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Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing

Related threads:
Bilingual Songs (14)
English/Irish lyrics (3)
Lyr Req: One Morning in June - Macaronic (3)
Manx Macaronic (2)
Lyr Req: Welsh Macaronics (5)


harry@opreith.freeserve.co.uk 25 Nov 98 - 08:54 PM
Annraoi Ó Préith 28 Nov 98 - 09:46 PM
Barry Finn 28 Nov 98 - 11:44 PM
Annraoi 04 Dec 98 - 08:07 PM
Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin 05 Dec 98 - 02:04 PM
Barbara 05 Dec 98 - 03:26 PM
Annraoi 05 Dec 98 - 04:38 PM
Jerry Friedman 05 Dec 98 - 04:40 PM
Annraoi 05 Dec 98 - 04:44 PM
Jerry Friedman 05 Dec 98 - 05:54 PM
Jerry Friedman 05 Dec 98 - 05:57 PM
Martin Ryan 05 Dec 98 - 07:11 PM
Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin 05 Dec 98 - 08:12 PM
Martin Ryan 06 Dec 98 - 08:50 AM
Philippa 06 Dec 98 - 09:27 AM
Annraoi 06 Dec 98 - 11:17 AM
Annraoi 06 Dec 98 - 11:23 AM
Philippa 06 Dec 98 - 01:11 PM
Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin 06 Dec 98 - 04:18 PM
Susan of DT 06 Dec 98 - 04:30 PM
Philippa 07 Dec 98 - 11:46 AM
Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin 07 Dec 98 - 06:37 PM
Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin 07 Dec 98 - 07:30 PM
Annraoi 07 Dec 98 - 09:04 PM
Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin 08 Dec 98 - 01:39 PM
Jerry Friedman 08 Dec 98 - 11:12 PM
Philippa 09 Dec 98 - 06:37 AM
Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin 09 Dec 98 - 01:45 PM
Philippa 09 Dec 98 - 05:24 PM
Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin 09 Dec 98 - 05:49 PM
Jerry Friedman 10 Dec 98 - 11:52 AM
the doppelganger 10 Dec 98 - 03:39 PM
Wallace 10 Dec 98 - 08:06 PM
Charlie Baum 10 Dec 98 - 10:52 PM
Sandy Paton 11 Dec 98 - 12:15 AM
Sandy Paton 11 Dec 98 - 12:21 AM
Philippa 11 Dec 98 - 11:53 AM
Ralph Butts 11 Dec 98 - 02:39 PM
Philippa 11 Dec 98 - 05:21 PM
Annraoi 11 Dec 98 - 05:48 PM
johnm 11 Dec 98 - 08:44 PM
johnm 11 Dec 98 - 09:02 PM
Barbara 12 Dec 98 - 09:36 AM
Philippa 12 Dec 98 - 12:20 PM
Annraoi 12 Dec 98 - 03:31 PM
Annraoi 12 Dec 98 - 03:37 PM
Wolfgang Hell 12 Dec 98 - 03:54 PM
a short story made long 13 Dec 98 - 05:06 AM
Philippa 13 Dec 98 - 05:25 AM
dick greenhaus 13 Dec 98 - 09:49 AM
Alice 13 Dec 98 - 12:59 PM
Annraoi 13 Dec 98 - 07:38 PM
Annraoi 15 Dec 98 - 04:55 PM
Philippa 16 Dec 98 - 04:52 AM
Ralph Butts 16 Dec 98 - 02:30 PM
Alice 17 Dec 98 - 12:02 AM
Alice 17 Dec 98 - 12:02 AM
Annraoi 17 Dec 98 - 02:04 PM
Alice 17 Dec 98 - 08:38 PM
Annraoi 17 Dec 98 - 09:41 PM
Alice 18 Dec 98 - 01:17 PM
Annraoi 18 Dec 98 - 05:46 PM
Alice 19 Dec 98 - 11:45 PM
Annraoi 20 Dec 98 - 07:57 PM
Alice 20 Dec 98 - 10:08 PM
Annraoi 22 Dec 98 - 05:04 PM
Alice 22 Dec 98 - 08:47 PM
johnm 22 Dec 98 - 11:16 PM
Alice 22 Dec 98 - 11:29 PM
johnm 23 Dec 98 - 10:16 AM
Philippa 23 Dec 98 - 11:36 AM
Alice 23 Dec 98 - 12:08 PM
johnm 23 Dec 98 - 08:34 PM
Annraoi 24 Dec 98 - 09:48 PM
Wolfgang 07 Jan 99 - 09:33 AM
Philippa 28 Jan 99 - 01:55 PM
Philippa 28 Jan 99 - 02:01 PM
Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin 28 Jan 99 - 06:48 PM
Lonesome EJ 29 Jan 99 - 12:46 AM
Annraoi 30 Jan 99 - 12:19 PM
Wolfgang 16 Apr 99 - 05:40 AM
johnm (inactive) 21 Apr 99 - 05:49 PM
Philippa 21 Apr 99 - 06:03 PM
Alice 21 Apr 99 - 07:05 PM
Philippa 22 Apr 99 - 07:47 AM
Philippa 22 Jul 99 - 02:05 PM
Philippa 30 Jul 99 - 10:37 AM
Philippa 30 Jul 99 - 10:42 AM
30 Jul 99 - 11:07 AM
Haruo 29 Sep 00 - 11:17 AM
Haruo 29 Sep 00 - 11:18 AM
Chocolate Pi 29 Sep 00 - 11:59 AM
Susanne (skw) 30 Sep 00 - 12:10 PM
GUEST,Liland qua guest 30 Sep 00 - 06:58 PM
GUEST,Philippa 16 Mar 02 - 09:18 PM
Alice 18 Nov 02 - 01:03 PM
GUEST,Philippa 18 Nov 02 - 01:20 PM
Declan 18 Nov 02 - 01:27 PM
Joe_F 18 Nov 02 - 07:59 PM
Alice 19 Nov 02 - 11:43 AM
Mary Humphreys 19 Nov 02 - 05:48 PM
Haruo 10 May 06 - 03:58 PM
GUEST,Darowyn 11 May 06 - 01:01 PM
Kaleea 11 May 06 - 04:06 PM
An Pluiméir Ceolmhar 11 May 06 - 05:05 PM
Darowyn 12 May 06 - 04:00 AM
sian, west wales 12 May 06 - 05:24 AM
Haruo 12 May 06 - 12:43 PM
MartinRyan 12 May 06 - 02:08 PM
Jim Dixon 12 May 06 - 03:00 PM
sian, west wales 12 May 06 - 03:22 PM
Wilfried Schaum 17 May 06 - 10:27 AM
GUEST,Jack Campin 17 May 06 - 01:44 PM
GUEST,Jill Rogoff 14 Jan 10 - 09:15 AM
MartinRyan 14 Jan 10 - 03:13 PM
melodeonboy 14 Jan 10 - 03:35 PM
Jack Campin 14 Jan 10 - 07:52 PM
GUEST,Philippa 10 Oct 12 - 07:30 PM
MartinRyan 11 Oct 12 - 05:14 AM
MartinRyan 12 Oct 12 - 04:34 PM
GUEST,John Moulden 13 Oct 12 - 11:46 AM
GUEST,Gerry 14 Oct 12 - 07:44 AM
Felipa 16 Oct 16 - 08:39 AM
JMB 16 Oct 16 - 12:59 PM
Felipa 16 Oct 16 - 01:22 PM
Jim Dixon 03 Dec 16 - 12:53 PM
Thompson 04 Dec 16 - 12:25 PM
Felipa 06 Jan 17 - 05:01 PM
Thompson 06 Jan 17 - 05:42 PM
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Subject: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs.
From: harry@opreith.freeserve.co.uk
Date: 25 Nov 98 - 08:54 PM

I am engaged in a long-term research project on the phenomenon of mixed language lyrics. I start from Irish/English, but have an input to Scots Gaelic/English, Welsh/English, Spanish/Catalán etc. I suspect that in modern terms, Macaronics has to do with languages/cultures in contact/conflict. My ideas are based on the Irish/English parameter, but I am sure that we are not unique in this respect. I would be grateful for any thoughts, ideas, examples, pointers in this field. I find it inconceivable that I am the only specialist in this area of study. Contact me. Harry O'Prey, 46 Brookvale Ave., Belfast, BT14 6BW, Ireland.


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Subject: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs
From: Annraoi Ó Préith
Date: 28 Nov 98 - 09:46 PM

Macaronic Songs are songs in which more than one language is used for effect. The phenomenon is well-known in Ireland especially since the Seventeenth Century. However, I am convinced that it exists in other communities where two or more languages / cultures are in contact / conflict. Does anyone out there have any examples of same ? I seems to me to be a very neglected area. Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs
From: Barry Finn
Date: 28 Nov 98 - 11:44 PM

Hi Annraoi The area of sea shanties might be a type you'd be intrested in. With multi national crews trading songs, there seems to be a mix. I found a songs maybe 20 yrs back, the name I had for it was "Slav Ho" (see Colcord). The verses are in english & the chorus in ? (sounds like slav ho, slav eata, brav si ya marita, slav ho). About 3 or 4 yrs back I heard David Parry doing a full english version called the "Saltpetter Shanty" (see Hugill, Shanties of the Seven Seas). Also in his book find the interesting shanty "Eki Dumah" where the verses are in pidgin English & the chorus he belives in Hindustani. Both Hugill & Doerflinger have "Yaw, Yaw, Yaw" or "Ja, Ja, Ja" (yes, yes, yes), Dutch & again pidgin English. In Hugill's Songs of the Sea he has what he calls the "Samoa Song" in Samoan & pidgin English. Hope I've been helpful. Good Luck. Barry


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Subject: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Annraoi
Date: 04 Dec 98 - 08:07 PM

A thread some time ago resulted in only one reply. I find this incredible, especialiy in a multilingual situation as exists in the States. I have learned that songs using Welsh and English exist. What about Bobby Bob in Mann ? Do you have them oveer there? Slane lhiat


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin
Date: 05 Dec 98 - 02:04 PM

I'm having problems at the moment. I'll try again now.

The short answer is no. Songs have generally been written Manx Gaelic with occasional loan words. There haven't really been that many in English about Mann.

The most famous has been the 1853 song by Eliza Craven Green, an actress from Leeds who did summer seasons in Mann and loved it. The song has recently been recorded by The BGs, who were born in Mann. Most people seem to think they were born in Australia, but they emigrated later.

So back to the original question, yes there are odd examples, but generally no.

Shoh slaynt,

Bobby Bob


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Barbara
Date: 05 Dec 98 - 03:26 PM

I assume you are looking for something more complex than a song with a verse in one language and a chorus in another, since there are quite a number of English/Gaelic songs that cross that way. Like Shul a Roon (Irish)and Sad Am I Without Thee (Hebrides, I think).
Is a Macaronic song one that uses occasional words from another language? It would help if you could explain what it is you are looking for.
Thank you.
Blessings,
Barbara


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 05 Dec 98 - 04:38 PM

To Bobby Bob,Go raibh maith agat as an fhreagra. I'd be glad if you could let me know where I might lay my hands on those songs you mentioned. Shoh slaynt. Barbara. Thanks for your interest and help. Songs with foreign words scattered throughout at random are not covered by my idea of Macaronic. Rather,the use of two or more languages in a structured way. Thus, one might have alternate lines / couplets / quatrains / verses / half-lines even in the languages concerned. The use of the "other" language might be translatory or - more interestingly - as an integral part of the narration, if that is the type of composition involved. One example of the latter is "One morning in June agus mé 'dul a' spaisteoireacht, Casadh domh cailín 's ba ró-dhdeas a gnaoi," etc. A bilingual conversation might be the chosen form as in "Do bhí mé lá ar thaoibh an chnoic" where the ploughman and the girl converse in alternate stanzas, he in Irish, she in English. Is this any help? What is even more interesting is if the Macaronics is carried over in the metrics of the song. Ádh mór, Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 05 Dec 98 - 04:40 PM

I don't know about songs, but here's a macaronic bit of the poem "Philip Sparrow" by John Skelton, who lived around 1500, and who is the first person the word "macaronic" reminds me of. The poem is about the death of a pet sparrow.

Alas, it will me so
That Philip is gone me fro!
Si in i qui ta tes,
Alas, I was evil at ease!
De pro fun dis cla ma vi
When I saw my sparrow die!


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 05 Dec 98 - 04:44 PM

Thanks Jerry, that certainly fits the bill. But my own interest is confined to the last three centuries and in living languages. But I very much appreciate the trouble you took to reply.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 05 Dec 98 - 05:54 PM

And thank you for being more polite than I was--I should have let you answer for yourself.

If you're interested in pop songs, I can think of "Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen", "Vaya con Dios" (preferably pronounced in Spanish instead of "Di-os"), "Michelle", "San Tropez" (I think that's the name--"Viens chez moi, le soir ne va pas terminer, nous resterons toujours ensemble"--wow, not a single accent), and "Hey Baby, Que Paso". But I'll bet that's not what you're looking for.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 05 Dec 98 - 05:57 PM

I seem to have cut myself off there. I was just going to agree: I live in a bilingual area (English and Spanish), so I find it strange that I can't think of any bilingual songs. But then I don't exactly know all the local songs.

I should add that I'm not sure of the title of the country song that begins "Hey Baby, Que Paso?" (Accents on the e and o.)


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 05 Dec 98 - 07:11 PM

Annraoi Weren't there some example of Irish/Latin macaronics?

regards

Yes, I know I should have done this in Latin, but the residuals are fading.......


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin
Date: 05 Dec 98 - 08:12 PM

Did you ever hear the song 'Deus meus' by Na Fili on their 'A Kindly Welcome' album? That's exactly the form, with a line in Latin, the international language, and a line in the language of a particular area, in this case Irish.

I think pedantically speaking that a macaronic is actually Latin mixed with another language, but has come to be applied to any two language mix.

I don't think the full lyric is given on the record sleeve notes - another piece of vinyl I can only sit and remember at the moment. The agonies of lost technology. Then again, after an unexpected storm whilst my son was on-line the other week, I can now genuinely include in a Manx phrase book,

'My modem has been struck by lightning'.

My vannaght lhiat,

Bobby Bob


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 06 Dec 98 - 08:50 AM

Bobby

Welcome to the modem-struck-by-lightning club! Happened me about three months ago.

Yes - I think Deus Meus was the one lurking in my head, alright. "Pedantically speaking" - what do you think the ethymology of "macaronic" is?


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Subject: Lyr Add: DEUS MEUS
From: Philippa
Date: 06 Dec 98 - 09:27 AM

Yes, I would like the answer to Martin's question too. I think I've heard an explanation, but I forget it.

See 'Gie Dedanken Sind Frei' in the DT. Second verse. Does it qualify?

I'm looking for words for a Scottish macaronic I've heard, appropriately about a Highlander in Glasgow. If I get it, I'll post the lyrics.

Are there any partly Yiddish Macaronic songs?

Bobby Bob, if you want the words to Deus Meus; this is how I remember them - it should be substantially correct and maybe Annraoi or someone else can refine them.

Deus meus adiuva me,
Tabhair dom do dhearc a mhichíl Dé,
Tabhair dom do dhearc a mhichíl Dé,
Deus meus adiuva me

Domine da quod peto a te,
Tabhair dom go dian a ghrian glán glé,
Tabhair dom go dian a ghrian glán glé ,
Domine da quod peto a te

Domine, domine exaudi me,
m'anam bheith lán ded ghrá a Dhé,
m'anam bheith lán ded ghrá a Dhé,
Domine, domine exaudi me

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 31-Mar-02.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 06 Dec 98 - 11:17 AM

Martin, bobby bob agus Philippa. Thank you all for your interest. The earlist occurrences of Latin/Irish lyrics date from the 7th Century and the "Deus Meus Adiuva Me" is a composition of the cleric Maol Íosa Ó Brolcháin who wrote in the 11th Century. This latter is still to be heard occasionally !! It has been recorded by several artists, including "na Filí" if my failing faculties delude me not. Your version, Philippa, contains some textual innaccuracies which I here set right, i gcead duit:- do dhearc = do shearc; a mhíchíl = a Mhic dhíl Dé; a ghrian ghlan gle = a ghrian ghlan ghlé; next verse- Tuum amoren sicut vis, Tabhair domh go tréan a déarfad arís (bis) Tuum amorem sicut vis.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 06 Dec 98 - 11:23 AM

There I go again, repeating myself. I don't know how this happens. I try to compose long stuff offline and then post it online. But why the repetition ?? By the way, the origin of "macaronic" seems to stem from a mediaeval Italian practioner called Teofilo Folengo who likened this form of verse to macaroni. I don't think it really matters so long as we all know what we're talking about. Philippa, you mentioned a Scots Gaelic song about a Highlander in Glasgow. This sounds exactly what I'm looking for. Any chance of the words (+ Tune) ?


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Philippa
Date: 06 Dec 98 - 01:11 PM

James Ross. 'A Classification of Gaelic Folk-Song'. "Scottish Studies" 1, 1957 pp 95-151. 2.2 [p.130] Macaronics "Macaronics, poems composed in alternating lines and phrases from two languages, one of them usually Latin, were fairly popular in Western Europe during the late mediaeval period. "Macaronic songs having both English and Gaelic words and phrases as compositional elements first appear in the eighteenth century. These songs are for a bilingual people and cannot be understood by reference to the English or Gaelic elements alone. The purpose of using the two languages where the poet could presumably compose in either one of them appears to be to exploit the peculiar humorous effects that can be obtained by the metrical combination of both languages. To the bilingual the chief humourous element consists of an exaggerated bathos."

examples given: 1)Ma thilleas tu fhathast ' s tu m'aighear 's mo run [if you return, my beloved] perhaps I will marry you 's t-earrach co-dhiubh [in the springtime, anyway]

2)from a song describing a stay in hospital: O madam you surprise me bheil thu dol as do chiall, [are you taking leave of your senses?] chan fhaod thu tigh'n cho teann orm [you mustn't come so close to me] I'm minus all my gear 'S ann thuirt i 'd i smileadh rium [it's then she said to me] you're very shy ma's fhior [if it's true] ach chi mi aig an danns thu [but I'll see you at the dance] if you do not die in here.

So these songs are sort of art form, a clever exploitation of bilingualism. They seem to me not to represent a conflict between the languages nor the adaptation of songs so that more people will understand them (rather the contrary), but a pride in being eloquent in two languages. It's like the bilingual jokes we have today, such as - What do you call the one-eyed Kerryman? Seán Ó Súilleabháin; What did the farmer say when he lost his mechanical baler? "An bhfaca tú mo Sheamaisín" Unfortunately Ross doesn't give a footnote to his first sentence about macaronics in Western Europe. Anyway, Annraoi, you said you wanted to study more recent songs, and I suppose your study could include other sorts of bilingualism in songs besides the sort represented in the lyrics quoted above. Ross does give sources for the excerpts of Gaelic song. You can look up the article as I imagine Queen's Uni. library would keep volumes of "Scottish Studies".

Annraoi, did you get my private e-mail messages, such as the forwarded copy of Die Gedanken sind frei from the DT, and some ideas of who else you might get in touch with concerning your project? / I'm asking around for the song of the highlander's visit to Glasgow - I wanted the lyrics from ever I first heard it anyway, now you've given me the incentive to ask more people more persistently. I hope I'll get the words soon and can post them./Since you seem quite expert in this realm, could you do Mudcat a favour and correct the disgraceful transcription of an Ghile Mear that's on the DT? There was a recent thread on the song, someone saying the words on the DT didn't match the ones on the recording, so I looked at the DT and I was shocked. One problem seems that everywhere a 'é' is wanted an 'i' came out, so we see 'shiimh' and 'chiile'. Which by the way reminds me of the letter to 'Doire Cholm Chille" which ended up in Santiago, Chile - seriously; the incredible thing was it was posted in Galway. --sorry for going off on a tangent, bye for now - Philippa


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin
Date: 06 Dec 98 - 04:18 PM

Gura mie mooar eu - thanks very much. I hadn't been expecting to get the full lyrics for Deus Meus.

For a meaning of "macaronic", I went to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, still keeping to the old name despite being printed in Chicago now. In Book 7, p. 603 column c there's this:

"originally comic Latin verse form characterized by the introduction of vernacular words with appropriate but absurd Latin endings; later variants apply the same technique to modern languages. the form was invented in the early 16th century by Teofilo Folengo, a dissolute Benedictine monk who applied Latin rules of form and syntax to an Italian vocabulary in his burlesque epic of chivalry Baldus (1517; Le maccherone, 1927-28). He described the macaronic as the literary equivalent of the Italian dish, which, in its 16th-century form, was a crude mixture of flour, butter, and cheese. The Baldus soon found imitators in Italy and France, and some macaronics were even written in mock Greek. The outstanding British poem in this form is the Polemo-Middinia inter Vitarvam et Nebernam (published 1684), an account of a battle between two Scottish villages, in which William Drummond subjected Scots dialect to Latin grammatical rules. A modern English derivative of the macaronic pokes fun at the grammatical complexities of ancient languages taught at school, as in A.D. Godley's illustration of declension in "Motor Bus":

Domine defende nos Contra hos Motores Bos

("Lord protect us from these motor buses").

The form has survived in comic combinations of modern languages. The German-American medleys of Charles G. Leland in his Hans Breitmann's Ballads (first published under that title in 1884) are examples of the modern macaronic, in particular his warning "To a Friend Studying German":

Vill'st dou learn die Deutsche Sprache? Den set it on your card Dat all de nouns has shenders, Und de shenders all are hard."

Thus the Encyclopaedia Britannica, anyway.

Shoh slaynt,

Bobby Bob


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Susan of DT
Date: 06 Dec 98 - 04:30 PM

See the Boar's Head Carol and Old Bangum for Latin/English. Not knowing Latin, i'm not sure how badly corrupted the Latin in Old Bangum is


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Philippa
Date: 07 Dec 98 - 11:46 AM

Bobby Bob gave us a bit from Leland from Encyclopedia Brittania. I found this excerpt from Leland on the web: "[OCTAVE DELEPIERRE ]often spoke of Breitmann's "Interview with the Pope" as his favorite Macaronic poem, which, as he had published two volumes of Macaronea, was praise indeed. His theory was, that as Macaronics were the ultra-extravagance of poetry, he who wrote most recklessly in them did best; in fact, that they should excel in first-rate BADNESS; and from this point of view it is possible that Breitmann's Latin lyric is not devoid of merit, since assuredly nobody ever wrote a worse. "

The German lesson quoted reminds me of similar Germanized English that used to be in issues of MAD magazine - which I'm sure some Mudcatters can remember. And also - Annraoi will appreciate this - of the time someone asked me "Sprechen sie Deutsh" and without thinking I replied "Ní spreichim"!


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin
Date: 07 Dec 98 - 06:37 PM

I've checked on Manx macaronics. The only two I've come across are poems, one by William Kennish and one by Tom Shimmin. William Kennish wrote The Manxman's Farewell, which started like this:

A Manninagh dooie, from the clean I was troggit Close by the foot of the bridge of Cornaa Whose keystone was fix'd in the year I was ruggit Three miles and a half from the town of Rhumsaa.

A true Manxman, from the cradle I was raised . . .

Whose keystone was fix'd in the year I was born . . .

The Cornaa/Corrany/Corony Bridge was finished in l799. I don't know if this is the only part of the poem which is a macaronic, as I don't have a copy to hand. The rest of his output was in English about Mann, and not without folkloric and historic interest.

As a matter of interest, at the New York banquet to celebrate the opening of the Panama Canal, Ferdinand de Lesseps praised William Kennish as the man who had discovered the only possible route to join the Atlantic and Pacific without using locks. This would have been via two navigable rivers in Ecuador which he proposed to join by means of a 3 mile tunnel through the Cordillera mountains. Kennish was also an inventor who came up with a number of things used for many years by the Royal Navy.

Anyway, that's William Kennish from the north of the Island. Tom Shimmin, from the south, was known as Tom the Dipper. He was something of a rag gatherer, but also a bit light-fingered. There was a story of how Tom was delivering some sort of sermon, and he got the people to look up to heaven. While they were looking up, he slipped a block of cheese under his coat. On another occasion, a shopkeeper saw him slip a pound of butter into his cap. So he invited Tom into the back room for a cup of tea in front of the fire. The shopkeeper amused himself watching Tom getting agitated, and going out with a cap into which all the butter had melted. At the age of 78 he built his Cottage in the Heather to live with his wife up in the hills.

Tom the Dipper was a writer of doggerel, but he produced one macaronic. There are quatrains. This is already rather long, but if you're interested, I'll copy that for you as well.

Mish, lesh firrinys,

Bobby Bob


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin
Date: 07 Dec 98 - 07:30 PM

. . . seven quatrains . . .

Gow my leshtal.

Bobby Bob


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 07 Dec 98 - 09:04 PM

Bobby Bob, You still haven't answered my question - are you Bob Carswell who used to broadcast on Manx Radio some years ago. And do you know Seán Ó Brádaigh ? Shoh slaynt, Annraoi


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Subject: Lyr Add: TOM THE DIPPER'S MACARONIC
From: Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin
Date: 08 Dec 98 - 01:39 PM

Gow my leshtal. You may have noticed in one of my previous outings that I mentioned I'd been having trouble. One of them must have been my missing reply to your query. The answer is yes, and I still do my bilingual programme called 'Claare ny Gael' on a Sunday evening on Manx Radio, but now it's from 6.30 pm to 7.45 pm, and also goes out on AM as well as FM. We've also got a 15 minute bilingual magazine programme, 'Traa dy Liooar' on a Wednesday evening at 9.45 pm.

The Claare ny Gael format is two distinct threads, one in Manx and the other in English, not the same stuff in both languages. The 'Traa dy Liooar' format is the same information in both Manx and English.

And yes, Sean O Bradaigh has been an excellent friend to Yn Chruinnaght, the annual Celtic festival in Ramsey, and to the Manx language, which he and Blaanid have learned, partly through attending Dr Brian Stowell's summer schools, and mainly through much dedication and effort with the help of tapes and books at home in Ireland.

But back to macaronics. This is Tom the Dipper's macaronic (eight quatrains - I can't count):

I was born at the Ynnagh where stands yon Big Mill
Ayns shen hooar mee'n chied greme ve curt ayns my veeal
[There I got the first bite (of food) that was put in my mouth]
On the fifteenth of May Eighteen hundred and Nought
Eisht dooyrt ny shenn vraane ver mayd eaddagh mie ort
[Then said the old women, "We'll put good clothing on you"]

Not long I remained down there it is true
Gys cheu Ballacross va mee choyrt lesh dy bieau
[To Ballacross side I was brought quickly]
My uncle he loved me an infant forlorn
Eisht churt lesh va mee dys thie Ballagawne
[Then I was brought to Ballagawne house]

Not long I remained my youth to regale
Eisht churt lesh va mee dys Ballcashtal
[Then I was brought to Castletown]
While there I was sent to school and to trade
As schollhear mie va mee ec three bleeney jeig
[And I was a good scholar ec thirteen years]

I began to improve in the shoemaking trade
As greasee mie va mee ec nuy bleeney jeig
[And I was a good cobbler ec nineteen years]
I soon became foreman, which was no disgrace
Eisht phoost mee shenn ven erskyn daeed blein dy eash
[Then I married an old woman above forty years of age]

Full thirty long years - I then lost my bride
As dooinney treogh va mee ec jeih blein as daeed
[And a widow man was I at fifty years]
Again I got married to a good woman true
Agh boggey ayns paitchyn cha row ad aym rieau
[But joy in children I never had]

Bred and born in the Lowland I upwards would go
Son cha row mee booiagh dy ve injyl myr shoh
[For I was not content to be lowly like this]
I am rising up higher again and again
Ta mee nish beaghey ayns Kirkdale ec Slieau ny Garnane
[I'm now living in Kirkdale (Kirkill) on Carnane mountain]

And shortly like Moses on top of the hill
Yn cheer roym cha baghtal lane bainney as Mill
[The country before me so conspicuously full of milk and honey]
But do not mistake me, I now mean the soul
Ta mee nish taggloo jeh'n cheer spyrrydoil
[I'm now taklking of the spiritual country]

Now I am getting old and death will devour
Dy jean Chreest leeideil as cur bea nooghyn my chour
[May Christ lead me and give a saintly life for (to) me]
Then the great judgement when all shall appear
Goit seose marish Yeesey dys thie mooar yn Ayr
[Taken up with Jesus to the great house of the Father]

Not exactly a comic verse, is it? I've thought of a couple more of short rhymes -

Cronk ard, high hill
Mwyllin geayee, windmill
Skynn gyere, sharp knife
Cloie y feddan, play the fife

Up 'faie Comish' and over at the 'Noe'
Go in 'thie Kirree' and they'll tell you where to go
Big 'thie thoot' and a little 'thie sclate'
A big 'chibbyrt-buckad' on the middle of the street
Big 'muck arkagh' lying on the turf stack
That's the way to find the road to Ballayack

'faie Comish' is Comish's (a personal surname) home-field or flatt
'Noe' is a place name
'thie Kirree' is Kirree or Kitty's house
'thie thoot' is a thatched house
'thie sclate' is a tiled house
'chibbyrt-buckad' is a well with a bucket in it
'muck arkagh' is a sow in pig
Ballayack is a farm name - Jack's balley, or farmstead. You notice in Tom the Dipper's piece that there's Ballacross and Ballagawne, following the same pattern.

Hope I haven't bored you too much.

Slaynt dy mie,

Bobby Bob

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 31-Mar-02.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 08 Dec 98 - 11:12 PM

Wow.

Philippa, funny you should ask about partly Yiddish, when there's a short Yiddish-Hebrew parodic macaronic in the "Tsena Tsena" thread (as you may already know).

I love "My modem has by struck by lightning" in a phrasebook! Now what's the Manx for "My hovercraft is full of eels"?


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Philippa
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 06:37 AM

From: allan.S Date: 07-Dec-98 - 07:40 PM

We once sang a yiddish version that went Tzena, Tzena, Tzena, Ich hob faltza Tzena Teath, Teath, Teath I have false teath

Allan's contribution reminds me of the way John Harley (and some others) sing the Gaelic 'Eilean nam Bo' -

'Bord na Móna, móna, Bord na Móna, móna, Bord Fáilte'

(The Turf/Peat Board, the Tourist Board : Irish Gaelic titles that even the non-fluent know.)


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 01:45 PM

Annraoi, as my original reply to your question didn't get posted properly, neither did my little tale of a macaronic written by me a good few years ago. I was at a festival in Cornwall, and I sang it as the first person up to break the ice in what was nominally a competition, but I don't think anyone took it too seriously. One of the judges was the late Brenda Wooton, and I think she was disgusted with my macaronic - not the content, merely the fact that there was English in it. My appalling singing probably didn't help either. But this, for what it's worth, is how it went:

One bright summer's morning, while going to Yn Chruinnaght
Harrish ny sleityn gys Balley Rhumsaa
[Over the mountains to the town of Ramsey]
Quoi haghyr mee er, agh ben aeg cho aalin
[Who did I happen on, but a young woman so beautiful]
She was fine to behold, she was handsome and fair.
Says I, "My young maid, will you come in the heather
As neemayd goaill spoyrt choud as ta shin nyn lhie"
[And we'll have sport whilst we are lying down]
Smiling then, hug ee e glioon ayns my vaggleyn
[She put her knee in my . . . well, you get the idea]
As choud's v'ee faagail, [And whilst she was leaving] there was a tear in my eye.

Yn Chruinnaght is, as I mentioned, our annual Celtic festival in Ramsey (Rhumsaa).

I forgot to ask how you come to ask about Radio Vannin and Sean, etc. And also to say that I understood your question in Irish, despite the funny way it was spelt :-)

The phrase you're looking for, Jerry, is

Ta'n saagh crowal aym lane dy astanyn.

Bobby Bob

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 31-Mar-02.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Philippa
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 05:24 PM

A funny coincidence about Bob's surname. I attended a talk by Mark Wringe about Seon Carsuel, John CARSWELL, who was responsible for the first printed book (as opposed to handwritten manuscripts) in Gaelic, a 1567 translation of John Knox's Book of Common Order. Carswell included a statement calling for the publication of the Bible andother books in the Gaelic of Scotland and Ireland as they were in Latin and English. Carswell had classical training, so he used the learned form of Gaelic rather than the common local speech, but because of this training he used proper Gaelic spelling rather than the 'Gaylick' which Gaelic speakers who had only learned to read and write in English wrote. So it may be thanks to Carswell that in Scotland we don't write as the Manx do. Of the three presently used systems, Scottish, Irish and Manx, my amateur opinion is that Scottish Gaelic orthography best represents the sounds of the language.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 05:49 PM

We had Dr Nicholas Williams from UCD here for Feailley Ghaelgagh a week or so ago, and he mentioned an affinity with the 'Gaylick' spelling Philippa mentions.

As to Bishop John, I doubt very much my family claims descendency. I have a feeling they were sheep stealers who left Scotland and changed the name to protect the guilty somewhere along the line.

To Annraoi, I thought my reply to her question was lost during my period of strife, but actually it was posted to the Mrs McGrath thread, and read:

Shen kiart, Annraoi, as ta mee foast jannoo ny naightyn myr ayrn jeh'n chlaare aym fastyr Jedoonee er Radio Vannin, 'Claare ny Gael'.

Bobby Bob


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 10 Dec 98 - 11:52 AM

Thank you, Bobby Bob! I now have to learn Manx Gaelic so I'll be able to give your translation the laughter it deserves. But that's nothing to the time I now have to spend looking for an occasion to use that sentence.

Thanks also to everyone who has allowed me to interrupt this fascinating thread with trivialities.

Shoh slaynt, whatever that means,

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: the doppelganger
Date: 10 Dec 98 - 03:39 PM

Subject: RE: Lyrics for Tzena, Tzena From: Jerry Friedman Date: 10-Dec-98 - 11:39 AM

Another treat, on a public-TV special, was Arlo Guthrie explaining this as a Gaelic folksong about sweet young Tsena Tsena Tsena Tsena, who is in love with "handsome, heavy-duty Alna Alna Alna Alna".


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Wallace
Date: 10 Dec 98 - 08:06 PM

Another heavy-handed Anglo-saxon attempt at wit. When willthey ever learn ? to coin a phrase. Wallace


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Charlie Baum
Date: 10 Dec 98 - 10:52 PM

A Yiddish/Hebrew macaronic song that comes to my mind is "Lomir Alle Zingen a Zemerel" [Let's all sing a Zemer (Sabbath drinking song)]. The lyrics are in Yiddish, but give a translation and explanation of the the Hebrew song "Yom Zeh Mekhubad" {This is the Day Which Gives Honor]. Many of the words to the Hebrew song are embedded in the Yiddish, and the translation is largely comic. ("What does 'basar' [meat] mean? At the rich man's table, 'basar' is a slab of beef, but with us, 'basar' is a small taste in the middle of the stew." Likewise for "dagim" [fish] and "kol matamim" [all tasty foods]).

Jerry Epstein of New York sings some Yiddish/English macaronic songs, many of which came out of the Yiddish theatre as it adjusted to an audience that was learning English.

--Charlie Baum


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 12:15 AM

Greetings:

You might want to check out "Perrie, Merrie, Dixi, Domini" in Linscotts Folk Songs of Old New England. It's a naive version of "The Riddle Song" with a corrupted Latin refrain line:

I had four brothers over the sea,
Perrie, Merrie, Dixi, Domini.
They each sent a present unto me.
Petrum, partrum, paradisi tempore,
Perrie, merrie, dixi, domini.


It goes on with such lines as "The first sent a cherry that had no stone. The second sent a chicken that had no bone." And so forth. Maybe Joe Offer, or one of the more experienced users of Digitrad, can help locate it here. I'm a novice who can only visit one area of the site at a time!

There's also a neat macaronic song in Chapell (is the book titled Popular Music of Olden Time?) called "We Be Soldiers Three." It alternates lines between English and French. My wife and I sing it, but I can't write the French, I'm afraid. I'm a high-school drop-out, still playing catch-up.(:-)) But it, too, may be in the Digitrad data base.

Sandy (Folk-Legacy's resident folk fogey)


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 12:21 AM

Oops! One of my "senior moments." I should have mentioned that Margaret MacArthur sings a version of the "Perrie, Merrie" riddle song. Hers, I think, is from the Flanders collection, slightly different from the Linscott version. Good though!

Sandy (again)


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Philippa
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 11:53 AM

Sandy - I remember that song! "We be soldiers three, Pardonnez moi, je vous en prie" - and it's in the DT (with only that line in French and not spelt Frenchly)

Jerry - Have you pondered the etymological connections between 'shalom', 'Shoh slaynt' and 'so long' - it's been good to know you


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Ralph Butts
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 02:39 PM

Freddy Fender's "Before the Next Teardrop Falls" alternates English and Spanish verses.

.....Tiger


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Subject: Lyr Add: CIAD TURAS MHIC DHÒMHNAILL A GHLASCHU
From: Philippa
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 05:21 PM

Here's a Scottish Gaelic macaronic:
"CIAD TURAS MHIC DHÒMHNAILL A GHLASCHU" (Uilleam Marshall, an t-Eilean Sgitheanach)

When I came to Glasgow first
a-mach air tìr nan Gall
I was like a man adrift
Air iomrall 's dol air chall -
The noise it seemed like thunder,
chuir e tuainealaich nam cheann,
And oftentimes I wished I was
Air ais an tìr nam beann.

Am fuaim a bh'aig na tramway cars
Was rumbling in my ear,
Nuair chaidh mi sìos am Broomielaw
My eyes were full of tears,
Mi guidhe gun robh mi air ais
In my dear native home -
Gur truagh an nì gur Gàidheal mi
In Glasgow all alone.

Na fireannaich 's na boireannaich
Who met me on the way,
An dòigheanna cha do chòrd iad rium -
They had too much to say!
Bha cuid dhiubh ag iarraidh airgead orm
And when I said "clear away!"
Gun do chuir iad a-mach an teanga orm
And nasty things did say!

Thog sin suas mo nàdar-sa,
My temper it got wild -
Is chaidh mio sìos gun sgapainn iad
Along the banks of Clyde.
Fhuair mi gréim air balach dhiubh
And I tossed him round my head,
'S thilg mi ' meadhan na sràide e
And they picked him up for dead.

Thàining an sin am polasman
- a splendid man was he -
duine gasda spèisealta
belonging to Portree;
Thuirt e rium, "O òganaich,
Now what is all this row?"
"Chaidh iadsan riumsa a' connsachadh
and I will tell you how."

Thòisich mi ri innse dhà,
He had heard the likes before,
Is rinn e fead fa chompanach
Who stood across the road.
Thug e a-mach a leabhar
And pretended down to write
Mar a thòisich Iain Dòmhnallach
The lowlanders to fight.

Bha nàire mòr is mì-ghean orm
To be in such a fix.
Ach thuirt e rium, "On 's e Gàidheal thu,
You'll have to stop these tricks.
Fhalbh 's na dèan a leithid gu bràth
Just treat them with disdain,
Oir gu cinnteach cuiridh mis' thu an sàs
If you do the likes again."

Thug mi taing gu cridheil dha
And I went upon my way.
Tha iomadh bliadhn' on latha sin,
I'm in Glasgow till this day.
Faithnichidh mi gach cùil a th'ann
-I know my Glasgow well-
An coibhneas mòr rim choimhearsnach
I ever more shall dwell.

I expect Bobby Bob and Annraoi will understand this song okay. Others may be able to read between the lines, but in case not, I provide a summary. A young highlander goes to Glasgow and is rather homesick for the peace and quiet of his homeland. He loses his temper when one too many spongers ask him for money, and belts the beggar so hard that he kills them. Fortunately for the highlander, the policeman who arrives on the scene is a Gael from the Isle of Skye who lets the young man off with a warning not to do it again.

The song is usually sung to the same tune as "I met her in the garden where the praties go".

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 31-Mar-02.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 05:48 PM

a Philippa, thug tu an sway leat !!

That's just what I've been waiting for. Not great poetry, but comhartha go bhfuil an traidisiúin beo - the tradition is still alive out there.

Tuilleadh, le do thoil.

Ralph, Where might I lay hands on the Sp / Eng song or even a recording thereof ?

Other folks , Keep them macaronics rolling.

Annraoi


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Subject: Lyr Add: MAIDRIN RUADH
From: johnm
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 08:44 PM

I dont have the Irish for this but Mary Ohara's Maidrin Ruadi is described as an example of a Macronic song, so I would think is In Dulci Jublio by Michael Pretorius , a classic Christmas song, and so is the classic Jewish joke

Oedipus Schmoedipus--what's it matter so long as he loves his mother.

Here is the English of MAIDRIN RUADH (The Little Fox)

The little red fox,
The little red fox so ugly
The little red fox lying among the rushes
And the top of his two ears sticking up

VERSE 1 As I was walking up over Sliabh Luachra

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 31-Mar-02.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: johnm
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 09:02 PM

Have no idea why this happened.

PICK UP
Coming up I noticed a little red fox CHORUS

2 (In English) Good morrow fox, good morrow sir
Pray what is it that you're 'ating?"
"A fine fat goose I stole from you,
And will you come and taste it?"
"O no, indeed (Gaelic) I do not want it,
I wouldn't taste a pick of it,
(In English) But I vow and swear, you'll dearly pay
For that fine fat goose you're 'ating it." CHORUS

3 Hark, jhark Finder Lily and Piper.
Gather the dogs together.
Hark, hark, Truman, you lazy hound.
Bateman, you're a good dog,
Tally ho, on the scent, tally ho, on the scent,
Tally ho, on the scent, little puppies
Tally ho, on the scent, tally ho, on the scent,
And the top of his two ears sticking up. CHORUS

4 A distressed an sore heart to you, you bad fox
That took from me my, lovely, flock of geese,
My fine big cock, my beautiful hens,
Any my nicest ducks in the whole of Ireland. CHORUS


IN DULCI JUBLILO

This is available everywhere.

In dulci jubilo,nun singet und seid froh,
unsers Herzens Wonne,
leit in praesepio, und leuchtet als die Sonne,
matris in gremio, Alpha es et O.

O Jesu parvule,, nache dir ist mir so weh,
trost mir mein Gemuete,
o puer optime, durch alle deine Guete,
o princeps gloriae, trahe me post te.

O Patris caritas, o nati lenitas,
wir warn all verloren,
per nostra crimina, so hat er uns erwoben,
coelorum gaudia, eia waern wir da.

Ubi sunt gaudia, nirgends mehr denn da,
da die Engel singen,
nova cantica, und e Schellen klingen,
in Regis curia, eia warn wir da.

Forgive all the duplications above
If you want a translation of this I will post it tomorrow

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 31-Mar-02.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Barbara
Date: 12 Dec 98 - 09:36 AM

There is also an English/Latin version of "In Dulce Jubilo" to be found in the Oxford Book of Carols. It is a glorious song for the harmony and counterpoint. I believe the arrangement is Bach. (so the German/latin words above would be the first version)
Blessings,
Barbara


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Philippa
Date: 12 Dec 98 - 12:20 PM

Does 'French at Killyloo' (separate thread) qualify?


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 12 Dec 98 - 03:31 PM

Not for me, sweetheart. Peppering foreign words throughout a text doesn't count. They have to add to the content in a meaningful way. Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 12 Dec 98 - 03:37 PM

a Philippa, Bhí mé cinéal giorraisc. Gabh mo leithscéal, a stór. Shíl mé nach raibh tú le cuairt a thabhairt orainn go dtí i ndiaidh na Nollag ?!!! Just couldnt stay away, huh?.

Nollaig shona agus Aithbhliain faoi mhaise duit, agus do Chaoimhín Ó Donnaille, agus do Iain Mac a' Phearsain, agus do Mharc fosta. Nach bhfuil sé ag caint liom níos mó ? Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Wolfgang Hell
Date: 12 Dec 98 - 03:54 PM

does anybody have more of the lyrics for Mary OHara's Maidrin Ruadh, mentioned by johnm above?

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: a short story made long
Date: 13 Dec 98 - 05:06 AM

"One young kingfisher once caught a stickleback in front of my hide and after a very superficial attempt to kill it preceded to try and swallow it. When the fish was half swallowed and still thrashing it became stuck. For 15 minutes the young bird tried to regurgitate the fish, shaking its head and wrenching at the fish, but it was stuck. By the time the bird managed to swallow the fish it had begun to shiver and sway on the perch. It had come very close to death and it was probably only the fact that the stickleback had suffocated whilst in its throat that saved it. I watched the same bird catch a stickleback the next day; it spent two or three minutes smashing the fish's head against the perch, killing it several times over, before swallowing it!" Charlie Hamilton James. Grantown-on-Spey: Colin Baxter Photography, 1987


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Subject: continuation
From: Philippa
Date: 13 Dec 98 - 05:25 AM

Excuse me, I pressed the wrong keys; I wasn't finished with the story. I just want you to understand why I didn't take down much or the song below; I was reading the above book with Celtic Connections playing in the background on BBC Radio Scotland. I was thinking about this example of bird learning (as opposed to instinct)and about the ambiguity of the penultimate sentence, and so on when I noticed the use of Irish in Bing Crosby's song "A Little Bit of Irish". Not a true macaronic of the type you require, Annraoi, but maybe something a bit like "Lomir Alle Zingen a Zemerel" as Charlie Baum describes it. The chorus goes:"Céad mile fáilte/Sláinte to you/And the top of the morning too" and the one verse I noted had something about "It's great how they greet you in Ireland...Learn the words so you won't have to guess"

Wolfgang - I might be able to get you lyrics, but it won't be right away so I hope someone beats me to it Annraoi - yes, Mudcat is addictive and it's even bringing on a multiple personality disorder. Anyway I keep looking for messages from you! It's good that I will soon have a break from the web. Caoimhin knows all about my habits, but don't tell Iain and Mark. I've heard the Glasgow song a few times on Radio nan Gaedheal and live at sessions, but I haven't heard other Scottish Gaelic macaronics nor seen any published in books or in an Tocher. Your best bet would probably be the School of Scottish Studies archives - I've given you a start with the Ross references. You could also try Martainn Mac an t-Saoir, who is archivist for the new Dualchas project at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 13 Dec 98 - 09:49 AM

Viva La Companie!

We have a serious problem with orthography, since my personal knowledge of, say, Gaelic (any flavor) is nil. As a consequence, I have to accept what's submitted.

Any suggestions?


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 13 Dec 98 - 12:59 PM

Does "I Wish I Had the Shepherd's Lamb" fit in this category? This thread is now so long, that it may have been mentioned earlier.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 13 Dec 98 - 07:38 PM

Dick, Carry on and don't worry. this is a serious thread with no unwelcome overtones.As far as I'm concerned, it is proving most instructive. I hope the same applies to the other contributors. Gaelic is not the only challenger to your orthographic expertise, seemingly, Vive la Compagnie! Happy christmas, Annraoi Alice, Maith thú. I'd forgotten that one. I think it just scrapes into my definition. Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 15 Dec 98 - 04:55 PM

Coinnigí ag dul ! Keep it up, Macaroneers. Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Philippa
Date: 16 Dec 98 - 04:52 AM

I shall not be swayed. I'm going to rest on my laurels (for the time-being, that is).


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Ralph Butts
Date: 16 Dec 98 - 02:30 PM

Lou Monte did a whole bunch of songs switching back and forth between English and fractured Italian, e.g.,

I'll Be Down to Get You in a Pushcart Honey
Skinny Lena
The Sheik of Napoli
Oh Marie
a number of others

......Tiger


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 17 Dec 98 - 12:02 AM

Cruiscín Lán (does it qualifiy?)

alice


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 17 Dec 98 - 12:02 AM

Cruiscín Lán (does it qualify?)

alice


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 17 Dec 98 - 02:04 PM

Depends on the version. Which one had you in mind, Alice?


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 17 Dec 98 - 08:38 PM

The version the Clancy's recorded, 'Let the farmer have his grounds, let the huntsman have his hounds,' etc. etc., then the chorus is in Gaelic. alice


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 17 Dec 98 - 09:41 PM

Alice, Remind me of it again. That's one I don't remember. I thought I knew all the Clancy's numbers. Annraoi


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Subject: Lyr Add: CRUISCÍN LÁN (Clancy/Makem )
From: Alice
Date: 18 Dec 98 - 01:17 PM

CRUISCÍN LÁN
(kroosh-keen-lawn)
lyrics and phoenetic pronunciation
as found in "The Irish Songbook, 75 Songs"
Clancy/Makem published ©79
(copied here for educational purposes)

Let the farmer praise his grounds,
Let the huntsman praise his hounds,
Let the shepherd praise his dewy scented lawn.
But I'm more wise than they,
Spend each happy night and day,
With my smilin' little cruiscín lán, lán, lán,
With my darlin' little cruiscin lan.

chorus
Oh, gradh mo chroide mo cruiscín, slainte geal Mauverneen,
Gradh mo chroide mo cruiscín lán, lán, lán,
Oh, gradh mo chroide mo cruiscín lan.
(phoenetic from the Irish
oh, graw mo kree mo kroosh-keen, slawnta gal Mohvoorneen,
Graw mo kree mo kroosh-keen, lawn, lawn, lawn,
Oh, graw mo kree mo kroosh-keen, lawn.)

Immortal and divine,
Great Bacchus god of wine,
Create me by adoption your own son.
In hopes that you'll comply,
that my glass shall ne'er run dry,
Nor my darlin little cruiscin lan, lan, lan,
My darlin little cruiscin lan.

chorus

When cruel death appears,
In a few but happy years,
He'll say, Oh, won't you come along with me.
And I'll say, Be gone, ye knave,
For King Bacchus gave me lave,
To take another cruiscin lan, lan, lan,
To take another cuiscin lan.

chorus

Then fill your glasses high,
Let's not part with lips so dry,
For the lark now proclaims it is the dawn.
And since we can't remain,
May we shortly meet again,
To fill another cruiscin lan, lan, lan,
To fill another cruiscin lan.

chorus


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 18 Dec 98 - 05:46 PM

Gotcha, Alice. Thanks. How's the weather in Montana.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 19 Dec 98 - 11:45 PM

minus 50 (f) below zero wind chill on the plains, but only minus ten below zero at my house


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 20 Dec 98 - 07:57 PM

Hello, Alice, At the moment it is -2 and we think it's hasky eneugh. Would your surname be Flynn, by any chance ? Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 20 Dec 98 - 10:08 PM

yes, it is.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 22 Dec 98 - 05:04 PM

I thought as much. It's a small world.Do you know anyMacaronic songs ? Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 22 Dec 98 - 08:47 PM

Only Cruiscín Lán, and I sing Maidrin Ruadh all in English in a version I put together from O'Hara's album notes, so the only part of that I sing in Gaelic are the words 'Maidrin Ruadh'. Since I don't really speak Gaelic, I only sing what I have listened to for years and am sure of pronunciation. There is a Gaelic Immersion language, music, dance workshop for 4 days in January in Missoula, MT, but I can't attend, unfortunately. Does 'The Juice of the Barley' count? There are only a few words in the chorus in Irish.

And how did you know my name is Flynn?

alice in montana


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: johnm
Date: 22 Dec 98 - 11:16 PM

My teacher taught/is teaching that course


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 22 Dec 98 - 11:29 PM

johnm, I called Sullivans tonight, because there are alot of us in Bozeman who would like to attend, but to drive that treacherous road in January weather and be gone from children for four days makes it impractical. It would be great to have the same classes in Bozeman sometime in the future (in better weather). alice


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: johnm
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 10:16 AM

The teacher is flying in from NY with her infant. I dont think she has ever been west of the Alleghenies before. She is a very good linguist and a singer to boot. You would enjoy her class


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Philippa
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 11:36 AM

John, who is the teacher? I'm going to visit family in New York sometime next year, I think.

Alice and Wolfgang - You can find the full macaronic Maidrin Rua as sung by Mary O'Hara in her book, A Song for Ireland. I'll type them in on a thread next year (look out for it around 8-12 Jan. I've also heard the song sung completely in Irish, apart from the word 'Tally-ho'.

Don't forget,everybody, neither Irish nor English has to be in the song for it to be valuable to this thread!

Nollaig Chridheil agus bliadhna mhath ur.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MADERINE RUE
From: Alice
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 12:08 PM

Peg and Robert Clancy have a version of 'Maderine Rue' that is mostly English, and it is printed in "The Irish Songbook, 75 Songs" Clancy/Makem.

The only recording of it that I have heard is Mary O'Hara's.

In the version I adapted to sing, it is different than the Clancy's in that I say 'two ears sticking up' (and if singing to kids, put fingers up by head like fox ears). In the Clancy's version, a more Irish use of 'peepin' instead of the more American 'sticking'.

MADERINE RUE
Maidrin Ruadh
lyrics adapted by Alice Flynn

chorus
Maderine Rue, Rue, Rue Rue,
Maderine Rue, the red fox.
Maderine Rue, he's hiding in the rushes,
With his two ears sticking up.

Good morrow fox, Good morrow sir,
Pray what is that you're eatin'?
A fine fat goose I stole from you,
Oh, would you like to taste it?
No, indeed Oh, no indeed,
I would not swallow any,
But I vow and swear you'll dearly pay,
For that fine, fat goose you're eatin'.

chorus

Hark, hark, Finder, Lily and Piper,
Gather the hounds together.
Come now, Truman, you lazy old hound,
Bateman, you're a good dog.
Tally ho on the scent, tally ho on the scent,
Tally ho on the scent little puppies.
Tally ho on the scent of that little red fox,
With his two ears sticking up.

chorus

Bad luck to you, you bad little fox,
For that fine fat goose you were eatin'
The lovely rooster, the pretty little hens,
And the finest ducks in Ireland.

chorus


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: johnm
Date: 23 Dec 98 - 08:34 PM

Philippa Her name is Una MacGillicuddy. Teaches at the Tara Circle in Westchester. If you see her in Missoula, say hello.

A disc I just got Bruach Na Carraige Baine by Diarmuid O Suilleabhain has two songs that fall into the Macrononic mode. The first is the title song for the album in which alternating verses are song in Irish and English and the second is My Pup Came Home from Claedeach, in which the languages are mixed together more completely. It is also humorous so should probably be added to the other thread. John Mulqueen


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 24 Dec 98 - 09:48 PM

Alice in Montana (Flynn), You appear in another place. 2+2=4. Nollaig shona agus sonas ort (thank you), Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Wolfgang
Date: 07 Jan 99 - 09:33 AM

better late than never: thanks, Alice, for posting Maderine Rua.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Philippa
Date: 28 Jan 99 - 01:55 PM

there's a very strange macaronic at zouki


Bobby, if you want to see notices that really are about Manx(not to do with macaronics, however), see also IrTrad-L archives

Wolfgang, I only just noticed that the version Alice posted isn't the one I have where the fox is addressed in Irish. So I still have to type that out for you after all. I'll give the song its own thread as this one is quite long. And I know Annraoi already has the song.


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Subject: the jumble above
From: Philippa
Date: 28 Jan 99 - 02:01 PM

I inverted the labelling of the two related URL addresses in my message above. The one called IrTrad-L archives will lead you directly to the macaronic ("Zouki helps out selflessly") while the one labelled "Zouki" will give you a selection of notices concerning Manx and music.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Bobby Bob, Ellan Vannin
Date: 28 Jan 99 - 06:48 PM

Philippa,

I'm not sure whether to thank you for that or not - or in what language (possibly loud and offensive!!).

Shoh slaynt,

Bobby Bob


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 29 Jan 99 - 12:46 AM

There is a very interesting collection of mixed French/English songs on the album "Acadie" by Daniel Lanois.He is the very talented Montreal-born singer songwriter who did the "Slingblade" soundtrack."Jolie Louise" and "Under A Stormy Sky" are both lively macaronic songs that interlace the two languages. Well worth a listen!


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 12:19 PM

Good on you, Bobby Bob. I don't know what some people get out of this type of infantile rubbish. Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Wolfgang
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 05:40 AM

On the new Chieftains CD, Tears of Stone, there's 'Jimmy, mó mhíle stór' in two languages, a song perfectly fitting in this thread. And there's 'A stór mó chroí, when you are far away' on the same album.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: johnm (inactive)
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 05:49 PM

Just came across a book in the Iona College Library called An tAmhran Macaronach by Diarmaid O Muirithe, Dublin 1980. it lists some 79 macronic songs. Introduction is in Irish, including two versions of An Maidrin Rua


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Philippa
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 06:03 PM

Annraoi has a copy of the book, johnm, but it was good of you to mention it.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 07:05 PM

Thanks for bringing this thread back. I was thinking of it when I posted to "lost loves" about The Quiet Land of Erin. Would it count? I would be interested in a translation to English of the Gaelic words in Quiet Land. I've only heard it as recorded by ... who else... Mary O'Hara.

alice in montana


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Subject: The Quiet Land of Erin
From: Philippa
Date: 22 Apr 99 - 07:47 AM

At Alice's behest, I've posted a singable English version, not a literal translation, at:
Ard Tí Chuain


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Subject: Mac Con Mara's macaronic
From: Philippa
Date: 22 Jul 99 - 02:05 PM

Usually in Irish/Gaelic-English macaronic verse, the lines in each language fit together without contradiction. The following ballad, however, is designed to deceive the monoglot. I have copied this song from James Healy. Ballads From the Pubs of Ireland. Cork: Mercier, 1965, 4th edition 1971. According to Healy's notes, the author Donnchadh Mac Con-Mara emigrated (in the 18th century) to Newfoundland and composed this poem on the spot when some English soldiers at a public house in St John's asked him for a song. Healy writes: "Extemporaneously he ran off the following to the delight of the sailor who understood the English part, and to the double-delight of the Irish present who understood it all. " I have copied the spelling from Healy's book; I suspect a couple of errors, but in most cases where the spelling deviates from the present-day standard I recognise a familiar archaic form. Mac Con-Mara's best known song is "Bán-Chnoic Éireann-ó"

MacNamara's Bilingual Ballad

As I was walking one evening fair,
Agus mé go déanacha m-baile Sheagáin [and I lately in St John's]
I met a gang of English blades
Agus iad da d-traohadh ag neart a námhaid [and they being subdued by the strength of their enemies]

I boozed and drank both late and early,
With those courageous 'men-of-war;'
'S gur bhinne liom Sasanaigh ag ruith ar
's gan do Ghaoidhil ann acht fíor bheagán. [and sweet it was for me to see English retreating and only a few Irish there]

I spent my fortune by being freakish,
Drinking, raking and playing cards;
Gidh ná raibh airgiod agam, 'ná greithe, [Although I had no money or jewels]
Na rád san t-saogal, achd nídh gan áird! [or anything in the world that was valuable]
Then I turned a jolly tradesman,
By work and labour I lived abroad;
'S bíoch ar m' fallaing-si gur mór an bhréag sin [And by my soul, but that's a great lie-]
Is beag dén t-saothar do thuit le m' láimh. ['Twas little work that I did]

Newfoundland is a fine plantation
It shall be my station till I die,
Mo crádh! Go m'fhearr liom a bheith a n-Éire [Alas, I'd rather be in Ireland]
Ag díol gáirteirighe, ná ag dul fá'n g-coill; [selling garters or taking to the woods]
Here you may find a virtuous lady
A smiling fair one to please your eye,
An paca staigionnadh is measa tréithe, [A pack of whores of the worst kind]
Go m-beireadh mé ar a bheith as radharc! [- may I be swept out of their sight!]

I'll join in fellowship with 'Jack-of -all-Trades,'

The last of August could I but see;
Atá fhios ag Coisdhealbhadh 's ar maghaisdir báid é, [Costello knows, and he's a ship's master]
Gur b'olc an láimh mé ar muir 'ná air tír; [that I'm no good on sea or land]
If fortune smiles, then I'll be her darling,
But if she scorns my company
Déanfad 'Bainistídhe an Toill anáirde.' [I'll manage myself a little hideout]
'S fada ón áit-si do bheidheadh mé 'rís [and it's far from this place I'll be again]

Come drink a health boys, to Royal George,
Our chief commander, nár órdaigh Críosd; [not blessed by Christ]
'S biodh bhúr n-athchuingidhe chum Muire Mhatair [And let your prayers to Mother Mary be]
É fein 's a ghárdaighe do Leagadh síos; [that he and his gansters may be struck down]
We'll fear no Cannon, nor 'War's Alarms',
While noble George will be our guide,
A Chríost go bhfeiceadh mé an bhrúid da chárnadh [O Christ; May I see the brute defeated]
Ag an Mac so ar fán uainn thall san bhFrainc [by this son {Prince Charles Edward Stuart,Bonnie Prince Charlie'} astray from us over in France]


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Subject: Lyr Add: MÍCHEÁL MÓR (David Mackenzie)
From: Philippa
Date: 30 Jul 99 - 10:37 AM

verses submitted by David Mackenzie to the Gaeilge-B mailing list in 1997. I found the the poem (without those annoying translations in brackets!] at:
www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaeilge/corpus/dain/micheal_mor.html


MÍCHEÁL MÓR

I heard this story ó mo athair [from my father],
(if you haven't Gaelic it doesn't matter)
This rural Ireland tragic tale
Narrates a sad seductive scéal [story]
Concerning lust without discretion
Agus beagnach rudaí eile freisin.[and a few other little things]

Uair amháin - fadó, fadó, [once upon a time]
On a little farm near Carraroe,
Lived [a] buachaill maith [good boy] named Mícheál Mór,
An only son of thirty four.
When work was done at end of day
He'd settle down with cupán tae [cup of tea]
And seldom felt the call to stroll
Or spend the evening time ag ól[drinking],
His intellectual needs were drawn
From books like Peig and Iosagán.

And so it was bliain in, bliain out [year in, year out]
Our Mícheál hadn't moved about.
He dreamt of cailíns [girls]- most men do-
But never sinned, an dtuigeann tú [do you understand]?

Meanwhile - up in Átha Cliath -
a cailín deas had a bright idea
When laethanta saoire [holiday] time came by
decided she would like to try
áit beag, ciúin,[a quiet little place] like Carraroe.
No foreign food - not far to go
and there to meet the native clan
Agus b'fhéidir{perhaps], find herself a man.

This cailín deas [pretty colleen] with eyes so blue
Was known in town as City Sue.
The lusty buachaillí [lads]came crawling
And all agreed she was go h-álainn.[beautiful]
She left her men in state of shock
Oh Mícheál Mór - bí cúramach ![be careful]

This scarlet woman knows each trick
She's heading west - beware a mhic [sonny]!
The lights shone in the Parish Hall
For the local Fáinne*-wearers Ball.
Bhí Mícheál ann..... Bhí Susie ann....{Micheal was there, susie was there]
Dressed in a most seductive gown.
[*the Fáinne is a badge indicating that the wearer is an Irish-speaker]

Our brave Cuchulainn of the West
His hurling medals across his chest
Exclaimed - when City Sue came in;
"In ainm Dé ! - well féach ar sin !"[in the name of Gaod, well, look at that!]
Though nervous - still - he took a chance
"Céad Míle Fáilte [100,000 greetings] - will you dance ?"
Go luath [quickly], on the floor they strut
Cheek to cheek - from mouth to foot.
She whispered into Mícheál's ear:
"Éist liom [listen] now, let's disappear,
We'll use my place, - the door's unlocked,
You'll stay the night - Seomra a h-ocht".[room 8]

Chríost ! Mícheál's ceann [head] was in a spin,
Ní raibh sé thinking thoughts mar sin ![he wasn't thinking such thoughts]
He blessed himself - this Jezebel
Would surely damn his soul to Hell.
He stood aghast - could hardly stutter
So off he bolted - ar a rothar [on his bike]
And straight abhaile [home] - into bed
Decades of the rosary said.

Mícheál Mór still sleeps alone
In his leaba bheag [little bed]- Ochón Ochón [alack and alas]!
He often dreams of Seomra a h-ocht ....
What might have been, Oh Mícheál bocht[poor] !

shades of Ros na Rún [Irish tv soap with a lot of Bearla thrown in]. Being bi-lingual does extend the range for rhymes!


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Subject: Mícheál Mór, bi-lingual song
From: Philippa
Date: 30 Jul 99 - 10:42 AM

the link didn't work, but you can just go to http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaeilge/corpus/dain/


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Subject: Lyr Add: SLAN ABHAILE (Dermot Henry)
From:
Date: 30 Jul 99 - 11:07 AM

SLAN ABHAILE (words and music by Dermot Henry; recorded by Cathie Ryan, bi-lingual chorus)
Dermot Henry, ASCAP/ACORN

The sun is down; the moon is blue
I think they know that I'm missing you
But time will heal this heartfelt pain
As soon as I see you again

Chorus
Slan abhaile.
Slan go foill
Safe home, good luck until we meet again
Beidh mo chroi seo briste gan thu a stor
This heart of mine will be broken without you my love
No go gcasfad aris orainn
Until we meet again
Eist is bi ag smaoineamh
Listen and be thinking
Ar an gceol 'ta ag teacht
On the music that is coming
O mo chroi seo amach
From the depths of my heart.

I see an island, you're on the pier
I see you crying in the misty air
You look so lonely and there's no one near
Wish I could hold you, wish you were here

Chorus

Look out your window when you're feeling blue
You'll see a bluebird looking in at you
Lay down your head, let yourself be free
Take in your deepest breath and sing with me

Chorus


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Subject: Lyr Add: VER MI O
From: Haruo
Date: 29 Sep 00 - 11:17 AM

Ver mi o

This is William Auld's perhaps macaronic Gaelic/Esperanto version of, I am guessing, "Sad am I without thee" as given in Marta Evans' Kantfesto I (Kanada Esperanto-Asocio, 1982?), in the compilation of which I collaborated, with slight emendations of the punctuation and h for circumflex; I'm pretty sure it had appeared previously in one of Auld and Hill's collections (probably Kantanta mia bird' or Floroj sen kompar'), but I don't have them at hand. I think the Gaelic has been respelt for non-Gaels (e.g. "Ver" might be "Bhair" or some such)... And I should say I don't consider this true macaroni; I think of true macaroni as much more integrated where it switches tongues, as in In Dulci Jubilo or the Boar's Head Carol.

REF: Ver mi o---ro van o
Ver mi o----ro van i
Ver mi o-ru o ho
Mi malghojas sen vi.

1. Se mi so-las kaj la mar'
nok-te hur-las en de-fi',
gvi-das lu-mo de_l' am'
mi-ajn pa-shojn al vi.

2. Mi-a har-po de la ghoj',
Mi-a ko-ra me-lo-di',
gvi-da lu-no de_l' nokt',
vi lu-ma-das al mi.

My MIDI of the tune is accessible at Melodio de "Ver mi o".

I don't know what the Gaelic says, but the Esperanto means more or less:

REF: ?(Gaelic)? / ?(Gaelic)? / ?(Gaelic)? / I am sad without you.

(aka, of course, Sad am I without thee!)


1. If I'm alone and the sea / howls at night in challenge, / the light of love guides / my steps to you.

2. My harp of joy, / My melody of the heart, / guiding moon of the night / you keep shining on me.

Now I'll go to the Digitrad Database and see what the English singing version looks like... (I'm a native anglophone of an eighth Gaelic (also half Sassenach, a quarter Norsky, and an eighth undecided) ancestry, but this song has hitherto been part of my Esperanto cultural heritage only.)

Liland
Esperanto hymnodist
Christmas Carols in Esperanto

PS: HTML test: Mi malĝojas sen vi (Encoding: Unicode UTF-8)


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Haruo
Date: 29 Sep 00 - 11:18 AM

My macaronic Latin/Esperanto version of In Dulci Jubilo is the latest addition to my online hymnal.

In dulci jubilo (Latin/Esperanto)

Enjoy.

Liland
Esperanto hymnologist, hymnodist and hymnist


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Chocolate Pi
Date: 29 Sep 00 - 11:59 AM

English/Yiddish: Mein Ruheplatz.
"Don't look for me where myrtles blossom,
You will not find me there, mein schatz.
At the machines, where lives are withered
Dorten iz mein ruheplatz, dorten iz mein ruheplatz."
In the Digitrad in a number of variations.

My highschool Spanish teacher delighted the class by playing fragments from a sort-of-rap-song which went:
"First you tell me one thing than you tell me otra cosa
How can I believe you when you are a mentirosa?"


Chocolate Pi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 30 Sep 00 - 12:10 PM

'Mein Ruheplatz' only becomes macaronic in translation, probably because it is very difficult to translate in its entirety without loss of its special flavour. There is a complete Yiddish text, though. - Susanne (glad to have her cookie back)


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: GUEST,Liland qua guest
Date: 30 Sep 00 - 06:58 PM

I have the Japanese first verses, romanized, of four Christmas carols including In Dulci Jubilo, which is why I mention it here, on my website at this location. But it's not macaronic, more of a Good Christian Men Rejoice approach.

Liland


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 16 Mar 02 - 09:18 PM

seesion 16 March at Thran Maggie's, Derry, Ireland. Dick MacGabhann & Páidí Ó Mianáin sang "One morning in May agus mé dul ag spaisteoireacht", so Beathag Morrison tried to recall "Ciad Turas Mhic Dhòmhnaill a Ghlaschu" (see 11 Dec 1998 above). So I thought maybe it's time to refresh this thread


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 18 Nov 02 - 01:03 PM

refresh for "Maidrin Rua"


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 18 Nov 02 - 01:20 PM

Alice, how about the maidrín ruathread

http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8906#56128


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Declan
Date: 18 Nov 02 - 01:27 PM

One of my favourite Macaronic songs is A Match was Making/Ta mo Chleamhnas a Dheanamh as sung on the first Altan album by Mairead and Aine Ni Mhaonaigh. The song possibly wouldn't be considered purely macaronic as the alternate verses in Gailge and English are translations of each other, but it is a beautiful version of a lovely song none the less.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Joe_F
Date: 18 Nov 02 - 07:59 PM

I think there was a tradition of German-Latin macaronic carols. In addition to "In Dulce Jubilo" mentioned earlier in this thread, I remember from high school

Psallite unigenito
Christo Dei filio
Redemptori Domino
Puerulo jacenti
In praesepio.

Ein kleines Kindelein
Liegt in dem Krippelein.
Alle liebe Engelein
Dienen dem Kindelein
Und singen Ihm fein.

Psallite, etc.

(You will pardon me if I have gotten some of the endings wrong.)

The following English--dog-Latin one, which I remember from college, is probably 18th- or 19th-century British:

Amo, amas, I love a lass
As a cedar tall and sleder.
Sweet cowslip's grace is her nominative case,
And she's of the feminine gender.

Rorum corum sunt divorum,
Harum scarum divo,
Tagrag merryderry periwig and hatband,
Hic hoc horum genitivo.

Can I decline a nymph divine?
Her voice as a flute is dulcis.
[line forgotten]
And soft, when I tacto, her pulse is.

Rorum corum, etc.

O how bella my puella!
I'll kiss secula seculorum.
If I've luck, sir, she's my uxor.
O dies benedictorum!

Rorum corum, etc.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 19 Nov 02 - 11:43 AM

Philippa, thanks for adding that link. I didn't trace the thread and couldn't find it yesterday.

This thread makes me sad, one of the most fun threads with Annraoi, may he rest in peace.

Alice


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Mary Humphreys
Date: 19 Nov 02 - 05:48 PM

This thread started with a mention of Welsh macaronic songs. Here is a good example which has not been posted yet:
A ei di'r deryn du?

A ei di'r deryn du
To my dearest love
O cais fy nghangen gu
For I'm so deep in love.

Ni welaf yn un man
Such a damsel in my sight
A'r ferch mor lan o liw
She is a beauty bright

Mae'i gwallt yn felyn aur
Just like a ring of gold
A'i phryd fel eira gwyn
The truth it must be told.

Collected fromW. Sylvanus Jones of Llanllyfni , Sir Gaerfyrddin & published in 1941.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: Haruo
Date: 10 May 06 - 03:58 PM

I just posted a quadrilingual Chinook Jargon/Skokomish/Clallam/English VBS-campfire-type ditty. It was posted yesterday to Chinook List by David Robertson, a Victoria BC linguist, and tentatively attributed to Myron Eells, noted 19th-century NW missionary/linguist. Robertson found it in the BC Provincial Museum archives, along with a couple of other religious songs (one in Skokomish i.e. Twana, the other in Nisqually i.e. Southern Lushootseed).

Haruo


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,Darowyn
Date: 11 May 06 - 01:01 PM

On the off-chance that somebody might be able to trace the source, I remember reading somewhere that the nursery rhyme "Hickory,Dickory Dock" was a macaronic verse, and that the apparently nonsense words were either Basque or (more romantically) "the secret language of the Witches"
Does this strike a chord with anyone?


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: Kaleea
Date: 11 May 06 - 04:06 PM

Don't know about hickory dickory dock, but my 1 1/2 year old neice & I watched someone sing (& dance) "Do the Macaroni" on Sesame Street this morning.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: An Pluiméir Ceolmhar
Date: 11 May 06 - 05:05 PM

Yiddish poses problems because it's an inherently macaronic language itself, being German in structure with roughly one part German, one part Hebrew and one part Russian/Polish vocabulary. Does that mean we've discovered metamacaronics? ;-)

BTW, I've sometinmes wondered if Hickory dickory dock isn't a thinly-veiled reference to sex. Have I a warped mind, or just read too much Freud in my formative years?


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Darowyn
Date: 12 May 06 - 04:00 AM

You are just thinking about basques, aren't you?
Cheers
Dave


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: sian, west wales
Date: 12 May 06 - 05:24 AM

Mary and the original poster mentioned Welsh songs - and Mary gave the words to one of the prettiest and perhaps best known. There are actually quite a few, and many of them 'fit' a lot of the theory above.

A Ei Di Deryn Du (Blackbird, will you go?) as posted by Mary

Bachgen Bach o Dincar - which was discussed in another thread some time ago, I think in connection with some Australian songs

Y Ferch o Fedlam (The Girl from Bedlam) - a variation of Dives and Lazarus

Ar y Ffordd wrth Fynd i Rymni (On the Road to Rhymni) - which I always tended to avoid in public singing due to the repeating line, "Very Well done Jim Crow". I recently found out that, in the area from which it came, there's a historic cottage known to everyone as "Jim Crow Cottage" so this may require some further research ...

Dingl Ding Joseph - a children's song

A number of ballads from the 18th C, particularly those of Jac Glan Gors

Can Merthyr, which is the only one that I have to memory, first verse being:

Ye lads all through the country
Gwrandewch (listen) unto my story:
You'd better go dros Ben y Graig (over Pen y Graig)
Than go with gwraig (wife) to gwely (bed).

The singer goes on to complain about his wife who gives him thin soup and no tobacco.

siân


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: Haruo
Date: 12 May 06 - 12:43 PM

That was weird, I was trying to see the diacritic on "siân", which was coming out on my screen as a capital A with an accent followed by a US cent sign (c + /). I checked the encoding and it was defaulting to "Western-Windows" so I clicked on Unicode, but it went automatically to 16-bit, and the whole thread suddenly turned into Chinese gibberish with occasional sentences in a mixture of Georgian, Korean and Devanagari. When I clicked on UTF-8 it finally showed me the circumflex I craved.

Haruo


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: MartinRyan
Date: 12 May 06 - 02:08 PM

APC

Heard one recently alternating German and Yiddish. No idea what it was about.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 May 06 - 03:00 PM

As I said in the thread Lyr Add: Multilingual Native-American Medley, when I listen to radio station WOJB, "Woodland Community Radio," in northern Wisconsin, I occasionally hear macaronic songs mixing English with some Native American language(s) which I don't recognize. (The Indians in that area are Chippewa/Anishinabe, but I don't think we can assume that all the music they play is in their language.)

I will pay more attention in the future and try to come back with some names of songs and singers.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: sian, west wales
Date: 12 May 06 - 03:22 PM

Haruo

The Macaronic principle has invaded the internet.

I like to think, however, that I have that effect on people. What is that Inuit saying? "A woman who does not lie with a husband is a dangerous thing." ... or something like that.

sia^n (if that helps)

p.s. I think the gibberish is connected with me using the Welsh accents software which comes with the Welsh spellchecker. Maybe. Dunno, really.

s


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: Wilfried Schaum
Date: 17 May 06 - 10:27 AM

A medieval student song from the Carmina Burana I posted in the wrong thread, look here


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,Jack Campin
Date: 17 May 06 - 01:44 PM

There is a Breton/French macaronic song which includes a bilingual pun. It came up when I asked about its tune on the ABC list. Turns out the tune is a nameless "an dro", used for a broadside ballad from 1871 which was recorded (1980s?) by the Breton group Tri Yann. It's about Breton soldiers being used as cannon fodder for the French at the time of the Franco-Prussian War and the Paris Commune. I have the full story and lyrics at home, but I'm 3000 miles away at the moment - maybe anyone who's still interested could email me directly (jack dot campin at gmail dot youknowwhat)and I'll fish it out.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,Jill Rogoff
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 09:15 AM

I'm working on a couple of quadrilingual songs from Sarajevo, from the Sephardic tradition. One is in Ladino (Judeo-Spanish), Hebrew, Turkish and Greek (four lines to a verse, each line in a different language); the other song is Ladino, Hebrew, Turkish and Serbo-Croat... No wonder they're scarcely sung anymore!

Many years ago, I also came across a song in Hebrew and Italian, but neglected to copy it down (thinking the book would always be available to me again -- big mistake!). I'm still looking for it.

In the medieval repertoire, there are some other macaronic songs: of course, there's the chorus ('Deo Gratias!') in the famous Agincourt Song, but also Nova Nova (a Scots song in Lallands and Latin, if I'm remembering correctly) and then the lovely There Is No Ros of Sych Vertu -- Middle English and Latin.

There are also occasional French shanty songs with English lines in them, or lines in Breton.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: MartinRyan
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 03:13 PM

As it happens, I've recently been trying my hand at composing a macaronic, in connection with a course I'm taking (of study, not medicine...). While the references are very local and topical, the approach may be of interest;
----------------

Air: Tatterjack Walshe (a.k.a. The Price of my Pig)

Ar mo ghabháil tríd an Spidéil ar maidin, go moch
I chanced to fall in with a handsome young buck
Ag fágaint Tigh Hughes, is é ólta go leor
And he stood and he blinked - as he walked out the door!
"Do thosaigh an ceol ag leath-huair 'théis a sé
The trouble is I can't remember WHICH DAY
Idir polkas, mazurkas, barndances and jigs
Sure I clean forgot - I'd to sell off them pigs!"

Shíos ag an cros-bothair, is ann bhí an scléip
The Guards were all laying out scene-of-crime tape
Bhí muc ag rith soir – 's ceann eile 'dul siar
As the Sergeant called out "Lets have some order here!"
Bhí triocha haon Franncaigh ar gluaisrothair móra
On the way to a session beyond Ballyhoura
Sé dúirt a gceannródai "Mais amis! My friend -
There's no telling how this adventure will end!"


Ag oifig an phoist in In-der-eabhán
Two lads tried a raid – with the guards looking on!
Now, caithfinn a rá nach raibh siad ró-glic
As bank-robbers go, they were totally thick!
Ón Aifrica Theas a tháinig an beirt
And one of them said – causing much mirth?
"Bhí "getaway" réite – is b'shin é an seift
Sure we even remembered to drive on the left!

Ach anois tá muid gabhtha – is beimid go deo
It's off to the Gaol of Clonmel we must go
Ag gabháil tríd An Spidéal a bheimid anocht
Inside of a squad car, go daingean is docht
'S caithfidh mé innsint libh rud amháin eile
They won't think of us like they did of Mandela
Ní thiochfaidh aon cuireadh ó N-U-I-G
And we'll never get – any Galway Degree!

Regards

p.s. No doubt some alert 'catter will spot the deliberate mistake!


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: melodeonboy
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 03:35 PM

Some zydeco songs are macaronic (French/English).


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Jack Campin
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 07:52 PM

Uzbek/Persian macaronics in northern Afghanistan:

Afghan Teahouse Music


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 10 Oct 12 - 07:30 PM

I've been looking, so far unsuccessfully, for digital copy of a broadside bilingual or macaronic song. Can anyone help out and expedite the search. Any song in the genre,an image of a printed broadside.
thanks in advance


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: MartinRyan
Date: 11 Oct 12 - 05:14 AM

Hi Philippa

You can access a copy of The Young Sick Lover (in TCD library) via:

This link

Regards


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: MartinRyan
Date: 12 Oct 12 - 04:34 PM

Refresh...


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,John Moulden
Date: 13 Oct 12 - 11:46 AM

Pretty well all the macaronics on ballad sheets were done by Haly [Joseph] of Hanover Street, Cork. There is at least one printed by him entitled "The Flowers of Edinburgh" which has alternate verses in Irish and English - in the Bodleian Ballads - I only looked till I found one - there may be more.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,Gerry
Date: 14 Oct 12 - 07:44 AM

I don't think anyone has mentioned Fel Shara. From the liner notes of the Putumayo compilation, A Jewish Odyssey: "Fel Shara is a traditional Sephardic love song that effortlessly blends five different languages (Ladino, Italian, French, Englsh and Arabic). The languages shift in mid-phrase, switching between English and French or Italian and Arabic from one word to the next...." The recording is by KlezRoym.

The Susan McKeown, Lorin Sklamberg CD, Saints & Tzadiks, has several mixed-language songs. The first track has Yiddish and English versions of the Cruel Brother ballad. Another track combines Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye, Kh'bin Oysgeforn Felder, and Deus Meus Adiuva Me --- the last one is half Latin, half Irish. The Rattlin Bog alternates Yiddish and English. The Dark Slender Boy alternates English and Irish.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Felipa
Date: 16 Oct 16 - 08:39 AM

Keberoxu just "discovered" another lyric, penned by early 20th century Scottish poet Murdoch Maclean and published in his "Songs of a Roving Celt" The verses in Gaelic mostly refer to the waves of the sea which separate the poet and (his) love/the isle of Skye, the poet singing while "na m'aonar s'mi ann so leam fhein" - alone here by myself

To sing thy praises would I try
    Cha bhard mi gus mo gradh a seinn
    Na m'aonar s'mi ann so leam fhein
So distant from the Isle of Skye.

But though the waves are raging white
    A's muir na'n tonn a'g eiridh ard
    Cur eadar mise a's mo gradh
To thee my fancy takes its flight.

And hours like fleeting moments speed
    Nuair smaoineacheas mi air do thlachd;
    Ged bhiodh mo chridhe fodh broin 's fodh smachd
What other balm could sufferer need?

Skill'd in poetic art were I
    Air te do chliu gu'n togainn fonn,
    Ach's ard na beann a's fuar na'n tonn
Between me and the Isle of Skye.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: JMB
Date: 16 Oct 16 - 12:59 PM

Iesum Dominum is a macaronic song mixing Latin and Scottish Gaelic. The chorus in Latin, and the verses in Gaelic. It is a Christmas hymn in the genre of waulking songs. I learned it at a Christmas Ceilidh some years ago, and arranged a version that I do with the guitar.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Felipa
Date: 16 Oct 16 - 01:22 PM

tapadh leibh Not fully macaronic, just refrain in Latin, at least in this version from the singing of Fiona Mackenzie
www.fionamackenzie.org/DuanNollaig.pdf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2PytwSb4_w
(I prefer Mairi MacInnes version https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkveZpFhniA )

IESUM DOMINUM

Sèisd
Iesum Dominum,
Venite, adoremus,
Iesum Dominum,

Rann
Biodh an trionaid ga Moladh
Gura Nollaig Mhic Dhè i!

Rugadh Ios' ar ceann-cinnidh
Ann an sgiothal na sprèidhe.

Bha an saoghal ro chumhang,
Ged a chruthaich E fhein e.

'N aona chùil bha gun urram,
Aite-fuirich Mhic Dè e.

E na shìneadh san fhrasaich,
Damh na fhaisge ri geumraich.

Ach, a Mhàthair na glaine,
'S gu bheil t'anam gun bheud air,

Bidh tu 'g ùrnaigh rid Mhacan
E bhith mathadh ar feuch dhuinn;

Oidhche choimheach na Nollaig
Anns a'bhothaig am Bèthlem.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DARLING, JE VOUS AIME BEAUCOUP (Sosenko)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Dec 16 - 12:53 PM

I enjoyed the challenge of transcribing this—with lots of help from Google Translate to make sure I got the accents and spelling right:


DARLING, JE VOUS AIME BEAUCOUP
Words and music by Anna Sosenko, ©1935.
As sung by Hildegarde in a British Pathé Pictorial.

SPOKEN: Now this song is about an English boy who falls in love with a French girl. Of course, not knowing the French language, he doesn't know just how to express his love, but this is how he manages it. Ooh-la-la!

VERSE: Je suis ici patrie long,
Mais, s'il vous plaît, écoute ma song.
Vous avez un grand appeal.
To speak my heart [n'est pas]* facile.
Permettez-moi
to expliquer
In my own peculiar way
Exactly what mon cœur would say:

CHORUS 1: Darling, je vous aime beaucoup.
Je ne sais pas
what to do.
Vous avez completely stolen my heart.

Matin, midi et le soir,
Toujours
wondering how you are—
That's the way I felt right from the start.

Ah, chérie, my love for you is très, très fort.
Wish my French were good enough; oh, I'd tell you so much more.

Mais j'espère that you comprit
All the little things you mean to me.
Darling, je vous aime beaucoup.
I love you.

CHORUS 2: Oh, my darling, vous êtes très jolie.
Qu'est-ce que c'est vous
do to me?
Absolutely je suis en la trance.

Tout le temps j'espère que vous
Dream of me a little too.
Ah, chérie, je pense this is romance.

Quand nous sommes alone and you are in my arms,
Je remercie le bon Dieu for all your lovely charms.

Dites-moi: do you love me too?
Je suis happy if you do.
Darling, je vous aime beaucoup.
Oh, I love you so, I do!
I do love you.


* I inserted "n'est pas" at this point to make sense of the line, but I couldn't make out what she really sings.

Nat King Cole recorded a shorter version of this in 1954. He sings only chorus 1 with a partial repeat, and some words given in French above are sung by him in English.

Wikipedia has the following comment:
When the song was written, "je vous aime" (using the respectful second person plural) was the normal way of saying "I love you" in French - until a threshold of intimacy had been reached, or in public. It has come to sound quaint, as now one would normally say "je t'aime" (using the familiar second person singular), regardless of the level of intimacy or location.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Thompson
Date: 04 Dec 16 - 12:25 PM

Sean Duffy's Medieval Ireland, an Encyclopedia has a reference to Colmán moccu Cluasaig (died around 655), abbot and fear léigind (journal-keeper?) of the Monastery of Cork, whose composition Sén De don de for don te ("God's blessing, bear us, succour us") was composed to avert the Yellow Plague of 664/5 (obviously not successfully in the case of poor Colmán +RIP+) and is referred to as "one of the earliest pieces of macaronic verse in any western European vernacular, interspersing Latin phrases into an Irish adaptation of an early liturgical ordo for the dead. The list of Old Testament saints invoked, Abel, Elias and so forth, betrays Eastern liturgical influence: nothing like it exists elsewhere in Europe at this early date", plus more about Colmán.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Felipa
Date: 06 Jan 17 - 05:01 PM

from http://www.jewish-languages.org/jewish-english.html

Many [Orthodox Jewish] community members talk about "Yeshivish," as we can see in the title of a popular book (Weiser 1995) and in this song by the Orthodox band Journeys:

    In the hallowed halls of yeshivos ('Yeshivas') far and wide,
    Our young men have discovered a new way to verbalize.
    With Yiddish, English, Hebrew – it's a mixture of all three,
    And a dash of Aramaic – a linguistic potpourri!
    That's called: yeshivishe reyd ('Yeshiva speech'), yeshivishe shprax ('Yeshiva language'):
    Take ('really'), epis ('something'), grade ('in reality'), a gevaldike zax ('remarkable thing').
    It's called: yeshivishe reyd, yeshivishe shprax:
    It's the tawk of the town, mamish ('really') tog un naxt ('day and night').


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Thompson
Date: 06 Jan 17 - 05:42 PM

Perhaps I've been listening to too much Soft Machine, but Sén De don de for don te sounds like something Kevin Ayers would have composed.


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