques) (9)
Lyr Req: French folk songs (161)
Seeking French translations of hymns (6)
Music creating 'French cafe' atmosphere (46)
Children's songs in french about the sea (8)
Req: english language version of 'le Gabier Noir' (10)
French folk song - Sur le Pont d'Auvignon (33)
French Canadian songs (41)
Lyr Add: French Canadian Songs- Voyages sur Mer (28)
Vive la French (74)
Lyr Req: The French Song (Quand le soleil dit...) (46)
60s protest songs sung in French (26)
Looking for a simple French song (47)
Lyr Add: French canons (multi-part songs) (35)
traditional music in France (15)
Lyr Req: Alouette parody (English version) (17)
Lyr Req: Les Roses Blanches: 'C'est aujourd'hui... (5)
Lyr Add: Le Temps des Cerises (11)
Lyr Add: La Chanson de L'Oignon / J'Aime L'Oignon (4)
Help/Lyr Add: Sur les Bancs de Terre-Nueve (4)
Lyr Add: Adieu Mignon (Ambroise Thomas) (1)
Lyr Req: chansons de bienvenue (3)
Lyr Req: Sur le Pont d'Avignon (16)
Help: Any Francophone Trenet/Piaf fans? (56)
Lyr Add: Alouetteski (parody of Alouette) (3)


Desert Dancer 30 Jun 10 - 11:22 PM
Desert Dancer 30 Jun 10 - 11:32 PM
Desert Dancer 30 Jun 10 - 11:33 PM
Desert Dancer 05 Jul 10 - 09:12 AM
GUEST,Ed 05 Jul 10 - 09:20 AM
Jack Campin 05 Jul 10 - 11:25 AM
Anglo 05 Jul 10 - 12:50 PM
Joe Offer 05 Jul 10 - 01:10 PM
brezhnev 05 Jul 10 - 01:11 PM
Monique 05 Jul 10 - 01:43 PM
McGrath of Harlow 05 Jul 10 - 02:06 PM
Matthew Edwards 05 Jul 10 - 03:03 PM
dick greenhaus 05 Jul 10 - 03:37 PM
Richard Mellish 05 Jul 10 - 04:39 PM
Jack Campin 06 Jul 10 - 08:22 AM
katlaughing 14 Nov 10 - 02:55 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:03 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:04 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:05 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:06 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:06 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:07 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:08 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:09 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:10 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:11 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:11 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:12 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:12 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:13 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:13 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:15 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:15 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:15 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:16 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:16 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:17 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:18 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:18 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:20 PM
Monique 20 Dec 10 - 06:24 PM
Desert Dancer 20 Dec 10 - 10:38 PM
Mr Happy 21 Dec 10 - 03:15 AM
Matthew Edwards 21 Dec 10 - 05:29 AM
Monique 21 Dec 10 - 07:00 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:37 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:38 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:38 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:39 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:40 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:41 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:42 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:43 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:43 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:44 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:46 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:46 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:47 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:48 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:49 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:49 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:50 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:51 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:52 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:52 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:53 AM
Monique 23 Dec 10 - 08:55 AM
Monique 27 Dec 10 - 04:26 PM
Monique 27 Dec 10 - 04:27 PM
Monique 27 Dec 10 - 04:29 PM
Monique 27 Dec 10 - 04:29 PM
Monique 27 Dec 10 - 04:32 PM
Monique 27 Dec 10 - 04:34 PM
Monique 27 Dec 10 - 04:35 PM
Monique 27 Dec 10 - 04:36 PM
Monique 27 Dec 10 - 04:38 PM
Monique 27 Dec 10 - 04:38 PM
Monique 27 Dec 10 - 04:41 PM
Monique 28 Dec 10 - 06:09 PM
Phil Edwards 28 Dec 10 - 06:37 PM
Monique 03 Jan 11 - 02:23 PM
Monique 03 Jan 11 - 02:25 PM
Monique 03 Jan 11 - 02:26 PM
Monique 03 Jan 11 - 02:28 PM
Monique 03 Jan 11 - 02:31 PM
Monique 03 Jan 11 - 02:33 PM
Monique 03 Jan 11 - 02:34 PM
Monique 03 Jan 11 - 02:36 PM
Monique 03 Jan 11 - 02:37 PM
Monique 03 Jan 11 - 02:40 PM
Monique 03 Jan 11 - 02:43 PM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 06:54 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 06:56 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 06:57 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:02 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:04 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:05 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:07 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:08 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:09 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:10 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:12 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:14 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:15 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:15 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:16 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:17 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:18 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:19 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:21 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:22 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:34 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:35 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:37 AM
Monique 05 Jan 11 - 07:39 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:02 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:03 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:05 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:06 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:08 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:09 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:11 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:12 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:13 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:20 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:21 AM
Monique 09 Jan 11 - 04:22 AM
Thomas Stern 10 Jan 11 - 09:12 PM
Monique 14 Jan 11 - 12:50 PM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:19 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:21 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:25 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:27 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:28 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:31 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:35 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:40 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:42 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:44 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:46 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:48 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:49 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:55 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:56 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:57 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 02:59 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 03:00 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 03:00 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 03:02 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 03:03 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 03:04 AM
Monique 15 Jan 11 - 03:08 AM
Joe Offer 15 Jan 11 - 04:20 AM
Matthew Edwards 15 Jan 11 - 05:12 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:21 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:25 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:27 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:30 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:35 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:38 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:41 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:44 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:46 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:49 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:53 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 07:57 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 08:00 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 08:03 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 08:07 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 08:11 AM
Monique 17 Jan 11 - 08:15 AM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 05:34 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 05:36 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 05:39 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 05:42 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 05:45 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 05:48 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 05:50 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 05:53 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 05:55 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 06:00 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 06:03 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 06:06 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 06:11 PM
Monique 20 Jan 11 - 06:14 PM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 05:45 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 05:53 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 05:57 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 06:06 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 06:15 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 06:19 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 06:22 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 06:28 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 06:31 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 06:37 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 06:48 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 06:58 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 07:01 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 07:06 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 07:14 AM
Monique 26 Jan 11 - 07:25 AM
Guillaume 11 Feb 11 - 09:21 AM
Monique 16 Feb 11 - 03:04 PM
GUEST,Marilena 06 Sep 11 - 11:03 AM
Monique 06 Sep 11 - 11:18 AM
GUEST,Big Roly 23 Sep 11 - 04:35 AM
Monique 23 Sep 11 - 05:57 AM
GUEST,Big Roly 23 Sep 11 - 10:38 AM
Monique 23 Sep 11 - 12:31 PM
GUEST,Guillaume 03 Nov 11 - 11:10 AM
GUEST,Fred McCormick 05 Aug 14 - 06:27 AM
GUEST,Fred McCormick 05 Aug 14 - 07:27 AM
Monique 06 Aug 14 - 07:10 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: Une Anthologie des Musiques Traditionelles
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 11:22 PM

Catching up on my Musical Traditions reading, I came on the review by Rod Stradling of this 10-cd set that has only gotten one passing mention here: Une Anthologie des Musiques Traditionelles, Frémeaux & Associés FA 5260.

Says Rod, "This is not so much a review as a brief overview of this fabulous 10-CD set of the traditional music of France ... a French Voice of the People, as its compiler, Guillaume Veillet, described it to me a few years ago when he had just received the go-ahead on the project."

The set divides the music up geographically
1. Bretagne
2. France de L'Ouest
3. Auvergne et Limousin
4. Centre France
5. Sud Ouest
6. Méditerranée
7. Alpes, Nord et Est
8. Corse
9. France d'Outre-Mer
10. Français d'Amérique

There are many RealAudio clips in the article, which I couldn't get to work on my Mac, even with a freshly downloaded version of RealPlayer. Bummer, because I don't think I'll be able to acquire this any time soon. But I may have to start saving my pennies.

Available at: www.audio-archives.com/en/catalogue/fiches/e_world_music_france_FA5260.htm for just €80 with free shipping worldwide. And you can find full details, track lists, etc at: www.fremeaux.com.

~ Becky in Tucson


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 11:32 PM

Undoubtedly Dick Greenhaus of Camsco can get it for you; a web search also brings up CDRoots, which will special order it for $119 plus shipping, Borders online, too.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 11:33 PM

A more direct link to the page at the Fremeaux site: click


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 09:12 AM

refresh


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: GUEST,Ed
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 09:20 AM

Lokks really interesting, Becky.

Thanks for the heads up.

There are many RealAudio clips in the article, which I couldn't get to work on my Mac, even with a freshly downloaded version of RealPlayer.

I couldn't get them to work in Windows either, for what it's worth.

Quite why Rod doesn't use mp3s is a mystery. RealAudio is pretty much out of date as far as I can tell.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Jack Campin
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 11:25 AM

I sent an email to Rod Stradling, and got a rather unhelpful reply saying to google for the free RealPlayer application.

I am rather unwilling to do that, as I have used a few versions over the years and they were all an utter fucking nightmare, making themselves the default application for situations where they weren't wanted and displaying intrusive "pay up for the registered version" dialogs every time you wanted to listen to anything. I thought I might still have it on this machine (Intel Mac Mini, MacOS Tiger) but mercifully it seems to have got lost in an upgrade.

So I was hoping there might be a third-party app that can play this stuff with less hassle. VLC can't (it can handle most other audio formats); neither can Miro, iTunes, Spotify or Vox. Ideas?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Anglo
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 12:50 PM

I haven't managed to play Rod's sound samples for some time, and I've been using the latest Mac version of the "official" Real Player app, the free one. I'm certainly not going to pay for their upgrade to test that out. What I have will not play them and Rod knows that, and has attempted to explain why he insists on still using that format. (Perhaps it does work on the PC version).

I do the recommend the French set. Lots of things here, some great singing, odd parade music, a lot of instrumentals, some of it quite weird. And lots of non-mainstream "French" from Corsica and former (maybe some current, my political geography isn't up to date) French colonies. I think I got it from the Fremaux site. I forget whether shipping was free or reasonable (to the US), but I thought it was a bargain.

If anyone wants to hear a specific track or two, PM me with an email address. The site does have a track listing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 01:10 PM

The Mustrad article is here (click). I did't have any trouble playing the RealAudio clips. I'm using Windows 7 with the free version of RealPlayer. You may have better luck if you download the clips, and then attempt to play them.

-Joe-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: brezhnev
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 01:11 PM

you can hear samples of all of the tracks on amazon.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 01:43 PM

I can hear the whole of it on Musicme though I don't know if you can from outside France but it might be worth a try.
UPDATE - APRIL 10 2011 The link above is dead.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 02:06 PM

Only thirty-second samples evidently available outside Francvia Musicmee, without signing up for a premium account. But that's still a way to hear some great stuff.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 03:03 PM

I don't recall having signed up to any sort of premium account with Musicme, but I've just been able to listen to the whole 8min plus of the Breton ballad 'Skolvan' sung by the magnificent Marie-Josèphe Bertrand and I'm in England. Also I've been able to listen to the RealAudio clips on the MT website without RealPlayer taking over as default player.

But I bought the CD collection anyway last year on the strength of Rod's enthusiastic notice and I'd very strongly recommend it as a great resource for anyone interested in traditional songs and tunes. There is a tremendous diversity of styles that is fascinating to explore. Vic Smith gave it a great review in March 2010 fRoots magazine.

The texts for the songs can be found on the Fremeaux website linked to by Becky above, but it would be really helpful to have a resource like the Musical Traditions 'Voice of the People' Suite with more information about the songs, the tunes, the singers, the musicians and the traditions they represent.

Matthew


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 03:37 PM

CAMSCO will be carrying the set---as soon as I can establish contact with an English-speaking distributor.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 04:39 PM

Apropos Real Audio: Rod recommended "Real Alternative" to me and it certainly allows me to hear the MusTrad clips. Just Google for it.

Richard


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Jack Campin
Date: 06 Jul 10 - 08:22 AM

I went to the Real Alternative site.

It's Windows-only.

I give up.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: katlaughing
Date: 14 Nov 10 - 02:55 PM

Just followed Monique's link. I'd missed this thread. Wow! Dick, I'll be calling you for this one, for sure!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD:Approchez pour entendre la chanson d'une fille
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:03 PM

Here are the lyrics and a translation to the first song of the 1st CD, i.e. Brittany. The translations are just what the lyrics mean, no more and I hope no less!

Link to the Frémeaux's leaflet of this CD

APPROCHEZ POUR ENTENDRE LA CHANSON D'UNE FILLE
(French)

Approchez pour entendre la chanson d'une fille (bis)
La chanson d'une fille belle comme le jour
C'est son coquin de frère qui veut lui faire l'amour.

Son père aussi sa mère vont à la promenade (bis)
Appelait sa (1) servante d'aller voir au chemin
D'aller voir si son père ou si sa mère revient.

L'a pris, l'a embrassée (2), l'a montée dans sa chambre (bis)
En lui disant : "Petite, quoique tu es ma sœur ,
Il faut que je te dise, où (3) j'aurai ton honneur !"

"Pensez à Dieu, pensez, pensez à Dieu mon frère (bis)
Pensez à Dieu mon frère, au grand Dieu tout-puissant
Aurais-tu le courage d'y mélir notre sang ?"

Le bruit fut entendu par tout le voisinage (bis)
Il fut jugé à pendre, à pendre ou à tuer
Dans la ville de Nantes, le jour d'un grand marché.

Coirault : 9711 Le frère amoureux de sa sœur I
RADdO : 05296.
COME CLOSER/NEAR TO HEAR THE SONG OF A GIRL


Come closer/near to hear the song of a girl,
The song of a girl as beautiful as the day
The rascal of his brother wants to make love to her.

His father and his mother go to have a walk
He told (called) his/her servant to check the way
To go to see if his father or if his mother comes back.

He took her, kissed/hugged her, took her in his bedroom
Telling her "Little one, though you are my sister,
I must tell you, where I'll have your honor!"

"Think of God, think, think of God, my brother
Think of God, my brother, of great God all-mighty
Would you have the courage to mix our bloods?"

The noise was heard by all the neighborhood
He was sentence to be hung, be hung or killed
In the town of Nantes, on a day of great market.


(1) As in all the Romance languages, we only know whether it's his or her by the context and here I'd say it's her. Ditto for the bedroom.
(2) In those old songs you can never know for sure the meaning of the verb "embrasser". It originally meant "to hug" "to take in one's arms" (Cf Sp. "abrazar") while to kiss was the verb "baiser" (hence the noun "un baiser" = a kiss). The meaning of the verb "baiser" came to mean "to fuck" though the meaning of the noun kept its original meaning so far, so the verb "embrasser" passed to mean "to kiss" while to hug needed to be formulated as "to take in one's arms". The shift happened before the end of the 17th century because Molière used the double entendre in one of his play, but you don't know how old those songs are –at least I don't- and when did the shift in the meaning happen outside the capital. The verb is as rude as its English equivalent.
Well, it could be that he kissed her or that he hugged her though I suppose that he first hugged her and not kissed her before taking her in his/her bedroom for she'd have protested before but who knows for sure?
Later I've been thinking that "L'a prise, l'a embrassée, l'a montée dans sa chambre" could also translate as "He took/grabbed/seized her, kissed her, carried her upstairs in her/his bedroom" which would explain that he kissed her and didn't protest wildly. Btw, I copied it as "l'a prise, l'a embrassée..." while it's copied as "l'a prit...". It can't be. Either it's "La prit", preterit tense (= took her) or it's "l'a prise", present perfect tense (lit.= "has taken her"). In Fr. the past participle conjugated with "avoir" (to have) agrees with the direct object when the latter is placed before the verb the same way it does in Oc and Italian. Besides, unlike in the other Romance languages (though I don't know about Romanian) the preterit tense in Fr is now only used in literature, songs included but you can find both tenses in the same song with no difference as to the aspect of the verb, it's just about rhyming and the number of syllables.
(3) I really can't figure out what this "où" stands for: though "I must tell you where I'll have your honor" indeed has a meaning, it doesn't make sense. I'd rather think this "ou" sound is the result of some mishearing or some misinterpretation, it could be "oui, j'aurai ton honneur", it'd make more sense. Unless it'd imply "the 'where' is here".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD: Passet eo gouel ar rouaned
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:04 PM

PASSET EO GOUEL AR ROUANED
(Breton)

Passet eo gouel ar rouaned ha tostaad 'ra da Veularjez,
Ha 'vo gwelet an dud yaouank 'tond da zañsal war ar hê.

Ar re goz hag ar veleien, troet int gand ar zermonio,
O klask lakaad an dud yaouank da zilezel an dañso.

O ni a gano hag a zañso hag a raio goab anê,
Barz ar bed-mañ ni a zañso, er bed all ni ray ive.

Evid diskenn barz ar zal vraz e oa kalz a varchennou,
A oa leun a dachou melen, traoñ ha kreh, ha penn-da-benn.

Hag eno 'oa diou renkad diaoulou, unan anê 'beb tu d'ar zal,
Oa gate beb a 'forh houarn, 'vid o brochou da zañsal.

RADdO : 06376.
THE TWELFTH NIGHT IS OVER


The Twelfth Night is over, Fat Tuesday is getting near
And we'll see the young people come to dance on the quay

The old people and the priests are inclined to moralize,
Trying to bring the youths to abandon dances

Oh, we'll sing, we'll dance, we'll laugh at them,
Down here we'll dance, in after-life, we'll do too.

To go down to the great hall, there were many stairs
Full of yellow nails, at the bottom, at the top and all along (all the way)

There, there were two rows of devils, one on each side of the room
To put them on a spit and make them dance.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD: Apportez-nous à boire
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:05 PM

APPORTEZ-NOUS À BOIRE
(French)

Apportez-nous à boire,
Faites venir Fanchon. (1) (bis)
Apportez du vin de Champagne,
Nous en boirons tant qu'il est bon.

Le vin n'est pas un crime,
Dieu ne le défend pas. (bis)
Il aurait fait des arrosoirs
S'il fallait qu'on n'en buvait pas.

Les moutons vivent d'herbage,
Les papillons de fleurs. (bis)
Et toi z'et moi, chère mignonette,
Viverons-nous de cœur en cœur ? (2)

L'amour n'est pas un crime,
Dieu ne la défend pas. (bis)
Il aurait fait des cœurs de marbre,
S'il fallait qu'on ne s'entraimait pas.

Coirault : 1516 Aimer n'est pas un crime
RADdO : 00529.
BRING US SOMETHING TO DRINK


Bring us something to drink
Have Fanchon come here
Bring us wine from Champagne
We'll drink some while it's good.

Wine is not a crime
God doesn't forbid it
He would have made watering cans
If we must not drink any (wine)

The sheep live from grass,
The butterflies (live) from flowers
And you and me, dear cutie one,
Will we live from heart to heart?

Love is not a crime,
God doesn't forbid it,
He would have made hearts of marble
If we must not love each other /one another.


(1) Fanchon is a pet name for Françoise. A more Breton pet name for it is "Soizic"
(2) "Viverons-nous" (standard "vivrons-nous", I suppose it was to make the lyrics match the tune) "de cœur en cœur": I don't fully understand what the author really meant, maybe it meant "will we live going from one heart to another", i.e. "will we live going from one lover/sweetheart to another without ever coming together?"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LAVAR DIN ME 'TA PAOTR YAOUANK
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:06 PM

LAVAR DIN ME 'TA PAOTR YAOUANK
(Breton)

Lavar din me 'ta paotr yaouank
Rigodo fardifardo
Peur e skrivi da embannoù ? Falarinette.
Rigodo falifardo falarino

Na pa vezo e Plougerne
Merc'hed mouzhet diouzh ar c'hafe.

Na pa vezo mui na bagoù
Na moukled e pont Treglonou.

Na pa vezo 'barzh e Plougin
Polotrez diouzh ar gwez sapin.

Na pa vezo 'barzh e Bourc'h-Wenn
Un tammig berroc'h o lostenn.

Na pa vezo e Gwiproñvel
Dresoc'h he c'hoef gant Gabrielle.

Na pa vezo e Plabenneg
Ul litrad gwin 'vit daou wenneg.

Na pa vezo e Plouvian
Kafe ha te da verenn-vihan.

Na pa vezo e Lesneven
Kavet brennig e-touez ar foenn.

Pa vezo e Lanhouarne
Drebet ar bleiz, gant Sant Herve

Na pa vezo e Kerlouan
Añdiv en iliz o tiwan.

Na pa vezo e Lilia
Tout ar c'hezeg o vrennika.

Na pa vezo ar baotred vat
Diskroget diouzh ar chopinad.

RADdO : 06377
TELL ME YOUNG MAN


Tell me, young man
Rigodo fardifardo
When will you call the banns? Falarinette.
Rigodo falifardo falarino

When there are in Plouguerneau
Women frowning upon their coffee.

Where there are neither more boats
Nor mussels at Tréglonou bridge.

Where there are in Plouguin
Plums to (hanging from) the fir trees.

When, in Bourg-Blanc, they wear
Shorter skirts.

When, in Guipronvel,
Gabrielle's bonnet is more upright.

When, in Plabennec, there is
One liter of wine for two pence*.

When there is in Plouvien,
Coffee and tea for tea-time.

When in Lesneven
We'll find limpets among the hay.

When in Lanhouarneau
The wolf is eaten by Saint-Hervé.

When in Kerlouan
Endives grow within the church.

When in Lilia
All the horses are gathering limpets.

When the good boys
Have dropped their glasses/bottles of wine.

* "sou" small currency, worth 1/20 franc

You can listen to this song here


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: À DIX HEURES DANS CES VERTS PRÉS
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:06 PM

À DIX HEURES DANS CES VERTS PRÉS
(French)

À dix heures dans ces verts prés,
Quat' patates, un brin d' porée, (bis)
Crénom de Diousse !*
Quat' patates, un brin d' porée, ça fait d'la bonne soupe. (bis)

À neuf heures dans ces verts prés…

RADdO : 06378.
AT TEN O'CLOCK IN THESE GREEN MEADOWS


At ten o'clock, in these green meadows
Four potatoes, some chard(s) (x2)
God damn it!
Four potatoes, some chard(s), it makes good soup (x2)

At nine o'clock, in these green meadows….

* The whole form of "Crénom de Diousse" is "sacré nom de Dieu" (God's holy name), "diousse" being used instead of "Dieu" to avoid blasphemy unless it was borrowed from elsewhere and written the French way (could be from us Occitan, but it's only an idea of mine)

Sheet music
This song and the two songs below are Rond Saint Vincent dancing songs. You can see rond St Vincent danced


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: Y A SIX ÉPILLES DANS MA COURONNE
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:07 PM

Y A SIX ÉPILLES DANS MA COURONNE
(French)

Y a six épilles dans ma couronne,
La fleur du genet s'envole.
Rossignolet du bois joli,
Les amants qui s'entraiment
Se marieront-ils ? Oh oui !

Y a cinq épilles…

RADdO : 06379.
THERE ARE SIX (WHEAT) EARS IN MY GARLAND


There are six (wheat) (1) ears in my garland (2)*
The broom flower flies away.
Little nightingale from the pretty wood,
Will the lovers who love each other
Get married? Oh yes!

There are five ears…

(1) actually, "ears" of anything, it's not mentioned, but just "6 ears" sounded weird to my ears
(2) couronne is a crown or a wreath or any round garland.

You have a slightly different version with lyrics, midi, mp3 rendition here. Scroll down till you find "Pays de Redon" in green near the middle, then click on the 3rd song "J'ai dix épilles à ma couronne".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: IL A PASSÉ PAR ICI TROIS FILEURS DE LAINE
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:08 PM

IL A PASSÉ PAR ICI TROIS FILEURS DE LAINE
(French)

Il a passé par ici trois fileurs de laine (bis)
Le premier qui passera file file filera
Le premier qui passera filera la laine

Il a passé par ici deux fileurs de laine…

RADdO : 06380.
THREE WOOL SPINNERS


Three wool spinners passed by here
The first who will pass will spin, spin, spin
The first who will pass will spin the wool.

Two wool spinners passed by here…


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: SKOLVAN, SKOLVAN, ESKOB LEON
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:09 PM

SKOLVAN, SKOLVAN, ESKOB LEON
(Breton)

Skolvan, Skolvan, eskob Leon
a zo deuet da greiz ul lann da chom,

a zo deuet da chom da greiz ul lann
En-kichen forest Kaniskan.

Pan a mamm Skolvan da welet he farkoù
e kavas an tan war ar harzoù.

"Ma bennoezh ha hani Doue
Piv en deus ho lakaet aze
nemet ha ma mab Skolvan a ve ?"

Pan a mamm Skolvan da welet an dour
e kavas ur feunteun e toull he dor.

"Ma bennoezh ha hani Doue
D'an nep en deus ho lakaet aze
nemet ha ma mab Skolvan a ve."

Pan a mamm Skolvan da gousket
Terribl holl e veze okupet.

"Piv a zo aze, piv a da aze
Ken diwezhat-se war ar vale
nemet ha ma mab Skolvan a ve ?"

"Tevet ma mamm, ne ouelet ket
Ho mab Skolvan a zo daet d'ho kwelet."

"Mag eo ma mab Skolvan a zo aze
Ma malloezh dezhañ da vont alese."

ne oa ket he ger perachuvas
E dad paeron a rañkontras.

"Ma filhor paour, din e lâret
Deus a ven a teuet ha men ec'h et ?"

"Deus ar purkatoer donet a ran
Sar an ifern monet a ran."

"Ma filhor paour, deuet war ho kiz
Ha me a c'houlennay evidoc'h iskuiz."

"Ya, seizh vle zo ec'h on war an henchoù
E treso ma gwall basajoù.

O ya toud holl am eus [sedet]
Met hani ma mamm baour n'em eus ket."

"Ma filhor paour, deuet war ho kiz
Ha me a c'houlennay evidoc'h iskuiz."

"Ma c'homer baour, kriat oc'h-c'hwi,
Pa ne bardonet ket ho krouadur."

"Penaos Doue, en pardoniñ
D'ar maleurioù en deus graet din ?

Lazho teir dimeus e c'hoarezed
Ha lâret e oent inosanted,
ne oe ket c'hoazh e oe e vrasañ pec'hed.

Seizh iliz parroz en deus entanet
Ya, [nav bern traoù] en doe poazhet,
ne oe ket c'hoazh e oe e vrasañ pec'hed.

Mont en iliz ha torro holl ar gwer
Lazho ar beleg deus an aoter
ne oe ket c'hoazh e oe e vrasañ pec'hed.

Ma lever bihan en doe kollet
Ya skrivet gant gwad hon Salver
Hennezh a oe e vrasañ pec'hed."

"Tevet ma mamm, ne ouelet ket
Ho lever bihan n'eo ket kollet,

emañ er mor don, tregont gourhed
En beg ur pesk bihan e viret.

Tevet ma mamm, ne ouelet ket
emañ war an daol rond ha eñ rentet
ne faota e-barzh nemet teir feuilhenn c'hlebiet,

Unan gant dour, un all gant gwad,
Unan gant daeroù ho tivlagad."

"Ma bennoezh a ran d'am mab Skolvan
Pan eo kavet ma lever bihan."

Pa gan ar c'hog d'an hanternoz
e kana an aeled er baradoz.

Pa gan ar c'hog da c'houloù deiz
e kana an aeled dirak Doue,
Ha Sant Skolvan a ra ivez.

Malrieu : 0258 Yannig Skolan
SKOLVAN, SKOLVAN, BISHOP OF LÉON


Skolvan, Skolvan, bishop of Léon
Has come to dwell in the middle of a moor,

Has come to dwell in the middle of a moor,
Near the forest of Quénécan.

When Skolvan's mother was going to see her fields
She found the slopes on fire.

"My blessing and God's
To who put you there,
Unless it'd be my son Skolvan"

When Skolvan's mother was going to fetch water,
She found a fountain by her door"

"My blessing and God's
To who put you there,
Unless it'd be my son Skolvan"

When Skolvan's mother was going to bed
She was terribly worried:

Who's here, who comes here
To stroll, so late
If it weren't my son Skolvan?"

"Hush, mother, don't you cry,
Your son Skolvan has come to see you"

"If it's not my son Skolvan here,
Let him leave with my curse."

She hardly had ended her talk
When he met his godfather:

"My poor godson, tell me,
Where do you come from and where do you go to?"

"I come from the purgatory
I'm going to hell."

"My poor godson, retrace your steps
And I'll ask forgiveness for you"

"Yes, I've been on the roads for seven years
To mend my bad steps.

Yes, I've gained all the forgiveness
But my poor mother's"

"My poor godson, retrace your steps
And I'll ask forgiveness for you"

"My poor woman (1), how cruel you are
Not to forgive your child."

"My God, how would I forgive
The misdeeds he did to me?

To kill three of his sisters
And pretend they were innoncent,
It even wasn't his greatest sin.

To set fire to seven churches
And to burn [nine bunches of things]
It even wasn't his greatest sin.

To go to church and break all the stainglass,
To kill the priest in front of the altar
It even wasn't his greatest sin.

He lost my little book
Written with the Savior's blood.
That was his greatest sin."

"Hush, mother, don't you cry,
Your little book isn't lost,

It's thirty fathoms in the depths of the sea,
In the mouth of a little fish that keeps it.

Hush, mother, don't you cry,
It's upon the round table, I gave/brought it back,
Only three wet sheets are missing:

(wet) One by the water, the other by the blood
And one by the tears of your eyes."

"I give my blessing to my son Skolvan
Since my little book was retrieved"

When the rooster sings at midnight,
The angels sing in paradise,

When the roosters sings at daybreak
The angels sing in front of God
And saint Skolvan sings too.

(1) the word "c'homer" which translates in Fr as "commère" -I take it that the word is of Fr origin- is the same that the Sp "comadre". In modern Fr "commère" only means "a gossip" but it also used to mean "woman, neighbor" and it also designated the same as in Sp i.e. what the godfather or the parents of the godchild would call the godmother.

In this version he didn't kill 3 sisters of his, he raped them and then killed their children.
In this document Fañch Postic says that the author of the Barzhaz Breizh mentioned the similarities between this lament and a Welsh poem from the 13th century that can be found in the Black Book of Carmarthen.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LA COMPLAINTE DE SAINT ALEXIS
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:10 PM

LA COMPLAINTE DE SAINT ALEXIS
(French)

Alexis tout aimable
Dès ses plus jeunes ans
Prince très charitable
Son père l' fit s' marier
Avec une noble princesse
Belle comme le jour
L'ornement de la Cour.

Le soir des épousailles
Alexis fut touché
Rentre à son cabinet
Dit adieu-t-à sa femme :
"Il faut que je m'en aille
Aux pays étrangers
Il faut que je m'en aille
Dieu me l'a commandé
Et tiens voilà bague
Ma ceinture à deux tours
Marque de nos amours."

Olympie toute en larmes
Dit à son bien-aimé :
"Auriez-vous le courage
De me laisser z-ici
Dans ce triste veuvage ?
Alexis mon époux
Pourquoi m'épousiez-vous
Mes pleurs et mes soupirs
Ils m'y feront mourir."

Alors il s'embarque
De Thrace en Cilicie
Le grand vent z-et l'orage
Le jeta près d'Ostie
Sur les bords du rivage
Arrive heureusement
À son débarquement.

Aux pauvres il a donné
Ses habits ses richesses
Jusqu'à son bel habit
Galonné de haut prix.

Alors il s'approche
Des valets des carriers
Des valets qui le cherchent
En chemin l'ont trouvé
Mais sans pouvoir le reconnaître
Tant il était changé
Lui ont fait la charité.

Au palais de son père
Il vint se présenter
Sans se faire reconnaître
Il demande à coucher
Dessous un escalier.
"Prince très charitable
Après avoir dîné
Les miettes de votre table
Faites-les moi donner
D'un amour agréable
Je prierai le Seigneur
De bénir vos grandeurs."

Dix-sept ans d' pénitence
Sous ce triste escalier
De jeûne et d'abstinence
Son corps fut mortifié
Les valets et servantes
Crachaient, jetaient sur lui
Les ordures du logis.

Le dévot d'Alexis
Revient prendre l'esprit
Revient prendre l'esprit
Dedans notre logis.

Le pape débonnaire
Au palais est allé
Dans ses mains prend l'écrit
À haute voix la lit
Sa mère de souffrance
Elle pense à mourir
Quand elle eut vu son fils.

Tout le monde regrette
Le dévot d'Alexis
Dévotions parfaites
Viennent de tous pays
Viennent de tous pays
Invoquer Saint-Alexis.

Coirault : 8902 Saint Alexis II (8902).
RADdO : 04087
.
SAINT ALEXIS'S LAMENT


Alexis, very nice,
From his early age,
Very charitable prince,
His father had him married
To a noble princess
As beautiful as the day,
The jewel of the court.

On the wedding night
Alexis was (grace/God) striken,
He entered his study,
Bid (lit. told) his wife farewell:
"I have to go,
To foreign lands
I have to go,
God summons me,
And here is the ring,
My two rounds belt,
Pledge of our love."

Olympia, weeping,
Says to her beloved
"Would you have the courage
To leave me here
In this sad widowhood?
Alexis, my spouse
Why did you marry me?
My tears and my sighs
Will make me die."

Then he embarked/ took to the sea/sailed off
From Thrace to Cilicia
The strong wind and the storm
Threw him near Ostia.
On the sea side
He fortunately arrived
For his disembarkation.(1)

To the poor he gave
His clothes, his wealth
And even his high priced, beautiful habit/coat/jacket/costume????
Trimmed with braid.

Then he goes near
The servants, the quarry-workers.
Servants who were looking for him
Found him on their way
But without been able to recognize him
Because he had changed so much,
They gave him a handout.

At his father's palace
He came to appear
Without aknowledging who he was
He asks to sleep
Under a staircase.
"Very charitable prince,
After you've had dinner,
Have me given
The crumbs from your table.
I'll pray the Lord
To bless your greatness
With a pleasant love.

Seventeen years of penance
Under this sad staircase.
From fast and abstinence
His body was mortified.
The servants and the maids
Would spit and throw at him
The garbage of the house.

The devout Alexis
Comes to give up the ghost,(2)
Comes to give up the ghost
Within our dwelling.

The good-natured pope
Went to the palace.
In his hands, he takes the document/piece of writing
Reads it out loud.
His mother thought to die
From the pain
When she saw her son.

Everybody regrets
The devout Alexis.
Perfect devotions
Come from all countries
Come from all countries
To invoke Alexis.

(1) I don't fully understand it, mostly because it lacks punctuation. Let's say that if there's a period after "Ostie", I take it to mean that he was lucky his trip came to an end on the sea side. If the period is after "rivage", I take it to mean that the boat was thrown on the seaside by the wind and storms and then the disembarkation took place in rather good conditions.
(2) he sings "revient prendre l'esprit" but it makes no sense, there's no "prendre l'esprit" in Fr, while "rendre l'esprit" (also "rendre l'âme") means to give up the ghost, lit. the spirit (l'âme = the soul)

The whole song lacks consistency as to the verbs tenses. It often happens because present tense makes the story more lively and also because French allows to use it for any moment from past to future as far as there's consistency between the main clause and any subordinate clauses within a sentence. Let's say that as far as there's something that can tell you when the event takes place you can say it in the present tense. What you can't do is to use an indicative when a subjunctive is needed –something that English speaking people usually find hard to grab because things are said otherwise in English.

There's a longer version here in the middle of the page.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: SAVET D'UR PLAC'HIG YAOUANK A BARREZ SANT
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:11 PM

SAVET D'UR PLAC'HIG YAOUANK A BARREZ SANT KARADEG
(Breton)

Savet d'ur plac'hig yaouank a barrez Sant Karadeg
'Zo ken glas a zaoulagad ha ruz èl ur boked

N'en doa ken 'met pemdek vlez pa lâre d'he mamm, d'he zad
Ma n'garit ket man dimeziñ, me zo 'vont d'ho kuitaat

Gwallik kourz enta, ma merc'h, evit karet ar baotred
N'oc'h ket c'hoazh 'met c'hwezek vlez, na pemdek arruet

Ne oac'h ket-c'hwi c'hoazh ma mamm, 'lâront, e ma oad-me
'Benn m'ho poa lakaet 'n ho soñj da gariñ ma zad-me

Na pa'm behe-me an tu, an tu hag ar moaian,
Na me 'roahe ur ''voiture'', ha rodoù en argant

Na me 'roahe ur ''voiture'', ha rodoù en argant
Na me 'gasahe ma merc'h da Wened d'ar c'houvant

Na me 'gasahe ma merc'h da Wened d'ar c'houvant
'He laoskahen ket dre-mañ get ar baotred yaouank

Na kar ar baotred yaouank a lâront a zo treitour
Hag a lakahe ma merc'h da golliñ hec'h enor

Na lârit-c'hwi din ma mamm petra 'rin er c'houvant
Nemet friziñ an dantel, soñjal en ur galant

Nemet friziñ an dantel, soñjal en ur galant
Ha skriviñ meur a lizher na d'ar baotred yaouank

A-barzh er c'houvant, ma merc'h, 'd eus ket a c'halanted
Nemet beleion yaouank, mestroù ha seurezed

Nag eno e vehet lakaet 'n ur gambrig alc'hwezet kloz
O na ne sortiahet ket na d'an deiz na d'an noz

Landredig a lanla, lâromp ar wirionez,
'Re 'gar ar merc'hed yaouank a zo fall er-walc'h ivez

'Re 'gar ar merc'hed yaouank a rekahe bout puniset
Na ne raont netra bemdez 'met kaozeal ag ar merc'hed

Teodoù ar baotred yaouank zo ken ruz èl an tan
'Zleahe dezhe bout konduiet da greiz (ar) forest da Rouan

Malrieu : 1027 E-barzh jardin ar minor – Ar c'hoant dimeziñ
IT'S ABOUT A YOUNG MAIDEN OF THE ST CARADEC PARISH


It's about a young maiden of the St Caradec parish
Who has blue eyes and is as red as a flower.

She only was 15 when she was telling her mother and father
If you don't want to marry me, I'll leave you.

It's a little early, daughter, to love the boys,
You're not 16 yet, you didn't turn 15.

Mother, you weren't yet my age
When you took it into your head to love my father.

If I had the means
I'd give a car(riage) with silver wheels

I'd give a car(riage) with silver wheel,
I'd take my daughter to the convent in Vannes.

I'd take my daughter to the convent in Vannes,
I wouldn't leave her here with young boys.

For young boys are treacherous
And would take my daughter's honor.

Tell me, mother, what I would do in the convent
I'd only shirr my apron (1), think of a lover,

I'd only ruffle the apron, think of a lover
And write many letters to (the) young boys.

In the convent, daughter, there are no lovers,
Only young priests, masters and nuns.

There, you'll be locked in a little bedroom
And you'll go out neither day nor night.

Langredig a lanla, let's tell the truth
Those who like young girls are bad too.

Those who like young girls should be punished
They do nothing all day long but talking about girls.

The young boys' tongues are as red as fire,
They should be brought to the heart of the Rennes forest/wood.

(1) I haven't the faintest idea of what it can mean if it ever means something but the literal meaning


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: ME MERH MARIE-LOUISE, UN DÉ 'M ES HÉ...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:11 PM

ME MERH MARIE-LOUISE, UN DÉ 'M ES HÉ HOLLET
(Breton and French)

Me merh Marie-Louise, un dé 'm es hé hollet (bis)
Je l'ai cherchée, je l'ai trouvée, le long de la rivière
Get deu pé tri chiminod yaouank, éh obér en amour

« Me merh Marie-Louise, deit-hui d'er gér me merh. (bis)
- Oh non papa, oh non maman, fillette abandonnée
Avec ces trois jeunes garçons, je suis la bien-aimée


A pe ouiehèh me mamm, peh ken eurus on-mé aman (bis)
Un coupe mon pain, l'autre verse mon vin,
Et l'autre, le verre à la main : "mignonne en veux-tu boire ?"


A pe dostan d'er sul, éh omp hoah eurusoh (bis)
Un fait mon lit, l'autre balaye ma chambre
Et l'autre met mes blonds cheveux à la mode de Paname


Mé hou suppli me mamm, a p'arriùéèt ér gér (bis)
Souhaitez le bonjour à tous les amis, aux garçons du village
Car ils n'ont jamais eu honneur d'avoir mon cœur en gage.


Coirault : 1215. RADdO : 00237.
MY DAUGHTER MARIE-LOUISE, ONE DAY I LOST HER


My daughter Marie-Louise, one day, I lost her
I searched her, I found her along the river
With two or three young vagrants making love to her

My daughter Marie-Louise, come home, my daughter
" Oh no daddy, oh no mommy, abandoned young girl
With these three young men, I'm the beloved (1)


If you knew, mother, how happy I am here
One cuts me bread, one pours me wine,
And the other, with a glass in his hand: 'Cuttie, will you drink any?'


When Sunday comes near, we're even happier
One makes my bed, the other sweeps my bedroom
And the other one dresses my blond air to Paname's fashion (2)


I beg you mother, when you get home
Say hi for me to all my friends, the boys of the village,
For they never had the honor to have my heart as a pledge

(1) this is very literal, you'd rather say "Of these 3 young men I'm the beloved" but it actually means that while she's with these three young men she feels loved, conversely to when she was home with her parents.
(2) Paname is an endearment nickname for Paris. In the early 1900's, Parisians would wear a Panama hat that the workers who dug the Panama Canal brought into fashion


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: MERC'HED AG AR GÊR-MAÑ NEND EO KET ...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:12 PM

MERC'HED AG AR GÊR-MAÑ NEND EO KET ISTIMET
(Breton)

Merc'hed ag ar gêr-mañ nend eo ket istimet,
'deus ket en o fichetoù prizioù butum malet, klamm !
'deus ket en o fichetoù prizioù butum malet.

Butum en frioù, èl ar bleuñv er valan,
Ar verc'h 'lâre d'ar vamm, brem' e krevo Yehann.

Ur priz butum d'ur gwaz, a zo ken agreapl,
Ur priz butum d'ur vaouez, a zo forzh divourrapl.

Ec'h a Yehann d'ar c'hoad, dre 'r fank ha dre 'r vouilhenn,
Ar verc'h 'lâre d'ar vamm, brem' e krevo Yehann.

Ec'h a Yehann d'ar gêr, dre 'r fank ha dre 'r vouilhenn,
Koll 'he deus he dañter, he c'hoef 'ziàr he fenn.

El-se ec'h arru, g'ar merc'hed digempenn,
Mes genomp-ni heneoazh, 'arruo ket c'hoazh èlkent.

Malrieu : 1223 Ar merc'hed hag ar butun mallet
THE GIRLS FROM THIS VILLAGE ARE NOT RESPECTED/PRAISED


The girls from this village are not respected/praised
They don't have in their headscarves pinches of ground tobacco
They don't have in their headscarves pinches of ground tobacco.

Tobacco in the nose, like the flower to the broom,
The daughter would tell her mother "now Joan will croak"(1).

For a man, a snuff is so pleasant,
A snuff for a woman is not recommended.

Joan goes to the wood in the mud and the muck
The daughter would tell her mother "now Joan will croak".

Joan goes home in the mud and the muck
She lost her apron, her bonnet from the top of her head.

She arrives thus with the careless women
But it won't happen the same to us tonight yet.

(1) slang for "die"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: EN PASSANT PAR LE MOULIN BLANC
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:12 PM

EN PASSANT PAR LE MOULIN BLANC
(French)

En passant par le moulin blanc,
J'ai vu la meunière, j'ai vu la meunière,
En passant par le moulin blanc,
J'ai vu la meunière du moulin à vent.

Elle voulait que je la caresse
Et moi qui n'avais pas le temps. (bis)

À tantôt, la belle, à tantôt,
J' t'y caresse et j' t'y caresse
À tantôt, la belle, à tantôt,
J' t'y caresserai comme il faut.

RADdO : 00861.
AS I PASSED BY THE WHITE MILL


As I passed by the white mill,
I saw the miller's wife (1), I saw the miller's wife
As I passed by the white mill,
I saw the miller's wife of the wind mill.

She wanted me to caress her
And I hadn't time to (twice)

See you soon, beauty, see you soon
I'll caress you and I'll caress you
See you soon, beauty, see you soon,
I'll caress you (2) properly.

(1) "meunière" is the feminine form of "meunier" (miller) so it could be a female miller as well though the chances are that in those trad songs it did refer to the miller's wife.
(2) In French the mark of the future lies in the termination of the verb vs the use of "will + vb" in English so the lines 2 and 4 can be understood as "je te caresse-, je te caresse-" with the 4th line having the full form of the verb "je te caresserai" or it can be understood as "je te caresse, je te caresse" present tense "I caress you, I caress you", the last one being the only one in future tense.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: CUEILLIR LE LIN, BELLE, CUEILLIR LE LIN
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:13 PM


CUEILLIR LE LIN, BELLE, CUEILLIR LE LIN
(French)
Cueillir le lin, belle, cueillir le lin,
Tant qu'il y aura du chanvre, du chanvre,
Cueillir le lin, belle, cueillir le lin,
Tant qu'il y aura du grain dans le lin.

Tant qu'il y aura du chanvre, du chanvre,
Tant qu'il y aura du grain dans le lin.

RADdO : 06391.
GATHERING FLAX, BEAUTY, GATHERING FLAX


To gather/gathering flax, beauty, to gather/gathering flax
As long as there'll be hemp, hemp
To gather/gathering flax, beauty, to gather/gathering flax
As long as there'll be seeds in the flax

As long as there'll be hemp, hemp
As long as there'll be seeds in the flax.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: UNE PELLE BLANCHE
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:13 PM

The six short songs below are songs "à curer les runs/rins". During cod fishing, the fishermen would dig lines in the salt in the ship hold in order to put the cods away. This digging was called "curer les runs" (the "runs" were the lines)
UNE PELLE BLANCHE
(French)

Une pelle blanche, une pelle avec son joli manche,
Pelle en haut tu n'en as guère, pelle en bas, tu n'en as pas.

Deux pelles blanches, deux pelles avec leur joli manche,
Pelle en haut tu n'en as guère, Pelle en bas, tu n'en as pas.

RADdO : 06235.
A WHITE SPADE


A white spade, a spade with its pretty handle
Spade up, you don't have much, spade down, you don't have any.

Two white spades, two spades with their pretty handle,
Spade up, you don't have much, spade down, you don't have any.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: MARIE-MARGOT S'ENDORMIT DANS UN PRÉ
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:15 PM

MARIE-MARGOT S'ENDORMIT DANS UN PRÉ
(French)

Marie-Margot s'endormit dans un pré,
Les jambes en l'air et les cuisses écartées,
Tous les corbeaux lui piquent au cul,
Marie-Margot pourquoi t'endormais-tu ?

RADdO : 06382.
MARIE-MARGOT WENT ASLEEP IN A MEADOW


Marie-Margot went asleep in a meadow,
Her legs raised and her thighs spread apart.
All the crows pinch her ass,
Marie-Margot why would you go asleep?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LA MER QUI NOUS BALANCE LE CUL SUR LES...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:15 PM

LA MER QUI NOUS BALANCE LE CUL SUR LES CAILLOUX
(French)

La mer qui nous balance le cul sur les cailloux
Pourvu que j' sauve mes plantes,
Oh j' m'en fous, j' m'en fous, j' m'en fous !

RADdO : 06339.
THE SEA THAT THROWS US WITH OUR ASSES ON THE STONES


The sea that throws us with our asses on the stones,
Let's hope I'll save my plants,
Oh, I don't care, I don't care, I don't care!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: HALTE-À-PATTE, SI TU CONTINUES
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:15 PM

HALTE-À-PATTE, SI TU CONTINUES,
(French)

Halte-à-Patte, si tu continues,
Des marins tu n'en trouveras guère,
Halte-à-Patte, si tu continues,
Des marins tu n'en trouveras plus.

RADdO : 06237.
HALTE-À-PATTE, IF YOU GO ON THIS WAY


Halte-à-Patte, if you go on this way
You won't find many sailors,
Halte-à-Patte, if you go on this way
You will find no more sailors.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: AS-TU CONNU L'AMIE GRIBOUILLE
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:16 PM

AS-TU CONNU L'AMIE GRIBOUILLE
(French)

As-tu connu l'amie Gribouille
C'était la femme d'un cordonnier,
Elle a manié plus d' paires de couilles,
Que son mari ne faisait d' souliers !

RADdO : 06383.
DID YOU KNOW OLD FRIEND GRIBOUILLE


Did you know old friend Gribouille
She was the shoemaker's wife;
She handled more pairs of ballocks
Than what shoes her husband would make!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: PETITE COUTURIÈRE, TON MÉTIER NE VA PLUS
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:16 PM

PETITE COUTURIÈRE, TON MÉTIER NE VA PLUS,
(French)

Petite couturière, ton métier ne va plus,
Les aiguilles sont trop chères,
Il faut jouer du cul !
LITTLE SEAMSTRESS YOUR BUSINESS GOES DOWN


Little seamstress, your business goes down,
Needles are too expensive,
You must use your ass!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: C'ÉTAIT PAR UN LUNDI, JE M'EN FUS VOIR...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:17 PM

C'ÉTAIT PAR UN LUNDI, JE M'EN FUS VOIR MA MIE
(French)

C'était par un lundi, je m'en fus voir ma mie
Et là je la trouvis (1), céleste et endormie.

Je lui ai fait le salut, la belle m'a répondu
D'un air si hardiment :
"J'y vois bien qu'à ta mine et qu'à ton air dolent
L'y a du changement."

Je lui ai demandé : "Qu'avez-vous donc la belle ?"
Je lui ai demandé : "Qu'avez-vous donc Françoëse (Françoise) ?"

"Je veux m'y marier, malgré ma volonté
En seriez-vous d'accord ?
Je veux m'y marier, sans m'y faire consentir
J'aime mieux la mort, souffrir."

"Oh de m'y marier, cela n'est point-z-un crime
Car j' voudrais bien aller faire un p'tit tour en ville.
Oh de m'y marier, cela n'est point-z-étrange
Car j' voudrais bien aller faire un p'tit tour à Nantes.

Auparavant d' partir, j' voudrais bien vous parler
Une heure à mes plaisirs."
"Vous savez quand on part, on reste dans l'oubli,
Peut-être sans revenir.

Cher amant je te dis, tu as le cœur volage
Jamais je n'aurais cru qu' t'aurais eu le courage."

"Allez dans nos jardins, le rossignol est là,
Qu'il vous consolera
Qui cherche vos amours, pourquoi les cherchez-vous ?
Elles sont toutes proches de vous"

RADdO : 06384.
IT WAS ON A MONDAY, I WENT TO SEE MY BELOVED


It was on a Monday, i went to see my beloved/sweetheart
And there I found her, celestial and asleep.

I greeted her, she responded me
In a so bold way
"I can see from you face and your painful look
That something has changed".

I asked her "What's the matter, beauty?"
I asked her "What's the matter Françoëse (Françoise)?

"I want to get married, in spite of my will
Would you agree?
I want to get married, without having my consent,
I'd rather die, suffer.

"Oh, my getting married is no crime
For I'd want to go to (wander in) the city
Oh, my getting married is no strange
For I'd want to go to (wander in) Nantes.

Before leaving, I'd want to talk to you
One hour, to my pleasure."
"You know when we leave, we forget (lit. remain forgetting)
Maybe we don't/won't come back.

Dear lover/sweethear, I tell you, you have a fickle heart
I'd never have thought you'd have the courage."

"Go in our gardens, the nightingale is there,
It'll comfort you,
It'll look for your love, why do you look for it (your love)
It's quite near you."

(1) "Je la trouvis" the correct form of the verb "trouver" in preterit tense is "trouvai" but sometimes in songs you find verbs conjugated with the termination of another group. The French verbs are classified in 3 groups, the ones ending in "er" in the infinitive but "aller" (1st group), those ending in "ir" with the present participle in -issant" (2nd group) all the others being in the 3rd group. Here, "trouver" has the termination of the 2nd group.

I find some lines unclear, I suppose that "I'd never have thought you'd have the courage" means "… the courage to tell me the truth about how you feel/the way your are".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: YANNIG KONGAR A BLOULIO
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:18 PM

YANNIG KONGAR A BLOULIO
(Breton)
Yannig Kongar a Bloulio
Koantañ paotr yaouank a zo 'barzh ar vro.

Yannig Kongar fleur ar werzed
Karantez an holl dimezelled.

Pa 'h ae Yannig Kongar d'al Lev-Draezh,
'Teue an dimezelled tout er-maez.

Hag a lâre an eil eta d'eben :
"Yannig Kongar zo o tremen !"

Yannig Kongar en devoa d'e vamm laret :
"Mari Dili am eus c'hoant da gavet.

Mari Dili a gavan ar c'hoantañ,
Honnezh a blij din ar muiañ.

Honnezh a blij din ar muiañ,
Honnezh a dimezin mar gallan."

"O ma faotr bihan, ma selaouit,
Na n'en em bresit ket.

Ma am eus klevet lâret alies
E oa Mari Dili un dreitourez !

Bet am eus ivez klevet lâret
Blije dezhi ober goap ouzh ar baotred.

Ha gant se, diwallit diouti,
Betek gouzout vec'hiet tromplet ganti."

"Honnezh eo an hini am eus choazet,
Ha honnezh a rankin kaout da bried.

Ur nombr bras a vadoù a reer ganti :
Ober reer ganti ur gourmanant.
Ober reer ganti kalz a arc'hant.
Ur c'harr houarn a reer ivez ganti,
Pevar a gezeg d'eñ konduiñ."

"Na n'eo ket ar binvidigezh, nag ar c'hoantiri,
Na ra tout ar boneur 'barzh an ti.

Eo pa vez yec'hed da labourat,
Ha d'en em selaou, santimant mat.

Pa 'n em glevet an eil gant egile
Honnezh ez eo ar gwir vuhez."

Añfin Yannig Kongar zo dimezet.
Met un nebeud goude, en em wel tourmantet.

Kaer en devoa ober diouzh e wellañ,
Den ebet na gaozee dioutañ.

Kaer en devoa gwellañ ma c'halle labourat,
Den na gaozee dioutañ, na ober dioutañ selloù mat

He mamm, un devezh, devoa dezhi lâret :
"Me karj Yannig Kongar na n'eo netra :
Na na dalv ket ur c'hlasker bara.

M'az pije pelloc'h, emezi, gortozet,
Welloc'h evitañ 'pije kavet."

"Un den 'm boa karet, emezi, wello'ch evitañ
Met evitañ, diouzhin, emezi, ne c'houle ket.
Hag evit-se gant Yannig Kongar ez on aet."

Un devezh o deus 'n em diskutet,
Hag he mamm he devoa dezhi lâret :

"Diouzh ar c'homzoù deuio deus e benn,
'Teus 'met skeiñ gantañ e groaz-nouenn."
Yannig Kongar a zo laouret !
Ken oa o vont davit dour n'en devoa ket gwelet.

Pa oa o vonet davit dour,
N'en devoa ket 'n em welet klañvour.
Met e-barzh an dour p'en devoa sellet,
E galon neuze a zo rannet.

P'en devoa eta kement-se gwelet,
Da di e vamm eo partiet.

Hag en devoa dezhi neuze lâret :
"M'am bije, ma mamm, ac'hanoc'h selaouet
Gant Mari Dili vijen ket dimezet.

Met na 'm eus netra ebet deoc'h da lâret,
Pa eo me ma-unam am boa he choazet.

Mersi a lavaran deoc'h bepred.
Kar n'en deo ket c'hwi 'poa din lâret.

Met a-raok finisiñ ma buhez,
Savit din bremañ un ti nevez.

Savit din bremañ un ti bihan nevez,
E-barzh en kroaz-hent Plouilio,
Lec'h ma welin prosesion Sant-Kado,

Lec'h ma welin prosesion Sant-Kado,
Hag hini Sant-Yann a-wechoù,

Lec'h ma welin ar groaz kaer alaouret
Pehini meur a wech 'm eus bet anezhi douget.

Malrieu : 1143 Ar c'hoant dimeziñ gant ur gakousez
YANNIG KONGAR FROM PLOUMILLIAU


Yannig Kongar from Ploumilliau,
The most handsome young man of the area (1)

Yannig Kongar, the most handsome of all men,
The love of all the maidens.

When Yannig Kongar was going to la Lieue de Grève
All the maidens would go out of their houses

And would tell one another,
"Here's Yannig Kongar passing by!"

Yannig Kongar told his mother,
"I want (to have) Marie Tilly.

It's Marie Tilly I find the prettiest,
She's the one I like the best,

She's the one I like the best
And I'll marry her if I can."

"Oh, my little one, listen to me,
Have no rush.

I've often heard it said
That Marie Tilly was treacherous!

I've also heard it said
That she like to make fun of the boys.

For this reason, beware of her
In case she'd betray you."

"It's her I chose,
Her I must have for a wife" (lit.spouse)

She has many possessions, from what people tell,
They say she owns a farm,
They say she has much money.
She also owns, they say, an ironed cart
And four horse to draw it."

"Neither is wealth nor beautiful attire
Will make happiness in a house

But enough health to work
And (enough) feelings (love) to get along.

To get along together,
This is real life."

At the end, Yannig Kongar got married
But very soon, he's worried.

However well he could do,
Nobody talked to him.

However well he could work,
Nobody talked to him, nor gave him a good-willing look.

One day, Marie's mother told her (Marie)
"Yannig Kongar is nothing,
He's not worth more than a beggar.

If you'd wanted to wait a little more, she said,
You'd have found better than him"

"I'd have found one, she said, better than him,
But he didn't want me
And this is the reason why Yannig Kongar got me".

One day, they fought
And her mother told her,

"According to what he'll say,
It only to give him the Extreme Unction"
Yannig Kongar is leprous!
He didn't see anything (he wasn't aware) before he went to fetch water.

When he was going to fetch water,
He didn't think he was was ill
But when he saw his reflection in the water,
His heart was broken (lit. split)

When he saw that,
He went to his mother's house.

Then he told her,
"If I'd listened to you, mother,
I wouldn't have married Marie Tilly.

But I have nothing to reproach you
Since I chose her myself.

I thank you anyway,
For it wasn't you who recommended her to me.

But before my life is over (finishing my life)
Have a new house built for me.

Have now a new little house for me.
On the Ploumilliau crossroad,
From where I'll see Saint Kado's procession,

From where I'll see Saint Kado's procession
And sometimes Saint John's.

From where I'll see the beautiful golden cross
That I carried more than once.

Note: It doesn't show in English that mother and son address each other as "c'hwi" (formal you) while Marie Tilly's mother addresses her daughter as "te" (informal you) which I take to tell more about their moral standards than their actual social positions.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: JE ME SUIS ENGAGÉ POUR L'AMOUR D'UNE...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:18 PM

JE ME SUIS ENGAGÉ POUR L'AMOUR D'UNE FILLE
(French)

Je me suis engagé pour l'amour d'une fille (bis)
Les gens qui m'ont logé m'ont bien mal renseigné
Ils m'ont dit d' m'en aller sans avoir mon congé.

Dans mon chemin faisant rencontre mon capitaine.
Mon capitaine m'a dit : "Où vas-tu mon ami ?"
"Là-bas dans ces vallons rejoindre mon bataillon."

Là-bas dans ces vallons s'engage une bataille
J'ai mis mon sac à terre, j'ai pris mon sabre en main
Je me suis battu là comme un vaillant soldat.

Du premier coup tirant tua mon capitaine
Mon capitaine est mort mais moi je vis encore
Peut-être avant trois jours ce sera bien mon tour.

Celui qui me tuera sera mon camarade
Tu m'y banderas les yeux avec un mouchoir bleu
Tu m'y feras mourir sans m'y faire trop languir.

Soldats de mon pays ne dites pas à ma mère
Oh dites-lui j' me suis fiancé à la plus belle fille
Qu'il y a dans le quartier
Ah dites-lui plutôt que je me suis engagé
Sur un navire anglais
Qu'elle m'y verra jamais

Coirault : 6803 Le déserteur qui tue son capitaine.
Malrieu : 0723 An dezertour
RADdO : 00205.
I ENLISTED MYSELF FOR A GIRL'S LOVE


I enlisted myself for a girl's love (twice)
The people who accommodated me informed me very badly
They told me to go away without having a leave/furlough.

On my way, I came across my captain.
My captain told me "Where are you going, my friend?"
"There, in that vale, to joint my batallion"

There in these vales, a battle began,
I put my bag on the ground, I took my saber in my hand,
I fought there like a valient soldier.

On the first strike, I killed my captain,
My captain is dead but I still live.
Maybe before three days it'll be my turn.

The one who'll kill me will be my comrade.
You'll blindfold me with a blue handkerchief,
You'll make me die without taking too long.(1)

Soldiers of my land (2), don't tell my mother,
Oh tell her I got engaged to the most beautiful girl
In the neighborhood.
Ah, rather tell her than I enlisted myself
On an English ship,
That she'll never see me again.
(1) "sans me faire trop languir" means "without having me long for it"
(2) "pays" here doesn't mean "country" but land, area, neighborhood, homeplace.

This song can be found all over France though it's said to originate in Berry. Some versions have him asking for his heart to be wrapped in a white napkin and to be brought to his sweetheart and for his mother to be told he's in Bordeaux, made a captive by the English.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: NA MAG AN-ME D'AN ARME EVEL MA KONTAN...
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:20 PM

NA MAG AN-ME D'AN ARME EVEL MA KONTAN MONET
(Breton)

Na mag an-me d'an arme evel ma kontan monet
e-menn e lakin-me ma dous berjelenn da viret ?"

"Reit-hi din eta ma breur kaer, reit-hi din ma karet
Me he lako e-barzh en kambr gant ma dimezelled,

Me he lako e-barzh en kambr gant ma dimezelled
Peotramant en ur sal vras gant ma itronezed."

ne oa ket aet pell an den yaouank, ne oa ket aet pell deus e di
e oa komañset he c'hoar gaer da ganañ pouilh dezhi.

"Diwisket ho prozhioù gwenn, ho koefoù dantelezet
Ha kerzhet d'ar menez du da viret al loened."

"Me a zo ur verc'h d'un itron gozh deus maner Poullaouen
N'on ket bet akustumet da viret al loened."

"O ma n'oc'h ket akustumet, akustumet e vehet
Amañ a zo ur wialig wenn hag a ray deoc'h-c'hwi kerzhet.

Amañ a zo ur wialig wenn deus an daou-tri seurt plant
A ray deoc'h-c'hwi berjelenn kerzhet ma pez ket c'hoant.

Hag e-pad ar seizh vloaz-se, ar verjelenn a ouele
Pe oa o komañs gant an eizhvet, ar verjelenn a gane.

Pa oa ur c'habiten yaouank distro deus an arme
e klevas ur vouezh, ur vouezhig dous o kanañ war ar menez

"Arestet, marc'hig bihan, arestet ho pazioù
Klevehet mouezh ur verjelenn e-barzh kreiz al lann o kano."

"Añzavet eta berjelenn, añzavet gant gwirionez
Moarvat emañ bet debret ho lein pa ganet-c'hwi ken gae ?"

"Bruzun bara diwar an daol a vez serret da greisteiz
Ma soubenn e skudell ar c'hi a vez trempet din bemdez

* * *

Rikikig ha rikikig, soubenn an anduilhenn
Kig ha kaol ha karotez a vez lakaet d'ober soubenn

* * *

Me am boa choazet ur vestrez, unan kapuchon bras
Pa oan aet da vouchet dezhi e oa chomet ma fenn e-barzh

Ola, me ne n'in ket ken da welet ma gwenedourez
An deiz-all e oa komzet din, ya deus ur fiselez

* * *

Echu eo ma c'hanaouenn, ec'h aomp da droc'hañ da verr (?)
Kar trawalc'h a momp lâret evit daou vab pilhotaer

* * *

Skalfet eo ma muzelloù, aet eo ma beg d'an treuz
N'on ket ken evit kanañ gant ar sec'hed am eus

M'am befe bet ur bannac'h sistr pe ur bannac'h lagoud
Kalz a vat a refe din da lâret ma zraoù toud

M'am befe bet ur bannac'h sistr pe ur bannac'hig rom
Kalz a vat a refe din da echuiñ ma chañson


Malrieu : 0063 An daou vreur. (the two brothers)
IF I JOIN THE ARMY AS I INTEND TO


If I join the army as I intend to,
Who will take care of my beloved shepherdess?

"Entrust her to me, my brother-in-law, if you want to,
I'll put her in the bedroom with my maidens,

I'll put her in the bedroom with my maidens
Or in the great hall with my ladies."

The young man hadn't gone far yet
When her sister-in-law starting harrassing her.

"Remove your white dresses, your lace bonnets
And go to watch the cattle on the black mountain."

"I'm the daughter of an old noble family of the mansion of Poullaouen,
I was never used to watching cattle."

"If you're not used to it, you will,
Here is a white switch that will make you toe the line.

Here is a white switch made of two-three plants,
Shepherdess, that will make you toe the line whether you want it or not."

During seven years, the shepherdess wept,
When the eighth began, the shepherdess sang (1)

While the young captain was going back from the army,
He heard a sweet voice singing on the mountain.

"Stop, little horse, hold your step,
You'll hear a shepherdess's voice singing in the middle of the moor."

"Make a confession to me, shepherdess, tell me the truth,
Did you have breakfast this morning to sing so joyfully?"

"They keep the crumbs of the lunch table for me,
My soup is dunked every day in the dog bowl."

* * *
Rikikig et rikikig, the andouille soup !
To make the soup, you put meat, cabbage and carrots. (2)

* * *

I had chosen a lover/sweetheart who had a large hood,
When I went to kiss her, my head kept stuck in it.

Now then, I won't go to see my Vannes girl any more,
The other day, I've been told of one from the fisel area! (3)

* * *

My song is over, we're going to cut it short
For we told enough for two sons of a ragman!

* * *

My lips are chapped, my mouth is twisted,
I can't manage to sing from being so thirsty!

If I'd had a cup/glass of cider or spirit,
It'd have done me great good to sing all the rest.

If I'd had a cup/glass of cider or rhum,
It'd have done me great good to end my song.
(1) She weeps for seven years and starts singing when the 8th year begins because the soldiers were enlisted for 7 years.
(2):Only an idea of mine but this sounds like the joke children play to one another. The song is about an adouille soup (an andouille is a sausage made of chitterlings) and the ingredients obviouly don't include andouille. So the kid told the story usually asks "What about the andouille?" and is answered "The andouille is you" because an "andouille" is also a dummy.
(3) Pays fisel, the Brittany area of "fisel dance" including 16 towns: Rostrenen, Maël-Carhaix, Bonen, Trégornan, Le Moustoir, Tréffrin, Trébrivan, Locarn, Saint Nicodème, Tréogan, Kergrist-Moëlou, Plouguernével, Duault, Glomel, Paule and Plévin.
The name Fisel is supposed to come to the fashion men had to tie their hats at the back of their heads with a lace or a string (ficelle, in French, hence the name).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: N'EV KET RE UHEL
From: Monique
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 06:24 PM

"N'EV KET RE UHEL ?"
(Breton)

"N'ev ket re uhel?"
"Nann, a hent all ne vo ket moien da heuliañ."
"Montreze ne vin ket klevet ac'kanon?"

D'omp d'an un' tradibidibidi
D'omp d'an un' tradibida
Doull b'an tenn tradibidibidi
Doull b'an tenn tradibida

D'omp d'an daou…

Roudoù Mari-Louiz roud an amitié
Rouli gram chet ho potoù ker'hit d' ar gambr
Kar ma c' houlomp ganti 'po ket e-giz se 'ta !

C'hwi zo minorezig c' hwi vo respektet
Deoc’ h vo laket voulous lec’h a lârehet

Diw vo laket d'an traoñ ha teir vo laket d'an nec'h
Ma ne vo ket trawac'h deoc'h vo laket c'hwec'h.

Fiche fiche logodenn war ar bodig war ar skodig
Fiche fiche logodenn war ar bodig drein
War c'horr' war lein war ar bodig war ar skodig
War c'horr' war lein war ar bodig drein
War c'horr' war dindan war ar bodig war ar skodig
War c'horr' war dindan war ar bodig moan.
"ISN'T IT TOO HIGH?"


"Isn't it too high?"
"No, otherwise we won't be able to follow"
"Maybe they won't hear me?

Let's go to one, tradibidibidi
Let's go to one, tradibida
Doull b'an tenn tradibidibidi
Doull b'an tenn tradibida

Let's go to two…

Let's follow Marie-Louise's trace/remembrance, trace/remembrance of love
Take your shoes off, go to the bedroom upstairs
For if we ask her, you won't get it easily/this way

You are an heir, you'll be respected,
You'll get velvet wherever you ask for it (1)

We'll put two at the bottom and three at the top,
If it's not enough we'll put you six of them

Put, put mouse, on the small branch, the small stump,
Put, put mouse, on the small branch of throrn
Above, on top, on the small branch, the small stump,
Above, on top, on the small branch of throrn
Above, on top, on the small branch, the small stump,
Above, on top, on the narrow, small branch

(1) I got help from some Breton colleagues. One said that the 4th "verse" was wrong and structurally incorrect so I corrected it. I also corrected the translation. About the velvet, he said that the yoke and stripes of velvet on the clothes were a sign of wealth and when one had many, it was a sign that one was a high-ranked person, that one was "rich" (for that time)

END OF CD1

Here you can listen to some Breton music and songs. If you click on the loudspeaker you will hear one file, if you click on the text it will open a small window, you'll want to click on "L'accompagnement musical" and another window will open with several sound files.

Son ha Ton, Breton traditional songs.

You'll also want to have a look at Rassat's Britany page


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 20 Dec 10 - 10:38 PM

Wow! Thanks, Monique!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Mr Happy
Date: 21 Dec 10 - 03:15 AM

.......that last one's reminiscent of 'The Rattling Bog'!!

Connection?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 21 Dec 10 - 05:29 AM

Well done Monique; thank you very much indeed for the work you have put in here.

Matthew


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 21 Dec 10 - 07:00 AM

Now is Holiday Season break and I'll be busy. I'll start translating the lyrics to CD 2 after New Year.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: IL EST ARRIVÉ EN PARIS UN VAISSEAU QUI...
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:37 AM

Well, CD 2 will be before Christmas after all

Link to the Frémeaux's leaflet of this CD.


IL EST ARRIVÉ EN PARIS UN VAISSEAU QUI NOUS A SURPRIS
(French)

Il est arrivé en Paris un vaisseau qui nous a surpris
Un vaisseau qui nous a surpris en arrivant sur Seine
Nous rapportant quelques débris de l'île de Sainte-Hélène. (bis)

Ces débris sont un testament fait par Napoléon le grand
Fait par Napoléon le grand à son dernier soupir
Il renvoya son testament aux napoléonistes. (bis)

Son testament fut visité et partagé aux héritiers.
Le prince de Joinville a remporté la redingote grise,
La redingote et les boutons qui font trembler les opinions. (bis)

Ceusses qu'ont trahi Napoléon se frappent la poitrine
Et ils demandaient encore tous pardon aux napoléonistes. (bis)

Souvenez-vous du p'tit chapeau qui n'a jamais tourné le dos
Il n'a jamais tourné le dos, il a toujours fait face :
"Mes soldats et mes généraux, j'ai gagné la bataille ! (bis)

Je veux qu' Napoléon mon n'veu soit monté sur son cheval bleu
Pour s'en aller au champ, sonner, sonner sa vaillance
Et regagner le Mont Saint-Jean, la perte de la France." (bis)

non listed by Coirault; a verse with the mentioned tune is in Millien, I (1906), p. 318.
RADdO : EA 06354.
THERE ARRIVED IN PARIS A SHIP THAT SURPRISED US


There arrived in Paris a ship that surprised us
A ship that surprised us when it arrived on the Seine,
It brought back some shards from St Helen island

These shards were a will made by Napoleon the great,
Made by Napoleon the great at his last breath
He sent his will to the "napoleonists" (his followers, then)

His estate was checked and shared between the heirs,
The prince of Joinville took the gray frock coat (1)
The frock coat and the buttons that makes the opinions shiver.

Those (2) who betrayed Napoleon beat their breasts
And they were still begging the "napoleonists" their pardon.

Remember the little hat that never turned his back
He never turned his back, he always squared up:
"My soldiers and my generals, I won the battle!

I want my nephew Napoleon to be mounted on his blue horse
To go to the (battle) field, to horn, to horn his valiance
And to go back to Mount Saint-Jean, France's loss."
(1) The Fr for "frock coat" is "redingote" from the Eng. "riding coat" (nothing is lost, nothing is created…)
(2) The normal word is "ceux" with a silent "x" at the end but it sometimes happens that it's pronounced –for good or to make fun of some provincial pronunciation- then the spelling may be "ceuss" or "ceusses" to indicate that you must add an "s" sound to it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: MAIS TOUT AUTOUR DE MA PATRIE
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:38 AM

MAIS TOUT AUTOUR DE MA PATRIE
(French)

Mais tout autour de ma patrie,
Mais tout au pied d'un vert buisson,
J'ai rencontré deux p'tits novices
Qui gardaient cinq à six moutons. (bis)

Je leur ai dit : "Mes p'tits mignons,
Vot' papa est-il à la maison ?" (bis)

"Mon bon monsieur, vous pouvez croire
Que de papa nous en avons pas.

Il y a douze ans qu'il est parti,
Qu'il est parti mais pour la guerre.
Il y a douze ans qu'il est parti,
Nous n'avons jamais vu parler de lui." (bis)

J'ai bien connu à cette parole
Que c'la était mes p'tits enfants.
De crainte de leur faire de la peine,
J' m'en suis n'allé tout droit à la maison.

J'ai rencontré ma mie charmante,
C'est elle qui m'a fait tant de peine.
J'ai rencontré ma mie charmante,
Celle que j'ai quittée en partant. (bis)

"Ah, de bonjour ma bonne dame,
Je crains la pluie, je crains l'orage,
Prêtez-moi donc votre maison.
De toute part, oh logez-moi,
Nous vous paierons tout c' qu'il faudra." (bis)

"Mon bon monsieur vous pouvez croire,
Que d' vous loger, nous n'pouvons pas.
Avancez-y trois pas plus bas,
Les voisins n' vous refuseront pas." (bis)

J'ai mis mon p'tit paquet au bas,
Je m' suis assis dans une chaise,
J'ai pris ma femme entre mes bras,
Encore elle m'y connaissait pas. (bis)

"Cessez vos rires, vos badinages,
Je m'écrierai au voisinage,
Cela sera pitié de vous." (bis)

"T'en souviens-tu ma douce amie
D' la marque que j'avais au pied droit.
C'était une envie de raisin,
À présent tu le vois donc bien." (bis)

"Mais reste ici, avant dix heures,
Tu y verras deux p'tits novices,
Tous deux jumeaux et tous deux frères,
Portant le nom de Louis Guerrier.
C'la m'a été tant révoqué,
Qu' j'en ai le cœur tout enflammé." (bis)

Coirault : 5304 La tache de raisin.
RADdO : EA 05304.
(BUT) AROUND MY HOMELAND


(But) around my homeland (1)
(But) at the foot of a green bush
I came across two little apprentices
Who were watching five or six sheep (twice)

I told them, "My little cuties,
Is your daddy home?" (twice)

"My dear sir, you can be sure/take it (lit. believe)
That we don't have a daddy.

He left twelve years ago,
He went (but) to war.
He left twelve years ago,
We never heard (lit. saw) talk about him (twice)

I knew with this talk
That those were my little children.
For fear of hurting them (lit. making them sorrowful),
I went home(2) straight away.

I met my charming beloved, (3)
She was the one who hurt me much (4)
I met my charming beloved,
The one I left when I went away. (twice)

"Ah, good day, my good lady,
I fear rain, I fear storm,
Lend me your house.
Accommodate me anywhere,
I (5) will pay you all that I must (twice)

"My good gentleman/sir, you can be sure (lit. believe)
That we can't accommodate you.
Go three paces farther down the street
The neighbors won't refuse you. (twice)

I lay down my little package,
I sat down on a chair,
I took my wife in my arms
Though she wouldn't know me (bis).

"Stop your laughing and your joking,
I'll call out to the neighborhood,
You'll be a pitiful sight" (6) (twice).

"Do you remember, my sweet beloved,
The mark I had on my right foot.
It was a purple birthmark (7)
Now you can see clearly. (twice)

"(But) stay here, before it's ten,
You'll see two little apprentices,
Both twins and both brothers,
Bearing the name of Louis Guerrier.(8)
This was so much reminded (9) to me
That my heart is all passionate.
(1) "Patrie" is literally "fatherland" but here it just means "my original area" "the place where I belong"
(2) "à la maison" can be understood as "home" or "to the house". Sometimes the soldier was coming back "home" to only discover this wasn't "home" any more!
(3) it may mean that she was the one who hurt him much (most) because she suffered from his absence and he's well aware of it and resented it. It may also mean that he'd felt sorrow because he'd missed her while he couldn't miss his children that he didn't know he had.
(4) "amie" or the short form "mie" in this context means "beloved/sweetheart", not "friend".
(5) lit. "we". It's not the royal "we"! It sometimes happens in old songs that "I" (me, mine) are replaced by the plural with corresponding conjugation of the verb.
(6) … after what they'll do to you.
(7) "une envie de raisin" literally translates as "a craving for grapes". It's about the superstition that said that when you happened to have a craving for something when you were pregnant and were denied it, the baby would have a birthmark of the same color of what you'd craved for.
(8) "Louis Guerrier" Eng. equivalent would be "Lewis Warrior"
(9) Probably a confusion between "évoqué" (recalled) and "révoqué" (dismissed/revoked) for sounding nearly alike.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: QUAND J' TIENS LA BRIDE DE MON CHEVAL
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:38 AM

QUAND J' TIENS LA BRIDE DE MON CHEVAL
(French)

Quand j' tiens la bride de mon cheval, (bis)
Pour aller voir ma mie, oh dé, oh do
Pour aller voir ma mie.

J'étais à peine demi-rendu, (bis)
Que mon cheval s'arrête, oh dé…

Tournez la tête de côté, (bis)
J'ai vu ma mie en danse.

Aussitôt qu' la belle m'a t-aperçu, (bis)
Son petit cœur soupire.

"Qu'avez-vous belle à soupirer ? "(bis)
"J'ai perdu ma ceinture.

Si ma ceinture était en argent, (bis)
Pour moi elle serait bien rendue.

Mais ma ceinture elle est en or, (bis)
Pour moi elle sera bien perdue."

not in Coirault. RADdO : EA 06355.
WHEN I HOLD THE BRIDLE OF MY HORSE


When I hold the bridle of my horse (twice)
To go to see my sweetheart, oh dé, oh do,
To go to see my sweetheart.

I was hardly half the way there (twice)
When my horse stopped, oh dé…

Turn your head to the side! (1)(twice).
I saw my sweetheart dance…

As soon as the fair lady glimpsed me (twice)
Her little heart sighed…

"What do you sigh for, beauty?" (twice)
"I lost my belt".

"If my belt was of silver (twice)
It would be returned to me.

But my belt is of gold (twice)
It will be lost to me for good.
(1) Either he speaks to the audience or he has a speaking horse!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: SUR LE PONT D'AVIGNON, J'ENTENDS CHANTER.
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:39 AM

SUR LE PONT D'AVIGNON, J'ENTENDS CHANTER LA BELLE
(French)

Sur le pont d'Avignon, j'entends chanter la belle
Qui dans son chant chantait une chanson nouvelle :
"J'ai perdu mes amours, je ne sais où les prendre
A Paris ou à Tours dedans ces vastes plaines."

Sont trois petits pigeons qui ont pris leur volée.
L'ont prise si haut si bas, la grand mer ont passée.
Sur le logis du roi, ils se sont reposés.
De sur la table du roi ils ont pris leur bêchée.

De sur le lit du roi, ils ont «pond » leur couvée.
Ceux qui la trouveront gagneront bonne journée
Gagneront cent francs par jour et en plus la nuitée.
"Ouvrez la porte, ouvrez, nouvelle mariée !"

"Comment je l'ouvrirai-je, je suis au lit couchée
Et mon mari aussi qui m'y tient embrassée
M'y tient et m'y tiendra le long de la nuitée."
"Ouvrez la porte, ouvrez, nouvelle mariée !"

"Vous y viendrez demain dans la mi-matinée
Mon mari n'y s'ra pas, il s'ra t'à sa journée."
"Ouvrez la porte, ouvrez, nouvelle mariée !"

Coirault : 5217 Chanson des Oreillers. RADdO : EA 00962
ON THE BRIDGE OF AVIGNON, I HEAR THE FAIR MAIDEN SING


On the bridge of Avignon, I hear the fair maiden sing
Who, in her singing, sang a new song,
"I lost my love, I don't now where to find him (1)
In Paris or in Tours, in these wide plains".

Three little pigeons took their flight.
They took it so high, so low, they crossed the great sea (2).
They rested on the king's dwelling,
They took their food (lit. beakful) from the king's table.

On the king's bed, they laid their clutch,
Those who will find it will earn a good day's pay.
They'll earn ten francs per day and on top the night stay.
"Open the door, open, you bride!"

"How would I open it, I'm lying in my bed,
And so is my husband who holds me in his arms,
He holds me and will hold me all night long."
"Open the door, open, you bride!"

"You'll come back tomorrow in the mid-morning,
My husband won't be home, he'll be working."
"Open the door, open, you bride!"
(1) In French, "amour" (love) is masculine in singular and feminine in plural. Besides, in songs, you often find "amours" (most often in plural) referring to the sweetheart (whether male or female) with the pronouns corresponding to "amours" and not to the actual sweetheart.
(2) It usually refers to the Atlantic Ocean.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LA VIOLETTE DOUBLE
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:40 AM

LA VIOLETTE DOUBLE
(French)

La violette double,
Doublons-la, ladérira
Le vent la dédoublera.

RADdO : EA 00691
THE DOUBLE VIOLET


The double violet
Let's double it, laderira,
The wind will unfold it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: J'AI UNE POMME DANS MON PANIER
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:41 AM

J'AI UNE POMME DANS MON PANIER
(French)

J'ai une pomme dans mon panier
Marguerite en veux-tu ?
(bis)

Si tu savais comme elles sont bonnes
Marguerite en veux-tu d' mes pommes
Marguerite en veux-tu ?
(bis)

J'ai deux pommes…

Coirault : 10117 Les dix pommes dans la poche.
RADdO : EA 05622.
I HAVE AN APPLE IN MY BASKET


I have an apple in my basket
Margaret, do you want any?
(twice)

If you knew how good they are,
Margaret, do you want any of my apples,
Margaret, do you want any?
(twice)

I have two apples…


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: BUVONS À LA SANTÉ DU PRINCE / ... DU ROI
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:42 AM

BUVONS À LA SANTÉ DU PRINCE,
BUVONS À LA SANTÉ DU ROI

(French)

Buvons à la santé du prince,
Buvons à la santé du roi,
Quand je la vois ma mignonnette,
Mon petit cœur est toujours gai. (bis)

Quand je suis assis à ma table ronde,
Ma mignonnette sur mes genoux,
Je lui dis tout bas à l'oreille :
"Ma mignonnette, embrassons-nous !" (bis)

"Comment veux-tu que je t'embrasse,
L'on dit que tu vas me quitter
Pour t'en aller donc à la guerre,
Sur le Piémont, servir le roi." (bis)

"Ah il faut bien que je m'y en aille
Puisque le roi m' l'a commandé,
Mais ce n'est pas pour nous y battre,
Mais c'est seulement pour nous venger."(bis)

Nous ne fumes pas à demi-campagne
Qu'il me vint une pensée,
Dieu m'envoya la voix d'une ange
Que ma maîtresse était fiancée. (bis)

Si elle est fiancée que vais-je faire ?
Si elle est mariée où vais-je aller ?
Là-haut, là-bas sur ces montagnes,
Au pied d'une arbre à soupirer. (bis)

J'y ai tant pleuré, versé des larmes,
Que les ruisseaux en ont coulé.
Petits ruisseaux, grandes rivières,
Tous nos moulins sont entrainés. (bis)

Les filles sont comme la lune,
Elles sont sujettes au changement,
Mais les garçons n'sont pas de même,
Car ils les aiment bien tendrement. (bis

Coirault : This song is made from the association
of several themes among which you find those presents in :
# 3008 The portrait (departure for Piedmont,
the tears that make the mills turn). RADdO : EA 00202.
# 3104 The vivandière (seller of food and drink allowed
to follow an army) who prefers an officer (girls are like the moon).
RADdO : EA 02532.
# 2606 Réveillez-vous belle endormie I (Wake up, sleeping beauty
–not Sleeping Beauty !) (the abandoned suitor who withdraws
in the mountains). RADdO : EA 02480.
LET'S DRINK TO THE PRINCE'S HEALTH,
LET'S DRINK TO THE KING'S HEALTH



Let's drink to the prince's health,
Let's drink to the king's health
When I see my little cutie,
My little heart is always gay (twice)

When I'm sitting at my round table,
My little cutie on my knees,
I whisper in her ear:
"My little cutie, let's kiss!" (twice)

"How do you want me to kiss you,
They say that you're going to leave me
To go to war, in the Piedmont,
To serve the king" (twice)

"Ah, I do have to go there
Since the king ordered me so,
But it's not for fighting,
Only for taking revenge" (twice)

We weren't even half the way there
When a thought came to my mind,
God sent me the voice of an angel
(saying) that my mistress (1) was engaged (twice)

If she's engaged, what will I do?
If she's married, where will I go?
Up there, on these yonder mountains,
At the foot of a tree, I will pine (twice)

I wept so much, shed so many tears
That the streams flowed,
Little streams, large rivers,
All our mills are carried away (twice)

Girls are like the moon,
They're subject to change,
But boys are not like this
For they love them very tenderly (twice)
(1) "mistress" at that time could (also) just refer to a man's sweetheart/beloved. The idea behind it was that he loved her so much that she was his mistress (the one who rules).
for the Coirault "the portrait" song type, "La Piémontaise"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: PILLE PILLE MA ROUTOUTOU
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:43 AM

Here come the classy ones!!


PILLE PILLE MA ROUTOUTOU
(Vendean)

Pille pille ma routoutou
Maroutou maroupille touderatou
(bis)
Touzeratou maroutou maroupille
Touzeratou maroupillétou
(bis)
PILE PILE MY ROUTOUTOU


Pile pile my routoutou (plural)
My routou (plural), my roupille touderatou (singular) (1)
you will have all, my routou my roupille
you will have all, my roupille and all
(1) Don't ask me what these things are, I don't know for sure, though since the topic of all these short songs is sex we might have a guess of something in plural (usually 2) together with something else in singular.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: Y'ATIONS QUATRE À BINER MA CHATTE
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:43 AM

Y'ATIONS QUATRE À BINER MA CHATTE
(Vendean)

Y'ations quatre à biner ma chatte
Y'ations cinq à la démêler
(bis)
WE WERE FOUR TO COMB MY PUSSY


We were four to comb my pussy (1)
We were five to untangle it.
(1) you can never be sure of which kind of pussy it is about!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: AU BOUT DOU FOUR A L'AVAIT GRAND POUR
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:44 AM

AU BOUT DOU FOUR A L'AVAIT GRAND POUR
(Vendean)

Au bout dou four a l'avait grand pour
Et au bout dou têt a l'avait grand fret
AT THE END OF THE OVEN SHE WAS VERY AFRAID


At the end of the oven she was very afraid,
At the end of the roof she was very cold.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: MON PÈRE BITAIT MA MÈRE
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:46 AM

MON PÈRE BITAIT MA MÈRE
(Vendean)

Mon père bitait ma mère
Moi y bito la chambrère
S'y'avions poué tcho p'tit bout qui pend
Y pourrions pas biter les feuilles
S'y'avions poué tcho p'tit bout qui pend
Y pourrions pas biter tout l' temps
MY FATHER WOULD FUCK MY MOTHER


My father would fuck (1) my mother
I would fuck the chamber maid.
If we hadn't this little piece that hangs,
We couldn't fuck the girls
If we hadn't this little piece that hangs,
We couldn't fuck all the time.
(1) the Fr. verb is built on "bite" (= cock) and I could find no equivalent in Eng. I mean a verb meaning the same and built on a slang word for penis. Btw, every time we (French) see an ad reading "big bites" or "little bites" we can't refrain a smile


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: TROU DU CUL DE QUOI TE PLAINS-TU ?
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:46 AM

TROU DU CUL DE QUOI TE PLAINS-TU ?
(French)

Trou du cul de quoi te plains-tu
N'es-tu pas bien dans l'allée de mes fesses
Trou du cul de quoi te plains-tu
N'es-tu pas bien dans l'allée de mon cul
N'es-tu pas bien dans l'allée de mes fesses
N'es-tu pas bien dans l'allée de mon cul
ASSHOLE, WHAT ARE YOU COMPLAINING ABOUT?


Asshole, what are you complaining about?
Don't you feel well in the alley of my buttocks?
Asshole, what are you complaining about?
Don't you feel well in the alley of my ass?
Don't you feel well in the alley of my buttocks?
Don't you feel well in the alley of my ass?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: TOUT L' LONG DU BOIS J'AI BAISÉ ANGÈLE
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:47 AM

TOUT L' LONG DU BOIS J'AI BAISÉ ANGÈLE
(French)

Tout l' long du bois j'ai baisé Angèle
Tout l' long du bois j'ai baisé trois fois
(bis)
Si ma casquette n'était pas tombée
La quatrième passait comme les autres
Si ma casquette n'était pas tombée
La quatrième y aurait bien passée
ALL ALONG THE WOOD, I FUCKED ANGELA


All along the wood, I fucked Angela
All along the wood, I fucked three times
(twice)
If my cap hadn't fallen
The fourth one would have happened as the others,
If my cap hadn't fallen,
The fourth one would have happened all right.
End of the bawdy ones!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: J'AI USÉ MES SOULIERS, BELLE
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:48 AM

J'AI USÉ MES SOULIERS, BELLE
(French)

J'ai usé mes souliers, belle
Tout en allant t'y faire l'amour
Pourquoi les usais-tu
Marchais-tu pas sur l'herbette
Pourquoi les usais-tu
Marchais-tu pas à pieds nus ?

RADdO : EA 01304.
I WORN OUT MY SHOES, BEAUTY


I worn out my shoes, beauty,
Going to make love to you.
Why were you wearing them?
Didn't you walk on the grass?
Why were you wearing them?
Didn't you walk barefoot?
In Fr "user" means both "to use" and "to wear out"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:49 AM

Y A PLUS QUE DIX FILLES DANS UN PRÉ
(French)

Y a plus que dix filles dans un pré (bis)
Et y avait Pint
Et y avait Mint
Et y avait Serpe et serpolet
Et celle qui joue aux épinettes
Et y avait Irène
Celle que mon cœur aime.

Coirault : 1813 Les dix filles dans un pré.
RADdO : EA 00008
.
THERE ARE TEN GIRLS LEFT IN A MEADOW


There are ten girls left in a meadow (twice)
And there was Pint,
And there was Mint
And there were Billhook and wild thyme
And the one who plays the spinet (1)
And there was Irene,
The one my heart loves.
(1) I'm not sure she plays the spinet because though "épinette" does mean "spinet" in French we don't play "an instrument" (direct object), we play "of an instrument" (indirect object introduced by "de" –of) but … we don't play "a game" (direct object) we play "at a game". So if the girl was playing the spinet, it would be "celle qui joue de l'épinette" (in singular, we don't play spinets). The construction might be alright in the local dialect but it isn't in standard French in which the Fr. translation is supposed to be. Then… "épinette" is also a withy cage to fatten poultry and a tree (spruce). Let's say her playing the spinet is the most likely supposition though "jouer aux épinettes" might be the local name of game and you wouldn't know what it refers to unless you belong there.
UPDATE:Aug. 5th 2014. In an online dictionary, it reads that "jouer des épinettes" meant to have sex. In another one, it reads that it meant "to cheat, to swindle" but according to the context, I'd choose the former. Btw, the 2nd dictionary gives a lot of expressions based on "jouer" (to play) that meant "to have sex" ("faire le déduit" they would say formally!)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:49 AM

NOUS VOILÀ BIEN DU MONDE ICI
(French)

Nous voilà bien du monde ici
Nous voilà bien du monde là
(bis)
Celle que j'aime n'y est pas
Ma charmante brunette

Mon petit cœur n'est pas à moi
Il est à ma maîtresse

Car je la vois venir là-bas

De sur son cheval noir et blanc

À sa main droite tient un gant blanc

Et de l'autre un étui d'argent

Mes amourettes (1) y sont dedans

Elles y sont bien étroitement

Mais elles y sont plus largement

Depuis Paris jusqu'à Rouen

Et de Rouen jusqu'à Fécamp.

Coirault : 7201 Le galant aux gants blancs.
RADdO : EA 03128.
WE HAVE MANY PEOPLE HERE


We have many people here
We have many people there
(twice)
The one I love is not here
My charming brunette.

My little heart isn't mine
It belongs to my mistress/beloved

For I see her come over there

On her black and white horse.

In her right hand she holds a white glove

And in the other a silver case.

My love is inside.

It's cramped in there

But it's more comfortable

From Paris to Rouen

And from Rouen to Fécamp.
(1) "Amourettes" Cf note to "On the Bridge of Avignon" some posts above. If you ever come across a French recipe of "amourettes", they can be animals testicles or spinal chord (check the shape!).
NB: there are two mistakes in the lyrics printed on the Frémeaux leaflet ("celui" instead of "celle" and "je le vois" instead of "je la vois", which makes the song very puzzling. I corrected both of them.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:50 AM

JE M'EN FUS TROUVER MA MAÎTRESSE
(French)

Je m'en fus trouver ma maîtresse (bis)
Vers les onze heures à la minuit, par la fenêtre de son lit. br> (bis)

"Mignonne, mignonne, dormez-vous ? (bis)
Si vous dormez, réveillez-vous, c'est votre amant qui parle à vous." (bis)

"Non, non, je n' dors ni je sommeille (bis)
Toutes les nuits je pense à vous, mon cher amant, marions-nous." (bis)

"J'en parlerai donc à ton père (bis)
Et à ta mère, si elle veut, nous nous marierons tous les deux." (bis)

"Bon paysan, donne-moi ta fille !" (bis)
"Elle est trop jeune, elle n'a qu' quinze ans, faites l'amour en attendant" (bis)

"Non, non, l'amour je n' puis la faire, (bis)
Je l'ai faite deux ans passés et je trouve que c'est bien assez ! (bis)

Je m'en irai sur ces montagnes, (bis)
Sur ces montagnes, sur ces rochers, pour y pleurer mon temps passé." (bis)

Coirault : 4710 Réveillez-vous belle endormie III (La supplique nocturne).
RADdO : EA 02751.
I WENT TO MEET MY MISTRESS


I went to meet my mistress (twice)
Around eleven or midnight, by her bed(room) window (twice)

"Cutie, cutie, are you sleeping? (twice)
If you are, wake up, your lover is speaking to you" (twice)

"No, no, I don't sleep or doze (twice)
Every night I think of you, my dear love, let's get married" (twice)

"Then I'll talk about it to your father (twice)
And to your mother, if she wants, the both of us will get married (twice)"

"Good peasant (1), give me your daughter" (twice)
"She is too young, she's only fifteen, court her in the meanwhile (2) (twice)

"No, no, I can't court her (her) (twice)
I've courted her for two years and I find it's long enough! (twice)

I will go on these mountains (twice)
On these mountains, on these boulders, to mourn my past (twice)
(1) "paysan" in Fr hasn't the same pejorative connotation as in English
(2) "faire l'amour" (lit. to make love) here means to court (faire la cour). You can also find either expression in La Yoyette/Yeyette.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:51 AM

UN JOUR UN JOUR M'Y PREND ENVIE
(French)

Un jour un jour m'y prend envie
De ma maîtresse la faire mourir

La faire mourir de ci de loin
Que ses parents le sauriont (1) point.
(bis)

Pris le cheval de mon père
Son pistolet, ses forniments (2)

Tout droit m'en suis n'allé
Droit à la porte à ma bien aimée.
(bis)

Si vous dormez belle endormie
Belle endormie si vous dormez

Si vous dormez réveillez-vous
C'est votre amant qui parle à vous.
(bis)

Ah ni je dors ni je sommeille
Toute la nuit je pense en vous

Toute la nuit je pense en vous
Mon bel amant rapprochez-vous.
(bis)

Veux-tu venir belle Louise
Que nous allions voir nos amis

Que nous allions voir nos amis
Pour ne plus rev'nir au pays.
(bis)

Et je l'ai pris par sa main blanche
De sur ma selle je l'ai montée

Tenez-vous bien belle Louison
Je veux piquer de l'éperon.
(bis)

Le bon cheval noir comme un nègre (3)
Et comme un lion désenchaîné

Il s'élancit sans s'arrêter
Jusqu'au milieu de la forêt.
(bis)

Là c'est ici belle Louise
Là c'est ici qu'il faut mourir !

Mon bel amant si j'ai grand tort
Donnez-moi le coup de la mort !
(bis)

La belle a mis le pied par terre
Le cœur tremblant, les larmes aux yeux

Il la frappit si durement
Que la belle a perdu le sang.
(bis)

La belle avait trois petits frères
Le l'ont cherchée, l'ont point trouvée

Le l'ont cherchée, l'ont point trouvée
La belle est morte et enterrée.
(bis)

Coirault : 9804 L'amoureux de la servante.
RADdO : EA 00132.
ONE DAY, ONE DAY, I GOT THE URGE


One day, one day, I got the urge
To make my mistress die.

To make her die, here or far,
But her parents wouldn't know it.
(twice)

Took my father's horse,
His handgun, his (soldier) equipment,

I went straight to,
Straight to my beloved's door
(twice)

"If you're asleep, sleeping beauty,
Sleeping beauty, if you're asleep,

If you're asleep, wake up,
It's your lover speaking to you."
(twice)

"Ah, I neither sleep nor doze,
All night long I think of you.

All night long I think of you,
My handsome lover, come closer."
(twice)

"Do you want to come, beautiful Louise,
So we'd go to visit our friends,

So we'd go to visit our friends
To never come back home?"
(twice)

And I took her by her white hand,
I brought her up on my saddle

"Hold on carefully, beautiful Louison,
I want to break into a gallop" (lit.~ to prick the spurs).
(twice)

The good horse (as) black like a negro
And as unchained as a lion

Thrust itself without stopping
As far as the middle of the forest
(twice)

"Now, it's here, beautiful Louise
Now, it's there you must die!"

"My handsome lover, if I'm very wrong,
Give me the death blow!"
(twice)

The fair maiden set foot on the ground
With her heart trembling and tears in her eyes.

He hit her so hard
That the fair maiden lost her blood.
(twice)

The fair maiden had three little brothers
They looked for her, didn't find her

They looked for her, didn't find her
The fair maiden is dead and buried.
(twice)
(1) "sauriont" (standard French "sauraient") in some French dialects, the conjugation differs a litlle from the standard language.
(2) the standard spelling is "fourniments" –from the verb "fournir" = supply.
(3) "Nègre" (from the Spanish "negro" = black) was first an equivalent of "negro", referring to a Black slave –the only Black people they knew at that time I'm afraid. Then it was used as an equivalent of the N-word (and still is so far). It also now means a ghostwriter.


Personal note: not only we have psychopaths in real life, some people felt the need to have them in songs too!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:52 AM

LE ROI RENAUD
(French)

Le roi Renaud revint de guerre, vain,
Portant ses tripes dans ses mains.
Sa mère qu'était sur le créneau
A vu venir le roi Renaud.

"Renaud, Renaud, réjouis-toi,
Ta femme est accouchée d'un roi."
"Ni de la femme ni du fils
Je ne saurai me réjouir.

Ma mère, ma mère, allez devant,
Préparez-moi un beau lit blanc.
Pas longtemps j'y demeurerai,
Dans la nuit je trépasserai.

Faites-le moi faire ici bas,
Que l'accouchée n'entende pas."
Et quand ce fut sur les minuit,
Le roi Renaud rendit l'esprit.

Et quand ce fut le matin jour,
Que les valets pleuraient toujours,
Ce ne fut l'heure du déjeuner,
Que les servantes ont pleuré.

"Dites-moi ma mère, ma mie,
Que nos valets pleurent ici ?"
"Ma fille en baignant nos chevaux,
Ont laissé noyer le plus beau."

"Dites-moi ma mère, ma mie,
Pour un cheval pleurer ainsi,
Quand le roi Renaud reviendra,
Plus beaux chevaux ramènera !"

"Dites-moi ma mère, ma mie,
Pourquoi j'entends cogner z'ici ?"
"Ma fille, ce sont les charpentiers
Qui raccommodent le plancher."

"Dites-moi ma mère, ma mie,
Pourquoi les cloches sonnent ici ?"
"Ma fille, c'est la procession,
Qui sort pour les rogations."

"Dites-moi ma mère, ma mie,
Que les petits chantent ici ?"
"Ma fille, c'est la procession
Qui fait le tour de la maison."

Quand elle fut pour relever,
A la messe elle voulut aller.
Quand ce fut passé les huit jours,
Voulut reprendre ses atours.

"Dites-moi ma mère, ma mie,
Quel habit prendrai-je aujourd'hui ?"
"Prenez le vert, prenez le gris,
Prenez le noir pour mieux choisir."

"Dites-moi ma mère, ma mie,
Qu'est-ce que ce noir signifie ?"
"Femme qui relève d'enfant,
C'est le noir qui est le plus seyant."

Quand à l'église elle fut rentrée,
Un cierge on lui a présenté.
Aperçut en s'agenouillant
La terre fraiche sous son banc.

"Dites-moi ma mère, ma mie,
Pourquoi la terre s'est rafraichie ?"
"Ma fille pour ne rien vous cacher,
Renaud est mort et enterré."

"Puisque le roi Renaud est mort,
Voici la clé de mon trésor.
Voici mes bagues et mes joyaux,
Nourrissez bien le fils Renaud.

Terre ouvre-toi, terre fends-toi,
Que j'aille trouver Renaud mon roi."
Terre s'ouvrit, terre fendit
Et se fut la belle engloutie.

Coirault : 5311 Jean Renaud.
RADdO : EA 01206.
KING RENAUD


King Renaud came back from war, vain,
Holding his guts in his hands.
His mother who was on the crenel
Saw king Renaud arrive.

"Renaud, Renaud, rejoice,
Your wife has given birth to a king"
"Neither of my wife nor son
I could rejoice.

Mother, mother, go ahead
Prepare a beautiful white bed for me,
I will stay in it no long,
During the night I'll pass away.

Have it made here, downstairs
So that the new mother (1) doesn't hear,
And when midnight came,
King Renaud gave up his ghost.

And when day break came,
The servants were still crying,
Before breakfast time,
The maidens were crying.

"Tell me, mother dear
What do our servants cry for here/now?"
"Daughter, as they gave the horses a bath,
They let the most beautiful drown".

"Tell me, mother dear,
To cry so much for a horse,
When king Renaud is back
He'll bring back more beautiful ones!"

"Tell me, mother dear,
Why do I hear knocking here/now?"
"Daughter, those are the carpenters
Mending the flooring"

"Tell me, mother dear,
Why are the bells ringing here/now?"
"Daughter, it's the procession
Going out for rogations."

"Tell me, mother dear,
What are the children singing here/now?"
"Daughter, it's the procession
Going around the house"

When she was to go out again (2)
She wanted to go to mass.
After eight days,
She wanted to wear her finery again.

"Tell me, mother dear,
Which dress will I wear today?"
"Wear the green one, wear the gray one,
Wear the black one as the best choice"

"Tell me, mother dear,
What does this black color mean?"
"For a woman who's just given birth,
Black is the color that suits her best."

When she had entered the church,
She's been given a candle.
She noticed, when kneeling down,
Fresh earth under her bench.

"Tell me, mother dear,
Why has the earth been dug?"
"Daughter, to be quite frank
Renaud is dead and buried."

"Since king Renaud is dead,
Here is the key of my treasure.
Here are my rings and my jewels,
Feel Renaud's son well.

Earth, open, earth, break open
For me to go with Renaud, my king."
The earth opened, the earth broke open
And the fair lady was swallowed up.
(1) A new mother is called "une accouchée", lit. "a delivered one"
(2) "relever" meant for a woman who'd given birth, to go out of home for the first time to go to mass and receive the priest's blessing.

We already have a King Renaud thread with a fine translation on Mudcat. Why, oh why did I find it only when I was done with this one!!!
Cora Vaucaire's rendition (lightly different lyrics); a spinet rendition


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:52 AM

LES GARÇONS SONT TROMPEURS
(French)

Les garçons sont trompeurs,
La chose en est certaine.
Sont-ils auprès de vous :
"Belle que je vous aime !"

Ah le petit gueux, le petit coquin, le petit trompeux,
Tu disais que tu m'aimais petit gueux !

Sont-ils auprès de vous :
"Belle que je vous aime !"
Ah, sont-ils éloignés,
Ils ne disent plus de même !

Ah le petit gueux…

Ils se disent l'un à l'autre :
"Connais-tu bien une telle ?

Elle croit de sur ma foi,
Que j'ai d' l'amitié pour elle.

Mais pour lui faire voir que non,
Que je me moque d'elle,

J'irai faire l'amour,
Tout proche de chez elle.

Si elle a mal à la tête,
Qu'elle se la bandelette !

Si elle a mal au jarret,
Qu'elle tire sa jarretière !

Si elle a mal au talon,
Qu'elle batte la semelle !"

Coirault : 2414 Les garçons sont trompeurs.
RADdO : EA 00305.
BOYS ARE DECEPTIVE


Boys are deceptive,
It is certain.
Are they near you?
"Beauty, how much I love you!"

Ah, the little rogue, the little rascal, the little deceiver,
You were saying that you loved me, you little rogue! (1)

Are they near you?
"Beauty, how much I love you!"
Ah, are they far?
They don't say the same any more!

Ah, the little rogue….

They tell one another
"Do you know So-and-So well?

She thinks, on my word,
That I feel love for her.

But to show her I don't,
That I don't care for her,

I'll go to make love
Very close to her house.

If her head aches
Let her bandage it!

If her calf hurts,
Let her remove her garter!

If her heel hurts
Let her go to and fro!
(1) Gueux (out dated) means "beggar" but is used only in historical contexts nowadays. It can be heard –though seldom- meaning "rogue, rascal". You won't hear "trompeux" either.
Sheet music for the verses.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:53 AM

DEDANS LA VILLE DE PLAISANTEMENT
(French)

Dedans la ville de Plaisantement
Il y a-t-une jeune fille qui n'a pas d'amant.
Elle porte d' la dentelle
C'est pour mieux se faire voir
La belle demoiselle
S'en va se promener.

Dans son chemin elle a rencontré
Un jeune amoureux qui l'a t-emmenée.
"Bonjour madame l'hôtesse
Nous voudrions coucher
Moi et ma femme
Nous voudrions loger."

Oh quand ça fut de sur les minuit
La p'tite brunette n'y pouvait point dormir
(bis)
Ramasse ses culottes
Son or et son argent
La p'tite brunette
Elle s'en va devant.

Oh quand ça fut oui le matin jour
Le beau galant souhaitit le bonjour.
(bis)
"Bonjour madame l'hôtesse
Oh j'ai été volé
Je suis sans culotte
Ainsi que sans le sou !"

Si vous l'aviez vu quàu gentil galant
Si vous l'aviez vu l' jour d'auparavant
Il était sans culotte
Ainsi que sans le sou
Que sans sa chemise
On aurait bien tout vu !

not listed by Coirault.
RADdO : EA 06358.
IN JOKING TOWN


In Joking town
There's a young girl who has no lover.
She wears lace,
It's to better be seen.
The beautiful maiden
Goes to stroll about.

On her way she met
A young lover who took her along.
"Good day, Mrs the hostess,
We would like to sleep here,
Me and my wife,
We would want to stay."

And when midnight came
The little brunette couldn't sleep
(twice)
Gather his breeches,
His gold and his silver
The little brunette
Goes away.

Oh, when morning came
The handsome suitor greeted. (1)
(twice)
"Good morning, Mrs the hostess,
Oh, I've been robbed
I have no breeches (2)
And I'm penniless too!"

If you'd seen that (3)nice suitor
If you'd seen him the day before
He had no breeches
And was penniless too
Without his shirt,
We'd have seen everything!
(1) "souhaitit" – verb "souhaiter" ,1st group of conjugation, conjugated as a verb of the 2nd group ("souhaitit" instead of "souhaita"). This line literally translates as "the handsome man wished the good day".
(2) "culotte" was the knee-length piece of a man's clothing before it came to mean a woman's panties. Hence the expression "porter la culotte" –to wear the culotte- referring to a woman who's in charge at home, and the name of "sans-culottes" (without-culottes) during the French Revolution, referring to men of the plebs who rejected the ancient régime knee-length breeches to wear long pants to show their patriotism.
(3) I take "quàu" to be "that" derived to the Latin for "that" while the only demonstrative determiner in standard Fr. is derived from the Latin for "this"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 08:55 AM

CE SONT TROIS GALIONS D'ESPAGNE
(French)

Ce sont trois galions d'Espagne,
Prenez courage,
Dedans la flotte ont pris congé,
Prenez courage, beaux mariniers.

C'était pour faire le tour du monde,
Sans jamais la terre y aborder.

Au bout de trois années entières,
Le pain, le vin, leur z'a manqué.

A fallu faire la courte paille,
Pour voir lequel qui sera mangé.

La courte paille resta z'au maître,
C'est lui doit être mangé.

"Y en a-t-il un de l'équipage
Qui voudrait m'y manger ?

Y en a-t-il un de l'équipage
Qui dans la hune il veut monter ?

Il aura le navire dessous mes pieds
Et ma fille en mariage."

C'était l' plus jeune de l'équipage
Que dans la hune y a monté.

Puis quand il fut dedans la hune,
Il s'y mit à rire et à chanter.

"J'y vois la tour de Babylone
Et la terre de tous côtés.

J'y vois les moutons dans la plaine
Et ma maîtresse à s'y baigner.

J'y vois les cheminées qui fument
Pour nous y apprêter à dîner."

Il était midi cinq minutes
Quand l'ancre au fond y a tombé.

Coirault : 7103 La courte-paille.
RADdO : EA 00387.
THOSE ARE/WERE THREE GALLEONS FROM SPAIN


Those are/were three galleons from Spain
Take courage
They left the navy,
Take courage, you handsome sailors (1)

It was to sail around the world
Without ever landing.

At the end of three full years
They went short of bread and wine.

They had to draw straws
To know which one would be eaten.

The short straw was left to the master
He was the one to be eaten.

"Is there one from the crew
Who would want to eat me?

Is there one from the crew
Who want to climb in the top? (2)

He will get the ship below my feet
And my daughter as a bride."

It's the youngest of the crew
Who climbed in the top,

Then when he was in the top,
He began laughing and singing.

"I see the Babylone tower
And land on all sides.

I see the sheep in the plain
And my mistress a-bathing.

I see the chimneys smoke
To cook a dinner for us." (3)

It was five past noon
When the anchor touched the bottom.
(1) A "marinier" period is a bargeman and a galleon is not a barge. Here it could stand for "marin" (sailor) or as a short for "officier marinier" (petty officer)
(2) Since it's "dans la hune" ("in" the top), I take it to be "in the crow's nest", which is in French "la gabie" but though there's at least one sea shanty that has the word "gabier" (top man), it doesn't seem there's any with "gabie" while there are some with "hune".
(3) In province (read "outside Paris") people would have "déjeuner" (breakfast) in the morning, "dîner" (dinner) at noon and "souper" (supper) in the evening while in Paris people would have "petit déjeuner" (lit. "small breakfast) in the morning, "déjeuner" (breakfast) at noon and "dîner" (dinner) in the evening. This is still accurate nowadays though Paris's custom has spread.

END OF CD 2


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 04:26 PM

CD 3 AUVERGNE LIMOUSIN

Link to the Frémeaux' leaflet of this CD


MINUIT VIENT DE SONNER
(French)

Minuit vient de sonner
À l'horloge voisine
J'appelle le sommeil
Hélas il ne vient pas.

Du fond de ma prison
J'entends la foule qui gronde
Et crie à mort, à mort
À ce bandit d' fainéant.

Simple fils d'ouvrier
J'ai roulé dans la débine
Mon sort était tracé
Comme celui d'un roi.

Et tous ces bons bourgeois
Qui m'ont tous condamné
Ils m'ont condamné
Aux travaux forcés.

Mourir sur l'échafaud
C'est une mort atroce
Puisqu'il le faut
Mourons sans trembler.

"Adieu mes chers parents
Donnez-moi du courage
Et toi mon frère Jean
Tâche de rester sage
Si tu as des enfants de bien les élever.

Recommande leur bien
Surtout de rester sages
Car à une mauvaise vie
Il n'y a rien z'à gagner.

Et toi Marie Astier
Ma charmante maîtresse
Viendra peut-être un jour
Je pourrai t'embrasser ?"

Oui c'est peut-être demain
Que l'on me guillotine
J'entends sonner
L'heure de mon trépas.

not indexed by Coirault.
RADdO : 06359.
MIDNIGHT JUST STROKE


Midnight just stroke
At the clock nearby
I call sleep,
Alas, it doesn't come.

From the bottom of my prison,
I hear the crowd rumble
And shout "Death, death
For this lazy rascal."

A simple worker's son,
I fell into poverty
My fate was as mapped out
As a king's

And all those good bourgeois
Who all sentenced me
They sentenced me
To penal servitude.

To die on the scaffold (1)
Is an atrocious death,
Since I must,
Let me (2) die without fear (lit. without trembling)

"Adieu, my dear parents
Give me courage
And you, my brother John
Try to stay good,
If you have children, (try to) raise them well.

Do recommend them
To stay good above all
For, from leading a bad life
There's nothing to gain.

And you Marie Astier,
My charming mistress
Maybe a day will come
When I can kiss you?

Yes, maybe tomorrow
They'll behead me,
I hear the time of my death
Strike.
(1) In French, to die on the scaffold implies to be beheaded by "la guillotine".
(2) the original lyrics have it as "us" though it's not the royal "we"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 04:27 PM

LE PREMEIR JORN DE MAS NÒÇAS
(Occitan -Auvergnat dialect- and French)

Le premeir jorn de mas nòças
Davinatz c' qu' m'es arribat ?
N'a vengut 'n òme a pòrta
Didòn didòn dindo-nèna
S'apelava le cusin
Didòn-dena didòn-di.

O dijatz donc paura femna
Ont botarem quel òme aicí ?
"Nous le mettrons dans une chambre
Dans le lit que nous avons."


Mes quand venguèt las vonze oras
Le nòvi s'es endormit.
La nòvia n'a mis pied à terre
Per anar jaire amb le cusin.

Mes quand venguèt las doas oras
Le nòvi s'es revelhat.
"O portatz-me una chandela
Tròbe pas ma femna aicí !"

La chandela es arribada,
Troba la femna amb le cusin.
"O le diable ta parentessa
Tant de cusins n'i a aicí !

Je suis cornard le dimanche
Mon voisin l'est le lundi.
Nous ferons voyage ensemble
Vendre nos cornes à Paris.

Nous en ferons des tabatières
Des manches de couteaux aussi.
Ça fera pour les belles dames
Feront priser leurs maris"


Coirault: 5915 Le cousin Jacobin.
RADdO : 01468.
ON THE FIRST DAY OF MY WEDDING


On the first day of my wedding
Guess what happened to me?
A man came at my door,
Didòn didòn dindo-nèna
He was called the cousin
Didondaine didondi.

"Oh, tell me, poor wife,
Where will we accommodate this man?"
"We'll put him in a bedroom,
In the bed we have."

When it was eleven
The groom went asleep,
The bride set foot on the floor
To go to sleep with the cousin.

But when it was two,
The groom woke up.
"Oh, bring me a candle,
I can't find my wife here!"

The candle was brought (lit. arrived)
He found his wife with the cousin.
"Oh, the hell of your relatives/tribe,
All those cousins in here!"

I'm a cuckold on Sundays
My neighbor is on Mondays
We'll travel together
To sell our horns in Paris.

We'll make tobacco boxes,
Knives handles too.
This will do for the beautiful ladies
They'll have their husbands snuff.
(1) the Fr word for "cuckold" is "cocu" from the word for "cuckoo", "cornard" means "horned one/horns bearer".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 04:29 PM

LA DEMENAM LA NÒSTRA NÒVIA
(Occitan -Lengadocian dialect)

La demenam la nòstra nòvia
La demenam coma l'avam
(bis)
E pas rossèla ni jantonèla
Mès cau ben faire coma se bo èra !

Tirolirolirolirolirolirolà
Tiroliroliro tiroliroliro
Tirolirolirolirolirolirolà
Tiroliroliro la-la-la

Passant per l'òrt, panam las rabas
Nos en anent las manjarem

Pièrre l'atrapa la fot per tèrra
Amb lo bilhon li fot pel cuou !
Tiro…

Tòca la tiá que ieu tòque la mieuna
Tòca la tiá que ieu tòque la miá (bis)

Garçons que sètz aquí
Fasètz dançar la nòvia
Garçons que sètz aquí
Fasètz-la devertir

E donatz-li un jorn de jòia
Garçons que sètz aquí
E donatz-li un jorn de jòia
Aicí.

Ne'n calrà plus parlar
D'anar per las velhadas
Ne'n calrà plus parlar
D'anar pels bals dançar

Dintre dins lo mainatge
Quite la libertat
E mon devertinage
Es n'anat (bis)
WE TAKE OUR BRIDE


We take our bride
We take her the way she is

She's neither blonde nor pretty
But we must do as if she were!

Tirolirolirolirolirolirolà
Tiroliroliro tiroliroliro
Tirolirolirolirolirolirolà
Tiroliroliro la-la-la

When we pass through the kitchen garden we steal the turnips
When we leave we'll eat them.

Peter catches her, he puts her on the ground,
With his rod he hits her ass!
Tiro...

Touch yours for I touch mine,
Touch yours for I touch mine.

Boys who are there,
Have the bride dance/dance with the bride
Boys who are there,
Have her have fun.

And give her a day of joy,
Boys who are there
And give her a day of joy
Here/now.

I must drop the idea of
Going to evening gatherings,
I must drop the idea of
Going to dance.

I enter marriage
I leave liberty
And my enjoying myself
Is over (lit. has left)

Témoignage, "La cabrette le jour des noces": "Ça c'est des machins nuptiaux, mais anciens, parce que dans le temps, on allait chercher la mariée à la maison avec la cabrette comme vous et alors on marchait à pied, il y avait pas de voiture. Et alors le musicien était devant, le "cabretaire", avec la cabrette, et il jouait ça, et on suivait derrière et on chantait et alors et il jouait ça et en patois, et c'était joli, eh ! Ça c'est la marche nuptiale de dans le temps. Quand moi, je me suis mariée, c'était comme ça." "Vous savez, quand il y avait quatre ou cinq kilomètres aller et autant retour… " "C'est comme d'ici vous allez à Pons à pied, le cabretaire derrière… mais c'était joli ; il avait un gros bouquet ici, à la cabrette il y avait des rubans bleus, verts, rouge, et puis ça flottait et puis il jouait, la cabrette… tiiiii tarariaaaaa… Tòca la tiá que ieu tòque la mieuna, tòca la tiá que ieu tòque la miá, tilalalia… mais c'était joli, la cabrette, moi j'aime ça.


Story (1) "The cabrette (local bagpipe) on wedding days". "This is wedding stuff, but old, because in the old days, people would fetch the bride at home with the cabrette, as you do, and they would walk, there was no cars. The musician was ahead, the cabretaire (piper) with his cabrette and he would play this, and we would follow and sing, and he would play that, and in patois, and it was pretty! This is the wedding march from days of old. When I got married, it was like this". "You know, when there were 4 or 5 km (~3 miles) to and as much back…" "It's as if from here, you'd walk to Pons, the cabretaire behind… but it was pretty, there was a big bunch of flowers here, to the cabrette there were ribbons, blue ones, green ones, red ones, they would float, and he would play, the cabrette tiiii tarariaaaaaa. Tòca la tiá que ieu tòque la mieuna, tòca la tiá que ieu tòque la miá, tilalalia… but it was pretty; the cabrette, I like it!

(1) I thought it was an interesting account of the way weddings were in those days of old, it's why I translated it even if it's not a song.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 04:29 PM

ADIEU PRIVAS PETITE VILLE
(French)

Adieu Privas petite ville
Je te quitte c'est pour longtemps.
(bis)
Je te quitte c'est pour longtemps, naviguons ma brunette
Je te quitte c'est pour longtemps, naviguons en avant.

Je ne regrette pas la ville, ni les bourgeois qui sont dedans
Ni les bourgeois qui sont dedans, naviguons ma brunette
Ni les bourgeois qui sont dedans, naviguons en avant.

Je ne regrette qu'une fille, une fille de dix-huit ans
Une fille de dix-huit ans, naviguons ma brunette
Une fille de dix-huit ans, naviguons en avant.

Coirault : 6514 Que regrettes-tu en partant.
RADdO : 03052.
FAREWELL PRIVAS LITTLE TOWN


Farewell Privas little town
I leave you for long
(twice)
I leave you for long, let's sail my brunette,
I leave you for long, let's sail forwards.

I don't regret the town, nor the bourgeois in there either,
Nor the bourgeois in there either, let's sail my brunette
Nor the bourgeois in there either, let's sail forwards.

I only regret a girl, an eighteen year old girl,
An eighteen year old girl, let's sail my brunette
An eighteen year old girl, let's sail forwards.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 04:32 PM

SOS LE PONT D'ORLEANS
(Occitan -Lemosin dialect)

Sos le pont d'Orleans
Marguerite 'la y lave.
Chantant le rossignolet
Le rossignolet
(bis)

La vit venir d'alai
Sieis grands cavaliers de guerre.

Lo premier, eu li disset :
"Dio, ma petite Marguerite !"

Lo deuxieme, eu li disset :
"Dio, voldria bien t'esposar !"

Lo troisieme, eu li disset :
"Dio, au fond de la granda prada !"

Lo quatrieme, eu li disset :
"Dio, nos li farem une grande virade !"

Lo cinquieme, eu li disset :
"Dio, nos li rentrarem dedins la grande broalhe !"

Lo sixieme, eu li disset :
"Dio, nos li farem l'amor !"

RADdO : 06360.
UNDER ORLEANS BRIDGE


Under Orleans bridge
Margaret was doing her washing there (1)
The nightingale was singing,
The nightingale (lit. "little nightingale")
(twice)

She saw six tall, war horsemen
Come from afar.

The first said to her (2)
"Say, my little Margaret!"

"The second said to her
"Say, I'd want to marry you!"

The third said
"Say, at the bottom of the big meadow!"

The fourth said
"Say, we'll take her for a long walk!"

The fifth said
"Say, we'll take her in the big wasteland!"

The sixth said
"Say, we'll make love to her!"
(1) The translation into French is given as "gets up" but I'm not sure she does. First there are different songs on this theme and the girl (most often "Catarina") is usually washing her laundry "lava (present)/lavava (imperfect)"; then: she gets up from under a bridge? was she really sleeping there? to get up period in this context means to get up from bed in the morning, not just to stand up; besides nightingales sing at night so unless she was some sort of night owl to get up at night and be able to see horsemen come in the dark I take 'la y lave' to be the verb 'lavar/lavâ' (to wash)

(2) Though all verses but the two first have "eu li disset" (he said to her/he told her) I kept "to her" when they were actually speaking to her.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 04:34 PM

FAI-LO CORNARD MA FILHA
(Occitan -Lengadocian)

Fai-lo cornard ma filha
Ton paire zo èra ben
(bis)
Ta maire lo prestava
E enquèra l'a ben !
(bis)

Presta-lo-me ma filha
Que te lo rendrai ben
(bis)

RADdO : 06363.
MAKE HIM A CUCKOLD, DAUGHTER


Make him a cuckold, daughter
Your father well was one.
(twice)
Your mother did lend it
And she still has it!
(twice)

Lend it to me, girl,
I'll give it back to you.
(twice)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 04:35 PM

PASSANT PAR PARIS, VIDANT LA BOUTEILLE
(French)

Passant par Paris, vidant la bouteille, (bis)
Un de mes amis me dit à l'oreille,
bon, bon, bon,
Le bon vin m'endort, l'amour me réveille,
Le bon vin m'endort, l'amour me réveille encore


Un de mes amis me dit à l'oreille (bis)
Jean prend garde à toi, l'on courti' ta belle,
bon, bon, bon,
Le bon vin…


Courtise qui le voudra, je me fie z'en elle.

J'ai eu de son cœur la fleur la plus belle

Dans un beau lit blanc créé de dentelles.

J'ai eu trois garçons tous trois capitaines

L'un est à Paris, l'autre à La Rochelle

Et l'autre à Bordeaux courtisant les belles

Et l' père est ici qui assure la ficelle.

Coirault : 2514 J'ai trouvé rival.
RADdO : 00207.
GOING THROUGH PARIS


Going through Paris, drinking (lit. emptying the bottle),(twice>
One of my friends tells me in my hear,
well, well, well,
The good wine makes me sleep, love awakes me,
The good wine makes me sleep, love awakes me again


One of my friends tells me in my hear
"John, beware, your beloved is being courted"
well, well, well,
The good wine...


"Court may whoever wants to, I trust her

I got from her heart the most beautiful flower

In a beautiful bed created (1) with lace

I had three boys all three captains

One is in Paris, the other in La Rochelle

The third one in Bordeaux courting the girls

And the father's here, insuring (2) the string."
(1) "créé"(created) must be a mishearing, it's usually "gréé" (rigged)
(2) "qui assure la ficelle" might mean "who insures/belays the string" (as it might mean "insuring the dough", "ficelle" being one of the many slang words for money) but I take it to be a mishearing since it's usually sung as "qui hale sur la ficelle" (pulling from the string/rope), the verb "haler" (to haul, to tow) was used in very specific contexts usually related to the navy and "Passant par Paris" isn't a "true" sea shanty.

I took the translation I'd already done in this thread where you can also find the Provençal version of it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 04:36 PM

EN MILLE HUIT CENT VINGT
(French)

En mille huit cent vingt
Ce fut un assassin par un de nos soutiens
Un grand prince de France
Se trouvant sans défense
Il fut assassiné par un garçon sellier.

Mais ce garçon sellier
Il fut bien attrapé par un vieux grenadier
Il cria aux hommes et forte
Mais d'une voix plus forte :
"On assassine ici le duc de Berry ! "

Sa femme vient de la maison tout pleurant
De la maison tout criant :
"Oh malheureuse France,
Voilà la récompense
D'être venue ici pour perdre mon mari ! "

"Duchesse ne crie pas tant,
Aie soin de notre enfant
Je ne suis pas mourant
Conduis-moi z'à l'hôtel
Le coup n'est pas mortel."

Mais à minuit on entend un grand bruit
Tout autour de son lit
"Adieu charmante duchesse
Il faut que je te laisse
Apporte mon enfant entre mes bras mourants.

Il faut que je te quitte,
Mais d'un regret bien triste
On mettra un prince à ma place,
Dieu en fasse la grâce
Mais ce que je voudrais le bonheur d'un Français."

RADdO : 06361.
IN EIGHTEEN AND TWEETY


In eighteen and twenty
It was a murderer, by one of our supports (1)
A great prince of France,
Being defenseless
Was murdered by a saddler boy.

But this saddler boy
Was caught by an old grenadier
He shouted to the men and loud
But with a louder voice,
"The duke of Berry is being murdered here!"

His wife comes from home weeping,
From home crying,
"Oh woe is France,
Here is the reward
To have come here to loose my husband!"

"Duchess, don't cry so much,
Take care of our child,
I'm not dying,
Have me brought to the hotel,
The blow isn't lethal."

But at midnight, they hear a great noise
Around his bed,
"Adieu, charming duchess,
I have to leave you,
Bring my child between my dying arms.

I have to leave you,
But with a very sad regret.
They'll put a prince in my place,
God may allow it,
But what I'd want is the happiness of the Frenchmen"
(1) This sentence is very weird, it makes no sense! There must be some mishearing somewhere though it can't be "assassin" or "soutiens" because of the rhyme


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 04:38 PM

CINQ SOS PER LA CHAMBRIERA
(Occitan -Lemosin dialect)

Cinq sos per la chambriera
Dos sos per lo vaileton
(bis)
Quo es pro char per la chambriera
Quo es pas pro per lo vaileton !
(bis)

RADdO : 06362
FIVE PENCE FOR THE CHAMBERMAID


Five pence for the chambermaid
Two pence for the young (male) servant (1)
(twice)
It's expensive enough for the chambermaid
It's not enough for the little servant!
(twice)
(1) it can't be "la vaileton" as typed on the leaflet, "la" is the feminine article and though in some dialects this "la" is pronounced "lo" ("loh" for you, with an "o" more or less open) it's never the other way round; "vaileton" is a boy, the feminine would be "vailetona" but another word would be used for a girl.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 04:38 PM

LA PASSION DE JESUS CRIST
(Occitan -Lemosin dialect)

La passion de Jesus Crist
N'es tant trista, dolanta

Escotetz-la pitits e grands
Si la voletz apprendre

Las aurelhas son per escotar
La bocha per la dire

Nòstre Senhor se vei permenar
Tot pendut coma un ange

N'emmena degun coma se
Mas Sent Jan e Sent Pierre

Quand sigueren a mieg chamin
Tròben belcòp de monde

Disset sent Pierre a sent Jan
Granda rejoïssença

Sent Jan disset a sent Pierre
Quò es granda traïssença

Tu ne'n veiràs deman a miegjorn
Ne'n veiràs l'experiança
Tu ne'n veiràs deman melhor
Ne'n veiràs l'esperiança

Tu ne'n veiràs mon cuer percé
Per mila còps de lança

Tu ne'n veiràs mon sang couler
Tot lo long de mes membres
THE PASSION OF JESUS CHRIST


The passion of Jesus Christ
Is so sad and painful.

Listen to it, children and adults (lit. little and big ones)
If you want to learn it.

The ears are made to listen
The mouth to tell it.

Our Lord goes to stroll
"Hung" like an angel. (1)

He takes nobody along
But Saint John and Saint Peter.

When (they were) half the way there
They find a lot of people.

Saint Peter tells Saint John
Great rejoicing

Saint John tells Saint Peter
"It's a great treason."

"You'll see tomorrow at noon,
You'll see the experience
You'll see better tomorrow,
You'll see the experience.

You'll see my heart pierced
By a thousand spear blows

You'll see my blood drip
Along my limbs."
(1) I take it to mean "hanging from nowhere" in the sky


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 04:41 PM

ROSSIGNOLET CHARMANT, ROSSIGNOLET SAUVAGE
(French)

“Rossignolet charmant, rossignolet sauvage,
Apprends-moi ton langage, apprends-moi à chanter,
Apprends-moi la manière comment l’amour se fait.”

“Comment l’amour se fait, je m’en vais te le dire.
Faut aller voir les filles, les embrasser souvent,
En leur disant la belle, je serai ton amant.”

“Si tu es mon amant, je serai ta maîtresse,
Je serai ta maîtresse, maîtresse pour longtemps,
On couchera ensemble malgré tous nos parents.”

“La belle dans ton jardin, y a t-une belle rose,
Y a t-une belle rose, belle dans ton jardin.
Permets-moi donc, la belle, que j’y mette la main.”

“Pour y mettre la main, y a bien des choses à faire.
Apporte-moi la lune, le soleil à la main,
Tu toucheras la rose qui est dans mon jardin.”

“Pour t’apporter la lune, la lune elle est bien haute,
La lune elle est bien haute, le soleil est bien loin,
Tu n’auras pas la rose qui est dans mon jardin.”

Coirault : 122 Rossignolet du bois.
RADdO : 01211.
CHARMING NIGHTINGALE, WILD NIGHTINGALE


"Charming nightingale, wild nightingale,
Teach me your language, teach me to sing,
Teach me the way to make love." (1)

"How to make love, I'm going to tell you,
You must go see the girls, kiss them often
Telling them 'Beauty, I'll be your lover'"

"If you are my lover, I'll be your mistress,
I'll be your mistress, mistress for long,
We'll sleep together in spite of all our parents"

"Beauty, in your garden there is a beautiful rose,
There is a beautiful rose, beauty, in your garden,
Allow me, beauty, to put my hand on it"

"To put your hand on it, there are many things to do.
Bring me the moon, the sun in your hand,
You'll touch the rose which is in my garden".

"To bring you’re the moon, the moon is very high,
The moon is very high, the sun is so far."
"You will not have the rose which is in my garden".

(1) I don't think he's asking for a class of sexual education. "To make love" would mean to court a girl -which could include making love as we understand it nowadays, but not necessarily though the chances are that he'd try to. If you consider the lyrics, he did try!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 28 Dec 10 - 06:09 PM

The last tune on the CD is just played, but it has lyrics…

PARA LO LOP
(Occitan)

E para lo lop, pichona/pichòta/pitiòta (1)
Para lo lop,
E para lo lop, pichona/pichòta/pitiòta
Para lo lop,
Para lo lop que t'empòrta, que t'empòrta,
Para lo lop que t'empòrta l'anhelon/los motons.
BEWARE OF THE WOLF


Beware of the wolf, girl (lit. little one)
Beware of the wolf,
Beware of the wolf, girl
Beware of the wolf,
Beware of the wolf that takes, that takes,
Beware of the wolf that takes your lamb/sheep.
(1) The word meaning "little one" is different according to the dialects.

Some people have added lyrics to this song, some about today's issues concerning the languages.

END OF CD 3

Looking for information I came across Vitrifolk.be. It's in French but you can find sheet music ("partitions") lyrics ("paroles") among many other topics


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 28 Dec 10 - 06:37 PM

Vitrifolk is a fantastic resource - their stock of partitions (tunes) has to be seen to be believed. Unfortunately it's sheet-music only, no ABC - and most of the tunes I looked at were notated in C, not the D or G I play in - but the sheer wealth of tunes makes up for the inconvenience.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jan 11 - 02:23 PM

CD 4 Center France

Link to the Frémeaux's leaflet of this DC.

LA BELLE S'EN VA AU JARDIN DES AMOURS
(French)

La belle s'en va au jardin des amours
C'est pour y passer la semaine
Son père qui la cherche partout
Et son amant en est en peine.

Y a un berger là-bas dans la prairie
Si il l'a vue qu'il nous renseigne :
"Berger, berger, mon doux berger
N'avez-vous pas vu la beauté même ?"

"De quelle couleur était-elle habillée ?
Est-elle en soie ou bien en laine ?"
"Elle a un jupon blanc satiné,
Une jolie robe couleur de rose."

"Elle est là-bas au jardin des amours,
Assise sus l' bord d'une fontaine,
Elle tient un p'tit oiseau dans sa main
À qui la belle raconte toutes ses peines."

"Mon p'tit oiseau, tu es donc bien heureux
D'être entre les mains d' ma maîtresse,
Moi je suis bien son amoureux
Et je ne peux pas m'approcher d'elle.

Faut-il être aussi près du rosier
Sans pouvoir même cueillir la rose ?"
"Cueillez, cueillez, cher amant cueillez,
C'en est pour vous qu' la rose est belle."

"Faut-il être aussi près du ruisseau
Pour endurer la soif que j'endure ?"
"Buvez, buvez, cher amant buvez,
C'en est pour vous qu' le ruisseau coule."

Coirault : 1801 La belle au jardin d'amour.
RADdO : 00006.
THE FAIR MAIDEN GOES TO THE GARDEN OF LOVE


The fair maiden goes to the garden of love
To spend the week there.
Her father is looking for her everywhere
And her lover is sorrowful.

There's a shepherd in the meadow,
Let him tell us if he saw her:
"Shepherd, shepherd, my sweet shepherd,
Didn't you see Beauty itself?"

"Which was the color of her clothes?
Is she wearing silk or wool?"
"She has/wears a white, silken petticoat
And a pretty, rose-colored dress"

"She's over there, in the garden of love,
Sitting on the edge of a fountain,
She holds a little bird in her hand
To which she (lit. the fair maiden) tells all her sorrows."

"My little bird, you're very lucky (lit. happy)
To be between my mistress's hands
Even if I am her sweetheart,
I can't go near her.

Has one to be so near the rosebush
Without been allowed to pick the rose?"
"Pick, pick, dear lover, pick,
It's for you that the rose is beautiful"

"Has one to be so near the stream
To endure the thirst I endure?"
"Drink, drink, dear lover, drink,
It's for you that the stream flows."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jan 11 - 02:25 PM

TES MOUTONS MA BARGÈRE
(French - Berrichon dialect?)

"Tes moutons ma bargère
Ils sont bien récartés
Ils sont dedans la plaine
On les voit pus aller."
(bis)
"Mes moutons ils marchent
Au courant de l'eau
Mon barger les appelle
Au chant des oiseaux."

"Allons donc ma bargère
Allons sous ces ormeaux
Nous parlerons d'amour
À quelques petits mots."
(bis)
"Si l'amour vous presse
Passez votre chemin
Ou gare après vos fesses
J' vas lâcher mes chiens."

"Pour tes chiens ma bargère
Il faut pas les lâcher
Si ma parole t'y fâche
Je vas m'en aller.
(bis)
Adieu fille ingrate
Fille sans pitié
Pus les amants vous flattent
Moins vous les aimez."

Un soir à la brune
En m'y promenant
Tout en fumant ma pipe
Bien gaillardement.
(bis)
J' rencontre mon camarade
Triste désolé
Ne parlant plus parole
Je l'ai reconsolé.

"Qu'as-tu donc camarade
Qu'as-tu à tant pleurer
Pour l'amour d'une brune
À tant t'y chagriner ?
Nous irons-t-en Flandres
Nous en trouverons
Des brunes aussi des blondes
Nous en choisirons."

"Des brunes aussi des blondes
Non m'y convient pas
Car ma maîtresse est belle
Je n' la quitterai pas.
(bis)
Ma maîtresse est belle
Elle a des agréments
Oh ! quand j' suis avec elle
Le dimanche aux champs."

Coirault : 4309 Ne lâche pas ton chien + 2613 En fumant ma pipe bien gaillardement.
RADdO : 02684 + RADdO : 01031.
YOUR SHEEP, MY SHEPHERDESS


"Your sheep, my shepherdess,
Are very scattered,
They are in the plain
We can't see them go any more"
(twice)
"My sheep walk
Along the stream of water.
My shepherd calls them
When the birds sing."

"Let's go, my shepherdess,
Let's go under those elm trees.
We'll talk of love,
Some little words"
(twice)
"If love is pressing you,
Be on your way
Or beware of your bottom,
I'm going to set my dogs loose."

"As for your dogs, my shepherdess,
No need to set them loose.
If my talking bothers you,
I'm going to leave.
(twice)
Farewell, ungrateful girl,
Pitiless girl,
The more lovers flatter you,
The less you love them".

One evening, at dusk,
I was strolling
And smoking my pipe
Cheerfully.
(twice)
I met my friend,
Sad and sorry,
He wouldn't say a word,
I comforted him.

"What's the matter with you, mate,
Why do you cry so much,
Why do you grieve so
For a brunette's love?
We will go to Flanders,
We will find some
Brunettes and blondes too,
We will choose some.

"Brunettes and blondes
Don't fit me
For my mistress is beautiful
I won't leave her.
(twice)
My mistress is beautiful
She has amenities
Oh, when I'm with her
In the fields on Sundays.
I added a question mark to "Berrichon dialect" because if you check Wiki article about it, from what we have in the song ("barger/bargère", "récartés", "reconsolé", some constructions and pronunciations) it's hard to tell whether the whole song is in Berrichon dialect or if it's just French with some regional shades which would be what we could call "nowadays Berrichon"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jan 11 - 02:26 PM

ROSSIGNOLET DES BOIS
(French)

"Rossignolet des bois
Rossignolet sauvage,
(bis)
Dis-nous donc la manière
Apprends-nous à parler
Apprends-nous la manière
Comment l'amour se fait."

"Comment l'amour se fait
Faut jamais rien en dire
(bis)
Faut jamais rien en dire
Ça serait-y qu'en riant
À sa jolie maîtresse
Que son cœur aime tant."

"La belle dans ton jardin
Y a des belles pommes reinettes
(bis)
Voudrais-tu m'y permettre
Ah ! d'y porter la main
A tes belles pommes reinettes
Qu'il y a dans ton jardin."

"Pour toucher à mes pommes
Cela m'est impossible."
(bis)
"La lune alle est bien haute
Le soleil est bien loin
Tu garderas la belle
Tes pommes dans ton jardin."

"Eh ! oh ! Là-bas va-t-en
Grand amuseur de filles
(bis)
Ah ! tu as pris mon cœur-e
À présent tu t'en vas
En passant la rivière
Galant tu périras."

"Oh ! oui j'y périrai
En passant la rivière ?
(bis)
Je suis garçon volage
Garçon à marier
En passant la rivière
J'tâcherai bin d'm'en r'tirer."      

Coirault : 122 Rossignolet du bois.
RADdO : 01211.
NIGHTINGALE FROM THE WOODS, WILD NIGHTINGALE


Nightingale from the woods,
Wild nightingale,
(twice)
Tell us the manner,
Teach me to speak,
Teach us the way
To make love." (1)

"How to make love,
One must never speak about it,
(twice)
One must never speak about it
Even as a joke
To one's pretty mistress
That one's heart loves so much."

"Beauty, in your garden
There are nice russet apples
(twice)
Would you allow me
Ah, to put a hand
On the nice russet apples
There are in your garden?

"To touch my apples,
It's impossible for me" (implied "to allow you to")
(twice)
The moon is very high,
The sun is so far.
Beauty, you will keep
The apples in your garden."

"Hey! Oh! Go away over there,
You great entertainer of girls,
(twice)
Ah, you took my heart,
Now you go away,
When you cross the river,
Lover, you'll perish."

"Oh, yes, I'll perish
Crossing the river?
(twice)
I'm a fickle boy,
Marriageable boy,
When I cross the river,
I'll do my best to get out of it.
(1) Cf note above


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jan 11 - 02:28 PM

GENS DE COURBAN QUI AVEZ DU CŒUR
(French)

Gens de Courban qui avez du cœur
N'oubliez pas vos enfants de chœur
Le bon Dieu vous le rendra
Alléluia !

Si vos poules ont bien pondu
Donnez un œuf, donnez-en deux
Pour mettre au panier que voilà
Alléluia !

Et si vous n'avez pas d'œufs
Mettez un franc, mettez-en deux
Dans la goillotte que voilà
Alléluia !

Coirault : 9111 Alléluia.
RADdO : 05532
PEOPLE FROM COURBAN WHO ARE KIND-HEARTED,


People from Courban who are kind-hearted
Don't forget your altar boys,
The good God will repay you
Hallelujah!

If your hens laid well
Give an egg, give two of them
To put in this basket
Hallelujah!

And if you have no eggs,
Put a franc, put two of them
In this purse.
Hallelujah!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jan 11 - 02:31 PM

ET Y EN TOUT TEMPS LA GALETTE EST BONNE
(French)

Et y en tout temps la galette est bonne
Et y en tout temps l'a du beurre dedans
(bis)
Quand n'y a point d' beurre dedans
Ça s'appelle pas d' la galette
Quand n'y a point d' beurre dedans
Ça s'appelle du "chauboulon".

RADdO : 06364.
ANY TIME, THE GALETTE IS GOOD


Any time, the galette (1) is good,
Any time, there's butter inside
(twice)
When there's no butter inside,
It's not called galette,
When there's no butter inside,
It's called "chauboulon" (2)
(1) a galette is a round cake made of a mixture of butter, almonds powder, sugar and egg between two layers of puff pastry. If you follow the link you'll read about the galette tradition on 12th Night in France and a recipe of said galette.
(2) Chauboulon : the note on the leaflet says it's a galette not made with puff pastry and rather heavy on the stomach.

Language: same issue as in "Tes moutons ma bargère" (above)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jan 11 - 02:33 PM

DU BON MATIN JE M' SUIS LEVÉ
(French)

Du bon matin je m' suis levé, plus matin que l'aurore, (bis)
C'est là que je m' suis-t-aperçu, que ma maîtresse ne m'aimait plus.

J'ai mis la bride à mon cheval, oh ! oh ! j'ai mis la selle, (bis)
Mon épée claire à mon côté pour y aller voir ma bien-aimée.

Mais j'arrive dedans la cour, son petit cœur soupire, (bis)
Qu'avez-vous donc à soupirer, la belle vous êtes enfiancée.

Enfiancée oh oui je suis, malheureuse ma journée, (bis)
Car c'est dimanche mes premiers bans, mettez-y donc empêchement.

Voilà le dimanche qui arrive, le curé monte en chaire, (bis)
Écoutez tous petits et grands, j' m'en vais vous publier les bans.

Mais le galant n'étant pas loin, entendit cette annonce, (bis)
Monsieur l' curé n' se pressez pas tant, je viens y mettre empêchement.

Mais quel est donc cet insolent qui m'y parle de la sorte, (bis)
Je ne suis pas un insolent, je suis le premier d' ses amants.

Je suis le premier d' ses amants, voilà sept ans que j' l'aime, (bis)
S'il y a sept ans que vous l'aimez, c'est comme de juste que vous l'aurez.

Coirault : 1432 L'empêchement aux bans.
RADdO : 00936.
EARLY IN THE MORNING I GOT UP


Early in the morning I got up, earlier than dawn (twice)
It's when I realized that my mistress loved me no more.

I put the bridle to my horse, oh, oh, I put the saddle on (twice)
My unsheathed sword at my side to go to see my beloved.

But when I arrived in her yard, her little heart sighed (twice).
"Why do you sigh, beauty, you are engaged."

"Engaged, oh yes I am, my day is sorrowful (twice)
For on Sunday are my first banns, hinder them."

Sunday came, the priest went up to the pulpit (twice),
"Listen all, children and grown ups, I'm going to call the banns."

But the lover wasn't far, he heard this announcement (twice)
"Father, don't haste so much, I've come to hinder them."

"But who is this insolent man who speaks this way to me (twice)"
"I'm not insolent, I'm the first lover of hers.

"I'm the first lover of hers, I've loved her for seven years. (twice)
"If you've loved her for seven years, you'll have her, it's quite fair."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jan 11 - 02:34 PM

AU PAYS DU BERRY
(French)

Au pays du Berry, quand une fillette
A fixé son choix, oui da, sur un épouseux
(…)
Et pour un sou, au son de la cornemuse
On chante et on s'amuse et on rit jusqu'au jour

Ha ha ha ha ha ha, ha la cornemuse
Ha ha ha ha ha ha, souffle jusqu'au jour !
IN BERRY LAND


In Berry land, when a young girl
Set her choice, yes indeed, on a husband
(…)
And for a penny, to the sound of the bagpipe,
We sing and we have fun and we laugh till daybreak.

Ha ha ha ha ha ha, ha the bagpipe
Ha ha ha ha ha ha, plays (lit. blows) till daybreak


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jan 11 - 02:36 PM

ON TE RACCOURCIRA TON PETIT COTILLON MA JEANNETTE
(French)

On te raccourcira ton petit cotillon ma Jeannette
On te raccourcira ton petit cotillon de lin.

RADdO : 06365.
THEY/WE WILL SHORTEN YOUR LITTLE PETTICOAT, MY JEANNETTE


They/we will shorten your little petticoat, my Jeannette
They/we will shorten your little flax petticoat.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jan 11 - 02:37 PM

PAYEZ DONC, MAMAN, PAYEZ DONC
(French)

Payez donc, maman, payez donc
La façon de ma camisole.
Payez donc, maman, payez donc
La façon de mon cotillon.

J'ai payé, maman, j'ai payé
La façon de ma camisole.
J'ai payé, maman, j'ai payé
La façon de mon tablier.

RADdO : 00083.
DO PAY, MOMMY, DO PAY


Do pay, mommy, do pay
The making of my camisole,
Do pay, mommy, do pay
The making of my petticoat.

I paid, mommy, I paid,
The making of my camisole,
I paid, mommy, I paid
The making of my apron.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jan 11 - 02:40 PM

HABITANTS DE TOUT ÂGE
(French)

Habitants de tout âge
À l'heure du repos,
En attendant l'ouvrage,
Écoutez quelques mots !
Un brave militaire
Revenait de la guerre,
Rêveur de ses bonheurs.
Ce soldat doux et sage
Rentrait dans son village
D'avec la Croix d'Honneur
Avec la Croix d'Honneur.

Allant-t-à la fontaine
La femme du Perrier,
Elle reconnut son frère
Cet aimable guerrier.
"Eh bien l' bonjour cher frère,
Voilà notre chaumière,
Venez voir mon époux !
Perrier, la bonté même,
Autant que moi vous aime !"
"Je voudrais m'en aller ! (bis)

Frère et sœur, le temps me presse
Embrassons-nous bonsoir !
Demain-z-avant la messe,
Tous deux venez me voir !
Nous ferons-z-une fête,
Elle sera parfaite
En souhaitant les beaux jours !
Ce sont mes pères-z-et mères
Qui sont-t-encore sur terre
Je les aime toujours. (bis)

Je veux voir si ma mère,
Sous l'habit militaire,
Reconnaîtrait son fils !
Lui parlant de l'Italie
Mon cher-e père Elise
N'en sera pas surpris ! " (bis)

"Bonsoir, madame l'hôtesse,
Pourriez-vous me loger ?"
"Mon ami je suis triste,
Je n'ai rien à manger !"
"Que rien ne vous chagrine,
Du pain-z-une chopine,
C'est suffisant pour moi !
De sur une paillasse,
Daignez m'y faire place,
Car il fait déjà froid ! (bis)

La chambre est ténébreuse,
Le soldat dort bientôt.
L'hôtesse, assez curieuse,
Visita le ballot.
Oh ! sans croire mais sans-z-honte
Oh ! cette dame y compte
Dix huit cent pièces d'or. (bis)

"Mon mari oh quelle somme,
Pour nous c'est un trésor !
Assassinons cet homme,
Nous aurons tout son or !"
Descendent dans la cave
Afin d'y faire un trou.
"Moi, j' vais trouver ce brave
Pour lui couper le cou !"

Le soldat plein de vie
Sous la femme en furie
Fut bientôt massacré.
Et elle s'en va le mettre
Oh sans le reconnaître
Dans le trou préparé. (bis)

Le lendemain dès l'aurore
L'estimable Perrier,
Ainsi que Léonore
Viennent pour voir le guerrier.
"Eh bien l' bonjour chère mère
Parlons d' ce militaire
Que vous avez logé !"
"Il est sur la grande route,
Déjà bien loin sans doute
Qui retourne au congé." (bis)

"Ma mère, c'est une fable
Que vous m' contez ici !
Ce soldat estimable
N'est point sorti d'ici !
Réveillez-le de grâce,
Afin que je l'embrasse,
Je l'aime tendrement !"
"Le r'connais-tu ma chère ?"
"Oui maman c'est mon frère,
Qui r'vient du régiment." (bis)

"Hélas ! Je sens mon crime
Qui m'entraîne à la mort !
Mon fils est ma victime,
Grands dieux, quel triste sort !
Hier soir après la brume,
Pour avoir sa fortune,
J'ai pris mon grand couteau.
Oh de ç-t-enfant aimable
Moi la mère abominable,
J'en deviens le bourreau !" (bis)

Coirault : 9614 Le fils soldat assassiné par ses parents IV.
RADdO : 05292.
PEOPLE OF ALL AGES


People of all ages,
At rest time,
While waiting for work,
Hear some words!
A good military man
Going back from war,
Dreaming of his happiness.
This sweet and nice soldier
Was going back to his village,
With the Cross of Honor
With the Cross of Honor.

A-going to the fountain
Perrier's wife
Recognized her brother,
This lovable warrior.
"Greetings, dear brother,
Here is our cottage,
Come and see my husband,
Perrier, goodness itself,
Loves you as much as I do!"
"I'd like to leave! (twice)

Brother and sister, I'm in a hurry,
Let's kiss goodbye! (lit. good evening)
Tomorrow before mass,
You two come to see me!
We'll have a party/celebration,
It will be perfect
Greeting the nice days
My father and mother
Still on earth,
I still love them. (twice)

I want to check if my mother
Would recognize her son
In his army clothes!
As I'll talk about Italy
My dear father Élise (2)
Won't be surprised (twice)

"Good evening, hostess,
Could you accommodate me?"
"My friend, I'm sad,
I have nothing to eat !"
"Don't worry,
Some bread and a glass (of wine or anything else)
It's enough for me!
On a straw mattress
Deign to make me some place
For it's already cold!" (twice)

The bedroom was dark
The soldier was soon asleep.
The hostess rather curious
Searched the bundle.
Oh, without believing it but shameless,
Oh, this lady counted
Eighteen hundred gold coins in it. (twice)

"Husband, oh! What an amount,
For us it's a treasure!
Let's murder this man,
We'll have all his gold!"
They went down in the cellar
To dig a hole in there.
"I'm going to see this brave,
To cut his neck/throat!" (twice)

The full of life soldier
Was soon slaughtered
Under(2) the furious woman
And she goes to put him
Oh, without knowing him
In the prepared hole. (twice)

On the next day, at dawn,
The worthy Perrier
And Léonore too
Go to see the warrior.
"Good day to you, dear mother,
Let's talk about this military man
You accommodated!"
"He's on the highway,
Probably already far away,
Going back to his leave (3). (twice)

"Mother, it's a tale
You're telling me now!
This worthy soldier
Didn't go out from here!
Please wake him up
So that I kiss him
I love him tenderly!"
"Did you know him, my dear?"
"Yes, mommy, it's my brother
Who comes back from the army." (twice)

"Alas! I feel my crime
Dragging me to death!
My son is my victim,
Great gods, what a sad fate!
Yesterday night after dusk
To get his wealth
I took my big knife.
Oh, of this lovely child,
I, his abominable mother,
Have been the executioner. (twice)
(1) The sister's name is Léonore so this "Élise" looks weird since it's supposed to be the father's name while Élise is a woman's name. Unless… the final "e" following a vowel could be pronounced in songs–and it still happens nowadays- so "Italie" was pronounced "itali-e" and would thus rhyme with "Élie" (Elijah) pronounced "éli-e", then Élise would come from a mishearing.
(2) meaning that she was on top of him when she murdered him.
(3) I suppose she meant that she thought he was on leave and had stopped there on his way home since "au" means "to (the)", not "from".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 03 Jan 11 - 02:43 PM

LES VOULEZ-VOUS CONNAÎTRE, LES ENFANTS SANS SOUCIS
(French)

Les voulez-vous connaître, les enfants sans soucis ?
Il faut les aller prendre un dimanche matin.

Il faut les aller prendre un dimanche matin
Sortant de la grand'messe : "Compagnon d'où viens-tu ?"

Sortant de la grand'messe : "Compagnon d'où viens-tu ?"
Je viens de la taverne, mon argent répandu

Je viens de la taverne, mon argent répandu.
Si tu voulus me croire, ton argent t'aurais eu

Si tu voulus me croire, ton argent t'aurais eu
Tu aurais bu de l'aigre et laissé ce bon vin.

Tu aurais bu de l'aigre et laissé ce bon vin
J'aurais vendu ma robe et mon pourpoint de satin

J'aurais vendu ma robe et mon pourpoint de satin
Rossignolet sauvage, rossignolet joli

Rossignolet sauvage, rossignolet joli
Va t'en dire à ma mie qu'elle n'aura plus d'ami

Va t'en dire à ma mie qu'elle n'aura plus d'ami
Qu'il est parti en guerre, c'est pour le roi servir

Qu'il est parti en guerre, c'est pour le roi servir
Servir le roi, la reine, et sa patrie aussi

Servir le roi, la reine, et sa patrie aussi
Rossignolet sauvage, rossignolet joli

Rossignolet sauvage, rossignolet joli
Va t'en chercher mon fifre et mon tambour joli

Va t'en chercher mon fifre et mon tambour joli
Pour donner des aubades aux enfants sans soucis

Pour donner des aubades aux enfants sans soucis
Qui sont dans la taverne, qui mangent du rôti.

Coirault : 1517 Qu'on m'apporte ma flûte.
RADdO : 02302.
DO YOU WANT TO KNOW THE CAREFREE CHILDREN?


Do you want to know the carefree children?
You need to go and catch them on a Sunday morning.

You need to go and catch them on a Sunday morning,
Going out from high mass "Mate, where do you come from?"

Going out from high mass "Mate, where do you come from?"
"I'm coming from the tavern with my money wasted (lit. spread)

I'm coming from the tavern with my money wasted"
"If you had wanted to believe me, you'd have had your money

If you had wanted to believe me, you'd have had your money
You'd have drunk sour wine and left this good one.

You'd have drunk sour wine and left this good one.
I'd have sold my gown(1) and my velvet doublet

I'd have sold my gown and my velvet doublet
Wild nightingale, pretty nightingale

Wild nightingale, pretty nightingale
Go to tell my beloved that she'll have no sweetheart any more

Go to tell my beloved that she'll have no sweetheart any more,
That he went to war to serve the king

That he went to war to serve the king
To serve the king, the queen and his fatherland too.

To serve the king, the queen and his fatherland too.
Wild nightingale, pretty nightingale

Wild nightingale, pretty nightingale
Go to fetch my fife and my nice (lit. pretty) drum

Go to fetch my fife and my nice drum
To serenade at dawn the carefree children

To serenade at dawn the carefree children
Who are in the tavern, who are eating roast.
(1)"robe" is usually a woman's dress or a judge or lawyer's gown or a priest's robe.

END OF CD 4


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 06:54 AM

CD 5 SOUTH-WEST

Link to the Frémeaux's leaflet of this CD.

DE PARIS DANS PARIS
(French)

De Paris dans Paris,
Sur la place publique,
(bis)
Il vient à passer le Grand Chasseur du Roi ;
Rencontre une bergère qui tremblait de froid.
(bis)

"Bergère, si vous avez froid,
Je vous donne ma couverture.
(bis)
Et mon manteau gris et ma capote aussi,
Mon joli cœur en gage s'il vous fait plaisir."
(bis)

"De votre joli cœur,
Je vous en remercie
(bis)
Car je l'ai promis à mon mignon berger,
Au son de la musette il me fera danser."
(bis)

"De ton mignon berger,
N'en fais pas tant la fière !
(bis)
Il s'est engagé au service du roi ;
J'en suis son capitaine depuis hier au soir."
(bis)

"De s'être engagé
Cela n'est pas possible
(bis)
Je le vois venir ce joli cœur d'amour,
Descendre la colline et me dire bonjour."
(bis)

Coirault : 3806 La couverture.
RADdO : 00035.
FROM PARIS INSIDE PARIS


From Paris inside Paris,(1)
On the public square,
(twice)
The King's Great Hunter happened to pass by
Met a shepherdess shivering from the cold.
(twice)

"Shepherdess, if you're cold,
I give you my blanket.
(twice)
And my gray coat and my capote too,
My pretty heart as a pledge if you please".
(twice)

"I thank you
For your pretty heart,
(twice)
For I promissed it to my cute shepherd,
To the sound of the pipe he will make me dance"
(twice)

"Don't boast so much
About your (2) cute shepherd!
(twice)
He joined the king's service,
I've been his captain since yesterday evening."
(twice)

"That he got enlisted
Is not possible
(twice)
I see this pretty heart of love
Go down the hill and greet me."
(1) It doesn't make much sense in either language!
(2) It doesn't show in the English since there's only one "you", but you'll notice that he first addresses her as "vous" (formal you) and as soon as she tells him that she doesn't want his heart as a pledge because she's engaged to someone else, he switches to "ton mignon berger" (informal your cute shepherd). No need to be polite with a mere shepherdess who won't yield to your nice offer…


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 06:56 AM

I A PAS DE FEMNAS PUS ALURADAS
(Occitan -Lengadocian dialect)

I a pas de femnas pus aluradas
Que las femnas de pel puèg
Que las femnas de pel puèg

E to la la
La dera deròt
E to la la

Se n'anavan per las velhadas
Daissavan lor marí al lièt…

E onze oras sonavan
Mièja nuèt un pauc plan prèp…

Lor marí lor demandava :
"Pauras femnas d'ont venètz ?..."

"Venèm d'aval de per la ribèira
De virar l'aiga de pel prat…

E se ba nos volètz pas crèire
Agachatz nos lo freta-pès…

Tres o quatre jorns aprèssa
Tòmban malaudas al lièt…

Calrà anar cercar lo vicari
Lo medecin per las garir…

Quand lo medecin arriba :
"Pauras femnas encentas sètz !"

Quand lo vicari arriba :
"Paures òmes cocuts sètz !"

Coirault : à rapprocher de 5908
Les femmes qui ont pris froid aux pieds I
RADdO : 02921.
THERE ARE NO SHARPER WOMEN…


There are no sharper women
Than the mountain women,
Than the mountain women.

And too la la
La dera dirette
And too la la

They would go away during the evening gatherings,
Leaving their husbands in bed…

And eleven would strike
And almost midnight…

Their husbands would ask,
"Poor women, where do you come from?"

"We come from over there, from the riverside,
To divert the water of the meadow…

And if you don't want to believe us,
Look at the (door) mat…"

Three or four days later
They lie sick in bed…

The vicar must be sent for
And the doctor too to heal them…

When the doctor arrives,
"Poor women, you're pregnant!"

When the vicar arrives,
"Poor men, you're cuckolds!"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 06:57 AM

ME PROMENANT LE LONG D'UN BOIS CHARMANT
(French)

Me promenant le long d'un bois charmant
J'ai rencontré trois garçons mariniers
Trois mariniers venant de Normandie
Tous les trois m'ont prié d' rentrer dans leur navire.

Dans leur navire ne fûmes pas rentrés
Que le vent du nord se mit à souffler
Souffler, souffler d'une telle tourmente
Qu'il nous a transportés de sur la mer flottante.

Sur la mer flottante sept ans je suis resté
Sans aller revoir la terre pour y aborder
En m'écriant : "Ma mère ma douce mère !"
Sans jamais oublier le château de mon père.

Que me diront les gens de mon pays
D'avoir passé sept ans sans revenir ?
Je leur dirai que j'étais à l'ombrage
Là-bas, là-bas sous un tendre feuillage.

Que me diront les gens de mon quartier
D'avoir passé sept ans sans rien gagner ?
Je leur dirai que j'étais dans les îles
Que je faisais la cour à d'autres belles filles.

Fillettes qui êtes à marier
Ne prenez pas un garçon marinier.
Les mariniers sont des trompeurs de filles
Plus de cent mille fois je m'en suis repentie.

Coirault : 1314 Le charmant matelot qui revenait des îles
RADdO : 00677.
A-STROLLING ALONG A NICE WOOD


"A-strolling along a nice/charming wood
I met three sailors,
Three sailors coming from Normandy
All three asked/prayed me to go into their ship.

We hardly were into their ship
When the North wind started to blow
To blow, to blow such a storm
That it brought us on the floating sea.

I stayed on the floating sea
Without going back to see my homeland to accost
Saying 'Mother, my sweet mother!'
Without ever forgetting my father's castle.

What will the people from my homeland say to me,
For having spent seven years without being back?
I'll tell them that I was in the shadow,
Over there, over there under a tender folliage.

What will the people from my neighborhood say to me,
For having spent seven years without earning anything?
I'll tell them I was in the islands (1)
That I was courting some beautiful girls."

"Marrigeable girls,
Don't take a sailor.
Sailors are girls deceivers,
More than a hundred thousand times I regretted that I did."
(1) "dans les îles" (in the islands) means some exotic, warm and very distant islands such as the Caribbean or Polynesia islands


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:02 AM

These are the lyrics to the track #5 of which you can only hear an accordeon rendition

L'AIGA DE RÒCHA
(Occitan)

L'aiga de ròcha te farà morir, pecaire
L'aiga de ròcha te farà morir.
Te'n cal mesfisar d'aquela aiga, pecaire,
Te'n cal mesfisar, beu un gòt/còp de bon vin.

S'una filheta se vòl maridar, pecaire
S'una filheta se vòl maridar,
Li'n cal pas donar d'aquela aiga, pecaire,
Aimarà melhor beure un gòt/còp de bon vin.
SPRING WATER


Spring water (1) will make you die, poor dear,(2)
Spring water will make you die,
You must mistrust this water, poor dear,
You must mistrust it, drink a glass of good wine (3)

If a young girl wants to get married, poor dear,
If a young girl wants to get married,
She mustn't be given of this water, poor dear,
she'll better drink a glass of good wine.
(1) "Aiga de ròcha" literally translate as "water from rock"; "ròcha" may be pronounced "roh-choh" or "roh-tsoh" depending on the dialect. More Southwards it's "aiga de ròca", the Latin "ca" wasn't palatalized in Southern dialects and maybe that could explain that the "roh-tsoh" pronunciation could to be understood by some people as "aiga de ròsa" (roh-zoh) = rose water.
(2) This word literally translates as "sinner" and if you ever visit Southern France you'll hear it said in its original form (pecaire) or its Frenchified form (peuchère); "poor dear" or "poor thing" are the best English equivalent I could think of. As an exclamation, it conveys the same shade of misfortune as in "woe is…"
(3) Some variants have the two last lines as "Te farà morir, aquela aiga, aquela aiga / Te farà morir aquela aiga de vin" (This water, this water will make you die / this water of wine (???) will make you die)

You can hear a nice hurdy-gurdy rendition (once he's tuned it!) on YouTube and on the YouTube page you can skip to a melodeon rendition ("Scottiche l'eau de roche") and from there to a rendition both played and sung by four ladies


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:04 AM

LA CALHE DE LA CALHE
(Occitan -Lengadocian dialect)

"La calhe de la calhe
Ont as tu lo niu ?"
(bis)

"Sul truc de La Bastida
Del puèg de Montbresson."
(bis)

"Mès digas-me tu la calhe
De qué I a dedins ?"
(bis)

"Dels uòus coma los autres
Un briat pus polits !"
(bis)

Coirault : 10506 La caille et son nid
RADdO : 04905.
QUAIL OF THE QUAIL


"Quail of the quail (1)
Where is your nest?"
(twice)

"On the La Bastide butt,
On Montbresson hill" (2)
(twice)

"But tell me, quail,
What is in there?"
(twice)

"Eggs like any other eggs,
A little prettier!"
(twice)
(1) lit. "the quail of the quail". It doesn't make sense but once you know that the main version of this song goes "Oh calha, la calha… (oh, quail, beautiful quail) it explains lots.
(2) For "La Bastida", see Wiki (the Fr. article is much longer with many more photos). Montbresson means "Bush Mount"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:05 AM

Nursery/children's rhyme

"COCUT ! ENT AS JAGUT ?"
(Occitan -Lengadocian dialect)

"Cocut ! Ent as jagut ?"
"Al Mont Agut !"
"Que i as fach ?"
"Un ostal traucat !"
"Qual t'a adujat a lo far ?"
"Monsur Bernat !"
"De que li as donat ?"
"Un uòu coat !"
"De que n'as fach ?"
"L'ai vendut !"
"Quant n'as fach ?"
"Cent escuts !"

RADdO : 06366.
"CUCKOO! WHERE DID YOU SLEEP?"


"Cuckoo! Where did you sleep?"
"At Montagut!" (1)
"What did you make there?"
"A pierced house!"
"Who helped you to make it?"
"Mister Bernat"
"What did you give him?"
"A hatched egg!
"What did you do with it?"
"I sold it!"
"How much did you sell it for?"
"A hundred crowns!"
(1) lit.: "on the peaked mount"
I don't know if we must look for a pun between the cuckoo building a house with a hole in it with the help of someone else and the fact that "cocut" in Occitan means cuckoo AND cuckold.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:07 AM

LO COCUT ES MÒRT
(Occitan -Lengadocian dialect)

Lo cocut es mòrt
Es mòrt a Paris
I an tampat lo cuol
Amb un grut de ris.

Repic
As pas entendut
Cantar la cigala
As pas entendut
Cantar lo cocut

Lo cocut es mòrt
Es mòrt en Espanha.
I an tampat lo cuol
Amb una castanha.

Lo cocut es mòrt
Es mòrt a Tolon.
I an tampat lo cuol
Amb un gròs bochon.

Lo cocut es mòrt
Es mòrt a Marselha
I an tampat lo cuol
Amb una botelha.

Lo cocut es mòrt
Es mòrt a Narbona
I an tampat lo cuol
Amb una bombona.

Lo cocut es mòrt
Es mòrt en Africa
I an tampat lo cuol
Amb una barrica.

Coirault : 10438 Le coucou est mort
RADdO : 04925
THE CUCKOO IS DEAD/DIED


The cuckoo is dead/died (1)
It died in Paris,
They blocked his ass
With a grain of rice.

Chorus
Didn't you hear
The cicada sing?
Didn't you hear
The cuckoo sing?

The cuckoo is dead/died,
It died in Spain
They blocked his ass
With a chestnut.

The cuckoo is dead/died,
It died in Toulon
They blocked his ass
With a big cork.

The cuckoo is dead/died,
It died in Marseilles
They blocked his ass
With a bottle.

The cuckoo is dead/died,
It died in Narbonne
They blocked his ass
With a demijohn.

The cuckoo is dead/died,
It died in Africa
They blocked his ass
With a cask.
(1) In Occitan as in French and Italian, some verbs are conjugated with the auxiliary "to be" instead of "to have" in compound tenses. The language doesn't differenciate the action from the result, e.g in English when you have died (action, vb "to die" in present perfect), you're dead (result, to be + predicative adj.), in Oc and Fr. the conjugation of "to die" in present perfect literally translates as "he is dead", you can't "have died" and "be dead", there's only one form.

We have a lightly different version of this song on Mama Lisa's World.
Usually, when the verse has the cuckoo dying in England they don't close the tomb with a little earth, they just stop his ass with it as in the present version.
There's also a verse going

"Lo cocut es mòrt
Es mòrt en Italia
I/li an tampat lo cuol
Amb un flòc de palha"
The cuckoo is dead/died,
It died in Italy
They blocked his ass
With a tuft of straw.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:08 AM

MON PÈRE A DES BLANCS MOUTONS
(French)

Mon père a des blancs moutons
Moi j'en suis la bergère.

Moi j'en suis la bergère dondaine dondaine dondon
Moi j'en suis la bergère don dondaine dondaine dondon

La première fois que je les ai gardés
Le loup m'en a pris quinze.

Un cavalier vient à passer
Me ramena les quinze.

Quand nous tondrons nos blancs moutons
Nous partagerons la laine.

"De la laine je n'en veux pas
Je veux votre cœur en gage."

"Mon cœur en gage vous ne l'aurez pas
Sans savoir qui vous êtes."

Coirault : 4002 La bergère aux cinq cents moutons
RADdO : 01823.
MY FATHER HAS WHITE SHEEP


My father has white sheep
I am their shepherdess

I am their shepherdess dondaine dondaine dondon
I am their shepherdess don dondaine dondaine dondon

The first time I watched them
The wolf took fifteen of them.

A horseman happened to pass by
He brought back the fifteen of them

When we fleace our white sheep
We'll share the wool.

"I don't wan't wool,
I want your heart as a pledge"

"You won't have my heart as a pledge
Without knowing who you are" (1)
(1) In other versions she's promissed it to some Pierre or it's "in wedding" (engaged). Other versions have the horseman as the king's son. There's usually another verse after the 3rd adding to the consistency of the song and that goes

- La Belle, que m'y donnerez-vous,
Oh ! pour ma récompense ?
"Beauty, what will you give me
Oh! as a reward?"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:09 AM

DIJAUS GRAS QU'A NAU MOTONS
(Occitan -Gascon dialect)

Dijaus gras qu'a nau motons
E tots son bèths e tots son gras
Atau dançan, dançan, dançan
E tots son bèths e tots son gras
Atau dançan dijaus gras.

Dijaus gras qu'a ueit motons…

Coirault : 101B23 Les neuf porcs du Mardi gras
RADdO : 05629.
FAT THURSDAY HAS NINE SHEEP


Fat Thursday has nine sheep
All are fine and all are fat
Thus they dance, they dance, they dance,
All are fine and all are fat
Thus they dances on Fat Thursday.

Fat Thursday has eight sheep…
This is a "cançon/canta/cant de nau/nòu" ("song of nine") i.e. a song that starts with 9 things on the first verse, then 8 on the second etc. down to one or none. "La nòvia", a wedding song you can find in this Mudcat thread is also a "cant de nau".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:10 AM

QUI T'A CARGAT LA GALA, TORRIN?
(Occitan -Gascon dialect)

Qui t'a cargat la gala, Torrin?
Qui t'a cargat la gala ?
I-ala-te-la, i-ala-te-la
Son las goiatas de Sent Sever
WHO PASSED THE SCABIES ON TO YOU, TOURRIN?


Who passed the scabies on to you, Tourrin (1)
Who passed the scabies on to you?
Take it away, take it away,
It was the girls from Saint-Sever
(1) The "tourrin" (here the guy's nickname) is a soup that people would traditionally bring to the newlywed. There's a Gascon wedding song called "Lo torrin" that you'll find on Mama Lisa's Blog along with an English translation, a recording, a link to the song page with sheet music and all, the description of the wedding custom and a link to the soup recipe.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:12 AM

ENGUAN JO ME SOI MARIDAT
(Occitan -Gascon dialect)

Enguan jo me soi maridat
E la hemna que m'èi presa
La n'èi totjorn beveda

La n'èi totjorn peu torn deus hons
Que sembla estar un carretin
Jamès au torn de l'aiga
la guaites pas qu'i caija

S'aquò tu dives contunhar
La clau deu chai te vau tirar
Quan me n'anga i-en campanha
te cal'rà béver aiga

Que non que non tròç de coquin
Tu beuràs l'aiga jo le vin
Le vin que me regosta
E l'aiga que me'n degosta

Le vin de merilha que me requenquilha
Le vin d'aramon hè petar le bosson.
THIS YEAR I GOT MARRIED


This year I got married
And the wife I took
Is always drunk.

She's always at the foot of the casks.
She looks like young veal (1)
Never near the water (2)
No risk she'd fall in it.

"If you're to go on this way,
I'm going to take the cellar key from you.
When I'm away,
You'll have to drink water."

"Oh no, you arrant rascal,
You'll drink the water, I will the wine,
Wines whets my appetite
And water makes me sick.

The merille (3) wine peps me up
The aramon (3) wine makes the cork go off
(1) like a calf always wanting to suck milk.
(2) to wash the laundry
(3) local grape varieties


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:14 AM

ERA CANÇON DE GRANGÈR
(CANTATZ DAB ALLEGRESSA, AULHÈRS DE BIGALOM)

(Occitan -Gascon dialect)

Cantatz dab allegressa, aulhèrs de Bigalom
Eths gendarmas de Lorda, pojats ja crei que'n son
"Que cercam un brave òmi, Joan Maria de Grangèr ;
Qu'ei en acera cabana ath pè deth Amporèr."

Eths cans en sentinèla se'n botan a lairar;
Devath era cabana se'n botan a cridar.
"Anem, mossurs, adara, aulhèrs, qu'evs cau lhevar!
Qu'ètz eth lop enas òlhas, que las se vòu minjar."

Arrodèr que se'n lhèva coma èra eth permèr;
Eths gendarmas ena pòrta que'u ne gahèn tanben.
Grangèr que I ei encòra, que guèrda quin pòt hèr;
Que'n sauta ena crabina deth gendarma Amarèr.

Amarèr crida ath òmi: "Lèisha m'estar, Grangèr!
Se'm tornas eras armas, no't dàrei ath darrèr."
Crabina, baioneta, tot que se n'ac portè,
Tot en dançant ua valsa tath pelat deth Lasèr.

"Adishatz, mossur Arro, que ve'n portaratz plan…
Qu'avem hèit era torniada, que la nse vatz signar.
Non v'ac gosam pas díser çò qui n' sei arribat,
En acera montanha, Grangèr ns'a desarmats."

Tres aulhèrs ena montanha qu'an hèit era cançon,
E se non ei plan hèita, qu s'i pòden tornar.
Tot en bevent ua tassa, que la pòden cantar!
Tot en bevent ua tassa, que la pòden cantar!

RADdO : 06361.
THE GRANGÈR'S SONG
(SING WITH JOY, SHEPHERDS FROM BIGALOM)



Sing with joy, shepherds from Bigalom
I think the gendarmes from Lourdes went up there.
"We're looking for a good man, Jean-Marie of Grangèr,
He's in this cabin, at the foot of the Ampourèr."

The watch dogs started to bark;
Under the cabin they started to howl.
"Come on, sirs, now, shepherds, you must get up!
You have a wolf in your sheep barn, it wants to eat the sheep (lit. ewes)"

Arrodèr got up since he was the first,
The gendarmes took him when he stepped outside.
Grangèr was still inside, figuring out what to do;
He then grabbed the rifle of the gendarme Amarèr.

Amarèr cried to him "Leave me, Grangèr!
If you give me my weapon back, I'll let you go away."
Rifle, bayonet, he took it all away
While dancing a waltz on the Lasèr mountain.

"Good day, mister Arro, you're going to be glad…
We did the report of the round, you're going to sign it to us.
We don't dare to say what happened to us.
On this mountain, Grangèr disarmed us."

Three shepherds in the mountain made/sang this song,
If it's not well made/sung, they can do it again.
While drinking a glass, they can sing it!
While drinking a glass, they can sing it!
The leaflet says that the event told in the song actually happened. In 1836 a man named Jean-Marie Soumprou who didn't want to be inlisted to go to war and deserted disarmed the gendarmes who'd gone up from Lourdes to the mountain where he was hiding, to arrest him. The song is supposed to have 10 verses but I couldn't find the 4 missing ones.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:15 AM

SE IO SABIÁI VOLAR
(Occitan -Gascon dialect)

Se io sabiái volar
Coma la perditz vòla lanlà lanlà lanlà
Coma la perditz vòla lanlà dondon

Io m'aniriái pausar
z-al castèl chas ma miga

Durbètz miga durbètz
Ci votre amant qu'arriba

Coment vos durbiriái ?
Soi dans mon lit malade

Coirault : 111 L'amant aux quatre lévriers
RADdO : 02050.
IF I COULD FLY


If I could fly
As the partridge flies lanlà lanlà lanlà
As the partridge flies lanlà dondon

I would go to sit
On the castle, at my sweetheart's.

Open, sweetheart, open,
Here's you lover coming.

How could I open (the door) to you?
I'm ill in bed.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:15 AM

L'AUTRE JOUR EN ME PROMENANT
(Occitan -Lengadocian dialec- and French

L'autre jour en me promenant (1)
Ò lanlà lalirà tot lo long d'una sèga

Ne'n rancontrèri un niuc d'ausèl
Que ressemblav' la trida

Io ne'n levèi lo mèi galhard
Lo portèri a ma miga

- Tenètz miga, aquí un ausèl
Metètz-lo en gabinhòla

En gabinhòla lo metèt
Sèt ans tres jorns i demorèt
Sans manger ni sans boire (1)

Al bot d'aquels sèt ans tres jorns
L'ausèl pren la volèia

Se'n vai pausar sul boisson blanc
Per minjar d'aussanèlas

- Tòrna tòrna petit ausèl
Tòrna en gabinhòla

Te donarèi de mon pan blanc
E dels choux à la crèma (2)

Te menarèi al riu corent
Per beure d'aiga clèra
THE OTHER DAY AS I WAS STROLLING


The other day as I was strolling
Ò lanlà lalirà along a hedge.

I found a nest
That look like the one of a thrush.

I took the strongest (fledging) from the nest
I took it to my sweetheart.

"Here you are, sweetheart, here's a bird,
Put it in a cage."

She put it in a cage
Seven years and three days it stayed there
Without eating or drinking.

At the end of these seven years and three days
The bird took its flight.

It goes to sit on the hawthorn
To eat some haws.

"Come back, come back, little bird,
Come back in the cage.

I'll give you some of my white bread
And profiteroles.

I'll take you to the stream
To drink clear water."
(1) I wonder why these lines are in French.
(2) "Choux a la crèma" is the occitanized form of the French "choux à la crème" (lit. "cabbages with cream")


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:16 AM

SÒM, SÒM, VÈNI, VÈNI, VÈNI
(Occitan -Lengadocian dialect)

Sòm, sòm, vèni, vèni, vèni,
Sòm, sòm, vèni, vèni, d'en dacòm

La sòm sòm es arribada,
A caval sus una craba.
Partirà doman maitin,
A caval sus un rossin.

Coirault : 7701 Le som som veut pas venir
+ 7705 Le sommeil s'en est allé
RADdO : 03190 + 03194.
SLEEP, SLEEP, COME, COME, COME


Sleep, sleep, come, come, come,
Sleep, sleep, come, come from somewhere.

The sleep has arrived
Riding a goat,
It will go away tomorrow morning
Riding a rouncey.
This is our most well-known and wide-spread lullaby. It has many versions and/or verses, I sort of compiled some of them on MLW


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:17 AM

DE SUR LE PONT DE NANTES, ALLANT ME PROMENER
(French)

De sur le pont de Nantes, allant me promener
J'ai rencontré une fille, voulant la saluer
La justice de Nantes m'a rendu prisonnier.

Quand la belle entend dire que son amant est pris
Elle s'habille en page, en postillon joli.
De sur son cheval monte et va voir son ami.

À la prison de Nantes, la belle se rendit :
"Oh bon geôlier de Nantes, donnez-moi permission
De parler à mon maître qui est dans la prison."

"Puisque c'est votre maître, allez-lui donc parler.
Faites courte parole avec le prisonnier
La justice de Nantes va venir le juger."

Quand à la prison je fus, à mon amant j'ai dit :
"Quitte tes habits vite, prends les miens promptement
De sur mon cheval monte, va-t'en comme le vent."

"Comment veux-tu que je fasse, je suis connu partout ?"
"En passant dans la ville marche modestement
Au-delà de la ville, va-t'en comme le vent."

Mais au bout d'un quart d'heure, la justice entra :
"Oh bon juge de Nantes n'auriez-vous pas compassion
De juger une fille habillée en garçon ?"

"Si vous êtes une fille, nous voulons le savoir."
"Oui, je suis une fille de l'étranger pays.
Croyant d'être surprise, moi j'ai changé d'habits."

"Si vous êtes une fille, dites-nous votre nom."
"Je m'appelle Marguerite, Marguerite est mon nom,
Fille d'un gentilhomme de noble condition."

"Sortez, sortez friponne, sortez de la prison!"
"Je ne suis point friponne, fille de condition,
Mon père et ma mère ont de riches maisons."

De sur le pont de Nantes, le roi fait publier
Que personne ne rentre sans être visité.
La ruse d'une fille a son amant sauvé.

"Allez dire au roi que je me ris de lui
De lui, de sa justice, de leurs bonnets carrés
Avec mon bonnet rouge j'ai mon amant sauvé."

Coirault : 1428 La fille qui s'habille en page
RADdO : 01365.
ON THE NANTES BRIDGE, A-GOING TO STROLL


On the Nantes bridge, a-going to stroll,
I came across a girl. As I wanted to greet her,
The justice of Nantes jailed me.

When the fair maiden heard it said that her lover was taken
She dressed up as a page, as a pretty postillion,
On her horse she mounted and went to see her sweetheart.

The fair maiden went to the Nantes prison,
"Oh, good jailer of Nantes, give me permission
To talk to my master who is in the prison."

"Since he's your master, do go to talk to him,
But keep the talking with the prisoner short,
The justice of Nantes is coming to judge him."

When I was in the prison, I said to my lover,
"Remove your clothes, fast, take mine quickly,
Mount my horse, go away as fast as the wind."

"How do you want me to do that, everybody knows me?"
"When you cross the town, go slowly,
Beyond the town, go as fast as the wind."

But after a quarter of an hour, the justice went in,
"Oh, good judge of Nantes, wouldn't you have pity
To judge a girl dressed as a boy?"

"If you're a girl, we want to know it."
"Yes, I'm a girl from a foreign country.
Fearing to be taken by surprise, I changed my clothing."

"If you are a girl, tell us your name."
"I'm called Margaret, Margaret is my name.
Daughter of a gentleman of noble rank."

"Get out, get out, you rascal, get out from the prison!"
"I'm no rascal, a high rank girl,
My father and my mother have rich houses."

On the Nantes bridge, the king has it published
That nobody will enter without being searched.
A girl's tricked saved her lover.

"Go to tell the king that I laugh at him,
At him, at his justice, at their square hats,
With my red cap/bonnet I saved my lover."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:18 AM

LECTIO EPISTOLAE
Occitan -Lengadocian dialect and Latin

Lectio epistolae
Aviái una craba qu'aviá qu'un pè.
Sautèt per l'òrt del vesin
Li mangèt tot lo caulet e lo lapi.
Lo vesin sortiguèt un ròc a la man
E t'i fotèt aquò
Entre mièg lo cap e la cuia.
La craba faguèt "mementum".
Anguèron quèrre lo medecin de Carcassona
Qu'èra una brava persona.
Li me fotèt la man jol ventre
E lo nas al trauc del cuol
Per veire se polsava.
La craba agèt fach mementum.
Amen.

RADdO : 06368.
LECTIO EPISTOLAE


Lectio epistolae
I had a she-goat that only had one foot,
She jumped into the neighbor's garden,
And ate all the cabbages and the celery.
The neighbor went out with a stone in hand
And threw it at her
Between her head and tail.
The goat did "mementum".
They went to fetch the doctor from Carcassonne,
Who is a nice person.
He put his hand under her belly
And his nose to her asshole
To check if she was still breathing.
The goat had done "mementum".
Amen.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:19 AM

VIVA LO MESTIÈR DELS AMOLAIRES
(Occitan -Lengadocian dilect)

Viva lo mestièr dels amolaires
Quant siasque pas riche d'argent
Mai que lo mestièr valgue gaire
L'amolaire val ben pus mens.

E zu tsu tsu tsu tsu
Tira lira lan la lan lanlèra
Tira lira lan tira lan lan la


Aval, aval, dins aquel vilatge
Li manca pas de trabalh.
Totas las dròllas me sonavan:
"Vos, venètz aicí, ganha-petit!"

Mas se sabiatz ont me menèron
Dins un salon de companhiá.
Ieu li trobèri una dròlla,
E ieu l'aimèri una brica (bria).

Digatz-me, vos, la nòstra vesina
Se volètz far agusar los cisèls.
Avètz alai l'amolaire que passa,
Vos respondi que vendrà lèu.

RADdO : 06369.
LONG LIVE THE TRADE OF THE GRINDERS


Long live the trade of the grinders
Though he's not rich of money
Though the trade is worth little,
The grinder is worth even less.
.
And zu tsu tsu tsu tsu
Tira lira lan la lan lanlèra
Tira lira lan tira lan lan la


Over there, over there, in this village,
There's no shortage of work.
All the girls would call me,
"Come here, you, low-wage earner!"

But if you knew where they lead me,
In a salon of (good) company.
And I found a girl there,
And I loved her a little.

Tell me, you, our neighbor,
If you want to have your scissors sharpened,
You have the grinder passing by over there,
I assure you he will come soon.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:21 AM

Nursery rhyme/ Finger play

CÒCÒRICÒ ! QU'AS TU POTHET
(Occitan -Gascon dialect)

"Còcòricò ! Qu'as tu pothet ?"
"Que hè hered !"
"Vè te cauhar !"
"A on ?"
"En çò de ta Maria !"
"Que non mi vòu !"
"Que l'as panat ?"
"Un sac de blat !"
"A on l'as metut ?"
"En pont de Valentina
Pica, pica era sardina
En pont de Montrejau
Pica, pica era sau."

RADdO : 06370.
COCK-A-DOODLE-DOO! WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH YOU, CHICKEN?


"Cock-a-doodle-doo! What's the matter with you, chicken?
"I'm cold!"
"Go to warm yourself!"
"Where?"
"At your Mary's house!"
"She doesn't want me!"
"What did you steal from her?"
"A bag of wheat!"
"Where did you put it?
"On the Valentine bridge,
Pinch, pinch the sardine,
On the Montrejau bridge,
Pinch, pinch the salt."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:22 AM

ENTER LA RÒCHA E COTRÀS
(Occitan -Gascon dialect)

Enter la Ròcha e Cotràs (bis)
Tostemps cridan batalha, ailàs
Tostemps cridan batalha.

Mos de Joaiosa I ei anat
Ditz au rei si's vòu rénder.

"Quí ei aqueth simple capdèt
Ditz au rei si's vòu rénder ?"

"Jo non sòi pas simple capdèt
Jo'n soi duc de Joaiosa."

Lo rei hè pundar los canons
Lo long de la murralha

Au permèr còp qui n'an tirat
Joaisosa trembolava.

Au segon còp qui n'an tirat
Joaiosa tomba a tèrra.

Helàs mon diu deus mens enfants
Tan joens pèder lur père.

Que'us cromparàn bèth chivau blanc
E la brida òi la sèra.

Se n'aniràn peu mont davant
Venjar la mort deu père.

RADdO : 06371.
BETWEEN LA RÒCHA AND COUTRÀS


Between La Ròcha and Coutràs, (1)
The battle is still going on, alas!
The battle is still going on.

Mister de Joyeuse is involved in it,
He asks the king if he wants to surrender.

"Who is this mere cadet
Who asks the king if he wants to surrender?"

"I am not a mere cadet,
I am the duke of Joyeuse."

The king had the cannons pushed
Along the wall.

On the first shot (that they shot)
Joyeuse trembled.

On the second shot (that they shot)
Joyeuse fell down on the ground.

Alas, my God, those two children!
So young they lost their father!

They will buy a beautiful white horse
And the bridle and the saddle.

They'll always be on the move
To avenge their father's death.
(1) Reference to the battle of Coutras in 1587.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:34 AM

MAUDIT SIA L'AMOR
(Occitan -Gascon dialect)

Maudit sia l'amor tant la nuèit com lo dia
Tant la nuèit com lo dia, mon Diu
Quant de larmas me còstan aqueths adius. (bis)

No'm viengas consolar, dèisha'm dens la tristèssa
Dèisha'm dens la tristèssa plorar
Ma volatge mestresssa vien de'm quitar. (bis)

RADdO : 06372.
MAY LOVE BE CURSED


May love be cursed night and day (lit. at night as well as during the day)
Night and day, my God,
How many tears this farewell/parting costs me.

Don't try to comfort me, leave me in my sadness
Let me crying in my sadness.
My fickle mistress has just left me.
Longer version (not recorded but you can listen to a polyphonic rendition of most of it on YouTube) >
MAUDIT SIA L'AMOR

Maudit sia l'amor, tant la nueit com lo dia,
Tant la nueit com lo dia, mon Diu !
Quant de larmas me'n còstan aqueths adius,
Mon Diu ! Mon Diu !
Quant de larmas me'n còstan aqueths adius.

No'm viengues consolar, deisha'm dens la tristessa,
Dèisha'm dens la tristessa, plorar,
Ma volatge mestressa vien de'm quitar,
Plorar, plorar,
Ma volatge mestressa vien de'm quitar.

Un navèth aimador quan plus èra vesiada,
Quan plus èra vesiada d'amor,
Que la m'a capvirada praube de jo,
D'amor, d'amor,
Que la m'a capvirada praube de jo.

Non me'n parletz pas mei, d'aquera malurosa,
D'aquera malurosa, jamei,
La vita m'ei afrosa quan jo la vei,
Jamei, jamei,
La vita m'ei afrosa quan jo la vei.

Jo que me'n vau anar, guardar las anesquetas
Guardar las anesquetas, la-haut,
Quant de larmas me'n còstan aqueths adius,
La-haut, la-haut,
Quant de larmas me'n còstan aqueths adius.

Arrés de mei urós que pastors en montanha
Que pastors en montanha, mon Diu !
Quant de larmas me'n còstan aqueths adius,
Mon Diu ! Mon Diu !
Quant de larmas me'n còstan aqueths adius.
MAY LOVE BE CURSED

May love be cursed night and day
Night and day, my God,
How many tears this farewell/parting costs me,
My God! My God!
How many tears this farewell/parting costs me.

Don't try to comfort me, leave me in my sadness
Let me cry in my sadness
My fickle mistress has just left me.
My God! My God!
My fickle mistress has just left me.

A new lover, when she was closer
When she was closer to/with love,
Turned her head (1), woe is me,
With love, with love
Turned her head, woe is me.

Don't talk to me any more of this devil,
Of this devil, ever.
Life is awful to me when I see her
Ever, ever
Life is awful to me when I see her.

I'm going to watch the sheep (lit. ewe lambs)
To watch the sheep up there,
How many tears this farewell/parting costs me
Up there, up there
How many tears this farewell/parting costs me.

Noone is happier than shepherds in the mountain
Than shepherds in the mountain, my God!
How many tears this farewell/parting costs me
My God, my God!
How many tears this farewell/parting costs me.
(1) lit. "who head-turned 'me' her with love…" which means "who turned the head of her-who-belongs-to-me with love"

There is a lightly different version recorded by Rosina de Peira featuring a woman abandoned by her lover. I don't know whether or not Musicme can be listened to outside France, just try.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:35 AM

Here come the Basque songs. I translated them from the French translations as I did for the Breton ones. But even if I don't speak Breton, I nevertheless have an idea of how the language works, I know some words and I can recognize others for having been borrowed from French while I know nothing, zilch, waloo about Basque, it's as dark as the darkest pitch-black night!

MELTXOR ETA MATTIN
(Basque)

Mattin :
Meltxor eta Mattin hemen dirade
Orain bi ihiztariak.
Nik nere tresna arma dut eta
Meltxorrek berriz saria.
Haren barnian horrek hiltzen ditu
Kolpatu eta eriak
Nik berriz etxera juaiten ditut
Lapinak eta erbiak.

Meltxor :
Piarres du eta gauza horrena
Behar dezute aditu
Hau esan gabe Mattin jaun horri.
Ezin ninteke gelditu
Nik ttorttolak sarearekin
Atxematen eta ezin dut sufritu
Zizpazalakin heldu danian
Danal bidaltzen ditu.

Mattin :
Holako ihiztari sariekin.
Sekulan ez dut ikusi
Batto barnian sartzen bazaio.
Meltxorri ez zaio aski
Inguruan gelditu direnen
Gonbidatzea lanik aski.
Hamar nahi ta behar hura ere
Joaitzen zaio ihesi.
MELTXOR AND MATTIN


Mattin :
Here they are, Meltxor and Mattin
Changed into two hunters.
As for me, my weapon is my longgun
Meltxor's is a net.
With this device, he only catches the ill and the wounded game.
I, conversely,
Bring back home
Rabbits and hares.

Meltxor :
His name is Peter and, listen to me,
I can't help talking
About Mattin.
With my net,
I catch larks
And I can't stand his way
To make them fly away
With his gun.

Mattin :
Poor hunter with his nets.
I never saw a bird
Letting itself be caught.
And it's not all of it; Meltxor,
On a fair or unfair manner,
Tries to attract those who are near.
He wants ten birds but even those within reach
Escape and fly away.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:37 AM

ADIOS, IZAR EDERRA, ADIOS IZARRA!
(Basque)

Adios, izar ederra, adios izarra !
Zü zare Aingerua mündian bakarra !
Aingeruekin (bis) zütüt konparatzen,
Zenbat maite zütüdan ez düzü pensatzen !
Aingeruekin (bis) zütüt konparatzen,
Zenbat maite zütüdan ez düzü pensatzen !

Izar naiz Araguan eta Kastilloan,
Hitz batez erraiteko España güzia.
Ez düt ikusi (bis) zü bezalakorik,
Nafarroa güzia zaude famatürik.
Ez düt ikusi (bis) zü bezalakorik,
Nafarroa güzia zaude famatürik.

RADdO : 06373.
GOODBYE, BEAUTIFUL STAR, GOODBYE STAR!


Goodbye, beautiful star, goodbye star!
You are the unique Angel on this earth..
For to the Angels (twice) I compare you.
How much I love you, you cannot figure it out!
For to the Angels (twice) I compare you.
How much I love you, you cannot figure it out!

I went to Aragon and to Castile,
To tell the truth, in one word, everywhere in Spain.
I never saw (twice) one like you!
You're famous in all of Navarre
I never saw (twice) one like you!
You're famous in all of Navarre.
I couldn't say if this "adios" means goodbye or farewell.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 07:39 AM

SORTU NAIZ IPARREAN
(Basque)

Sortu naiz Iparrean
Uso ume bakarra ohantze batean
(bis)

Aitamek naute hazi, aitamek naute hazi lumatu artean !
Zoriona gozatuz hiruek batean.
(bis)

Mundurat agertzean biluzia nintzen
Amattok hegalpean ninduen berotzen
(bis)

Hazkurriaren biltzen, hazkurriaren biltzen aita zen ibiltzen…
Nork erran ni ttikian zenbat gosta naizen!
(bis)

"Zure hegalak aski lumati orduko,
Osto eror denbora, zauku etorriko
(bis)

Iparretik Hegora, iparretik hegora,
Gare airatuko;
Nik lagunduz bidean etzare galduko".
(bis)

Iruzkia zenean sortzera apaldu,
Ihiztariak zuen sarea zabaldu.
(bis)

Ez da behar itsua, ez da behar itsua, gidaritzat hartun ;
Ez bertzen erranari sobera fidatu.
(bis)

Zonbat uso oizneko… hegalik gabeko
Ihiztariak aiher hetaz jabetzeko !
(bis)

Kasu egin dezaten, kasu egin dezaten,
Ez naiz ixilduko ;
Bertzela saretarra tuztela bilduko!
(bis)
I WAS BORN IN THE NORTH


I was born in the North,
The only woodpigeon in the nest.
(twice)

My parents fed me
Till I was big.
(twice)

When I came into the world, I was naked,
My mother would warm me under her wings.
(twice)

My father had to go to search food.
How much I was fullfilled/happy when I was little!
(twice)

"When you're big enough,
The time of the dead leaves will come.
(twice)

Southwards and Northwards
We will fly.
With my help you won't loose your way."
(twice)

When the Sun went out,
The hunter set his nets.
(twice)

It's not advisable to have a blind guide,
To trust what someone else says either.
(twice)

How many woodpigeons lost their wings?
The hunter will capture them.
(twice)

You must listen to me, you must hear me.
I won't hush
Otherwise you'll fall into his nets.
(twice)
END OF CD 5


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:02 AM

Here we go for CD 6 - Mediterranean

Link to the Frémeaux's leaflet of this CD.

LE ROSSIGNOL DE L'AMÉRIQUE
(French)

Le rossignol de l'Amérique
Messager des amoureux
Va t'en dire à ma maîtresse
Dans son lit toute seulette
Dans son lit couvert de fleurs.

Le rossignol a pris son vol
Au château d'amour s'en va.
S'est assis sur la fenêtre
Chantant une chansonnette.
La belle se réveilla.

"Belle je m'en vais dimanche
Je n'emporte rien de toi
Donne-moi pour assurance
Un bouquet de souvenance
Pour me souvenir de toi."

"Que veux-tu que je te donne ?
Je t'ai déjà trop donné.
Je t'ai donné une rose
La plus belle de mes roses
Qu'il y avait sur mon rosier."

"Rose, ta tant belle rose
Tu me l'as bien fait payer
Tu me l'as vendu le double
Encore une fois le double
La valeur de cent écus."

"Cent écus n'est pas grand chose
À l'égard de mon honneur.
Mon honneur et mon cœur en gage
Que te faut-il davantage ?
Par ma foi tu n'auras rien."

Coirault : 407 Le baiser de souvenance.
RADdO : 01679.
THE NIGHTINGALE OF AMERICA


The nightingale of America,
The lovers' messenger,
Go to tell my mistress
All alone in her bed
In her bed covered with flowers.

The nightingale took its flight,
Went to the castle of love,
Sat on the window,
Singing a ditty.
The fair maiden woke up.

"Beauty, I'm leaving on Sunday,
I have nothing from you to take away,
Give me as an assurance
A remembrance bouquet
To make me remember you."

"What do you want me to give you?
I already gave you too much.
I gave you a rose,
The most beautiful rose
There was on my rosebush."

"Rose, your so beautiful rose,
You made me pay much for it,
You sold it to me twice the price,
Once more twice the price,
For a hundred crowns worth."

"A hundred crowns is not much
Compared with my honor,
My honor and my heart as a pledge.
What more do you need?
On my word, you'll get nothing".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:03 AM

MA MAIRE N'AVIÁ QU'UN ANHÈU
(Occitan -Vivaro-Alpine dialect)

Ma maire n'aviá qu'un anhèu.
Totjorn belava, li virèt la pèl
La tèsta e los botilhons
Tot çò que resta quò's es pas lo melhor.

Ma maire n'aviá qu'una dent.
Totjorn branlava quand èra lo vent.
Mon paire qu'èra bon maçon
Li la plantava ambe son martelon.

Coirault : 10112 Les dents de la vieille. RADdO : 04586.
MY MOTHER HAD ONLY ONE LAMB


My mother had only one lamb
It was always bleating, she took its skin off,
The head and the hooves.
What is left is not the best.

My mother had only one tooth,
It would always shake when it was windy.
My father, who was a good bricklayer
Would knock it in for her with his little hammer.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:05 AM

D'ONT VAS SONHAR BERGÈIRA
(Occitan -Vivaro-Alpine dialect)

"D'ont vas sonhar bergèira,
D'ont vas sonhar de lòng ?

Lo lòng de la ribèira
Ne'n beurem quauques còps.
(bis)

Tu portaràs lei noses
Ieu portarai lo pan.

Lo lòng de la ribèira
N'en farem de bòn sòm."
(bis)

Per 'quí amont en montanha
Au chamin i a un pin.

Ma mia li trebuchava
Creia qu'èra sa fin.
(bis)

Per 'quí amont en montanha
Li a un chin rosset

Que totas las dimenges
Anava au cabaret.
(bis)

Per quí amont en montanha
Li a un ametlièr.

Getava de floretas
Coma lo papièr ble.
(bis)

End' aquelas floretas
Li a un ametlon

Per maridar las filhas
Daube lei garçons.
(bis)
WHERE ARE YOU GOING TO WATCH (YOUR FLOCK), SHEPHERDESS?


"Where are you going to watch (your flock), shepherdess,
Where are you going to watch (your flock) this way?

Along the river
We'll have some drinks.
(twice)

You'll bring the nuts,
I'll bring the bread.

Along the river,
We'll sleep nice naps"
(twice)

Up there in the mountain,
On the way, there's a pine tree.

My sweetheart would stumble there
She would think she would die.
(twice)

Up there in the mountain
There's a red dog

That went to the café/pub/
Every Sunday.
(twice)

Up there in the mountain
There's an almond tree.

It would grow little flowers
As white as paper.
(twice)

In those little flowers
There's an almond

To marry girls
With boys.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:06 AM

AMUSEZ-VOUS FILLETTES
(French)

Amusez-vous fillettes
Profitez du beau temps

Le temps des amourettes
Ne dure pas longtemps
(bis)

"Je suis fillette à plaindre
J'ai perdu mon amant

Faudra que je le cherche
Dedans le régiment."
(bis)

"Habille-toi la belle
Prends l'habit d'un guerrier

Tu marcheras ensuite
Trente-six jours à pied.
(bis)

Trente-six jours de route
Y a bien de quoi marcher

Pour aller dans les îles
Chercher son bien-aimé."
(bis)

N'en fut pas dans les îles
Rencontra son amant

Qui faisait l'exercice
À la rigueur du temps.
(bis)

"Oh dis-moi donc la belle
Qui t'envoyait ici ?

Donne-moi des nouvelles
Des garçons du pays."
(bis)

"Les garçons du village
Se sont tous mariés

Y a rien que toi barbare
Que tu m'as délaissée."
(bis)

"Je serai plus barbare
Je serai ton amant

Tu seras ma maîtresse
Dedans le régiment."
(bis)

Amusez-vous fillettes
Profitez du beau temps

Le temps des amourettes
Ne dure pas longtemps
(bis)

Coirault : à rapprocher de 3503 Celle qui marche quarante jours
RADdO : 00190.
HAVE FUN, YOUNG GIRLS


Have fun, young girls,
Enjoy the nice weather/ nice time (1)

The time for youth love
Don't last long.
(twice)

"I'm a young girl to be pitied,
I lost my lover

I'll have to look for him
In the regiment."
(twice)

"Beauty, get dressed,
Take a warrior's clothes

Then you'll walk
Thirty-six days.
(twice)

A thirty-six day walk
Is quite a long walk

To go in the islands
To fetch one's beloved."
(twice)

She didn't go to the islands
She met her lover

Who was training
In the harsh weather.
(twice)

"Oh, tell me, beauty,
Who sent you here?

Give me news
Of the boys from our place."
(twice)

"All the boys from our village
Got married,

Only you is left, you barbarian
Who abandoned me."
(twice)

"I will be a barbarian no more,
I'll be your lover

You'll be my mistress
In the regiment."
(twice)

Have fun, young girls,
Enjoy the nice weather/ nice time

The time for youth love
Don't last long.
(twice)
(1) There's no way to know whether "temps" means "time" or "weather" since we have only one word in French and the sentence can be understood either way.

This song is to be compared to "La fille du soldat" (Malicorne's version and rendition)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:08 AM

TOUT EN ME PROMENANT
(French)

Tout en me promenant
Le long d'une prairie
(bis)
J'ai rencontré une fille
Qui était à mon gré.

Je lui ai dit tout en riant :
"Êtes-vous mariée ?"
"Mariée, je ne suis pas.
Je suis fillette jeune, je n'y pense pas."

"La belle, si tu voulais,
Nous ferions déjà promesse.
(bis)
La bague en or que j'ai au doigt,
Si tu voulais, la belle, elle serait à toi."

"La bague en or m'appartient pas
Car je suis fille jeune.
(bis)
Va-t'en, va-t'en au régiment
Et quand tu reviendras, nous y serons à temps."

Ne fut-il pas au régiment,
Son père la marie.
(bis)
Avec un homme de soixante ans,
De soixante ans, la belle, soixante ans passés.

"Ma fille, l'épouseras-tu,
Ce vieillard pour nous plaire ?"
(bis)
"Papa, maman, je l'épouserai,
Mais jamais de la vie, je ne l'aimerai.

Papa, maman, préparez-moi
Un blanc lit pour ma noce
(bis)
Car le premier soir de noce,
Moi je veux bien dormir."

Mais au bout de deux ans,
Son cher amant arrive.
(bis)
Trois petits coups, il a frappé
À la porte de sa mie, de sa bien-aimée.

"On m'a appris au régiment
Que tu étais fiancée
(bis)
Que tu étais fiancée,
Mariée déjà."

La belle, pour finir nos amours,
Permets-tu que je t'embrasse ?
(bis)
Son tendre cœur j'ai embrassé
Mais aussitôt la belle s'est mise à pleurer."

Coirault : 1416 Mariée à un vieillard pendant que son ami est à la guerre
WHILE I WAS STROLLING


While I was strolling
Along a meadow
(twice)
I met a girl
To my liking.

I told her laughing
"Are you married?"
"Married I am not,
I am a young girl, I don't think about it."

"Beauty, if you wanted,
We would get engaged.
(twice)
The gold ring I have on my finger,
Would be yours, beauty, if you wanted to."

"The gold ring isn't mine
For I am a young girl
(twice)
Go, go to do your military service
And when you come back, we'll be on time."

He hardly was gone to the army
When her father married her
(twice)
With a sixty year old man
Sixty years old, beauty, over sixty years old.

"Daughter, will you marry
This old man, to please us?"
(twice)
"Daddy, mommy, I'll marry him
But never in my life I will love him.

Daddy, mommy, get
A white bed ready for my wedding
(twice)
For on the my first wedding night
I want to sleep well."

But after two years,
Her dear lover arrives
(twice)
Three little knocks he knocked
On his sweetheart's door.

"They told me in the army
That you were engaged
(twice)
That you were engaged,
Already married."

Beauty, to end our love,
Do you allow me to kiss you?"
(twice)
I kissed her tender heart
But the lady fair started to weep straight away.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:09 AM

As it's said in the leaflet, the language of this song is a mixture of words from different Occitan dialects and Italics ones (Italian and Piedmontese)

PILHATE-VOI BÊLA 'QÜELH MAÇOLIN

"Pilhate-voi bêla 'qüelh maçolin (bis)
Serà la despartida,
O jòia bèl còr !
Serà la despartida,
O jòia bèl còre di amor !

La despartida de mi e de voi :
Lo mieu pèra mi marida.

Mi marida pas con voi
Mi marida con una altra.

N'es pas tant bèla coma voi,
Mai di dòta l'es più rica,

E d'encuèi a quändes di'
Vos enviterai ai nòce."

"A le vòstre nòce mi li vau nen,
Anderai a le vòstre dance."

Si ne'n balèt una correnta ò due,
La bèla tomba mòrta.

E la gente que li èron d'entorn
Dichèron : "Que grand dalmatge !

Era verament una bèla dòna…" (bis)

Coirault : 3409 La délaissée aux trois robes.
RADdO : 02563.
BEAUTY, TAKE THIS POSY

"Beauty, take this posy (twice)
It will be the parting,
Oh joy, beautiful heart!
It will be the parting
Oh joy, beautiful heart of love!

The parting of me and you
My father gets me married.

He doesn't get me married with you,
He gets me married with another one.

She's not as beautiful as you
But she has a richer dowry,

And within a few days,
I'll invite you to my wedding."

"I won't go to your wedding
But I'll go to your dances."

She danced a courante or two,
The fair maiden fell dead.

And people around her
Said "What a great pity!

She really was a beautiful woman…"(twice)
This song is to be related to "Les tristes noces" (Cf Mudcat thread for the lyrics and translation and Malicorne's rendition).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:11 AM

JE ME SUIS FAIT Z'UNE MAÎTRESSE
(French)

Je me suis fait z'une maîtresse, trois jours n'y a pas longtemps (bis)
J'irai la voir dimanche, lundi sans plus attendre,
Mardi sans plus tarder, j'irai la demander

Le père qui est en fenêtre, qui entend tous ces discours (bis)
"Ma fille en mariage, j'en ai reçu le gage,
À d'autre amant que vous, galant retirez-vous."

"S'il faut que je me retire, je me retirerai (bis)
Dans un couvent d'ermite pour l'amour d'une fille
Ermite dans le bois, Céline je m'en va

Céline, oh ma Céline, prête-moi tes ciseaux (bis)
Pour couper l'alliance que nous avons ensemble
L'alliance d'amour, Céline pour toujours

Céline, oh ma Céline, prête-moi ton mouchoir (bis)
Pour essuyer les larmes qui coulent de mon visage
Les larmes de tes yeux sont pour te dire adieu. "

"Pour de mouchoirs de poche, galant je n'en ai point (bis)
Ils sont dans ma chambrette couverts d'une toilette
Tout auprès de mon lit, galant revenez-y ! "

"Céline, oh ma Céline, oh non je n'irai pas (bis)
Ta mère est trop méchante quand elle nous voit ensemble
Et ton père z'aussi, quand il nous voit venir."

Coirault : 4708 Prête-moi ton mouchoir.
RADdO : 00370.
I GOT A MISTRESS


I got a mistress three days ago, it's not much (twice)
I'll go to visit her on Sunday, on Monday without waiting more,
On Tuesday without delay, I'll go to ask for her hand.

The father who is at his window and hears all this talk (twice)
"I promised to marry my daughter
To another lover but you; suitor, withdraw."

"If I must withdraw, I will (twice)
In an hermit's convent for a girl's love.
An hermit in the woods, Céline, I'm off.

Céline, oh my Céline, lend me your scissors (twice)
To cut the pledge we have together,
The love pledge, Céline, forever.

Céline, oh my Céline, lend me your handkerchief (twice)
To wipe the tears that run down my face.
The tears from your eyes are to bide you farewell.

As for handkerchiefs, sweetheart, I have none (twice)
They are in my bedroom, covered by a "toilette" (1)
Close to my bed, sweetheart, go back there!"

"Céline, oh my Céline, oh no, I will not go (twice)
Your mother is too nasty when she sees us together
And so is your father when he sees us come."
(1) it meant the cloth cover for a dressing table. I have no idea of what the English equivalent could be.


Témoignage
"Au pèi, au pèi, vé la belle sardine toute fraîche, que la queue elle y boulègue encore !"
Et ils passaient tous les jours, ces gens ?
Tous les jours.
Les Bouches du Rhône, les ???
Ah oui, oui, oui. Et tous ils criaient, ils passaient dans la rue et ils appelaient et???? Mais quand tu étais dedans, tu entendais pas, tu étais pas toujours à la fenêtre, … alors on descendait aux portes, et bien entendu on entendait sonner, on ouvrait, alors il se mettait dans le couloir et puis il criait…
À la gasta (?) les limaçons, 'y en a des gros et des pitchouns. Les limaçons, ça c'était à saisons. Elle, elle criait alors, elle, elle baladait, elle criait. Mais il fallait faire vite. Parce que nous, on habitait au cinquième, alors descendre chercher les limaçons, le temps qu'on ait ramassé le bol et ce qui nous en allait (?), elle avait déjà fait…
Et puis 'y avait aussi des chanteurs qui passaient ???? à la fenêtre et quand il arrivait … il fallait regarder un peu, et quand il voyait quelqu'un à la fenêtre, il s'arrêtait et il chantait. Alors ma mère elle envoyait deux sous, deux sous, trois sous… à chaque… il faisait ça sa tournée (?) comme ça en chantant et il ramassait les sous qu'on lui donnait
(In Occitan- Marseilles Provençal dialect) E… dins la carrièra de Marsilha, èra quaucarèn de polit per que tot lo monde cridava, tot lo monde cantava, èra quaucarèn de formidable. Ara, si veu pus e es ben domage

Story :
"Fish, fish, look at the beautiful, fresh sardines, their tails are still moving!"
And those people passed by every day?
Every day.
The Bouches du Rhône, the ???
Ah, yes, yes. And all shouted, they walked in the street and called and ??? But when you were indoors, you didn't hear, you weren't always by the window… so we went down to our doors and of course, we could hear them ring, we opened, then he went into the hallway and shouted.
(?) the snails, there are big ones and small ones. Snails came in seasons. She, she would shout, she did! But you had to hurry. Because we lived on the 6th story (5th floor for the U.K.ers), then, going downstairs to fetch the snails… time to gather a bowl and what we needed (?) she'd already done… (meaning walked too far away to be still in reach)
And then there were singers who passed by ??? at the window and when he arrived… you had to have a look, and when he saw someone by their window, he stopped and sang. Then my mother would send two "sous" (small currency), two "sous", three "sous"… at each… he toured around and sang and he picked up the money people gave him.
And… in Marseilles streets, it was pretty (lit. "it was something pretty) because everybody cried/shouted, everybody sang, it was wonderful. Now, you can't see it anymore and it's a real pity.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:12 AM

COMMENÇONS LA SEMAINE
(French)

Commençons la semaine, qu'en dis-tu cher voisin ?
Commençons par le bon vin et finissons de même !

Il vaut mieux moins d'argent, chanter, boire et rire et rire
Il vaut mieux moins d'argent, chanter, boire et rire souvent


Tous mes parents me grondent que j'ai mangé tout mon bien
Mais ils se trompent bien, car je ne fis que boire.

Il vaut mieux moins d'argent, chanter, boire et rire et rire
Il vaut mieux moins d'argent, chanter, boire et rire souvent


Le père des tulipes, maître des capucins,
Nous dit que le bon vin vaut mieux que l'eau bénie

Le receveur de taille me fit vendre mon lit
Mais je me fous de lui, je couche sur la paille.

Notre curé nous prêche la sobriété du vin
Que le diable ait son latin, car il en boit lui-même.

Coirault : 10716 Vaut bien mieux moins d'argent.
RADdO : 05699.
LET'S START THE WEEK


Let's start the week, what do you say about it, dear neighbor?
Let's start by good wine and let's finish the same way!

It's better to have less money but to sing, drink and laugh and laugh
It's better to have less money but to sing, drink and laugh often.


All my relatives scold me that I ate all my good
But they're quite wrong for I only drank.

It's better to have less money but to sing, drink and laugh and laugh
It's better to have less money but to sing, drink and laugh often.


The father of the tulips, master of the Capuchin friars
Tells us that good wine is better than holy water.

The taxman had me sell my bed
But I don't care for him/laugh at him, I sleep on straw.

Our priest preaches us to forbear from drinking wine.
Let the devil get on his Latin for he drinks some himself.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:13 AM

PAR MON CHEMIN JE RENCONTRAIS
(French)

Par mon chemin je rencontrais
Une fille faite à mon gré :

"Où vous allez jeune fillette
Dedans le bois toute seulette ?" (bis)

"Je suis une fille du bon Dieu
Que mon père m'a envoyé à cent lieues

Il m'a envoyée t-en France, Espagne
Porter la bague à ma tante." (bis)

"Mais nous voulons ta bague d'or
Et ton honneur que tu as au cœur

Ton honneur et ton cœur en gage
Puisque nous t'avons dans le bocage. " (bis)

"J'ai un couteau dedans ma main
Je l'enfoncerai dedans mon sein.

Je l'enfoncerai dans ma personne
Avant que mon cœur s'abandonne." (bis)

Quand la belle se fut tuée
Les trois garçons se sont en allés.

Ils sont arrivés tout droit à la porte
De le père de la fille morte. (bis)

Oh, mais à la fin du repas
Celui qui va payer sait pas.

Il mit la main dedans la bourse
Voilà la bague d'or qui tombe ! (bis)

Mais le père qui était près
La bague d'or l'a relevée.

"Voici une bague bien jolie
Combien elle vous coûte, je vous prie ?" (bis)

"Mais nous l'avons pas achetée
Au moins encore non plus volée.

Nous avons passé devant une église
Nous l'avons vue, nous l'avons prise."

"Oh tais-toi, méchant garçon,
Tu m'as joué de trahison ! (bis)

Ça, c'est la bague de ma fille
Tu me la rends, morte ou vive." (bis)

Le plus jeune il s'est déclaré :
"C'est mes deux frères qui l'ont fait."

On l'a conduit dans le bocage
Qu'elle est couverte de feuillages. (bis)

Le plus jeune il fut pardonné
Les autres deux l'ont fait (?).

( ?) à Paris, Rome, Valence,
Voilà la mort de cette enfance. (bis)

Coirault : 9604 La fille à l'anneau tuée par les trois libertins.
RADdO : 04039.
ON MY WAY I MET


On my way I met
A girl to my liking:

"Where are you going, young girl
All alone in the wood?" (twice)

"I am a daughter of God
That my father sent a hundred leagues from here,

He sent me to France, to Spain
To bring the ring to my aunt." (twice)

"But we want your gold ring,
And your honor that you have in/to your heart.

Your honor and your heart as a pledge
Since we have you in the wood"(1) (twice)

"I have a knife in my hand,
I'll stick it in my bosom.

I'll stick in my person
Before my heart yields." (twice)

When the fair maid was killed,
The three boys went away.

They arrived straight to the door
Of the dead girl's father. (twice).

Oh, but at the end of the meal,
The one who was to pay didn't know,

He put his hand in his purse
And the gold ring happened to fall! (twice)

But the father who was close
Picked up the gold ring.

"Here is a very pretty ring.
How much does it cost, if you please?" (twice)

"But we didn't buy it,
Even less did we steal it.

We went past a church,
We saw it, we took it." (twice)

"Oh, hush, bad boy,
You cheated on me! (twice)

"This is my daughter's ring,
Give her back to me, dead or alive" (twice)

The youngest confessed/declared:
"My two brothers did it.

We lead her to the wood,
She's covered with cut branches." (twice)

The youngest was forgiven
The two others ??? (2)

??? to Paris, Rome, Valence,
Here is the death of this child/childhood? (twice)
(1) she sings "bouscage". "Bocage" is hedged farmland but the description fits more a wood than farmland.
(2) it seems she sings "les autres deux ont fait rouler / tra Paris…" but it doesn't make sense, "tra" doesn't even exist.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:20 AM

This is a part of a longer song called "La mula de Parenzo", a song from the North-East of Italy and Istria

TUTTI MI CHIAMANO BIONDA
(Italian)

Porto i capelli neri
Porto i capelli neri
Tutti mi chiamano bionda, laililoilà
Ma bionda non lo sono, laililoilà

Porto i capelli neri
Sinceri nell'amor
E perché non m'ami più ?
(bis)

S'il mare fosse tocio
Montagne de polenta
Ohi mamma che tociade! (bis)
(bis)
Polenta e baccalà
Perché non m'ami più.

La mia morosa e vecia,
La tengo per riserva,
E quando spunta l'erba (bis)
(bis)
La mando a pascolar
Perché non m'ami più ?

RADdO : 06374.
ALL CALL ME BLONDE


I have black hair
I have black hair
All call me blonde
But blonde I am not,
(twice)
I have black hair.
Sincere in love.
And why don't you love me any more?
(twice)

If the sea were gravy,
Mountains (were made) of polenta
Oh, mommy! what sops! (twice)
(twice)
Polenta and cod,
Why don't you love me any more?

My girlfriend is old,
I keep her as a substitute
And when the grass grows (twice)
(twice)
I send her to the pasture.
Why don't you love me any more?
YouTube rendition
Istrian site where I found the lyrics below and at least one interesting link.


LA MULA DE PARENZO

La mula de Parenzo - liolà
l'ha messo su bottega,
de tutto la vendeva…
de tutto la vendeva
La mula de Parenzo - liolà
l'ha messo su bottega,
de tutto la vendeva
fora che'l baccalà.
Perché non m'ami più?

La mè morosa l'è vecia,
la tengo per riserva,
e quando spunta l'erba…
e quando spunta l'erba
La mè morosa l'è vecia,
la tengo per riserva
e quando spunta l'erba
la mando a pascolar.
Perché non m'ami più?

La mando a pascolare
nel mese di settembre,
ma quando vien novembre…
ma quando vien novembre
La mando a pascolare
nel mese di settembre
ma quando vien novembre
la mando a riposar.
Perché non m'ami più?

La mando a pascolare
insieme alle caprette,
l'amor con le servette…
l'amor con le servette
La mando a pascolare
insieme alle caprette
l'amor con le servette
non lo farò mai più!
Perché non m'ami più?

Se il mare fosse tòcio
e i monti de polenta:
ohi mamma che tociàde…
ohi mamma che tociàde
Se il mare fosse tòcio
e i monti de polenta
ohi mamma che tociàde
polenta e baccalà!
Perché non m'ami più?

Se il mare fosse di vino
e i laghi de acquavita,
'briaghi per tutta la vita…
'briaghi per tutta la vita
Se il mare fosse di vino
e i laghi de acquavita
'briaghi per tutta la vita:
polenta e baccalà.
Perché non m'ami più?

Tutti mi dicono bionda,
ma bionda io non sono,
porto i capelli neri…
porto i capelli neri
Tutti mi dicono bionda,
ma bionda io non sono
porto i capelli neri,
neri come il carbon.
Perché non m'ami più?

Sinceri ne l'amore,
sinceri ne gli amanti:
ne ho passati tanti…
ne ho passati tanti
Sinceri ne l'amore,
sinceri ne gli amanti
ne ho passati tanti
e passerò anche te!
Perché non m'ami più?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:21 AM

LE LUNDI DE LA PENTECÔTE
(French)

Le lundi de la Pentecôte
Je me suis allé promener
Je me suis allé promener
Tout le long d'un pré.
J'ai trouvé ma mie endormie
Je l'ai réveillée.

Aussitôt je m'approchai d'elle
Faisant semblant de l'embrasser
Faisant semblant de l'embrasser
Elle m'a refusé.
"Mon cher amant ne venez pas
Vous m'ennuyez !

Si c'est l'amour qui vous tourmente
Venez ce soir à la minuit
Venez ce soir à la minuit
Oh mon bel ami
Car mon père sera endormi
Ma mère aussi."

N'en furent pas une heure ensemble
Que le coq chanta minuit
Que le coq chanta minuit
Oh mon bel ami
Tout coq qui chante à la minuit
Doit être rôti.

N'en furent pas une heure ensemble
Que l'alouette chante le jour
"Alouette tu m'as trompé
Tu m'as trahi
Tu chantes la pointe du jour
Ce n'est pas la minuit.

Ah si l'amour prend la racine
Dans mon jardin j'en planterai
Dans mon jardin j'en planterai
Mais aux quatre coins
J'en ferai part aux amoureux
Qui en auront besoin."

Coirault : 607 Le rendez-vous de nuit.
RADdO : 00553.
ON WHIT MONDAY


On Whit Monday
I went for a walk
I went for a walk
Along a meadow.
I found my sweetheart asleep,
I woke her up.

I promptly got near her
Pretending to kiss her
Pretending to kiss her,
She denied me to.
"My dear lover, don't come,
You bother me!

If love is what is tormenting you,
Come tonight at midnight
Come tonight at midnight
Oh my dear sweetheart,
For my father will be asleep
And so will my mother.

They hardly were together for an hour
When the rooster sang midnight,
When the rooster sang midnight
Oh my dear sweetheart,
Whatever rooster that sings at midnight
Must be roasted.

They hardly were together for an hour
When the lark sang daybreak
"Lark, you deceived me,
You betrayed me.
You're singing daybreak,
It's not midnight.

"Ah, if love takes root
In my garden I will plant some
In my garden I will plant some,
But in the four corners
I'll give some to the lovers
Who would need any."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 09 Jan 11 - 04:22 AM

ADIEU PAURE CARNAVÀS
(Occitan)

Adieu paure,
Paure, paure,
Adieu paure Carnavàs !
Manjarem plus de saussissas,
ni de maigre ni de gras.

Adieu paure,
Paure, paure,
Adieu paure Carnavàs !

RADdO : 06375.
FAREWELL, POOR CARNIVAL


Farewell, poor,
Poor, poor,
Farewell, poor Carnival!
We will eat no more sausages,
Neither lean nor fat..

Farewell, poor,
Poor, poor,
Farewell, poor Carnival!
We have another version of this song with translation, recording, midi and sheet music on Mama Lisa's World
and a couple of articles about Carnival on Lisa's blog.

END OF CD 6


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Thomas Stern
Date: 10 Jan 11 - 09:12 PM

heads up: J&R in New York City has this for $80!
Anthologie Traditionnelles J&R


Best wishes, Thomas.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 14 Jan 11 - 12:50 PM

Before I start posting the lyrics and translations to CD7 I'd want to say that I wish that you guys out there pointed where the previous ones are wrong, weird, awkward, incomprehensible...
Thanks!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:19 AM

CD 7 ALPS NORTH EAST

Link to the Frémeaux's leaflet to this CD


J'AI FAIT UNE MAÎTRESSE
(French)

J'ai fait une maîtresse
Il n'y a pas trois jours longtemps.

Si Dieu me la conserve
J'en serai son amant.
(bis)

J'ai bien reçu une lettre
Qu'à la guerre nous faut aller.

Ma charmante maîtresse
Ne faisait que pleurer.
(bis)

"Ne pleurez pas tant la belle
Car nous sommes encore ici

À la fin de cette guerre
Nous pourrons bien revenir."
(bis)

La guerre elle est finie
L'amant l'est revenu

À la porte de sa mie
Où il est allé frapper
(bis)

"Qui frappe à la porte
À cette heure de la nuit ?

J'ai ma chandelle est morte
Je n'ose point t'ouvrir !"
(bis)

Coirault : 3612 Fiancée à un autre
RADdO : 02591.
I GOT A MISTRESS


I got a mistress
Only three days ago.

If God keeps her for me
I'll be her lover.
(twice)

I did receive a letter
(saying) that we must go to war.

My charming mistress
Couldn't stop weeping.
(twice)

"Don't cry so much, beauty,
For we are still here,

At the end of the war
We will come back."
(twice)

The war is over,
The lover has come back

To his sweetheart's door
He went to knock
(twice)

"Who's knocking at the door,
At this time at night?

My candle is dead,
I don't dare open to you!"
(twice)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:21 AM

DANS NOTRE VILLAGE, MA CHARMANTE MAMAN,
(French)

Dans notre village, ma charmante maman,
Les filles sont sages jusqu'à quatorze ans. (bis)

Silence, silence, la nuit pas de bruit,
Le jour s'avance et la nuit s'enfuit.

RADdO : 06385.
IN OUR VILLAGE, MY CHARMING MOMMY


In our village, my charming mommy,
The girls are good till they're fourteen. (twice)

Silence, silence, no noise at night,
Days comes near and night goes away.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:25 AM

CONSCRITS, ÉGAYONS NOS VINGT ANS
(French)

Conscrits, égayons nos vingt ans
Voici l'heureux jour du tirage

Profitons de tous nos instants
Pour célébrer ce doux passage

Allons marchons au pas
Ne nous alarmons pas

Le destin du soldat
Est le plus heureux que l'on trouve ici bas.

Coirault : 6504 L'heureux jour du tirage
RADdO : 03043.
DRAFTEES, LET'S ENLIVEN OUR 20 YEARS OF AGE


Draftees, let's enliven our twenty years of age,
Here comes the happy day of the draw (1)

Let's enjoy all our moments
To celebrate this sweet transition.

Come on, let's walk in step,
Let's not get worried

The soldier's fate
Is the happiest one can find here below.
(1) At a certain moment of the conscription history, young men first had to be passed "bon pour le service" (fit for the military service) which was in itself a transition ritual –if fit, they'd be men!- then they would draw lots: suppose 100 soldiers were needed, all the young men would draw a piece of paper on which a number from 1 to the number they were was written. Then they were sorted out. Those who had drawn #1 to 100 were drafted, those from # 101 to let's say 130 were reservists, the others were exempted. Hence the expression "tirer un bon/mauvais numéro " (to draw a good/bad number) that means to be lucky/unlucky. Military service could be pretty long (5 to 7 years during peace time, more in war time) and since substitution was allowed, well-off men could pay someone else to go to the army in their stead.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:27 AM

LES CONSCRITS SONT LÀ
(French)

a/ Les conscrits sont là, mais on ne les voit guère
Les conscrits sont là, on ne les verra pas

Et si on les voit, on ne les entend guère
Et si on les voit, on en les entend pas.

RADdO : 06386.
THE DRAFTEES ARE HERE


a/ The draftees are here, but they can hardly be seen,
the draftees are here, they will not be seen.

And if they can be seen, they can hardly be heard,
And if they can be seen, they cannot be heard.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:28 AM

LE CONSCRIT
(French)

b/ Le conscrit, quand il partira
Laissera les autres dans la misère.

Le conscrit, quand il partira,
Laissera les autres dans les embarras.

À la guerre, il faut s'y faire
Dans les combats, il faut des soldats.
(bis)

RADdO : 06387.
THE DRAFTEE


b/When the draftee leaves,
He will leave the others in poverty.

When the draftee leaves,
He will leave the others in their troubles.

You need to get used to war,
You need soldiers in fights.
(twice)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:31 AM

LES CONSCRITS DE LA TOUSSAINT
(French)

Écoutez nos complaintes et nos gémissements
Sensibles à nos plaintes, tirez-nous des tourments.

Nous étions comme vous, ayant nos corps.
Vous serez comme nous, parmi les morts.

Oh vous voyez nos peines, hélas secourez-nous.
Nous sommes dans les chaînes, ayez pitié de nous.

Nos amis, nos parents, nos chers enfants,
Nous souffrons grandement dans ce tourment.

Les peines qu'on endure avant que de mourir
Ne sont qu'une peinture de ce qu'il faut souffrir.

Dans ce terrible lieu au loin de Dieu
Nous sommes attachés par nos péchés.

Prier pour père et mère, enfants, vous le devez
Puisqu'étant sur la terre, ils vous ont tant aimés.

De leur biens délaissés, vous jouissez
Donnez-leur promptement soulagement.

Coirault : 8115 Complainte des pauvres âmes
RADdO : 05326.
THE ALL SAINTS DAY'S DRAFTEES


Listen to our laments and our wailings,
Moved by our moans, get us out from our torments.

We were like you, having our bodies,
You'll be like us, among the dead.

Oh, you see our pains, alas, rescue us,
We are in the chains, have pity for us.

Our friends, our parents, our dear children,
We suffer greatly in this torment.

The pains we endure before we die
Are only a picture of what we have to suffer.

In this terrible place far away from God,
We are tied by our sins.

You must pray for your father, mother and children
Since on earth, they loved you so much.

You're enjoying their forsaken goods,
Soothe them quickly.

NB: I find the end of this one confusing


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:35 AM

QUAND J'ÉTAIS PETITE FILLE
(French)

Quand j'étais petite fille, tralalala lala lala
Quand j'étais petite fille, les moutons je les gardais.

Mais j'étais encore bien jeune, j'oubliais mon déjeuner.

Mais le valet de mon grand-père est venu me l'apporter.

"Tenez, tenez, petite-fille, tenez voilà votre déjeuner !"

"Comment voulez-vous que je déjeune, les moutons sont égarés.

Ils sont là-bas dans la prairie, où je puis les retrouver."

Elle prend sa cornemuse et les moutons sont retrouvés !

Coirault : 4501 Le déjeuner oublié (La danse du troupeau)
RADdO : 00044.
WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL


When I was a little girl, tralalala lala lala
When I was a little girl, I would watch the sheep.

But I was still very young, I forgot my breakfast/snack.

But my grandfather's servant brought it to me.

"Here you are, here you are, granddaughter (1), here is your breakfast/snack!"

"How could I have my breakfast/snack, my sheep are lost.

They are over there in the meadow where I can find them."

She took her bagpipe and found her sheep!
(1) it may have been spelled with a hyphen which makes the compound mean "granddaughter" because of the grandfather, so the servant would call her the way her grandfather did. In other versions, it's just "petite fille" without a hyphen which translates as "little girl". The most well-known version of this song goes...

QUAND J'ÉTAIS PETITE FILLE

Quand j'étais petite fille, mes moutons j'allais garder (bis)
J'étais encore dans ma jeunesse, j'oubliais mon déjeuner (bis )

Un matin maître se lève pour venir me l'apporter (bis)
Tenez, tenez, petite fille, voici votre déjeuner (bis)

Que voulez-vous que j'en fasse, mes moutons sont égarés (bis)
Il sont là-bas dans la prairie, je ne puis les retrouver (bis)

Maître prit sa cornemuse et s'mit à cornemuser (bis)
Au son de la musette, les moutons sont retrouvés (bis)

Ils se sont pris par la patte et se sont mis à danser (bis)
Et au milieu de cette danse/ronde, j'ai mangé mon déjeuner (bis)
WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL

When I was a little girl, I would go and watch the sheep (twice).
But I was still in my youth, I would forget my breakfast/snack. (twice)

Once day, master got up to bring it to me (twice).
"Here you are, here you are, little girl, here is your breakfast/snack!" (twice)

"What would I do with it, my sheep are lost.(twice)
They are over there in the meadow, I can't find them."

Master took his bagpipe and started to pipe (twice)
To the sound of the pipe, the sheep were found (twice)

They held one another's legs/feet and started to dance (twice)
And in the middle of this dance/round, I ate my breakfast/snack.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:40 AM

C'ÉTAIT UN PLAFONNEUR, D'UNE RICHE FAMILLE
(French)

C'était un plafonneur, d'une riche famille
Cherchant nuit et jour l'amour d'une fille.
Il l'a cherché, il l'a cherché, la fille il l'a trouvée. (bis)

La fille de bon matin s'en va dire à sa mère :
"Mère, connaissez-vous bien le garçon que j'aime ?
C'est un garçon plafonneur, celui qui a su charmer mon cœur !" (bis)

À ce propos-là, la mère se fâche :
"Non, tu ne l'auras pas, petite volage !
Nous te marierons fort bien avec un garçon de bien." (bis)

"Ce garçon-là, ma mère, il n'a pas de l'adresse
Comme mon plafonneur, rempli de tendresse.
Si vous ne me le donnez pas, je le suivrai de pas à pas ! (bis)

J'irai tous les jours sur le bord du rivage,
Pleurer nuit et jour, l'amour mon esclavage.
J'aurai toujours dedans mon cœur l'amour du joli plafonneur." (bis)

"Nous te mettrons, ma fille, dans un couvent de filles.
Tu regarderas par la croisée, tu verras le plafonneur passer !" (bis)

Coirault : 914 Le garçon plafonneur
RADdO : 02185.
HE WAS A PLASTERER


He was a plasterer (1), looking night and day
For the love of a rich family's daughter.
He looked for it, he found it, he found the girl (twice)

Early in the morning, the girl goes to tell her mother:
"Mother, do you know well the boy I love?
It's a plasterer boy, the one who knew how to charm my heart!" (twice)

Hearing this, the mother gets angry:
"No, you won't have him, little fickle!
We will marry you very well with a rich boy" (bis)

"That boy, mother, has no skill
Like my full of tenderness plasterer.
If you don't give him to me, I will follow him step by step. (twice)

Every day I will go on the waterside,
To weep night and day, love, my slavery.
I will always have in my heart the love of the pretty/nice plasterer" (twice)

"We will put you, daughter, in a girls convent.
You'll look through the window, you'll see the plasterer pass by!" (twice)
(1) "plafonneur": plasterer who works on ceilings (plafond = ceiling)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:42 AM

MÈ DZE SI EUNNA TSANSÔN
(Franco-Provençal, aka Arpitan)

Mè dze si eunna tsansôn
Que l'è totta de meussondze.
Se le ya-t-eun mô de veretô
Dz'oui que me la confondre.

Si levà lo bon mateun
Quan lo solèi mechave.
Si allà à la fèira lo premi
Quan le-s-atre s'èn vignavon.

Dz'i atseutô eun dzèn cavalleun blan
S'è trôo eun croè ano borgno.
N'i coppô-lèi le quatro pià
Courjè pe tò lo mondo.

Dz'i appalô mon tseun é mon tsa
La tchévra le veun môdre.
E m'a mordù lo grou artèi
Le bouigno me sèinavon.

Cice que l'an fé ceutta tsansôn
Son quatro maronade.
La tsansôn se l'è fété
L'è 'n tsapièn de pallie.

Coirault : 11401 Les menteries
RADdO : 00264.
I KNOW A SONG


I know a song
That is lying.
If there is one only word of truth,
I want to expose it for you.

I got up early in the morning
At sun set.
I was the first to go to the fair
When the others were coming back.

I bought a pretty, white foal,
It came out to be a lousy, one-eyed donkey.
I cut his four feet,
He would run around everywhere.

I called my dog and my cat,
The goat went to bite them.
She bit my big toe,
My ears bled.

Those who composed this song
Are four jokers.
If the song was made,
It was while cutting straw.
This song is to be compared to J' me lève de bon matin or Ahora que vamos despacio


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:44 AM

DANS LA COUR D'UN PALAIS
(French)

Dans la cour d'un palais,
Tout le long d'un gué, ce joli mois de mai
Dans la cour d'un palais,
Y avait une servante (bis)

Qui voulait se marier
Tout le long…
Personne ne la demande. (bis)

Le fils du pharmacien
En a fait la demande. (bis)

Son père le veut bien
Sa mère en est contente. (bis)

Y a que les grands-parents
Qui en font la différence. (bis)

"Malgré nos grands-parents
Nous coucherons ensemble. (bis)

Aux quatre coins du lit
Quatre pommes d'orange. (bis)

Et au milieu du lieu
Le rossignol chante. (bis)

Chante rossignolet
Et quand tu auras bien chanté,
Tu auras ta récompense !" (bis)

Coirault : 4801 La Flamande
RADdO : 00273.
IN THE YARD OF A PALACE


In the yard of a palace,
All along a ford, this pretty month of May
In the yard of a palace,
There was a maid (twice)

Who wanted to get married
All along …
Nobody proposed her. (twice)

The pharmacist's son
Proposed her (twice)

Her father agreed,
Her mother was glad of it (twice)

Only the grandparents
Made a difference (twice).

"In spite of our grandparents,
We will sleep together (twice)

At the four corners of the bed
Four oranges (1) (twice)

And in the middle of the place
The nightingale sings (twice)

Sing, little nightingale
And when you've sung well,
You'll have your reward." (twice)
(1) oranges were often called "orange apples", it's called this way in Occitan (pomas d'irange) and in Sioux Lakota (tȟaspáŋzi = yellow apple)

This song is to be compared with "Aux marches du palais". There are notes about the singing of the nightingale and the middle of the place/bed on this thread


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:46 AM

VOICI CE JOLI MOIS DE MAI
(French)

Voici ce joli mois de mai
Qui est si joli si bien fait.
Nous l'adorons par sa présence
Voici ce joli mois qui rentre.

Voici ce joli mois des fleurs
Qui réjouit partout les cœurs
Les cœurs de ces jeunes fillettes
Qui sont si jolies si bien faites.

Vous pères et mères qui avez
Des jeunes filles à marier
Que dieu vous fasse l'avantage
De les unir en mariage.

Et vous fillettes qui dormez
Voulez-vous bien vous réveiller
Car vos amants sont à la porte
De belles fleurs ils vous apportent.

Ils vous apportent un beau bouquet
De roses blanches, de muguet
Et par-dessus trois belles oranges
Voici ce joli mois qui rentre.

Coirault : 9004 Toutes les fleurs sont dans leur valeur
RADdO : 05496.
HERE COMES THIS PRETTY MONTH OF MAY


Here comes this pretty month of May
That is so pretty and so well made.
We love it for its presence.
Here's this pretty month coming in.

Here comes this pretty month of flowers
That rejoices hearts everywhere.
The hearts of these young girls
Who are so pretty and so well built (whose bodies look so good)

You, fathers and mothers who have
Marriageable young maidens,
May God give you the luck
To have them joined in matrimony.

And you, young girls who are sleeping,
Would you want to wake up,
For your lovers are at your door,
They bring you beautiful flowers.

They bring you a beautiful posy
Of white roses, of lily of the valley
And on top three nice oranges.
Here is this pretty month coming in.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:48 AM

'S ERSCHTE JOHR, WÜ-N-I HA FANGA A HÜSE
(Alsatian)

's erschte Johr, wü-n-i ha fanga a hüse,
Hat m'r unser Herrgott e Pitel ga.
Alla Litt ha welle wesse wie das Pitel heisst :
Pittelé heisst mi kleines Hiehnelé.
O Eland ! Jerusalem !

's zweite Johr, wü-n-i ha fanga a hüse,
Hat m'r unser Herrgott a Ante ga.
Alla Litt ha welle wesse wie dia Ante heisst :
Ringeldi Rangeldi heisst mi Antali,
Pittelé heisst mi kleines Hiehnelé.
O Eland ! Jerusalem !

's drette Johr, wü-n-i ha fanga a hüse,
Hat m'r unser Herrgott a Gans ga.
Alla Litt ha welle wesse wie dia Gans heisst :
Langhans heisst mi Gans, Ringeldi Rangeldi heisst mi Antali,
Pittelé heisst mi kleines Hiehnelé.
O Eland ! Jerusalem !

's viarte Johr, wü-n-i ha fanga a hüse,
Hat m'r unser Herrgott a Kühe ga.
Alla Litt ha welle wesse wie dia Kühe heisst :
Nia- genüe heisst mi Kühe,
Langhans heisst mi Gans, Ringeldi Rangeldi heisst mi Antali,
Pittelé heisst mi kleines Hiehnelé.
O Eland ! Jerusalem !

's femfte Johr, wü-n-i ha fanga a hüse,
Hat m'r unser Herrgott a Ochs ga.
Alla Litt ha welle wesse wie da Ochs heisst :
Grosskopf heisst mi Ochs, Nia- genüe heisst mi Küe,
Langhans heisst mi Gans, Ringeldi Rangeldi heisst mi Antali,
Pittelé heisst mi kleines Hiehnelé.
O Eland ! Jerusalem !

's sechste Johr, wü-n-i ha fanga a hüse,
Hat m'r unser Herrgott a Frauï ga.
Alla Litt ha welle wesse wie dia Frauï heisst :
Rutsch-em-Schtrauï heisst mi Frauï, Grosskopf heisst mi Ochs,
Nia-genüe heisst mi Küe, Langhans heisst mi Gans,
Ringeldi Rangeldi heisst mi Antali,
Pittelé heisst mi kleines Hiehnelé.
O Eland ! Jerusalem !

's sewete Johr, wü-n-i ha fanga a hüse,
Hat m'r unser Herrgott a Kend ga.
Alla Litt ha welle wesse wie das Kend heisst :
Pflederleng heisst mi Kend, Rutsch-em-Schtrauï heisst mi Frauï,
Grosskopf heisst mi Ochs, Nia genüe heisst mi Küe,
Langhans heisst mi Gans, Ringeldi Rangeldi heisst mi Antali,
Pittelé heisst mi kleines Hiehnelé.
O Eland ! Jerusalem !


RADdO : 06388.
IN THE FIRST YEAR I STARTED TO KEEP MY HOUSE


In the first year I started to keep my house
Our Lord God gave me a little hen.
Everybody wanted to know how this hen was called:
Pitalé is the name of my little hen.
O woe! Jerusalem!

In the second year I started to keep my house,
Our Lord God gave me a duck.
Everybody wanted to know how this duck was called.
Waddle-waddly is the name of my duck,
Pitalé is the name of my little hen.
O woe! Jerusalem!

In the third year I started to keep my house,
Our Lord God gave me a goose.
Everybody wanted to know how this goose was called:
Longneck is the name of my goose, Waddle-waddly is the name of my duck
Pitalé is the name of my little hen.
O woe! Jerusalem!

In the fourth year I started to keep my house,
Our Lord God gave me a cow.
Everybody wanted to know how this cow was called.
Never-enough is the name of my cow,
Longneck is the name of my goose, Waddle-waddly is the name of my duck,
Pitalé is the name of my little hen.
O woe! Jerusalem!

In the fifth year I started to keep my house,
Our Lord God gave me an ox.
Everybody wanted to know how this ox was called.
Big-head is the name of my ox, Never-enough is the name of my cow,
Longneck is the name of my goose, Waddle-waddly is the name of my duck,
Pitalé is the name of my little hen.
O woe! Jerusalem!

In the sixth year I started to keep my house,
Our Lord God gave me a woman/wife.
Everybody wanted to know how this woman/wife was called.
Slip-on-straw is the name of my woman/wife,
Big-head is the name of my ox, Never-enough is the name of my cow,
Longneck is the name of my goose, Waddle-waddly is the name of my duck,
Pitalé is the name of my little hen.
O woe! Jerusalem!

In the seventh year I started to keep my house,
Our Lord God gave me a child.
Everybody wanted to know how this child was called.
Pflederleng is the name of my child, Slip-on-straw is the name of my woman/wife,
Big-head is the name of my ox, Never-enough is the name of my cow,
Longneck is the name of my goose, Waddle-waddly is the name of my duck,
Pitalé is the name of my little hen.
O woe! Jerusalem!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:49 AM

EN 'K GINGEN LESTMAAL AAN HET JAGEN UIT
(Flemish)

En 'k gingen lestmaal aan het jagen uit
Aan het jagen ging er ik uit,
Wien vonde 'k ik op mijne wegen ?
Een schoon meisje, die kwam er al tegen,
En zij was er maar ja, gedaan en gedaan,
En zij was er maar ja opgedan.

"Bonjour" zeide hij, "jonkvrouwe jolie,
Zou 'k ik niet meugen een nacht bij je zijn ?
Zou 'k ik niet meugen een nacht bij je slapen ?
Dat zal mijn jonk hertje vermaken."

"Een nacht bij mijn slapen,
Dat mag er wel zijn."
Zo sprak dat jong meisje fijn.
"Schoon lief, komt omtrent dien avond,
Schoon lief en ik zal U verwachten."

Den dag die verdween en dien avond die k(w)am
Die jager is derwaarts gegaan
En hij klopte op heure klafforen
Dat meisje di k(w)am er al voren,
En ze liet er die jager en goe(d)in,
En ze liet er die jager in.

Die vader die sliep en de moeder die riep,
"Wie mag d'r hier boven zijn
Welk (wat) mag uus dochtertje maken ?
Haar berre (bedde) begunt er te kraken
Zij en is er vorwaar, niet alleen, niet alleen,
Zij en is er vorwaar niet alleen."

Die vader sloeg vier en die moeder gong mee,
En ze zijn er naar boven gaan zien,
En ze lei in die jagers ermen (armen)
Alleen en al zuchten en kermen.

"Dochtertje later gij' getrouwd zal zijn,
Je gaat gij meugen blijven thuis
Je gaat gij meugen zitten en wiegen,
Van den jager je te laten bedriegen
En roepen met 't hert vol druk en rouw :
Klein jagerke slaapt er maar gauw !"

RADdO : 06389.
AND I WAS LATELY GOING ON A HUNT


And I was lately going on a hunt
And for a hunt I went out.
And who did I find on my way?
A beautiful maiden came in front of me,
And she was so well adorned,
Yes, so well adorned.

"Good day" he said, "Pretty young maiden,
Couldn't I be one night with you?
Couldn't I sleep one night with you?
It would make my young heart happy".

"To sleep one night with me?
It might well be."
Thus spoke this pretty maiden.
"Fine love, come at night,
Fine love, I'll watch you come."

The day went away and the night came
The hunter went there.
And he knocked at her shutters,
The young girl went to open
And let the hunter go in
And let the hunter in.

And the father was sleeping and the mother called:
"Who might be up there?
What might our daughter be doing?
Her bed starts cracking,
She's certainly not alone in it, not alone,
She's certainly not alone in it."

The father took the lamp and the mother went with him
And they went upstairs to see,
And she was lying in the hunter's arms,
and was only moaning.

"Daughter, when later you're married,
Well you'll have to stay at home,
You'll have to stay by the cradle
Because of the hunter who betrayed you
And (you'll) say with the heart full of oppression and sorrow:
'Little hunter, sleep quicker!'"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:55 AM

LES CORDONNIERS SONT PIRES QUE DES ÉVÊQUES
(French)

Les cordonniers sont pires que des évêques (bis)
Trinquent tous les jours et le dimanche avec.
Lon la, lon la
Battons la semelle oh gué, lon la
Battons la semelle et le beau temps r'viendra


Tous les lundis, ils s'en font une fête (bis)
Et le mardi, ils ont mal à la tête.
Lon la…

Les mercredis, ils vont boire chopinette (bis)
Et les jeudis, ils « feusent » dans leur couchette.

Les vendredis, s'assient sur leur sellette (bis)
Les samedis, baptisent leur recette.

Mais le dimanche, ils chantent à plein bec (bis)
Les cordonniers sont pires que des évêques.

Coirault : 6414 La semaine ouvrière
RADdO : 01230.
THE SHOEMAKERS ARE WORSE THAN BISHOPS


The shoemakers are worse than bishops (twice)
They drink (1) every day and on Sunday too.
Lon la, lon la
Let's hit the sole oh gué, lon la
Let's hit the sole and the fine weather will come back


Every Monday they party (bis)
and on Tuesdays they have a headache.
Lon la…

On Wednesdays, they go to drink a little glass (2) (twice)
And on Thursdays, they "do" (3) in their beds.

On Fridays, they sit on their cradles (twice)
On Saturdays, they baptize their takings/receipts (4)

But on Sundays, they blare out (twice)
The shoemakers are worse than bishops
(1) trinquer means to cling glasses before drinking. The word comes from the German "trinken" (to drink) and can be used to mean "to drink", it also means "to pay the price" hence the expression "les parents boivent, les enfants trinquent" (the parents drink/booze, the children cling glasses = pay the price)
(2) chope, chopine, chopinette: all words coming from the German Schoppen and Alsatian Schoppe referring to a beer mug: chope = 1 pint, chopine ½ pint, chopinette being a diminutive/pet name for chopine but isn't supposed to be smaller..
(3) "feusent": there are quotes in the lyrics, which means the word "is not French" = it's not said this way normally or it "doesn't exist" at all, i.e. officially, in the dictionary- . This is a form of the 3rd person of plural of the verb "faire" (to do/ to make) based on the fact that the forms spelled "fais--" are pronounced like the English "fuzz" and so is "feusent". The line would then translate as "on Thrusday, they "do" in their bed. But what would they do? Other versions probably tell more, here is one that goes, "Les cordonniers sont pires que les évêques / le lundi, ils font une fête / le mardi, ils ont mal à la tête / le mercredi, ils jouent de la clarinette / le jeudi, ils vont voir leur maîtresse / le vendredi, passent la navette / Le samedi, leur semaine est bien faite." I also found the same song referring to weavers. so… since alternate versions have the Thursday line as "they go to see their mistresses" this is probably what they "do" in their beds.
(4) I have no idea of what it means but it could be the result of a mishearing because other versions give this line as "le samedi, petite est leur recette" (on Saturdays, small is their taking)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:56 AM

JEAN PANSARD N'A PAS ENCORE SOUPÉ
(Walloon and French)

Djan Ponsôd n'a né co soupé
S'il-vous-plait de lui en donner.
Taillez ci, taillez là,

Mètouz-l' au mitan du plat.
In p'tit bokèt d'pwin
In p'tit bokèt d'tchau
Pou Djan Ponsôd.
D'jai dès djambes di fiêr,
Dje coûrs come un ciêr ;
Dj'ai dès djambes di fistu,
Djè d'mère toudi ascroupu d'ssus
JEAN PANSARD HASN'T HAD SUPPER YET


Jean Pansard (1) hasn't had supper yet,
If you'd like to give him some,
Cut here, cut there

Put some in the middle of the dish.
A little piece of bread,
A little piece of meat
For Jean Pansard.
I have iron legs,
I run like a deer;
I have wisp legs,
I always stay hunkered on them.
(1) John Potbelly could be a good equivalent.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:57 AM

CHANT DE QUÊTE – 1
(Walloon)

Madame, dji vins hèyi
Po veûy çou qu'vos m'din.rîz.
Vos-avéz fé des wafes,
Vos m'lès lêriz sayî.
Boutéz foû, boutéz d'vins
Jusqu'à tant qu'I seûy bin plin.
Ine pitite hèye, Madame,
pace qui dj'a si bin tchanté !
COLLECTION SONG 1


Ma'am, I've come to collect
To see what you will give.
You made waffles,
You'll let me taste them,
Put some outside, put some inside
Till it's (my bag) very full.
A little present, Ma'am,
Because I have sung so well!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 02:59 AM

CHANT DE QUÊTE – 2
(Walloon)

On djoû Monseû l'Cwèrbâ, à l'copète d'on tiyou.
Tinéz ! Volà mé min, comment va-t-I, mon Diou ?
Nosse pôve petit houlot qu'a toumé foû dè nid,
Qu'a toumé foû dè nid en s'cassant lès deûs gngnos.
Sur l'air du tradèridèra (ter) et tralala…
Une petite hèye, Madame,
pace que j'ai si bien chanté, si v's plêt.
COLLECTION SONG 2


One day, Mister Crow on top of a lime tree.
"Here you are, here is my hand, my God, how are you?"
"Our poor, little youngest fell down from the nest,
Fell down from the nest and broke its two knees,
To the tune of the tradéridéra (3 times) and tralala…
A little present, Ma'am,
Because I have sung so well, please!
This song is sung to the same tune as La Mère Michel to which is also sung St Nicolas, patron des écoliers


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 03:00 AM

CHANT DE QUÊTE – 3
(Walloon)

Bondjoû, Madame, dji vins hèyi
Eune bone annèye à v's sohêti
On bon rôy po l'djoû d'vosse vèye
Et des galants à vos djônès fèyes.
Dji sos v'nou chal è vosse payis
Tot nou, tot d'hâs, tot mâ tchåssi.
Ine pitite hèye po m'rimoussi !
Ine pitite hèye, Madame,
pace qui j'a si bin tchanté !
"Kibin èstéz-v's ?"
"Nos deûs !"
"E-bin aléz-r'-z-è vos deûs !"
"Dij v'sohête li Diâbe è l'coulêye
po tote l'annèye !"
COLLECTION SONG 3


Good day, ma'am, I've come to collect
To wish you a happy (new) year,
A good king (husband) for the rest of your life
And sweethearts for your young daughters/girls.
I've come here, in your area (1)
Naked, sockless and poorly shod.
A little present to thank me.
A little present, Ma'am,
Because I have sung so well!"
"How many are you?"
"The two of us!"
"Well, you two go away!"
"I wish you the Devil in your chimney
For all the year!"
(1) "dans votre pays" = in your area, place, region, land… though "pays" means country, here it's not about a country (nation)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 03:00 AM

♫ Oh oh hard is the fortune of all womankind…♫

LÀ-HAUT, SUR CETTE MONTAGNE
(French)

Là-haut, sur cette montagne
Il y a des oiseaux.

Il y a des p'tits aussi des grands qui chantent leur langage
Que les jeunes filles sont malheureuses de se mettre au ménage.
(bis)
Pour se mettre au ménage
Il faut avoir du courage.

Il faut nourrir homme et enfant et embrasser l'ouvrage.
L'on peut bien dire : "Adieu beau temps, je suis dans l'esclavage."
(bis)

Le jour du mariage,
Quel habit mettrons-nous ?

Nous mettrons nos habits blancs, la robe de pénitence,
Le chapeau haut à trois couleurs, le ruban de souffrance.
(bis)

Six mois du mariage
Elle va trouver son père.

"Mon père vous m'avez mariée, vous m'avez donné z'un homme,
Qui est toujours au cabaret, négligeant sa besogne."
(bis)

"Ma fille prenez courage
Peut-être qu'il changera.

Embrassez-le, caressez-le, montrez-lui du courage,
Vous trouverez du changement dans votre petit ménage."
(bis)

Coirault : 5420 Que les amants sont insouciants de se mettre en ménage
RADdO : 00028.
UP THERE ON THIS MOUNTAIN


Up there on this mountain
There are birds.

There are small ones also large ones that sing (in) their language
That young girls are anxious to get married
(twice)
To get married,
You must be courageous.

You must feed man and child and work.
One can well say, "Farewell, good time, I am in slavery."
(twice)

On the wedding day,
Which clothes will we wear?

We'll put our white clothes on, the penance gown,
The three-colored top hat, the ribbon of suffering.
(twice)

Six months after her wedding,
She goes to see her father.

"Father, you married me off, you gave me a man
Who is always at the pub/café, neglecting his work."
(twice)

"Daughter, take courage,
Maybe he will change,

Kiss him, fondle him, show him courage,
You'll find some change in your little household."
(twice)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 03:02 AM

DU PRINTEMPS LORSQUE DÈS L'AURORE
(French)

Du printemps lorsque dès l'aurore, les oiseaux chantent le retour
Quand aux doux prémices de flore, les zéphyrs font déjà la cour
Quand la nature entière offre un aspect nouveau
Et que près de la mère l'on voit bondir l'agneau.

Frères, il faut battre aux champs quand on voyage à notre âge
Nos cœurs contents sont exempts de peine et de tourment.


Pour connaître du tour de France le tableau que l'on nous en fait
Pour parvenir à la science que le dieu des arts nous promet
Pour montrer le courage chez nous encore naissant
Et nous rendre à l'ouvrage, plus prompts, plus vigilants.

Pour mieux connaître les délices du devoir si cher à nos cœurs
Pour gagner des mains de novices les bonnes grâces et les faveurs
Du vrai compagnonnage pour connaître à la fois
L'astucieux sillage et les augustes lois.

Nos pères sur le tour de France chantaient Bacchus, chantaient l'amour
Et d'une douce indépendance ils goûtaient le prix chaque jour.
Ah si jadis nos pères bénissaient le destin
C'est qu'en tout temps, mes frères, ils chantaient ce refrain.

Que les larmes de la tristesse ne viennent point troubler nos yeux
Livrons nos cœurs à l'allégresse, gaiement faisons tous nos adieux
Sur le champ de conduite le rouleur nous attend
Le devoir nous invite à partir promptement.

Mais avant tout, chers camarades, l'auteur comme nous compagnon
Veut qu'on verse quelques rasades en terminant cette chanson
Vendôme à nous s'adresse, compagnons chamoiseurs
Chantons, chantons sans cesse, comme la clef des cœurs.

RADdO : 06390.
WHEN AT DAWN, THE BIRDS SING THE RETURN OF SPRING


When at dawn, the birds sing the return of Spring,
When zephyrs already court the first blooms
When the whole nature offers a new aspect
And one can see the calf jump near its mother.

Brothers, one must scour the fields when one travels at our age,
Our happy hearts are free of sorrow and worries.


To know the picture of the tour of France that people make to us,
To reach the science that the god of arts promises us,
To show the new courage inside us
And to make us swifter and more vigilant to work.

To better know the delights of the duty so dear to our hearts,
To win the good graces and the favors from the novices' hands
To know both the clever wake and the noble laws
Of the real companionship.

Our father, on the tour of France, would sing of Bacchus, would sing of love
And they would taste the price of a sweet independence every day.
Ah, if in days of yore our fathers would bless fate,
It's because anytime, my brothers, they would sing this refrain.

May the tears of sorrow not blur our eyes,
Let's give up our hearts to joy, let's bid our farewells cheerfully,
Duty invites us to leave quickly.

But before all, dear comrades, the author, a companion like us,
Wants us to pour some glassfuls as we end this song.
Vendôme as the Key of the Hearts (1) addresses us, tanners (2) companions,
Let's sing, let's sing without stopping.
(1) Reference to Jean-François Piron, aka Vendôme la Clés des Cœurs, a tanner companion and songwriter (1796-1841)
(2) a chamoiseur was a chammy leather tanner


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 03:03 AM

PETIT CAPITAINE
(French)

Petit capitaine
Revenant de guerre
Chercher son amie.
(bis)

Puis il la chercha
Puis il la trouva
Au fond d'une tour.
(bis)

"Qu'as-tu donc ma belle
Ma charmante belle
Qui t'a enfermée ?"
(bis)

"C'est moi le méchant père !"
A crié le père
Tout ça pour l'amour.
(bis)

Coirault : 1425 Brave capitaine
RADdO : 01657.
LITTLE/YOUNG CAPTAIN


Little/young captain
Was back from war
To fetch his sweetheart
(twice)

Then he looked for her,
Then he found her
At the bottom of a tower.
(twice)

"What's the matter with you, my pretty,
My charming fair lady,
Who locked you in?"
(twice)

"I, the mean father!"
The father shouted,
For love's sake.
(twice>
This song is to be related to this one in which the father is the king who wouldn't give his daughter to a young captain.
Btw here is a pdf with Davenson's "Le Livre des chansons"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 03:04 AM

ENFANTS, REVELHATZ-VOS
(Occitan)

Enfants, revelhatz-vos
Una bona novèla
A Betleèm apèla
Los pastres d'alentorn
Enfants, revelhatz-vos!
CHILDREN, WAKE UP


Children, wake up,
A good news
In Bethlehem calls
The shepherds from around.
Children, wake up!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 03:08 AM

PASTRÉ, DÈ DÈLAY L'AYO (BAYLÈRO LÈRO)
(Occitan)

"Pastré, dè dèlay l'ayo
As gayré dè boun tems
Dió, lou baylèro, lèro ?
Lèro, lèro, lèro, lèro, baylèro lô ?"

"È n'ay pas gayré, e dió, tu,
Baylèro, lèro !
Lèro, lèro, lèro, lèro, baylèro lô ?"


"Pastré, lou prat fay flour,
L'y cal gorda toun troupel."
"L'erb'ès pu fino'l prat d'oyci."

"Pastré, couçi foray ?
En obal y o lou bel riou !"
"Espèro-mé, té báu çirca."

(Transcription as published in l'Anthologie des chants populaires by Canteloube)

Coirault : 4502 Pastourelle de delà l'eau
RADdO : 02709.
SHEPHERD, BEYOND THE WATER


Shepherd, beyond the water (the river)
You're hardly having a good time,
Say, baylèro (1), lèro
Lèro, lèro, lèro, lèro, baylèro lô ?"
"I ain't, and you, say?
Baylèro, lèro !
Lèro, lèro, lèro, lèro, baylèrolô?"

"Shepherd, the grass/meadow is blooming,
Come to watch your flock."
"The grass is finer in the meadow here"

"Shepherd, how would I cross?
Over there is the large stream?"
"Wait for me, I'm coming to fetch you."
(1) Baylèro (also spelled bailèra) first referred to the sort of onomatopoeic call that shepherds would utter to keep in contact with one another before it referred to the call-and-answer type of shepherds songs.

alternate translation and alternate transcription

END OF CD 7


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Joe Offer
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 04:20 AM

Thank you very much for this, Monique. It makes the CDs so much more enjoyable.

-Joe-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 05:12 AM

Monique, may I echo what Joe has written; your translations have been immeasurably helpful in heightening my appreciation of the songs in this most valuable collection.

Earlier on you asked for some constructive help with your initial translations: "I wish that you guys out there pointed where the previous ones are wrong, weird, awkward, incomprehensible....

I haven't found any fault with your translations so far, but I shall do my best to go through them again, and where I can do so, I may suggest some alternative readings which I'll tell you by PM. Many of the apparent akwardnesses are inherent in the original language, where some very idiomatic expressions are used. Much of the language is so compressed that it would take a whole paragraph to disentangle all of the meanings from a short two or three word phrase.

It is very useful that you should continue to provide basic literal translations, along with your helpful notes and glosses. It has been said elsewhere, and more elegantly than I can express it here, that the heart and soul of a poem is the bit that gets left out when it is translated. The more you, or anybody else, attempt to round off the weird and awkward bits to make them read better in English the more you stray from the original - but you know that already!

I will certainly try to help, when I can do so, and offer some suggestions with your translations from French. I can't help at all with Basque, Breton, Walloon, or Corsican, and Occitan is a struggle for my limited powers too! I wish Malcolm Douglas were still with us as he had a good working knowledge of French at degree level.

I'd love to see some good English language versions of some of these songs; and I'd love to sing a version of Le Roi Renaud or of Skolvan, but I think those are best left to other, separate discussions.

Thanks once again for all you have done so far.

Matthew


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:21 AM

CD # 8 Corsica

Link to the Frémeaux's leaflet to this CD.
L'ALCUDINA
(Corsican)

Principià vogliu à lodare
U San Pietru è Veraculongu
Po ci hè Nebbiu incù la trova
O Fraulettu à fà la prova

Funtana di Terminelli
U termine da faccia al pianu
Di bellezza hè in i confine
O da quel (??) circondate

Sottu quel toppe di prati
O sguìzzanu tanti roscelli
Sottu son pesci sarrati
È sopra pàscenu l'agnelli
L'ALCUDINA


First I want to praise
San Petru and Veraculongu
Then comes Nebbiu with
Also Frauletu that deserves it.

The fountain of Terminelli
Is on the edge of the plateau.
Everywhere in this area,
We're surrounded by beauty.

Under the meadows openings
Spring out so many streams,
Where trout are prisoners
And above the lambs graze.

The names in the song refer to different places in Corsica,
l'Alcùdina, "The Anvil" Mount, Southern Corsica highest point, San Petru, the Nebbiu villages, Frauletu

It's also a part of a longer song

Alcudina
(Tradiziunale zicavese)

Principià vogliu à lodare
U San Petri è Veraculongu
Po ci hè Nebbiu cù la trova
U Fraulettu à fà la prova.

Funtana di termineddi
U terminu da faccia al Pianu
Teppa Ritta fù chjamata
O da quel terminu vicinu.

Sattu quel toppe di prati
Sguizzanu tanti roscelli
Sottu son pesci sarrati
È sopra pascinu l'agnelli

Li cavalli è li ghjumenti
È li boia cù li vitelli.
O passendu par li Croci
U Cavallari è Pallaiolu

Sentu una sampugna rara
Chì facianu tanti caroli.
L'Alcudina chjama è invita
O di l'altezza nun ci hè la para

Guarda la Corsica unita
O quantu giranu terra è mari
È po guarda à Magior Segnu
È parte assai de la Sardegna.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:25 AM

VULERIA CHÌ LA MIO PELLE
(Corsican)

Vuleria chì la mio pelle
Diventassi un coghju forte

Per mandalla à la concia
Per fanne un paghju di botte

Per pudè purtalle tù
Lu mio amore fin'à la morte
I WISH MY SKIN


I wish my skin
Became a strong leather

To send it to the tanners
And make a pair of boots out of it

So that you could wear them,
My love, until you die.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:27 AM

BRÍNDISI
(Corsican)

Ch'ellu ti sia cuncessu
Tuttu l'oru di la Spagna
U granu di la Casinca
Cun l'oliu di la Balagna
U vinu di U Migliacciaru
È d'Orezza la castagna
TOAST


May you be granted
All the gold from Spain,
The wheat from the Casinca,
Also the oil from the Balagne
The wine from Migliacciaru
And the chestnuts from the Orezza


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:30 AM

SALUTE AMATI SPOSI
(Corsican)

Salute amati sposi
Onore à Sant'Andria
Ma ùn ci sia più ghjelosi
Sì la nostra hè Maria
Preghenduvi bona sorte
Sermanu anu da apre le porte.

Sermanu apre le porte
Cù la strada di li fiori
È vi offre per cumpagnu
Lu più bravu di li cori
Cullate in casa di Lesiu
Voi serete in paradisu
GREETINGS BELOVED SPOUSES


Greetings, beloved spouses,
Honor to the village of Saint-Andrew
But let there be no more jealous ones
If our Mary is the bride.
Wishing you good luck,
Sermanu is going to open its gates to you.

The village of Sermanu opens its gates
On a flowery road
And gives you as a companion
The most generous heart.
You enter Alexis' household,
You'll be in paradise there.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:35 AM

NI SENTU UNA VOCI IN PIAZZA
(Corsican)

"Ni sentu una voci in piazza
Mi par Paula Maria
Quella chè lu mio figliolu
Amava per cumpagnia."

"Or lasceti u m'abbraccià
Incù poca ghjilusia
Ch'era ghjà trè mesi è più
Chì vidutu eu ùn l'avia
Chì lu vi teniate ascosu
Indeh par Paula Maria."

"La me Paula Maria
Cunfessu lu me piccatu
Piuttostu chè dallu à voi
Bramava avellu intarratu
Ma sè era vivu stamani
Saria lu vostru spusatu

Or cacciami da st'angoscia
Or cacciami da quistu mali
È po fà alloch'è à trè anni
O cara lu viduvali
Ti docu trecentu scudi
Cuntati in u me scusali
Altrettanti à la me morti
Li ti suttuscrivu avali."

"Ringraziu i vostri dinari
Ringraziu i vostri quattrini
Sapeti ch'in la me casa
Si misuranu à bacini

In casa di lu me babbu
Ci fala quattru funtane
Una di lu russu vinu
L'altra di lu biancu pani
Una di l'amor di Diu
L'altra di la caritani."
I HEAR A VOICE ON THE SQUARE


I hear a voice on the square
It seems to be Paula Maria's voice,
The one whose company
My son loved."

"Let me kiss him
Without any jealousy,
For I hadn't seen him again
For more than three months.
You kept him hidden
From Paula Maria's eyes."

"My dear Paula Maria,
I confess my sin.
Rather than giving him to you,
I would prefer to see him buried,
But if he were alive this morning,
He would be your husband.

Take this anxiety from me
Take this pain from me
And wear for three years
My dear, the widows' dress.
I'll give you three hundred crowns
Counted in my apron
As many when I die,
I subscribe them to you right now."

"I thank you for your money,
I thank you for your crowns.
You know well that in my family,
We count them by the bushels.

In my father's house,
Four fountains would flow,
One of red wine,
The other of white bread,
One of God's love,
The other of charity."
An essay about Mediterranean mothers, anybody?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:38 AM

A MORTE DI FILICONE
(Corsican)

Impiegà vogliu la musa
Per fanne duie canzone
Mi ritrovu ind'e poghje
È dimoru in l'Arbitrone
Ne sò tristu è scunsulatu
Chì ghjè mortu Filicone.

La morte di Filicone
Quantu mi hà datu pena
Sò ghjunti li cacciadori
Di lu Pricoghju è d'Arena
Sonu arrivati da Fiumorbu
Di Serra di Scopamena.

Quand'elli la senteranu
Li cacciadori in Casinca
Ch'ellu hè mortu Filicone
À u pede d'una lustinca
N'hè mortu bellu onoratu
Cù l'un cinghjale capu à capu.

Cinghjale di trenta chilò
U l'avimu pigliatu in bocca
N'avimu fattu le parti
In lu collu d'Arcarotta
Ci si truvava ancu Ghjambattistu
Soprannome Cocca Cocca.

Ellu trovava pernici è lefre
Molti cinghjali è fasgiani
È ne partia da Aleria
Sinu à Fiume Alisgiani
Passava per Padulella
Cantone di Moriani.

O quale hè chì ferà la guardia
Indu la casa à l'Arbitrone
La notte cum'è lu ghjornu ?
N'era sempre reunione
Avà ghjè finitu tuttu
Chì ghjè mortu Filicone.

Quì finiscu è chjodu il fogliu
Tuttu tristu è scunsulatu.
M'hà dispacciatu il mio amicu
Chì si trova nel Viscuvatu
Saria venutu à l'interru
S'ellu era statu avisatu.
FILICONE'S DEATH


I appeal to my muse
To compose some lines.
I am in the hills
And I live in the Arbitrone(1).
I am sad and despaired
For Filicone is dead.

Filicone's death
Hurt me so much.
The hunters from Pricoghju and Arena
Joined in,
They've come from Fiumorbu,
From Serra di Scopamena.

When the Casinca's hunters
Are told
That Filicone died
At the foot of a mastic tree,
He died in the greatest honor
Facing a wild boar.

We removed from his mouth
A sixty-six pound wild boar.
We shared it
At the Arcarotta pass.
Jean-Baptise, nicknamed Cocca Cocca
Was with us.

He would find partridges and hares
Wild boars and pheasants.
He would start from Aleria
And go as far as the Alisgiani.
He would cross Padulella
In Moriani district.

Who will keep watch
In the house of the Albitrone,
By night and by day?
There were always gatherings
Today, all of this is over
For Filicone is dead.

Now I am done and finish my verses
I'm very sad and despaired.
My friend who lives in Viscuvatu
Sent me a telegram,
He'd had come to the burial
If he'd been told.
(1) L'Albitrone, river Albitrone valley, North of Ajaccio.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:41 AM

SUDA SANGUE IL REDENTORE
(Corsican)

Suda sangue il Redentore,
E non piangi o peccatore
Miserere nostri, Domine
Miserere nostri
Sacre piaghe del mio Dio
Siate impresse nel cuor mio
Miserere…
Piangi, piangi, o peccatore
La Passione del tuo Signore
Miserere…
THE REDEEMER IS SWEATING BLOOD


The Redeemer is sweating blood,
And you, sinner, don't weep.
Have mercy on us, Lord,
Have mercy on us.
My God's holy wounds,
Be printed in my heart.
Have mercy…
Weep, weep, you sinner,
Your Lord's Passion.
Have mercy…


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:44 AM

PERDONO, MIO DIO
(Corsican)

Perdono, mio Dio
Mio Dio, perdono
Perdono, mio Dio
Perdono e pietà.

Pur troppo vi offesi
Confesso, o Signore
Con sommo rossore
La mia iniquità.

Io son quell'ingrato
Che voi Redentore
Scacciai dal mio core
Con tanta impietà.

Perdono, mio Dio
Mio Dio, perdono
Perdono, mio Dio
Perdono e pietà.
PARDON, MY GOD


Pardon, my God
My God, pardon
Pardon, my God
Pardon and mercy.

I offended against you, alas.
I confess, o Lord,
In greatest shame,
My iniquity.

I am this ungrateful man
Who drove you, the Redeemer,
From his heart
With so much impiety.

Pardon, my God
My God, pardon
Pardon, my God
Pardon and mercy.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:46 AM

CREDO IN UNUM DEUM
(Latin)

Credo in unum Deum,
Patrem omnipotentem,
factorem caeli et terrae,
visibilium omnium et invisibilium.
Et in unum Dominum Jesum Christum,
Filium Dei unigenitum
Et ex Patre natum ante omnia saecula.
Deum de Deo, Lumen de Lumine,
Deum verum de Deo vero.
Genitum, non factum, consubstantialem Patri
per quem omnia facta sunt.
Qui propter nos homines, et propter
nostram salutem, descendit de caelis.
Et incarnatus est de Spiritu Sancto
ex Maria Virgine, et homo factus est.
I BELIEVE IN ONE GOD


I believe in one God,
The Father almighty
Maker of heaven and earth,
Of all things visible and invisible
And in one Lord Jesus Christ,
The only-begotten Son of God,
Begotten of the Father before all worlds
God of God, Light of Light,
True God of true God,
Begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father;
By whom all things came into being.
Who for us men, and for
Our salvation, came down from heaven
And was incarnate by the Holy Ghost
Of the Virgin Mary, and was made man.
Don't you guys think that I've suddenly become soooooooooo good at English, I just copied and pasted it from The Nicene Creed


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:49 AM

PADRE
("Corsicanized" Toscan)

Padre la presi per la mano e stretta
E poi la volevo condurre a quel desio
Faccendo questo e què a la mio diletta

Padre io son venuta a confessarmi
Ditemi se voi siete maritata o figlia
Padre vedova son senza famiglia

Assolvetemi voi padre pietosu
Che Dio mi assolverà se a me portate
A parlar con la brava mi son ascosu.
FATHER


Father, I took her by her hand, tight,
And I wanted to lead her to this extreme desire,
Doing this and that to my beloved.

Father, I've come to confession.
Tell me if you're married or single.
Father, I'm a widow without a family.

Give me the absolution, merciful father,
For God will forgive me if you take me
To talk to her on the sly.
The first verse is missing, I'll add it as soon as I get it!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:53 AM

Election time song.
INDUVE HÈ PIGLIATU ROMANI
(Corsican)

Induve hè pigliatu Romani
Chì in più docu lun si vede
Hè nantu à lu catafalcu
Tuttu accintu di candele
È lu sgiò Paul Renucci
Li canta lu Miserere.

Li canta lu Miserere
Cù lu santu De profundis
Lu partitu di Renucci
Criscimu cum'è li funghi
Chì lu nostru cuncurrente
In Peru più nun ci ghjunghji.

Quandu simu ghjunti in Peru
Ne sunava la ciccona
Pare ch'ellu fussi ghjuntu
Napuleone in persona
Lu nome di lu sgiò Paul
Quantu in cantone risona.
WHERE CAN ROMANI BE?


Where can Romani be,
For he's nowhere to be seen.
He's lying down on the bier,
Surrounded by candles,
And mister Paul Renucci
Sings the Miserere for him.

He sings him the Miserere
Also the holy De profundis.
The Renucci's party,
(we) grow as mushrooms
So that our challenger
Doesn't ever set a foot in Peru again.

When we arrived in Peru,
The bells were ringing,
It seemed Napoleon himself
Was coming.
Mister Paul's name
Resounds very loudly in the district


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 07:57 AM

OLA ,OLA, LI BON BOI
(Corsican)

Ola, ola, li bon boi
Quelli chì la sanu fà.
Prima ci aiutanu à pone
È po dopu à tribbià.
S'elli avianu le so mani
Ci aiutavanu à macinà
È po fenduli li so ambasti
Ci aiutarebbenu à trascinà
Per purtà lu granu in casa
Ch'hè quellu chì ci hà da fà manghjà.
COME ON, COME ON, GOOD OXEN


Come on, come on, good oxen,
You who are so smart.
They help you first to saw,
Then to thresh.
If they had hands,
They'd help us to grind
And if we put them a pack-saddle,
They would help us to carry
To bring the grain home
For it's what will feed us.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 08:00 AM

NE VOGLIU FÀ L'APERTURA
(Corsican)

Roccu Mambrini :

Ne vogliu fà l'apertura
Cù la mio musa benigna
Sottu à un celu nivulosu
Induve pocu stella ne scrigna
È mandà lu mio salutu
À questu paese Pigna. […]

È po fendu lu mio giru
È po fendu la mio ronda
Felicità vogliu ancora
Ancu à Tonì Casalonga
Aghjustu à la mio puesia
I fratelli Acquaviva.

Tutti què sò l'istigatori
O di questa seratina
D'avè riunitu in Pigna
I poeti di la confina
Chì durmianu inde l'ombra
D'una grotta tantu divina.

Hè per quella ch'io mi rigiru
Cum'è i preti à l'altare
Per mandà la benvinuta
À tutti questi poeti
Chì sta sera esposeranu
Tutt'ognunu i so mireti.

O trà ch'è no ci truvemu
À mezu à parenti è à amici
È siguru l'averanu
O li so cori felici
Vogliu passà a parolla
À un certu Carlu Parigi. […]

Carlu Parigi :

Vistu aghju contru à stu lume
Chì girava una farfalla.
E'aghju portu a sedia
Ellu saperà chì hè calda.
Per finì a pueasia
Quessa ùn vene da Bastia.
I WANT TO DO THE OVERTURE


Roccu Mambrini :

I want to do the overture
With my benevolent muse
Under a cloudy sky
Where few stars smile,
And to send my greetings
To this village of Pigna […]

Then as I make my tour,
As I make my round,
I also want to congratulate
Toni Casalonga.
I add to my poem
The Acquaviva brothers.

All these persons
Initiated this evening performance.
They gathered in Pigna
The poets of the area
Who were sleeping in the shadow
Of a very divine cave.

It is why I turn around
Like the priests on the altar
To welcome
All these poets
Who, this evening, will show
Their talents successively.

Since we are
Among relatives and friends
And that they surely have
A cheerful heart,
I want to hand over
To one Carlu Parigi […]

Carlu Parigi :

I saw that around this light
A butterfly was flying.
I brought it a chair.
It will notice because it (the chair) is hot .
To finish the poem,
It (the chair) doesn't come from Bastia.
I sometimes find genders in languages to be very useful!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 08:03 AM

This one still has a copyright
O LA RICCHEZZA DI LA SO MAMMUCCIA
(Corsican)

O la ricchezza di la so mammuccia
U me figliolu tisoru di mè
A ninninanna digià t'abbiuccia
Chjodi i to ochji chì veghju per tè.

In celu luce tamanta una stella
U rusignolu hà cantatu dighjà
A luna hè tonda pare una bastella
L'anghjuli in celu a si volenu manghjà.

In li castagni ci sò tanti nidi
È l'acellucci sò tutti à dormì
A lucciulella fighjula è po ridi
È la so mamma hè cuntenta cusì.

Sottu la scala i piulelli sò fitti
Ùn ne finiscenu più di piulà
Ma s'elli ùn volenu micca stà zitti
A nostra cioccia li s'hà da lacà.

In un castellu eu socu una fata
Hè tantu bella è ti vol tantu bè.
Tanta ricchezza è tanta rinnumata
L'aghju dighjà cummandata per tè.

Più tardi quand'è tù serai maiore
Una regina ti vurrà spusà
U me geraniu di centu culori
U me figliolu, bijou di Mammà !
YOU, THE WEALTH OF YOUR LITTLE MOMMY


You, wealth of your little mommy,
My son, treasure of mine,
This lullaby lulls you to sleep.
Close your eyes for I keep watch upon you.

In the sky a huge star is shining,
The nightingale already sang,
The moon is round and looks like a pie (1)
The angels in the sky would want to eat it.

In the chestnut trees, there are so many nests
And all the birdies are asleep,
The firefly looks and smiles,
Their mommy is happy like this/this way.

Under the stairs, the chicks are squeezed
They don't stop tweeting,
But if they don't want to hush,
Our mother hen is going to leave them.

I know a fairy in a castle,
She's so beautiful and loves you so.
I ordered her great wealth
And great fame for you.

Later, when you're older
A queen will want to marry you,
My hundred colored geranium,
My son, your mommy's jewel.
(1) A "bastella" (video) is a pie made with two layers of pastry (with regular pie crust or with puff pastry) filled with a mixture of onions and herbs


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 08:07 AM

GHJÙNSIMU IND'È VINCINSINA
(Corsican)

Ghjùnsimu ind'è Vincinsina
È quallà fècimu cena
Ne ghjunse quattru giandarmi
Mi strìnsenu le catene.

Cullendu pè tribunale
N'era bellu circundatu
Da li signori calvesi
N'era bellu accumpagnatu.

"Cundannàtelumi forte
Sintite lu tistimone."
La sintenza hè digià fatta
Quattr'anni n'aghju pigliatu.

O lu mio Petru Ghjuvanni
Nun ere ancu trapassatu
Per avè vintiquattr'anni.

Ma s'o fussi un acellinu
Sparge l'ale è poi vulare
Un paese di Ghjunsani
Lu vulia fracillane.

O lu mio figliolu
N'ai fattu lu to statu
Nun era calchì cuntessa
Ch'ella ùn fussi al to paru.
WE ARRIVED AT VINCINSINA'S


We arrived at Vincinsina's
And we had dinner/supper there (1)
Four gendarmes came in
They chained me up.

On the way to the court,
I was nicely surrounded
By gentlemen from Calvi,
I was well accompanied.

"Sentence him heavily,
Hear the witness."
The sentence is already pronounced,
I got four years.

My dear Petru Ghjuvanni,
You weren't very old yet,
Being twenty-four.

But if I were a little bird,
And I could spread my wings and fly,
I would have liked to squash
A village of the Ghjunsani (2)

My poor child
You made your own fate,
She was no countess
Who wouldn't have been your equal.
(1) "Cena" is the evening meal, whatever your local name for it may be
(2) Ghjunsani, a high vale.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 08:11 AM

NUN TI SCURDÀ DI MÈ BEN'CHÈ LUNTANU
(Corsican)

Nun ti scurdà di mè ben'chè luntanu,
Appia cumpassione d'un infelice
Ch'eo vogu pienghjendu da li colli al pianu.

Chì à parlacci, a bocca più nun lice
Per spiegarti tutti i mei dolori ;
Legge il foglio dolente quel chè dice :

" 'nduve si 'nduve stai 'nduve domori ?
Idulu del mio core, nice si bella,
A tante pene perchè nun succorri ?

Son'sicuru che tù 'n serai più quella ;
Avrai forse cambiatu di novu amore
A la fonte d'amore Diana Stella."
DON'T FORGET ME


Don't forget me, even from afar,
Have mercy of a poor man
Who cries wandering hither and thither (lit. "from the hills to the plain").

Since my mouth can't speak
To describe (explain) all my pains to you,
Read the painful/sad letter, the one that says,

"Where are you, where do you live, where do you dwell?
Idol of my heart, my beautiful beloved,
Why don't you relieve so much pain?

I am sure that you are not the way you were;
You may have changed your love
At the love spring, Diana Stella.(1)
(1) the French translation says "I'm sure you have changed/ and that you came back /to the spring of your love", the Corsican says (word by word) "I am sure that you will no more be that one / you will maybe have changed of new (= again) of love / at the spring of love, Diana Stella"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 08:15 AM

Corsican anthem –I apologize to all the Corsicans for my poor translation but it's supposed to be a literal translation, not a good looking/sounding one.

DIO VI SALVI REGINA
(Corsican)

Dio vi salvi Regina
E Madre Universale
Per cui favor si sale
Al Paradiso.

Voi siete gioia e riso
Di tutti i sconsolati,
Di tutti i tribolati,
Unica speme.

A voi sospira e geme
Il nostro afflitto cuore,
In un mar di dolore
E d'amarezza.

Maria, mar di dolcezza,
I vostri occhi pietosi,
Materni ed amorosi,
A noi volgete.

Noi miseri accogliete
Nel vostro santo Velo
Il vostro Figlio in Cielo
A noi mostrate.

Gradite ed ascoltate,
O Vergine Maria,
Dolce, clemente e pia,
Gli affetti nostri.

Voi dei nemici nostri
A noi date vittoria ;
E poi l'Eterna gloria
In Paradiso.
MAY GOD SAVE YOU, QUEEN


May God save you, Queen
And universal Mother
By whose favor one goes up
To Heaven.

You are joy and laughter
For all the sorrowed ones,
For all the tormented ones,
The only hope.

Towards you our afflicted hearts
Sigh and moan
In a sea of pain
And bitterness.

Mary, sea of gentleness,
Turn your pious, motherly,
Loving eyes
Towards us.

Welcome us, the miserable ones,
In your holy Veil.
Show us
Your son in Heaven.

Welcome and listen
O, gentle, clement and pious
Virgin Mary,
Our marks of love.

Give us victory
Upon our enemies,
Then Eternal glory
In Paradise.
END OF CD 8

I enjoyed doing those and I'm glad I took a few Italian classes some 30 odd years ago!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 05:34 PM

CD 9 OVERSEAS FRANCE

Link to the Frémeaux' s leaflet to this CD.


MASCAREIGNES (La Réunion, Rodrigues, Maurice)



VALÉ VALÉ PRÉTEZ-MOI VOS FUSILS
(Reunionese Creole)

Valé valé prétez-moi vos fusils
Voilà l'oiseau prêt à voler
Valé valé prétez-moi vos fusils
Voilà l'oiseau prêt à voler
Valé valé prétez-moi vos fusils
Voilà l'oiseau prêt à voler

Si nous avez gagné l'oiseau
Suffisamment pour mon voyage
Et pour mon arrivée
Si nous avez gagné l'oiseau
Suffi d'argent pour mon voyage
Et pour mon arrivée

Trois plats à table ec un pizon blanc
Suffisamment pour mon dîner
Trois plats à table ec un pizon blanc
Suffisamment pour mon dîner
Mais pas si tôt la belle perçoit
Sapo z'en main pour me saluer
Mais pas si tôt la belle perçoit
Sapo z'en main pour me saluer

(Quand) Nous l'a 'tendu le roi dans nou bois
La reine l'a rivé
Nous l'a 'tendu le roi dans nou bois
La reine l'a rivé
(bis)

(Oui) Le vin qui brûle oui l'est dans mon verre
Bon dieu l'a dit mon z'enfant boit pas
(bis)

Bon dieu l'a dit mon z'enfant boit pas
(six fois)

Le vin qui brule oui l'est dans mon verre
Bon dieu l'a dit mon z'enfant boit pas
(bis)

Bon dieu l'a dit mon z'enfant boit pas
(quatre fois)

Dégaz a nou manman
Dégaz a nou
Dégaz a nou calicot l'a rivé
(quatre fois)

(Quand) Nous l'a 'tendu le roi dans nou bois
La reine l'a rivé
Nous l'a 'tendu le roi dans nou bois
La reine l'a rivé
(bis)

(Oui) Le vin qui brûle oui l'est dans mon verre
Bon dieu l'a dit mon z'enfant boit pas
(bis)

Bon dieu l'a dit mon z'enfant boit pas
(quatre fois)

Le vin qui brule oui l'est dans mon verre
Bon dieu l'a dit mon z'enfant boit pas
(bis)

Dégaz a nou manman
Dégaz a nou
Dégaz a nou calicot l'a rivé
(quatre fois)

Dégaz a nou calicot l'a rivé
(Ad lib)

Frenchified graphy transcription.

RADdO : 06397.
BROTHER-IN-LAW, BROTHER-IN-LAW, LEND ME YOUR FLINTLOCKS


Brother-in-law (1), brother-in-law, lend me your flintlocks,
Here is the bird ready to take its flight,
Brother-in-law, brother-in-law, lend me your flintlocks,
Here is the bird ready to take its flight
Brother-in-law, brother-in-law, lend me your flintlocks,
Here is the bird ready to take its flight.

If you have killed the bird,
It's enough for my travel
And for my stay.
If you have killed the bird,
It's enough money for my travel
And my stay.

Three dishes on the table/for a meal with a white pigeon,
It's enough for my dinner.
Three dishes on the table/for a meal with a white pigeon,
It's enough for my dinner.
As soon as the fair lady catches sight of me,
With her hat in her hand, she greets me
As soon as the fair lady catches sight of me,
With her hat in her hand, she greets me.

When we heard the king in our woods, (2)
The queen arrived.
When we heard the king in our woods,
The queen arrived.
(twice)

The wine that burns (my mouth and throat!) is in my glass
God (lit. the good God) said, "My child, don't drink
(twice)

God said "My child, don't drink.
(six times)

The wine that burns (my mouth and throat!) is in my glass
God (lit. the good God) said, "My child, don't drink
(twice)

God said "My child, don't drink.
(four times)

Let's leave quickly, mommy,
Let's leave quickly,
Let's leave quickly, the train has arrived.
(four times)

When we heard the king in our woods, (2)
The queen arrived.
When we heard the king in our woods,
The queen arrived.
(twice)

The wine that burns (my mouth and throat!) is in my glass
God (lit. the good God) said, "My child, don't drink
(twice)

God said "My child, don't drink.
(four times)

The wine that burns (my mouth and throat!) is in my glass
God (lit. the good God) said, "My child, don't drink
(twice)

Let's leave quickly, mommy,
Let's leave quickly,
Let's leave quickly, the train has arrived.
(four times)

Let's leave quickly, the train has arrived.
(Ad lib)
(1) -According to this document the word "valé" doesn't refer to the French word "valet" (male servant) but to the Malagasy "valilahy" meaning "brother-in-law")
(2) According to the same document, maroon slaves of Malagasy origin would reproduce some structures of their original society such as making woods sacred, their chiefs they had chosen being then kings and queens.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 05:36 PM

O NAMSIDO SI LA BI LA BWAR
(Reunionese Creole)

O Namsido si la bi la bwar
Namsido la bi la bwar
Namsido o si la bi la bwar
Namsido piti pé pou mwin
Namsido donn ma gouté
Namsido non la pi bon pou twé
Namsido a ma gouté
Namsido a si la bi la bwar
Namsido (hum) si la bi la bwar
Namsido si la bi la bwar
Namsido o si la pi nana
Namsido (hum) si la pi nana
Namsido si la pi nana
Namsido donn ma gouté
Namsido la pi bon pou twé
Namsido a si la bi la bwar
Namsido (hum) si na pi nana
Namsido (hum) si na pi nana
Namsido a donn ma gouté
Namsido a la pa bon pou twé
Namsido a tousa la lontan
Namsido a mwin la pi ton tan
Namsido a donn ma gouté
Namsido o si la bi la bwar
Namsido a si la pi nana
Namsido (hum) si na pi nana
Namsido (hum) si na pi na bwar
Namsido donn ma gouté
Namsido a la pa bon pou twé
Namsido a tousala lontan
Namsido a la fini ton temps
Namsido (hum) si la bi la bwar
Namsido (hum) si la bi la bwar
Namsido a si la pi nana
Namsido a si nana la pwin
Namsido a si la pi nana
Namsido (hum) donn ma gouté
Namsido a donn ma gouté
Namsido a la pa bon pou twé
Mansido a mé la pi ton tan
Namsido a tousala lontan
Namsido a la pa bon pou twé
Namsido a la pi bon pou twé
Namsido a si la pi nana
Namsido (hum) si nana na pwin
Namsido (hum) si nana na bwar
Namsido (hum) si nana na bwar
Namsido (hum) si na pi na bwar
Namsido

Transcription in KWZ graphy
NAMSIDO HE DRANK AND WE WILL DRINK


Namsido he drank and we will
Namsido he drank, we will
Namsido, oh, he drank, we will
Namsido a little for me
Namsido give (me some) so I can taste/try it
Namsido, no, it's no more good for you
Namsido I'm going to taste/try it.
Namsido he drank, we will
Namsido he drank, we will
Namsido he drank, we will
Namsido when there's none left, there's still some
Namsido when there's none left, there's still some
Namsido when there's none left, there's still some
Namsido give (me some) so I can taste/try it
Namsido, no, it's no more good for you
Namsido I'm going to taste/try it.
Namsido when there's none left, there's still some
Namsido when there's none left, there's still some
Namsido give (me some) so I can taste/try it
Namsido, no, it's not good for you
Namsido those are things from the past
Namsido I'm no more your age
Namsido give (me some) so I can taste/try it
Namsido he drank, we will
Namsido when there's none left, there's still some
Namsido when there's none left, there's still some
Namsido if there's no more left, we'll drink
Namsido give (me some) so I can taste/try it
Namsido, no, it's not good for you
Namsido those are things from the past
Namsido your time is over
Namsido he drank, we will
Namsido he drank, we will
Namsido when there's none left, there's still some
Namsido when there's none left, there's no more left
Namsido when there's none left, there's still some
Namsido give (me some) so I can taste/try it
Namsido give (me some) so I can taste/try it
Namsido it's not good for you
Namsido I'm no more your age
Namsido those are things from the past
Namsido it's not good for you
Namsido it's not good for you
Namsido when there's none left, there's no more left
Namsido when there's none left, there's still some
Namsido if there's some, we will drink
Namsido if there's some, we will drink
Namsido if there's no more left, we will drink
Namsido


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 05:39 PM

KI POMM' D'AMOUR ?
(Rodrigues Creole) Nursery Rhyme

Ki pomm' d'amour?
Pomm' d'amour rouz
Ki rouz ?
Rouz di san
Ki di san ?
Di san kayé
Ki kayé ?
Kayé devwar
Ki devwar ?
Devwar anglé
Ki anglé ?
Anglé kotis
Ki kotis ?
Kotis zasar
Ki zasar ?
Zasar mang
Ki mang ?
Mang la corde
Ki la corde ?
La corde coco
Ki coco ?
Coco manzé
Ki manzé ?
Manzé coson
Ki coson ?
Coson dan park
Ki park ?
Park di bwa
Ki bwa ?
Di bwa kolofon
Si mo kass sa
Sink cou d' baton
Si mo kass sa
Sink cou d' baton
Si mo kass sa
Sink cou d' baton

RADdO : 06391
WHICH CANDY/TOFFEE APPLE?


Which candy apple?(1)
The red candy apple.
Which red?
The blood red.
Which blood?
The coagulated blood.
Which note book?
The homework notebook.
Which homework?
English homework.
Which English?
The English schottische.
Which subscription?
The achars subscription.
Which achars?
The mango achars.
Which mangoes?
The stringy mangoes.
Which string?
The coco string.
Which coco?
The edible coco?
Which food?
Pigs food.
Which pigs?
Pigs in the park?
Which park?
The wooden park.
Which wood?
The kolofon (2) wood
If I break it,
Five stick blows,
If I break it,
Five stick blows,
If I break it,
Five stick blows.
(1) Candy apples are called in Creole and French "pommes d'amour" (love apples). Btw, cotton candy is "barbe à papa" (daddy's beard)
2) I have no idea of what can "kolofon" wood may be unless it's some variety of pine from which they get "colophane" (rosin, Greek pitch)- Cf. below.

This is the sort of untranslatable rhyme because it's based on how words sound and each line starts by the end of the previous line in the same way you have in English Miss Susie. The structure of Romance languages –and these creoles are French based- allows this sort of chain of words because epithet adjectives can (or must, it depends) be placed after the noun and because they use noun1 + preposition + noun2, while it's done differently in English from a grammatical point of view. Here is the French widest spread rhyme based on this chain of words.
The Spanish equivalent is "Se murió Lola" (Version 1 Se murió Lola, de Lola lo lamento, de mento mentosal, de sal salamar, de mar maletín, de tin tiburón, de ron ron con cu, de cu cubo de agua, de agua aguarráz, de raz rabo de mono, de mono monopolio, de polio policia y de cia se acabó –
Version 2 Se murió Lola, que Lola? lolamento, que mento? Mentosanto, que santo? santo ma, que ma? mata e coco, que coco? coco de agua, que agua? agua rá, que ra? rabo e mono, que mono? monopolio, que polio? policia, que cía? siacabó, que bó? bocachica, que chica? chicago, que cago?)

I found a slightly different one online

ki passer la
marchand dilait
ki dilait
dilait cailler
ki cailler
cahier devoir
ki devoir
devoir anglais
ki anglais
anglais potiche
ki potiche
potiche zassar
ki zassar
zassar mangue
ki mangue
mangue lacorde
ki lacorde
lacorde coco
ki coco
coco manze
ki manze
manze cochon
ki cochon
cochon dan parc
ki parc
parc di bois
ki dibois
dibois collophane
si mo trape li si mo gagne li
si mo gagne li
100 coups baton lor se nenez


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 05:42 PM

VIRÉ, BONSWAR MADAM, VIRÉ BONSWAR MÉSIÉ
(Rodrigues Creole)

Viré, bonswar madam, viré bonswar mésié
Ala tourné fer mo lé kèr fer mal
Viré bonswar mésié, madam, madémoisel
Ala tourné fer mo lé kèr kontan

Viré bonswar madam, viré bonswar mésié
Ala tourné fer mo lé kèr kontan
Viré bonswar mésié, madam, madémoisel
Ala tourné fer mo lé kèr fer mal
(… vers repris ad lib.)

RADdO : 06392.
TURN AROUND, GOOD EVENING MADAM,
TURN AROUND, GOOD EVENING SIR


Turn around, good evening madam, turn around, good evening sir
Here you go, turn around, you make me sad, (lit. you hurt my heart)
Turn around, good evening sir, madam, miss,
Here you go, turn around, you make me happy.

Turn around, good evening madam, turn around, good evening sir
Here you go, turn around, you make me happy,
Turn around, good evening sir, madam, miss,
Here you go, turn around, you make me sad
(…line sung ad libidum)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 05:45 PM

COMPAGNONS DE LA MARJOLAINE
(French) - Nursery Rhyme

"Qui est-ce qui passe ici mesdames,
Compagnons de la Marjolaine ?
Qui est-ce qui passe dans ce château ?"
"C'est la fille du roi !"

"On ne peut pas la voir !"
"Les murs sont très hauts !"

"Elle a une fille que j'ai trouvée."
"Ohé ohé ohé ohé."

Coirault: 7804 Qu'est-ce qui passe ici si tard. Chevalier du guet.
Laforte, III, H-10 Qu'est-ce qui passe ici si tard
RADdO : 01175.
FELLOWS OF THE MARJORAM


"Who is passing by, ladies,
Fellows of the Marjoram?
Who is passing in this castle?
"It's the king's daughter"

"We cannot see her !"
"The walls are too high !"

"She has a girl I've found"
"Ohé ohé ohé ohé."
This rhyme is based on the song "Compagnons de la Marjolaine" aka "Le chevalier du guet", the "ohé, ohé" thing reminds me of "Il était un petit navire".
Looking for information on who those "compagnons de la marjolaine" were I came across a couple of websites, one explaining that marjoram would be used in love songs as was rose or lily of the valley, the other explaining that young men going on a spree would put some sprigs of marjoram sticking out from the top of their boots hence forming an informal "Fellowship of the Marjoram", both saying that they were charmers.
I've just found in "Trésors des plus belles mélodies de tous les temps et de tous les pays", Delfolie, Edidtions Edsco, Chambéry, 1947" that in the 15th century people wouldn't say "to serenade someone" but "to wake up the pots of the marjoram" and that the Brotherhood of the Marjoram (Confrérie de la Marjolaine) was the guild of the perfumers. It was a very powerful brotherhood/fellowship/guild or whatever you call it because the king's court and the city -good society I suppose- made a very intense use of perfumes. The song goes back to circa 1650.
According to Du Mersan (Chants et chansons populaires de France, t. 2) it was "the meeting of young men and girls who go to dance on meadow where the marjoram blooms".
To sum it up, it seems that they were jolly good fellows!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 05:48 PM

FRENCH GUIANA

IYAA IYAA A A A
(Wayãpi)

Iyaa iyaa a a a
Osõsõsõsõngatu alalaloway olopolay lemè a'e la'ela.
HOW PRETTY IS…


How pretty is
The rustle of the macaw feathers while we dance.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 05:50 PM

MANMAN MO GEN ÈNMI
(Guyanese Creole)

Manman mo gen ènmi-o san mo pa konnèt yé
Mo ganyen ènmi laro
Mo ganyen ènmi anba
Manman mo gen ènmi-o san mo pa konnèt yé
Pli bon di mo zami
Sa yé fè yé ka trayi-mo
Mo ganyen ènmi divan
Mo ganyen ènmi dèyè
Manman mo gen ènmi-o san mo pa konnèt yé
Enmi ka késyoné-mo
Pou yé konnèt mo sigré
Mo ganyen ènmi agoch
Mo ganyen ènmi adrèt

RADdO : 06393.
MOMMY I HAVE ENEMIES


Mommy, I have enemies without knowing them,
I have enemies up there,
I have enemies down there,
Mommy, I have enemies without knowing them.
My best friends,
What did they do? They betrayed me.
I have enemies at the front,
I have enemies at the back
Mommy, I have enemies without knowing them.
My enemies ask me questions
To know my secrets.
I have enemies on the left,
I have enemies on the right.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 05:53 PM

MARTINIQUE

MARIWÒZ-O !
(Martiniquese Creole)

Mariwòz-o !
Leve Chimiz !

Mwen mande-ou leve dwè-ou,
Mwen mande-ou leve dwè-ou,
Mwen mande-ou di nouvèl-ou,
Mwen mande-ou kouman ou ye.
Vini wè yo an lawi-a,
Vini wè yo kouman yo ye.
Pa kwiye-mwen Papiyonvèl,
Papiyonvèl se pa non-mwen.
M'a wete vye fanm ankò !
(etc.)

RADdO : 06394
MARY-ROSE O


Mary-Rose ô !
Get out of bed! (lit. Take your shirt up)!

I ask you to get up,
I ask you to get up,
I ask you some news,
I ask you how you are.
Come and see them in the street,
Come to see how they are (1)
Don't call me Papiyonvèl,
Papiyonvèl is not my name.
I don't live with an old woman any more!
(etc.)
(1) "how they are" as when you ask "how are you?"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 05:55 PM

GUADELOUPE
NOTRE ARMATEUR NOUS CHERCHE
(French) - Forebiter

Notre armateur nous cherche
Partout dans les auberges
Sans pouvoir nous trouver. (bis)

À la dernière auberge
Notre armateur nous trouve
Enfants il faut partir ! (bis)

Notre grande ancre est à pic
Tous nos huniers sont en veille
Tout prêt à déraper. (bis)

Mais c'est notre gouvernail
Qu'a pris un tour de câble
Enfants, faut réparer ! (bis)

Nous sommes à trois corsaires
Tous trois plein vent arrière
Sans pouvoir nous quitter. (bis)

À la Petite Dorade
Qui marche comme un orage
La nuit nous a laissés. (bis)

À la rivière des Pères
C'est là que tous nos confrères
Ont fait leur destinée. (bis)

RADdO : 06395
OUR SHIP-OWNER IS LOOKING FOR US


Our ship-owner is looking for us
Everywhere in the hostels/taverns (1)
Without being able to find us (twice)

In our last hostel/tavern
Our ship-owner finds us,
Guys (lit. children), we must leave! (twice).

Our big anchor is right below,
All our topsails are on standby,
Everything is ready to drag. (twice)

But it's our rudder
That has gone loose. (2)
Guys, we must mend it. (twice)

We are tree privateers,
All three full tailwind
Without being able to leave each other (twice).

At the Petite Dorade
That works like a storm (3)
Night left us. (twice)

At the Pères river,
Is where all our colleagues
Made their fates. (twice)
(1) From the context I'd say that it means tavern but it could be either.
(2) I never was a sailor, so "a pris un tour de câble" that translates literally as "got a round of cable" has no much meaning to me but I suppose it means that the rudder went loose and that it needed an additional round of cable to work properly.
(3) I take the Petite Dorade (the Little Gilt-Head) to be some tavern and "that works like a storm" to mean "that goes at great guns" because the usual expression is "marcher du tonnerre" (word for word: to work to the thunder) or "marcher du feu de Dieu": to work to God's fire). Unless it'd mean that it's very noisy…

Looking for some other version or source, I came across this excerpt. You'll find a slightly different version of the first verse on page 12 –there's only the 1st verse.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 06:00 PM

QUAND DIEU NAQUIT À NOËL
(French) - Carol

Quand Dieu naquit à Noël
Dans la Palestine
On vit ce jour solennel
Une joie divine.
Il n'était ni petit, ni grand
Qui n'apportait son présent

Et no, no, no, no
Et n'offrit frit, frit
Et no no et n'offrit
Et n'offrit sans cesse
Toute sa richesse.
(bis)

L'un apportant un agneau
Avec un grand zèle
L'autre un peu de lait nouveau
Au fond d'une écuelle
Et sous ses pauvres habits
Chacun un peu de pain bis

Pour la, la, la, la
Pour la sain, sain, sain
Pour la, la pour la sain
Pour la sainte Vierge
Et Joseph concierge.
(bis)

Ce bon père putatif
De Jésus mon maître
Que le pasteur plus chétif
Désirant connaître
D'un air obligeant et doux
Recevant le don de tous

Sans cé cé cé cé
Sans ré ré ré ré
Sans cé cé, sans ré ré
Sans cérémonie
Pour le fruit de vie.
(bis)

RADdO : 05446.
WHEN GOD WAS BORN ON CHRISTMAS DAY


When God was born on Christmas day
In Palestine,
They saw on this solemn day
A divine joy.
There was no child, no grown-up
Who did not bring their present

And di-, di- di-
And didn't bestow, tow, tow,
And di-di and didn't bestow
And didn't bestow without stopping (1)
All their wealth.
(twice)

One bringing a lamb
With great zeal,
Another a little milk freshly milked
At the bottom of a bowl
And under their poor clothes,
Every one a little brown bread.

For the, the, the, the,
For the ho, ho, ho,
For the, the, for the ho,
For the holy Virgin
And Joseph the porter.
(twice)

This good putative father
Of Jesus, my master,
Whom the puniest shepherd
Wanted to know
With a grateful and sweet look,
Received the donation of all.

Without ce- ce- ce- ce-
Without re- -re– re –re-
Without ce- ce-, without re- re-
Without ceremony
For the fruit of life. (2)
(twice)
(1) The grammatical structure of French and English being so different, it's difficult to put it the same way. Here the verb in the negative is split in two "n'offrit" but you can't have "no bes – towed" in English. This is valid for the two other verses built the same way.
(2) Though being literal, the translation of the two last verses makes grammatically more sense than the original.

You probably know a more or less similar tune as Jamaica (some info) but I know it as the tune to the cordelles dance (article about this dance -in Fr. only)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 06:03 PM

SOULAJÉ ! SOULAJÉ DO A KATALINA
(Guadeloupean Creole)

Soulajé ! soulajé do a Katalina
Woy ! Dédé yé Elwaz kongné tanbou-la ban-mwen
Soulajé ! soulajé do a Katalina
Si an té rich an or é an arjan
An té ké poté bonbon pou lé répondé
Soulajé ! soulajé do a Katalina
Si au kay monté wi dan mat kokagn
Alé volé lajan a po ti-Rèla
Soulajé ! soulajé do a Katalina
Woy ! Alino mésyé pa menné-nou alé
Soulajé ! soulajé do a Katalina
An ka chonjé lendi 14 jiye tousa
I abo mo a manman-mwen
Soulajé ! soulajé do a Katalina
Soulajé do a Katalina
Lé malaba pa menné mwen alé !

RADdO : 06396.
RELIEVE ! RELIEVE CATALINA'S BACK


Relieve! Relieve Catalina's back.
You! Dédé et Eloi (1), play the drum (lit. Hit on the drum)
Relieve! Relieve Catalina's back.
If I were rich with gold and silver,
I'd have brought candies for the responders/answerers (2).
Relieve! Relieve Catalina's back.
If you climb the mast,
Go and steal the money from poor little Réla
Relieve! Relieve Catalina's back.
Oh ! Alinor, don't take me away,
Relieve! Relieve Catalina's back.
I remember Monday 14th of July,
All those who where present when my mother died
Relieve! Relieve Catalina's back.
Relieve Catalina's back.
Muscle men, don't take me away !
(1) Dédé: pet name for André (Andrew), Eloi = Eligius
(2) I suppose they're the ones who answer in a call-and-answer type of song. I don't know what you call them -the guys I mean. In everyday life a "répondeur" is an answering machine.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 06:06 PM

SAINT BARTHELEMY
PAR UN SAMEDI Z'AU SOIR M'EN ALLANT VOIR LA BELLE
(French)

Par un samedi z'au soir m'en allant voir la belle (bis)
M'en allant voir la belle par amitié. (bis)

"Oh si tu viens me voir par amitié (bis)
Je me rendrai rose dans un rosier
De moi tu n'auras pas nullement d'agrément."

"Oh si tu te rends rose dans un rosier (bis)
Je me rendrai arrosoir pour t'arroser
J'arroserai, la belle, par amitié."

"Oh si tu te rends arrosoir pour m'arroser (bis)
Je me rendrai carpe dans une étang
De moi tu n'auras pas nullement d'agrément."

"Oh si tu te rends carpe dans une étang (bis)
Je me rendrai pêcheur pour te pêcher
Je pêcherai la belle par amitié."

"Oh si tu te rends pêcheur pour me pêcher (bis)
Je me rendrai étoile au firmament
De moi tu n'auras pas nullement d'agrément."

"Si tu te rends étoile au firmament (bis)
Je me rendrai nuage pour te couvrir
Je couvrirai, la belle, par amitié."

"Oh si tu te rends nuage pour me couvrir (bis)
Je me rendrai malade de sur mon lit
De moi tu n'auras pas nullement d'agrément."

"Oh si tu te rends malade de sur ton lit (bis)
Je me rendrai médecin pour te guérir
Je guérirai, la belle, par amitié."

"Oh si tu te rends médecin pour me guérir (bis)
Je me rendrai morte sur mon lit blanc
De moi tu n'auras pas nullement d'agrément."

"Oh si tu te rends morte sur ton lit blanc (bis)
Je me rendrai Saint-Pierre en paradis
Je t'ouvrirai la porte par amitié."

"Puisque tu m'as conduit jusqu'au paradis (bis)
Tiens voilà mon cœur tu l'as bien mérité." (bis)

Coirault : 1528 Les métamorphoses.
Laforte : IV, Ma-7 Les métamorphoses.
RADdO : 00602.
ON A SATURDAY EVENING A-GOING TO SEE THE FAIR LADY


On a Saturday evening a-going to see the fair lady (twice)
A-going to see the fair lady out of love (1). (twice)

"Oh, if you come to see me out of love (twice)
I will become a rose in a rosebush,
From me you will get no amenity." (2)

"Oh, if you become a rose in a rosebush (twice)
I will become a watering can to water you,
I will water, fair lady, out of love."

"Oh, if you become a watering can to water me (twice)
I will become a carp in a pond
From me you will get no amenity."

"Oh if you become a carp in a pond (twice)
I will become a fisher to fish you
I will fish, fair lady, out of love."

"Oh, if you become a fisher to fish me (twice)
I will become a star in the firmament
From me you will get no amenity."

"Oh if you become a star in the firmament (twice)
I will become a cloud to cover you
I will cover, fair lady, out of love."

"Oh, if you become a cloud to cover me (twice)
I will become ill upon my bed
From me you will get no amenity."

"Oh if you become ill upon your bed (twice)
I will become a physician to cure you
I will cure, fair lady, out of love."

"Oh, if you become a physician to cure me (twice)
I will become dead on my white bed
From me you will get no amenity."

"Oh if you become dead on your white bed (twice)
I will become Saint Peter in paradise
I will open the gate for you out of love."

"Since you led me as far as paradise (twice)
Here is my heart for you, you've well deserved it." (twice).
(1) Amitié (friendship) could mean love (Cf the end of some versions of À la claire fontaine)
(2) It translates literally as "you won't have no amenity" and is as grammatically incorrect as in English.

A similar song and a Provençal one can be found on this Mudcat thread


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 06:11 PM

NEW CALEDONIA
WE BWAAM NGA TAARU
(Native language, but which one???)

We bwaam nga Taaru
Fwâ ne do moo ra ta nga
Ne do ta nga Kaledoni
Do ra ga hma raa huyi
Do ra thuyi we jakhu lem
We jakhu lem maan hio
Pei Kaavo ma Peni
Pei hpmaa veli ceek
Vehi thoogec po mac
Ve tiwa pwen a thi le we
Ye the pe phue run dalik
Phue ra taa cada
Ye taa cada nem nga hun
Bwaan ai ye le u fhe
Ye le u fhe na nem paac
Fhe da le paac u Giom
Yele tigic nem Katoos.
POOR DADDY


Poor Daddy,
When you leave
To go back to Caledonia,
When you arrive you'll tell,
You'll tell the story,
The story of the elder sister and her younger brother
Of Kaavo and of Peni.
There was a tree,
The deadly sea mango.
Its fruit fell down in the water,
It's tossed by the waves.
Tossed, it's arrives and lands.
It comes alongside the large land (i.e. France)
Poor thing, they took it,
They set it into the war.
William set it into the war,
The chains of the 14-18 war.
Sea mango


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 20 Jan 11 - 06:14 PM

WALLIS AND FUTUNA


1.

Soko mai 'aso lalasi
Kua lava teutasi
Kua lava filifili
Kua noa le tui
Ko leia lakaga
Na lava lautī
Laututu mo ni taga
Masaesae fuli
Ka na iai ni osi na tou kai kulī.

2.

Kua fakamāsani le vali kula e fai
Kua pena pe se vaka
E pe ma papālagi
Pena mati'ininia fakakula fuli ai
Toe pena mo le gutu
Fakakula mo le 'ulu
Oi ku se siki mai pe se pano e tu'u.

3.

Malama uila, tou 'aga fiafia
Otatou ne'a fuli na faifaitalisa
Ko leia lakaga na fafa taume
Laga taka faliava
Kua taka tu'ete leinei lakaga.

4.

Kua kau manatu'i
Ki lo'oku 'iki'iki
I temi oge fuli
Loku fia ma'uli
Tuku laku 'uaina
Kua tae mai
Ko le temi leinei
Kua kai pane vali.

5.

Tuku mu'a ke fakamatala
Tuku mu'a ke fakamatala
Atātou 'ano'aga
Mo leia lakaga
Sulu mai okotou lava
Fakafiti fakatoga
Kua sulu fakasa'amoa
Ko Uvea mo Futuna
Na mativa mo koloa.
IMAGES FROM NOW AND YESTERYEARS

1 – Celebrations costumes

Celebrations days come near,
We put our costumes on.
We have the choice.
We put the traditional outfits aside.
Yesteryears
We would dress with cordyline leaves,
With Broussonetia bark and with torn
Bags.
There were horse and we would eat dog.

2 Make up

We took the habit to make up in red.
We paint ourselves like a boat
That looks like the Europeans ones.
We polish our nails in red
And we also paint our mouths.
We dye our hair red,
It looks like a standing board/sign (1)

3 Lighting and shoes

There is electric light, we rejoice.
We do whatever we (once) fancied.
In the past we would carry torches,
We would weave sandals with creepers,
Now we wear shoes.

4 Famine and abundance

I remember,
When I was little
In times of famine,
My urge to live.
Nothing left to eat
That we could gather.
And now
We eat buttered bread.

5 Poverty and wealth.

Let me tell you,
Let me tell you
Our way of life
At that time.
You wear your grass skirt
The Fijian way (or) the Tongan way.
We wear it the Samoan way.
Wallis and Futuna
Had few ressources/wealth (?).
Cordyline
Broussonetia
(1) There's no way to know if "panneau" means road sign or an ad board.

END OF CD 9


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 05:45 AM

Now, last but not least, CD #10, America's French

I didn't write the names of the places in very big and blue because while the songs from CD #9 were sorted by places, those aren't so the names of the places are not "chapter titles".

Link to the Frémeaux's leaflet to this song.

LOUISIANA
Story
Dans le vieux temps, quand il y avait un jeune garçon qui courtisait la fille, quand il arrivait… il allait courtiser la fille à cheval... il amarrait le cheval au poteau puis quand la nuit voulait prendre, si le jeune homme était accepté par les parents, le papa prenait le cheval du jeune homme, il allait puis lui donnait à manger à l'écurie, il faisait boire… tout ça était fait, puis il venait, puis il sellait le cheval encore puis il l'amarrait au poteau. Et ça, ça voulait dire que le jeune homme était bienvenu chez les parents de la fille qu'il courtisait.

In old times, when a young man courted a girl, when he arrived… he would ride to court the girl… he tied the horse to the post then when night was on its way, if the young man was accepted by the parents, the father took the horse then fed it in the stable, watered it… when he was done, he went back then saddled the horse again, then tied it to the post. And this meant that the young man was welcome in the house of the parents of the girl he courted.
The story above kind of explains the song below

LOUISIANA
J'AI FAIT L'AMOUR CHEZ L'ONC BAB
(Cajun French)

J'ai fait l'amour chez l'onc Bab
Ça m'a coûté une livre de tabac.
(bis)

L'onc Bab a fumé jusqu'à
Sa vieille pipe est 'venue rouge.
(bis)

Tante Bab a chiqué jusqu'à
Son vieux menton est 'venu vert.
(bis)

Clémentine m'embêtait
Et Ida veut pas de moi.

Oh Prince, allons s'en aller
Moi j'attrape les capots
Et toi tu manges les poteaux.

RADdO : 06398.
I COURTED AT UNCLE BAB'S


I courted at uncle Bab's,
It costed me a pound of tobacco.
(twice)

Uncle Bab smoked till
His old pipe went red
(twice)

Aunt Bab chewed (tobacco) till
Her old chin went green.
(twice)

Clementine was bothering me
And Ida wouldn't want me.

Oh, Prince, let us go,
I grab my coats
And you're eating the posts.
Sung to the same tune as "Farewell Angelina"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 05:53 AM

CANADA
MARGUERITE EST DANS SA CHAMBRE
(French)

Marguerite est dans sa chambre, elle pleure et elle soupire (bis)
Sa mère s'en va la voir : "Oh, qu'as-tu Marguerite ?"

Sa mère s'en va la voir : "Oh, qu'as-tu Marguerite ?"
"Ah ! Je peux bien pleurer, oh car j'ai le cœur triste.

Ah ! Je peux bien pleurer, oh car j'ai le cœur triste.
Le jour je suis fille, et la nuit tant blanche biche.

Le jour je suis fille, et la nuit tant blanche biche.
Tous les chiens du château, tous les soirs me poursuivent.

Tous les chiens du château, tous les soirs me poursuivent.
Sont ceux de Renaud, sont ceux qui sont les pires.

Sont ceux de Renaud, sont ceux qui sont les pires
Allez-y donc chère mère, allez-y donc lui dire.

Allez-y donc chère mère, allez-y donc lui dire."
"Renaud, arrêt' tes chiens, c'est ta sœur Marguerite !

Renaud, arrêt' tes chiens, c'est ta sœur Marguerite !"
Renaud prit son sifflet,; au bois il s'en va vite.

Renaud prit son sifflet, au bois il s'en va vite.
Il a sifflé trois coups sans qu' ses chiens purent entendre.

Il a sifflé trois coups sans qu' ses chiens purent entendre.
Du quatrième coup, la blanche biche est prise.

Du quatrième coup, la blanche biche est prise.
Ils l'emmènent su' l' cuisinier, pour qu'ils la faisiont cuire.

Ils l'emmènent su' l' cuisinier, pour qu'ils la faisiont cuire.
Quand ça v'nut au souper, au nom de Marguerite.

Quand ça v'nut pour le souper, au nom de Marguerite.
"Soupez, soupez, mon sieur, je suis la première en table.

Soupez, soupez, mon sieur, je suis la première en table.
Mon corps est dans vos plats, mon âme réjouie.

Mon corps est dans vos plats, mon âme réjouie.
Entre deux plats d'argent, mes pieds, mes mains sont mises.

Entre deux plats d'argent, mes pieds, mes mains sont mises"
Quand Renaud entend cela, il recula les vivres.

Quand Renaud a entendu cela, il recula les vivres.
"Ceux qui mang'ront d' ce souper mangeront des martyres.

Ceux qui mang'ront d' ce souper mangeront des martyres."
Renaud a pris son sabre; en trois coups z-il se frappe.

Renaud a pris son sabre ; en trois coups z-il se frappe.
Renaud a tombé mort, il tombe à la renverse.

Coirault : 8910 La blanche biche.
Laforte : I, B-01 La blanche biche.
RADdO : 01463.
MARGARET IS IN HER BEDROOM


Margaret is in her bedroom, she's crying and sighing (twice)
Her mother goes to see her "What's the matter with you, Margaret?"

Her mother goes to see her "What's the matter with you, Margaret?"
"Ah! I can well cry, oh, for my heart is sad.

"Ah! I can well cry, oh, for my heart is sad.
By daylight I'm a girl, by night a white doe.

By daylight I'm a girl, by night a white doe.
All the castle hounds chase me every night.

All the castle hounds chase me every night.
Renaud's are the worst.

Renaud's are the worst.
Do go, my dear mother, go to tell him."

Do go, my dear mother, do go to tell him."
"Renaud, stop your hounds, it's your sister Margaret!"

"Renaud, stop your hounds, it's your sister Margaret!"
Renaud took his whistle and hurried to the wood.

Renaud took his whistle and hurried to the wood.
He whistled three times but his hounds couldn't hear.

He whistled three times but his hounds couldn't hear.
On the fourth time, the white doe was caught.

On the fourth time, the white doe was caught.
They take her to the cook so that they cook her.

They take her to the cook so that they cook her.
When supper time came, to Margaret's name,

When supper time came, to Margaret's name,
"Supper, supper, sir, I am the first at the table.

"Supper, supper, sir, I am the first at the table.
My body is in your dishes, my soul rejoiced.

My body is in your dishes, my soul rejoiced.
My feet, my hands were put in two silver dishes."

My feet, my hands were put in two silver dishes."
When Renaud heard this, he pushed his food away.

When Renaud heard this, he pushed his food away.
"Those who will eat of this supper will eat martyrs"

"Those who will eat of this supper will eat martyrs"
Renaud took his saber and by three times cut himself.

Renaud took his saber and by three times cut himself.
Renaud fell down dead, he fell flat on his back.
There's already a Mudcat thread about it.
Videos: renditions with slightly different lyrics and/or tunes by Tri Yann, Malicorne, Keltia


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 05:57 AM

LOUISIANE
SUR LE NATCHITOCHES, IL Y A Z'UNE BRUNE
(Cajun French)

Sur le Natchitoches, il y a z'une brune
À qui je veux lui faire fortune.
J'ai que mes dimanches pour aller la voir. (bis)

Et par un beau matin je me "feutre" allé
Je l'ai trouvée sur son lit couchée.
"Dormez belle, sommeillez-vous ?
Belle et nos amours, je ne pense qu'à vous."

"Oh non ni je dors ni je sommeille.
Tout toute la nuit je suis privée.
Mon cher amant, je ne pense qu'à vous
Mon cher amant, tu marilleras nous ?"

"J'irai me faire bâtir un ermitage
Et yoù que mon manger serait d'herbages
Et que ma boisson ce seraient des pleurs
Pour deux amours qui vit en langueur.

Et si que vous avez un z'habit à prendre
Prenez le donc couleur de cendres.
Parce que c'est la plus triste couleur
Pour deux amours qui vit qu'en langueur."

Coirault : 2605 Réveillez-vous belle endormie I & 4710 d° III.
Laforte II, E-22 Réveillez-vous belle endormie.
RADdO : 02479.
ON THE NATCHITOCHES


On the Natchitoches, there's a brunette
Whose fortune I want to make.
I only have my Sundays to visit her (twice)

And on a nice morning I went there
I found her lying on her bed.
"Are you sleeping, beauty, are you slumbering?
My beauty and love, I think only of you."

"Oh no, I neither sleep nor slumber.
All night long I am deprived.
My dear lover, I think only of you,
My dear lover, will you marry me?"

I will have an hermitage built,
Where my only food were grass
And my only drink were tears
For two languishing loves.

And if you must take a suit to wear,
Do take it color of ashes
Because it's the saddest color
For two languishing loves."
Melodeon rendition


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 06:06 AM

LOUISIANA
OH BONSOIR MOREAU
(Cajun French)

Oh bonsoir Moreau, oh bonsoir Moreau
Oh j'connais c'est l'heure j'm'en vas
Oh bonsoir Moreau
On a eu un bon temps
Un bon temps toute la nuit
Oh j' connais c'est l'heure j' m'en vas
Oh bonsoir Moreau
Oh, la lune après s' coucher
Et le soleil après lever
Et Caillette est pas tirée
Oh bonsoir Moreau !
OH GOOD NIGHT MOREAU


Oh, good night, Moreau, oh, good night, Moreau,
Oh, I know, time is up, I'm leaving.
Oh, good night Moreau,
We had a great time,
A great time all night long.
Oh, I know, time is up, I'm leaving.
Oh, good night Moreau,
Oh the moon is about to set
And the sun about to raise
And Caillette wasn't milked
Oh, good night Moreau!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 06:15 AM

CANADA
I WENT TO MARKET
(English and Quebec French)

I went to market with a pania volant
The first one I met (was) one fèye (d') on-avocat
And I love you èt d'totes les manires
And I love you mais vos vos m'aimez pas.

The first one I met (was) one fèye (d') on-avocat
I asked her for fifty cents and she said : "Je n'avos pas."

I asked her for fifty cents and she said : "Je n'avos pas."
She went upstairs po li trover sè papa

She went upstairs po li trover sè papa
She came downstairs : le bounhomme I n'èst pus là

She came downstairs : le bounhomme I n'èst pus là
I squeezed her so hard that I cassé les deux bras

I squeezed her so hard that I cassé les deux bras
And it cost me five hundred for to get-er les deux bras

RADdO : 06399.
I WENT TO MARKET


I went to the market in my shirttails,
The first person I met was a lawyer's daughter.
I love you in all and every ways
I love you but you don't love me.

The first person I met was a lawyer's daughter.
I asked her fifty cents and she said she didn't have them.

I asked her fifty cents and she said she didn't have them.
She went upstairs to meet her daddy.

She went upstairs to meet her daddy,
She went downstairs and the man wasn't there.

She went downstairs and the man wasn't there,
I squeezed her so hard that I broke her two arms.

I squeezed her so hard that I broke her two arms.
It cost me five hundred for to get her her two arms.
Gilles Vigneault's rendition, the lyrics are somewhat (!) different


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 06:19 AM

USA - WISCONSIN
N'AV'NÈN VÈYU MI P'TIT MUSICYIN
(Walloon)

N'av'nèn vèyu mi p'tit musicyin ?
À l'dicauce (bis)

N'av'nèn vèyu mi p'tit musicyin ?
À l'dicauce c'èst s'nom.

Il èstot d'dja on bon gamin
Mins I n' choûteûve nén.

Dj'a sayî à l'fé choûter
Mins I n' v'leûve nén.

Dj' l'a voyî aus tchamps avou lès (sès) vias
Il a v'nu pire qui l'twa.

Adon 'l a stî après les coméres
Mins dj'ennè p'leûve rén.

'L'a pris pa l' djambe, 'l l'a foutu su l'lét
Po qwè fé, vos l'savoz bén !

Après ça, il l'a r'pèté
Ça, ça n' payeûve nén.

Après ça, 'l a ieû on gamin
Sav' bén c'èst qu'èle l'a lomé ?

N'av'nèn vèyu mi p'tit musicyin ?
À l'dicauce c'èst s' nom.

RADdO : 06400.
DIDN'T YOU SEE MY LITTLE MUSICIAN


Didn't you see my little musician?
"At the fair".

Didn't you see my little musician?
"At the fair" is his name.

He already was a good boy
But he wouldn't obey.

I tried to make him obey
But he didn't want to.

I sent him to the fields with the calves
He turned out worse than the bull.

Then he chased women
But I couldn't help it.

He took her by her leg, threw her on the bed,
To do what? You do know it!

After than he knocked her up,
It wasn't worthwhile.

After that, he had a boy.
Do you know how she called him?

Didn't you see my little musician?
"At the fair" is his name.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 06:22 AM

CANADA
PAR DERRIÈRE CHEZ MON PÈRE
(Quebec French)

Par derrière chez mon père, en allant nous nous promener
J'ai trouvé l'eau si belle que je me suis baigné, oh hé

Y a longtemps que je t'aime, jamais je t'oublierai, oh hé
Y a longtemps que je t'aime, jamais je t'oublierai


J'ai trouvé l'eau si belle que je me suis baigné
À la plus haute branche, le rossignol chantait, oh hé

Y a longtemps…

À la plus haute branche, le rossignol chantait
"Chante, rossignol, chante, toi qu'as le cœur si gai, oh hé

Toi qu'as le cœur si gai, moi je l'ai t'à pleurer
Pour un bouton de rose que je l'ai refusé, oh hé

Pour un bouton de rose que je l'ai refusé
Je voudrais que la rose fuit encore au rosier, oh hé

Je voudrais que la rose fuit encore au rosier
Et ma chermante belle fuit dans mon lit couché, oh hé

Je voudrais que ma belle fuit dans mon lit couché
Par un baiser de bouche que je l'ai réveillée, oh hé "

Coirault : 3415 En revenant des noces.
Laforte : I, G-10 A la claire fontaine.
RADdO : 00004.
BEHIND MY FATHER'S HOUSE


Behind my father's house, a-going to stroll,
I found the water so fine that I bathed in it, oh hey

I've been loving you for so long, I'll never forget you, oh hey,
I've been loving you for so long, I'll never forget you.


I found the water so fine that I bathed in it,
On the top branch, the nightingale was singing, oh hey.

I've been loving you for so long…

On the top branch, the nightingale was singing.
"Sing, nightingale, sing, you who have such a cheerful heart, oh hey.

"You who have such a cheerful heart, mine is weeping.
For a rose bud that I denied her, oh hey.

For a rose bud that I denied her,
I'd want the rose to be still on the bush, oh hey.

I'd want the rose to be still on the bush,
And my fine lady fair to be lying in my bed, oh hey.

I'd want my fine lady fair to be lying in my bed.
And to wake her with a kiss on the mouth, oh hey."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 06:28 AM

CANADA
LES POUTINES DANS L' POTTE
(Quebec French)

Les poutines dans l' potte
Tadiyatahé
J'ai pris une fourchette
Tadiyataho   
C'est pour les tremper
Tadiyatahé
Elles n'étiont pas cuites
Tadiyataho

RADdO : 06401.
THE POUTINES IN THE POT


The poutines in the pot
Tadiyatahé
I took a fork
Tadiyataho   
It was to dip them
Tadiyatahé
They weren't done
Tadiyataho
Wiki article about poutine


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 06:31 AM

CANADA
EN ARRIÈRE DE CHEZ MON PÈRE
(Quebec French)

En arrière de chez mon père, il y a t'un oranger, le voilà (bis)
Nous irons, nous boirons, nous tarirons les verres et nous les remplirons (bis)

L'en était tellement chargé que les branches en touchent terre, le voilà (bis)
Nous irons, nous boirons…

Elle passe de branche en branche, elle choisit la plus belle, le voilà (bis)

Le premier qui m' les marchande, c'est le fils de l'avocat, le voilà (bis)

Il m'en achète une douzaine, il m' les a jamais payées, le voilà (bis)

Il m'envoie de chez la banque et la banque était fermée, le voilà (bis)

Il m'envoie chez l'avocat, chez le fils de l'avocat (bis)

Et le fils de l'avocat, l'en était tellement pas là, le voilà (bis)

Je me moque de la banque et le fils de l'avocat, le voilà (bis)

Coirault : 2205 La marchande d'oranges chez l'avocat.
Laforte : I, H-1 La fille aux oranges.
RADdO : 00336.
BEHIND MY FATHER'S HOUSE


Behind my father's house, there's an orange tree, here it is. (twice)
We'll go, we'll drink, we'll empty our glasses and we'll fill them (twice)

It was so much loaded with them that the branches touched the ground, here it is. (twice)
We'll go, will drink,….

She went from branch to branch, she chose the finest one, here it is. (twice).

The first one to haggle them with me was the lawyer's son, here it his. (twice)

He bought me a dozen, he never paid me for them, here it is. (twice)

He sent me to the bank and the bank was closed, here it is. (twice),

He sent me to the lawyer's, to the lawyer's son's, here it is (twice)

And the lawyer's son wasn't there at all, here it is (twice)

I don't care for the bank and the lawyer's son, here it is (twice)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 06:37 AM

USA
L'EST DANS LES TEMPS DU PREMIER JOUR DE L'AN
(American French)

(Parlé :)
"Attendez voir… You mean you want me to sing the whole song?"
"No, just a verse, just a verse…"
"Oh…"


L'est dans les temps du premier jour de l'an
Mais pour les fêtes en parents
J'ai rempli mon verre
Pour qu'i' nous réveille
T'as bien faite la ronde, t'as pas beaucoup baissé
Si ça ça contine j'crés qu'ça va bien aller
J' haïs la boisson, j' haïs la boisson
Mais j'haïs pas d'en prendre un p'tit coup
Un p'tit coup à boire
Pour qu'i' nous réveille
T'as bien faite la ronde t'as pas beaucoup baissé
Si ça ça contine y aura personne de saoul

(Parlé :)
"That means if it keeps on there will be nobody drunk !"


Oh mes amis, oh tu m'as fait plaisir
D'avoir fait la ronde t'as pas beaucoup baissé
D'avoir fait la ronde
Pour qu'i' nous réveille
T'as bien faite la ronde t'as pas beaucoup baissé
Si ça ça contine j'crés qu'ça va bien aller

RADdO : 06402
IT WAS AROUND THE NEW YEAR DAY


(Spoken):
"Wait… You mean you want me to sing the whole song?"
"No, just a verse, just a verse…"
"Oh..."


It was around New Year day,
But for the family parties/gatherings,
I filled my glass
So that it boosts us.
You made a good round, you didn't drink much (1),
If it keeps on like this, I think it's going to be fine.
I hate drinking, I hate drinking (2)
But I don't hate to drink a glass,
To drink a glass
So that it boosts us.
You made a good round, you didn't drink much,
If it keeps on like this, nobody will be drunk.

(Spoken)
"That means if it keeps on there will be nobody drunk!"


Oh my friends, oh, you made me glad
From having made the round, you didn't drink much
From having made the round
So that it boosts us.
You made a good round, you didn't drink much,
If it keeps on like this, nobody will be drunk.
(1) I'll tell you honestly that this line puzzles me and I'm not sure at all that it means what I wrote because…
- "tu as bien faite la ronde" does mean literally "you made a good round" but is it about paying a drink to everybody or just dancing in a round
- "t'as pas beaucoup baissé"… "you didn't ---- much" ; the root of the verb is "bas" = "low", so it could mean "you didn't drink much so the level in your glass hasn't lowered much" –that's what I chose- but also you danced in a round and you're still in good shape (hence you're still good at dancing). What made me choose the first meaning is the line about "nobody will be drunk".
(2) meaning "boozing"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 06:48 AM

CANADA
PAR UN DIMANCHE AU SOIR, EN M'EN ALLANT VEILLER
(Quebec French)

Par un dimanche au soir, en m'en allant veiller (bis)
J'ai rencontré Lisette qui allait s'y baigner
Gai faluré maridondaine, gai faluré maridondé (bis)

J'ai rencontré Lisette qui allait s'y baigner (bis)
Mit son p'tit pied à l'eau, son p'tit cœur s'est noyé
Gai faluré…

Elle alla s'échouer à l'ombre d'un vert pommier

"Beau pommier, beau pommier, toi qu'es chargé de fleurs

Ça prend qu'un petit vent pour enlever tes fleurs

Ça prend qu'un voyageur pour avoir son p'tit cœur."

Coirault : 1720 La baigneuse qui dialogue avec le pommier.
Laforte, I, L-1 La fille qui se noie.
RADdO : 02343.
ON A SUNDAY NIGHT, GOING TO AN EVENING GATHERING


On a Sunday evening, going to an evening gathering,
I met Lisette who was going to take a bath.
Gai faluré maridondaine, gai faluré maridondé (bis)

I met Lisette who was going to take a bath.
She put her little foot in the water, her little heart drowned
Gai faluré…

She ended up in the shadow of a green apple tree

"Fine apple tree, fine apple tree, you who are loaded with flowers

It only takes a little wind to take your flowers away.

It only takes a little traveler to get one's little heart."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 06:58 AM

CANADA
LES PETITS SAINT PIERRE SONT PLUS RICHES QUE LES ÉVÊQUES
(French)

Les petits Saint Pierre sont plus riches que les évêques (bis)
Et le dimanche commencent la semaine
Salutaire fa fa fa, j'ai pas perdu ma femme
Soit dit entre nous, Saint-Pierre est toujours chauve !


Le lundi ils font une fête.

Le mardi, ils ont mal à la tête

Le mercredi, levaient la chopinette.

Le jeudi, ils vont voir les maîtresses.

Le vendredi, ils s' passent la navette.

Le samedi, la semaine est bien faite.

Le dimanche, ils vont à la basse messe.

Quand y ont l' temps, y r'tournent à la grand messe !

Coirault : 6414 La semaine ouvrière.
Laforte : IV, Ca-10 La semaine ouvrière.
RADdO : 01230.
THE LITTLE SAINT PIERRE ARE RICHER THAN THE BISHOPS


The little Saint Pierre are richer than the bishops (twice)
And on Sunday they start the week
Salutary fa fa fa, I didn't lose my wife
Between you and me, Saint Peter is always/still bald!


On Monday they have a party

On Tuesday, they have a headache.

On Wednesday they had a drink.

On Thursday, they go to see their mistresses

On Friday, they have the shuttle going

On Saturday, the week is over.

On Sunday, they go to low mass.

When they have time, they go back for high mass!
There's a lightly different version of this song on CD 7 (Cf. the Mudcat post about it)

If someone has an idea about who these "Saint Pierre" can be... I could find no link between St Peter and weavers, he doesn't seem to be their patron saint anywhere. I also thought that the song could have been adapted to make fun of people from Saint Pierre and Miquelon...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 07:01 AM

CANADA
DERRIÈRE CHEZ NOUS IL Y A UN JOLI BOCAGE
(French)

Derrière chez nous il y a un joli bocage,
Rempli de fleurs et de rosiers d'amour
(bis)

Je te trouve toujours jolie,
Mais pourtant tu n'es pas pour moi
(bis)


"Te souviens-tu la soirée adorable,
Là je t'aimais pour la première fois ?"
(bis)

Je te trouve toujours jolie…

"Comment veux-tu, cher amant que je t'aime,
Tous mes parents me défendent de t'aimer !"
(bis)

"J'ai fait graver sur l'écorce d'un hêtre,
Ton nom, le mien, ton aimable portrait."
(bis)

RADdO : 06403.
BEHIND OUR HOUSE THERE IS A PRETTY WOOD


Behind our house there is a pretty wood
Full of flowers and love rosebushes
(twice)

I still find you pretty
Though you aren't for me

(twice)

"Do you remember the lovely evening,
When I loved you for the first time?
(twice)

I still find you …

"How do you want me, dear lover, to love you,
All my relatives forbid me to love you!"
(twice)

"I had carved in the bark of a beech
Your name, mine, your lovely portrait."
(twice)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 07:06 AM

CANADA - ONTARIO
NOUS SOMMES TRENTE-TROIS
(Canadian French)

Nous sommes trente-trois,
Tous voleurs d'une bande
Et moi le capitaine le maître des voleurs
Je marche à la tête comme un vrai gouverneur.

Un jour me voilà pris
Dedans une embuscade
J'ai beau crier "Alarme" et personne ne m'entend
Avant de me faire entendre dans les prisons je m' fus dedans.

Un jour mes petits enfants
Ils demandent à leur mère
Ma mère ma bonne mère où poupa est allé
V'là bien cinq ou six semaines qu'on n'entend plus parler.

Mes bons petits enfants
Portez-moi patience
Il est à la potence en prison en tourments
Les monsieurs de la justice vont y rendre jugement.

J'ai trois barriques d'or
Portez-les-t-au roi d' France
Et au roi de Paris
Enfin qu'il prenne soin de ma femme mes petits enfants aussi.

J'ai trois petits enfants
D'une tendre et jolie femme
D'une tendre jolie femme qu'est parfaite en beauté
Si elle a eu du malheur c'est d' m'avoir rencontré.

Coirault : 9502 Le libertin.
Laforte : II,A-62 Le voleur dans les églises.
RADdO : 00658.
WE ARE THIRTY THREE


We are thirty-three,
All thieves in a gang,
And I, the captain, the master of the thieves,
Walk at the head like a real governor.

One day, I am caught
In an ambush.
Even if I cried "Alarm" nobody heard me
Before they heard me, I was in jail.

One day my little children
Ask their mother
"Mother, my good mother, where has daddy gone
It's well been five or six weeks since we haven't heard of him.

My good little children
Have patience with me
He's on the gallows, in jail, in torments,
The justice gentlemen are going to judge him.

I have three barrels of gold,
Bring them to the king of France
And to the king of Paris
So that he takes care of my wife and of my little children too.

I have three little children
From a tender and pretty wife,
From a tender, pretty wife who's perfect in beauty.
The misfortune she had is to have met me.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 07:14 AM

LOUISIANA
ALLONS À LAFAYETTE
(Cajun French)

Allons à Lafayette mais pour changer ton nom.
On va t'appeler madame, madame Canaille Comeaux !
Petite, t'es trop mignonne pour faire ta criminelle !
Comment tu crois mais moi j' peux faire mais moi tout seul ?
Mais toi, mais joli cœur, 'garde donc mais quoi t'as fait !
Si loin comme moi j' su' d' toi, mais ça, ça m' fait pitié !
LET'S GO TO LAFAYETTE


Let's go to Lafayette to have your name changed,
They're going to call you Mrs, Mrs Canaille (1) Comeaux!
Girl, you're too cute to do wrong things.
How can you think that I can manage alone.
But you, my pretty heart, look what you've done!
I am so far from you, but that makes me sad.
(1) Canaille means rascal, mischievous

Wiki article about the song

Full lyrics and English translation (The lyrics must still have a copyright)

Recordings


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 07:25 AM

CANADA - NEW BRUNSWICK
NOUS SOMMES PARTIS TROIS JEUNES FRÈRES À L'ÉCOLE DE PARIS
(French*)

Nous sommes partis trois jeunes frères à l'école de Paris. (bis)

On a à peine mis le pied en Pontoise, prisonniers nous ont été pris. (bis)

On n'avait rien qu'un frère qui gouvernait dans Paris

S'il savait notre misère, il serait bientôt z'ici.

Il a à peine achevé la parole, leur gentil frère arrivait (bis)

"Bonjour donc, dame de Pontoise, mes écoliers sont-ils ici ?" (bis)

"Non, oh non, beau gentilhomme, ils sont allés aux penderies." (bis)

"Dites-moi donc, dame de Pontoise, j'aurai-t-y le temps d' les voir en vie ?" (bis)

"Non, oh non, beau gentilhomme, vous allez trop lentement !" (bis)

Il débarque sur sa Climène (1), il monte sur son cheval blanc
Il touchit (2) z'à tour de bride, son cheval va comme le vent.

Quand il fut sur ces rigoles, son cheval suivait le sang
Quand il fut sur ces montagnes, il vit ses trois frères pendant.

Ils aviont (3) sur l'épaule droite tous chacun un mouchoir blanc
Ils aviont sur l'épaule gauche tous chacun un pigeon blanc.

Il mit l'pied dedans l'échelle, il coupit (2) les trois tirants
Et au bout de trois quarts d'heure, ses trois frères étaient vivants.

"Dites-moi donc, sire beau juge, dites-moi donc votre jugement."
"Dites-moi donc, sire beau sire, c'est-y quelqu'un de vos parents ?"

"Y en a deux qui sont mes frères et l'autre c'est mon cousin germain
Si jamais j' mets l' pied en Pontoise, je mettrai tout feu à sang.

Si jamais j' mets l' pied en Pontoise, je mettrai tout feu à sang
Toutes les dames de la ville crieront grâce pour ces innocents !"

Coirault : 9601 Les écoliers de Pontoise.
Laforte :I, B-14, Les écoliers pendus.
RADdO : 03917.
WE, THREE YOUNG BROTHERS, WENT TO SCHOOL IN PARIS


We, three young brothers, went to school in Paris (twice)

We'd hardly set a foot in Pontoise, they caught us as prisoners (wice)

We had only one brother who ruled in Paris,

If he knew of our misfortune, he'd soon be here.

He had hardly finished to speak (when) their nice brother arrived

"Good day, then, Pontoise lady, are my students here?"

"No, oh no, fine gentleman, they are at the gallows."

"Tell me then, Pontoise lady, will I have time to see them alive?"

"No, oh no, fine gentleman, you're going too slowly!"

He disembarked from his Climène, he mounted on his white horse,
He spurred on intensively, his horse went like the wind.

When he was in these valleys, his horse followed the blood,
When he was on these mountains, he saw his three brothers hanging.

They all had a white handkerchief on their right shoulder
They all had a white dove on their left shoulder.

He set a foot on the ladder, he cut the three ropes
And after three quarters of an hour, his three brothers were alive.

"Do tell me, sir nice judge, do tell me your judgement."
"Do tell me, sir nice sir, are they some relatives of yours?"

"Two of them are my brothers and the other is my first cousin,
If I ever set a foot in Pontoise, I'll put everything to fire and sword.

If I ever set a foot in Pontoise, I'll put everything to fire and sword.
All the ladies of the town will cry mercy for those innocent persons.
* From wherever the song originated in.
(1) The name of his ship.
(2) 2nd group verbs preterit tense endings applied to 1st group verbs.
(3) Ditto for this form of imperfect tense.

Graver la parole "Recording the speech" is a collection of Francophone Canadians' recordings about many topics and this is the link to the songs section. The sound files are .ram files and most read that it's an excerpt.

END OF CD#10
END OF THE WHOLE SET

I'd want to thank Q for helping me with his valuable and extended knowledge.

Now you guys out there feel free to put that in proper English.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Guillaume
Date: 11 Feb 11 - 09:21 AM

Hello,

I'm the compiler of this 10-CD boxset and I have just come accross this thread. Thank you all for your interest in this work.

Wow, Monique, I can't believe you managed to translate everything into English. I am flabbergasted !

I know how much work it represents, having spent several weeks working on the French version of the lyrics (which unfortunately could not be included to the CDs' booklets and can only be found on the Internet).
... and thank you for spotting a few mistakes in the French version !

I am currently thinking about an online resource like the "Musical Traditions 'Voice of the People' Suite" - as suggested by Matthew in an earlier post. When it is ready, maybe we could use your translations ? Could you get in touch with me ? The address is : guillaume.veilletATlibertysurf.fr

Merci d'avance !


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 16 Feb 11 - 03:04 PM

I added where it belongs the story told on CD 6 about everyday life in Marseilles some decades ago.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: GUEST,Marilena
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 11:03 AM

I stumbled on this thread looking for some Corsican lyrics, and reading around a little I found a Flemish text listed as "Alsatian"... just wanted to signal the mistake:
it's this song:

EN 'K GINGEN LESTMAAL AAN HET JAGEN UIT
(Alsatian)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 11:18 AM

Thank you Guest Marilena, I corrected it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: GUEST,Big Roly
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 04:35 AM

CD2: Ce sont trois galions d'Espagne

There are a number of liberties taken with the Standard French language in this text. It was collected from Jack Le Feuvre, an inhabitant of Sark in the (British) Channel Islands. His first language was a local variety of Norman French, as different from the official language of Paris as Broad Scots (as written by Robert Burns) would be from the language we are accustomed to hearing on official English-language news media. This would account for the occasional non-standard use of prepositions and the pronunciation of the "h" in "hune", an archaism which has disappeared from Standard french.

At least one other song, "Voici mon marinier" (aka "Les clefs d'or") collected on Sark (Locke & Anderson, 1976: Société Sercquiaise archives)uses the word "marinier" where the French would either use "marin" or "matelot" to mean a sailor. There are no bargemen on Sark (unless they're there on vacation, of course) as the island has no inland waterways whatsoever.

Quite apart from these observations, you've done a wonderful job here Monique. It saves me the trouble of writing out the words of this song!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 05:57 AM

Thanks for these observations, Big Roly! You can also find the lyrics on the Frémeaux leaflet of each cd -link provided at the top of the lyrics to song #1 of each cd. It's where I took them from.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: GUEST,Big Roly
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 10:38 AM

Guillaume, you extracted "Ce sont trois galions d'Espagne" and "La bébé" (aka La polka des bébés) from Marie-Marguerite Andral and Claudie Marcel-Dubois' field recordings (1970?) from Sark. Where did you find them? Are they in the Bibliothèque Nationale? I already know about Peter Kennedy's recordings (1957 - 60), Locke and Anderson's tapes (Sark; 1976) and the BBC recordings of the Sark Singers (1938), but I would be interested to know whether Andral and Marcel-Dubois collected anything that the others had missed.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 12:31 PM

Big Roly, I think you should email him, he gave his email address -still valid- in his post and I suspect he hasn't come back much to the 'cat ever since.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: GUEST,Guillaume
Date: 03 Nov 11 - 11:10 AM

Hi Big Roly,
Andral and Dubois worked for the Musée national des Arts et Traditions Populaires (MnATP), based in Paris, which is now unfortunately closed but about to re-open under a different name (Musée des Civilisations d'Europe et de Méditerranée or MuCEM) in Marseilles in 2013.
They recorded extensively for the museum from 1939 to the early 1980s. Every six months or so, they would go on a "recording trip" in a specific area (for instance the Cantal département in 1959 or the Roussillon in 1963). There, local contacts would introduce them to local singers and musicians and they would go back to Paris with dozens of tapes full of fascinating recordings (made with quality professional equipement). Unfortunately, even though they worked for the French state, they never allowed anybody to listen to the material !
So, for decades, it was virtually unkwown. Then, a few years after Dubois' death (in 1989) and shortly before Andral's passing (in 2004), everything was digitalized.
I was given access to the CDs and could use everything I wanted (which wouldn't have been possible 10 years earlier). I used about 50 of Dubois and Andral's recordings in the "Anthologie", which was a first (only a few extracts had been published by Rounder in the "France" volume of the "Alan Lomax Collection" : Lomax never collected in France and used Andral and Dubois' recordings instead).
Now, although the museum is closed, researchers still have access to the recordings (no real public access, you need a good reason). Everything is still in Paris, in the Bois de Boulogne building where the museum was. The person you should contact is Marie-Barbara Le Gonidec (head of Music at the MucEM). The 1970 recordings in Jersey, Guernsey and Sark ARE fascinating. Jack Le Feuvre sang about 20 songs, maybe more. Brillant stuff.
Hope this helps. Guillaume Veillet


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: GUEST,Fred McCormick
Date: 05 Aug 14 - 06:27 AM

I've finally caught up with this set. Well, I found a copy on the Internet at the remarkably cheap price of £65-00 inc p&p, and have spent a very happy morning ripping the whole set to hard drive for safe keeping.

Absolutely bleep bleepin' wonderful.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: GUEST,Fred McCormick
Date: 05 Aug 14 - 07:27 AM

I just wanted to add to my previous missive that, except for a general introduction, none of the booklet notes seem to have been translated into English.

Well, weighing up the production costs against the retail price, that's hardly surprising. But what a wonderful gesture on the part of Monique to prepare such a comprehensive set of translations, and then to post them on here.

Many, many heartfelt thanks for all your hard work.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The French 'Voice of the People' set
From: Monique
Date: 06 Aug 14 - 07:10 AM

I've updated this post as I found an explanation for "jouer aux épinettes" even if what I found is "jouer des épinettes".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 22 June 3:39 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.