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BS: Mudcat foodies thread

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Chanteyranger 25 Mar 07 - 05:55 PM
TRUBRIT 25 Mar 07 - 05:59 PM
Rapparee 25 Mar 07 - 06:19 PM
autolycus 25 Mar 07 - 06:37 PM
Bee 25 Mar 07 - 06:40 PM
Rapparee 25 Mar 07 - 06:49 PM
The Fooles Troupe 25 Mar 07 - 08:20 PM
Rapparee 25 Mar 07 - 08:38 PM
The Fooles Troupe 25 Mar 07 - 08:55 PM
GUEST 25 Mar 07 - 09:06 PM
GUEST,Canadienne 25 Mar 07 - 09:07 PM
Beer 25 Mar 07 - 09:28 PM
Bee 25 Mar 07 - 10:03 PM
GUEST,Cats 26 Mar 07 - 04:54 AM
Scoville 26 Mar 07 - 11:11 AM
JennyO 26 Mar 07 - 11:15 AM
MMario 26 Mar 07 - 11:23 AM
GUEST 26 Mar 07 - 12:15 PM
MMario 26 Mar 07 - 12:37 PM
Scoville 26 Mar 07 - 12:42 PM
ClaireBear 26 Mar 07 - 02:16 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 26 Mar 07 - 02:32 PM
Liz the Squeak 26 Mar 07 - 05:44 PM
mrdux 26 Mar 07 - 06:53 PM
GUEST,worker 26 Mar 07 - 07:16 PM
Rapparee 26 Mar 07 - 07:30 PM
bobad 26 Mar 07 - 07:33 PM
GUEST,worker 26 Mar 07 - 07:35 PM
Rapparee 26 Mar 07 - 07:43 PM
GUEST,Bardan 26 Mar 07 - 08:31 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 26 Mar 07 - 10:26 PM
Bee 26 Mar 07 - 11:30 PM
The Fooles Troupe 26 Mar 07 - 11:42 PM
mrdux 27 Mar 07 - 01:43 AM
Barry Finn 27 Mar 07 - 02:57 AM
Wordsmith 27 Mar 07 - 03:44 AM
GUEST,Cats 27 Mar 07 - 04:08 AM
autolycus 27 Mar 07 - 11:02 AM
Bee 27 Mar 07 - 11:19 AM
MMario 27 Mar 07 - 11:23 AM
Ruth Archer 27 Mar 07 - 11:36 AM
The Fooles Troupe 27 Mar 07 - 10:35 PM
Scoville 28 Mar 07 - 10:45 AM
GUEST,maire-aine 28 Mar 07 - 12:39 PM
Georgiansilver 28 Mar 07 - 12:44 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 28 Mar 07 - 04:09 PM
Mrrzy 29 Mar 07 - 01:06 PM
RangerSteve 29 Mar 07 - 06:53 PM
The Fooles Troupe 29 Mar 07 - 06:59 PM
mrdux 30 Mar 07 - 12:58 AM
Wordsmith 30 Mar 07 - 02:00 AM
Wordsmith 04 Apr 07 - 04:17 AM
Scoville 04 Apr 07 - 12:41 PM
GUEST,maire-aine 04 Apr 07 - 01:23 PM
Bee 04 Apr 07 - 01:29 PM
bobad 04 Apr 07 - 01:32 PM
Scoville 04 Apr 07 - 01:57 PM
Dave'sWife 04 Apr 07 - 04:30 PM
Scoville 04 Apr 07 - 04:50 PM
Bee 04 Apr 07 - 05:04 PM
The Fooles Troupe 04 Apr 07 - 06:35 PM
GUEST,HiLo 05 Apr 07 - 10:06 AM
Scoville 05 Apr 07 - 10:20 AM
GUEST,Hi Lo 05 Apr 07 - 12:18 PM
Scoville 05 Apr 07 - 12:58 PM
Dave'sWife 05 Apr 07 - 03:57 PM
mrdux 06 Apr 07 - 02:06 AM
Dave'sWife 06 Apr 07 - 02:56 AM
Wordsmith 06 Apr 07 - 03:40 AM
GUEST,HiLo 06 Apr 07 - 08:10 AM
mrdux 06 Apr 07 - 02:28 PM
Scoville 06 Apr 07 - 02:35 PM
GUEST,Dani 06 Apr 07 - 05:41 PM
Wordsmith 07 Apr 07 - 03:28 AM
GUEST,Bardan 10 Apr 07 - 04:46 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 10 Apr 07 - 07:32 PM
GUEST,Scoville at dad's 10 Apr 07 - 08:07 PM
mrdux 11 Apr 07 - 01:26 AM
MMario 11 Apr 07 - 08:15 AM
GUEST,maire-aine 11 Apr 07 - 10:30 AM

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Subject: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 05:55 PM

Being one who loves to cook and eat out, I thought I'd start a thread for any and all things related to cooking, eating, food history, family recollections, favorite food writers, recipes, and the like.

Do you feel a certain connection to friends through cooking and eating together that is much like a musical connection? Both are nourishing to the body and soul. Who are the people that have influenced your cooking and eating tastes and habits? Any favorite recipes to post? Just a few questions in what I hope to be a very open ended discussion about all thngs food related.

For starters, my family has most influenced me. My mother is a great cook, and has opened a world of food for us. The Julia Child revolution affected her and helped further open up her repertoire and fueled her natural curiosity. My sister is a food writer and lecturer, cookbook author...and one hell of a great cook, too. My father cooked Chinese food for the family every Wednesday night. outside of family, there are two food writers who most influence me: Claudia Roden, and Paula Wolfert. If you like Eastern Mediterraneran and North African food, you can't go wrong with them.

Chanteyranger


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: TRUBRIT
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 05:59 PM

Well - my husband's curry (I do not cook - I admire -- I sit at the breakfast bar and say, that smells wonderful dear - may I have another glass of wine....) has now come to represent monthly song circles or house concerts at Sinsull's. If any one wanted, I could ask him for the recipe.......

As soon as I smell a Chelsea Bun, I KNOW I am in England....


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Rapparee
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 06:19 PM

1. Select the dinner you want.
2. Following the directions, heat it in the microwave.
3. Eat it.

Cooking is sooooooooooooooo simple. And all you have to do is remember my Prime Directive:

Non-toxic in, non-toxic out.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: autolycus
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 06:37 PM

I thoroughly recommend the Hasty Pudding recipe in the joke thread.

   Taken to more roll-mops herrings and picled cucmbers recently, a real throwback to the cuisine of my Lithuanian grandfather.


   A bloke writes. Cooking is easy. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Just follow the recipe until the penny drops.






       Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Bee
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 06:40 PM

My mother is a plain cook, and a gifted baker. My big cooking influences ended up being various flatmates... the Russian Jewish girl who was the very best cook I've ever known taught me everything from a proper chicken soup (start with whole chicken) to Italian yummies, zabaglione, baked beef heart with prunes and vegetables, and general kitchen skills .... the Burmese girl who taught me yummy sweet burmese curry noodle dishes with coconut milk and how to make carrot fudge .... the Dutch kids who taught me basic Indonesian style curries and a frightening dish consisting of potatoes, sausage coil and kale boiled in one pot....

With that base, I learned to cook other great ethnic dishes pretty easily. I love cooking.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Rapparee
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 06:49 PM

I shouldn't denigrate my cooking, says my wife. I'm a decent cook, and can turn out a pretty good meal when I have the time to do so.

But I'm never again going to cook venison or any other pastitsio, because I swore that I would never, ever again make a beauchamel sauce from scratch.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 08:20 PM

So, you tired of being the pat'stitsio. Rapaire?


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Rapparee
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 08:38 PM

No, just that a job that should have taken two hours tops took eight hours to finish.

It was delicious, but that's a bit much for me.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 08:55 PM

Confessing that you bit off more than you could chew, Rap?   :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 09:06 PM

OK - I'm a self-confessed "foodie"
My apologies for posting various recipes for squirrel, moose etc I really LOVE cooking and daren't confess how many cook books I have although it's in the hundreds! (well a girl has to have a hobby)

Next weekend I have to plan a dinner menu for a double birthday party for 8 people - suggestions welcome.

p.s, I'm quite partial to good wines too :)


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,Canadienne
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 09:07 PM

sorry - that was me !


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Beer
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 09:28 PM

Mum was (still alive at 90) a great cook. Especially when there was nothing in the house to eat. Feeding 12 children was a chore but one I was to young to understand. I remember a few things though. Going to school with bread and lard as the spread. Lining up in the morning before school to get our cod liver oil dose. She use to go to the fish house and scrape the oil as it floated to the top. Take it home boil it and when cooled feed us. Then there was the potatoes and herring 5 days a week when the fishing was good. Porridge and bread and molasseses was a treat. Then Dad would get lucky and happen to catch a halibut or cod. Boy there was nothing like a stuffed baked halibut.
Those were the hard times and cherished memories.
Love you Mum.
Adrien


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Bee
Date: 25 Mar 07 - 10:03 PM

Nothing wrong with a big stuffed baked haddock, either, Beer. We ate lots of that, and lots of homemade bread and molasses. Saturdays she'd bake beans, in the coal stove oven, in a crock with onions, pork scraps or bacon, and molasses, and bake brown bread in big juice cans with it.

Man, I hated cod liver oil, but we got bottles of it, not living near a fish house - there were small farms around us, so we had vegetables, and we kids picked every edible berry around for winter jams.

But my bro-in-law is a fisherman's son, and he remembers being ashamed when bringing lobster sandwiches to school every day because they couldn't afford balogna.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,Cats
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 04:54 AM

I am an unashamed foodie. Wouldn't eat anything else! Last Saturday I did a dinner for another foodies birthday on the theme of 'A Dinner for an English Gentleman'. We had King Prawns in Brandy cream sauce served with Cornish asparagus and home baked rolls as a starter, Roast haunch of venison with a gin jus served with new potatoes, and local seasonal vegetables, followed by Port jelly [i.e. port set and nothing else added] with Cornish Clotted cream, fresh raspberries and shortbread, Cheeseboard then coffee and florentines. Wines were Lanson with the prawns, Presidents XV with the venison, Couvoisier XO with the coffee. The food miles were minimal. Conviviality superb, food exceptional even though I say so myself. Anyone want menu's - I'll quite happily design one for you.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Scoville
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 11:11 AM

TexasCooking.com

The Gumbo Pages.

Texas & Louisiana, respectively. Includes recipes involving catfish (but not banjo. I've yet to discover how to filet a banjo).

And the Chitterling Site has a great sweet-potato pie recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: JennyO
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 11:15 AM

I suppose if you don't cook a banjo properly, it will be a bit tough and stringy....


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: MMario
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 11:23 AM

Bee - re: lobster as "poor man's food" -- at a recent family gathering we were discussing the fact that various items we grew up eating becuase of their low cost; and that were scorned by our peers - such as lobster, mussels, whelk, various cuts of meat are now so pricey that they are trendy


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 12:15 PM

I am a pasta foodie, just a lump of garlic, fresh sauted tomates and a bit of basil and olive on a plate of Penne...then garlic bread and a good Italian wine, can't beat it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: MMario
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 12:37 PM

you don't need the tomatoes, either - a bit of basil, some garlic and the oil...


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Scoville
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 12:42 PM

Re: cooking banjo

And don't forget to skin it first.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: ClaireBear
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 02:16 PM

Don't be silly. The banjo is not a food, it's a pan. You use it to make haggis in an oven. The skin head on the banjo releases its savor up through the haggis mixture, giving the haggis that je-ne-sais-quoi. Especially if the banjo player sweated a lot.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 02:32 PM

I raised my sons alone, and for several years before that did much of the cooking. Cooking has never been an art form for me... more of an enjoyable necessity. One of my great treasures is my Mother's recipe book which she copied for me, of all her favorite recipes. I still do a lot of cooking, and was pleased to see this thread. If we can make requests, I've been looking for a white chili recipe... chicken or turkey chili with garbanzo beans as a substitute for the usual kidney beans. I'd be glad to swap my treasured Cowboy Cake recipe for a chicken or turkey chili recipe. I paid one of my Folk-Legacy albums for the Cowboy Cake recipe at a concert that I did, many years ago.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 05:44 PM

Got this in my head earlier.. tune should be obvious.

Mayo, Mayonnaise,
Lunchtime comin and I want me lunch.
Mayo, Mayonnaise,
Lunchtime comin and I want me lunch.

Hey Mr Sandwich man, make me up a sandwich
Fresh, fresh butter and a crusty bun.
Egg mayonnaise please, make me up a sandwich,
Lunchtime comin and I want me lunch..

Well it amused me for a while.

LTS


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: mrdux
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 06:53 PM

Canadienne --

Dinner party for 8? A couple weeks ago I did a dinner for six -- a cassoulet, with a loaf of crusty bread and a big green salad. And a couple old(er) bottles of wine. Baked apples for dessert. Everyone ate well, grinned a lot, and the whole thing was quite festive. If it sounds interesting I'll share the cassoulet recipe (it expands easily).

michael


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,worker
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 07:16 PM

Dinner for 8. We had 6 last night including ourselves. We served baked salmon fillets, asparagus, baby new potatoes, served with various flatbreads and olives. It didn't take much labor in preparation and the results were successful for all.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Rapparee
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 07:30 PM

Fresh Copper River King salmon (well, as fresh as possible) brushed with melted butter and dill, broiled and with fresh lemon juice squeezed on top just a few minutes before it's ready to serve. If you don't have King salmon, use what you have, but it's got to be wild caught.

Put some mayo in a small pan and heat it after stirring in some sweet curry. Be careful, since you want to release the curry flavor but not make the mayo seperate. Serve on steamed fresh aspargus.

Small red potatoes, washed, pricked all over, rolled in olive oil and sea salt, then microwaved or baked.

For dessert, fresh blackberries over angel food cake, topped with creme fraiche.

Enjoy with a good wine -- Thunderbird, Ripple, Boone's Farm....


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: bobad
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 07:33 PM

I can't find Ripple anywhere.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,worker
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 07:35 PM

I never looked for them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Rapparee
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 07:43 PM

Doesn't matter, as long as it's got a screw top and costs less than USD 2.00 per liter.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,Bardan
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 08:31 PM

mmmm. Food. I have to say I really miss Italy. The oil, the vegetables, the proper bisteche, the veal, the porcini, the bread, the pizze, the ham, the cheese... *stares vacantly and dribbles*.

I made a nice meal by accident a while back. The recipe's slightly approximate, but it's turned out nice a few times since.
I marinaded some tuna steaks in lemon juice, olive oil, pepper and copious ammounts of fresh coriander and stuck em on the barbecue. Then no-one bloody well turned up for ages. I stuck em in one of those aluminium trays, like the ones chinese takeaways come in only bigger and chucked in the marinade so they wouldn't completely dry out or burn. The marinade started to dry up so I kept adding wine and water. Still no-one came and they cooked so much they started to fall apart, to I broke em up and took the bones away and added the rice which I was originally going to serve them on. Turned out lovely when everyone finally arrived over an hour after they were meant to. (They were family so I forgave them.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 10:26 PM

Mr. Redux:

Cassoulet! Ah yes!!! I'd love to get your recipe. I used to have it a long time ago on a fairly regular basis and loved it. I'd forgotten all about it until I went to a dinner of soul food cooking, and someone brought a baked lima bean dish that tasted much like cassoulet.

One thing that I've been doing these last three years is revising old recipes to cut down on sugar and cholesterol. Some things work better than others. I've reached the point where my wife actually seems to prefer my spaghetti & meatballs made with whole grain spaghetti, and meatballs made of a mixture of turkey sausage and ground turkey. I've converted all of my pasta dishes that way, and while some (like baked ziti) don't measure up, at least I don't feel like I need to serve them on a tombstone, like the pasta I used to make.

A couple of weeks ago, I picked up a soup and casserole cook book that has a recipe for cassoulet in it. The italian sausage and bacon give it much of it's flavor, and I'm sceptical how it will taste substituting turkey sausage and turkey bacon. I doubt that it will be anywhere near as good, but I'm going to give it a shot. The good news is that these last three years, I've kept my weight 30 pounds below where it was for many years, my energy level is high, for a 71 year old, and my cholesterol and blood sugar are good without medication, even though I am diabetic. Whatever taste I sacrifice in cooking is more than made up for with my greater taste for living.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Bee
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 11:30 PM

Jerry, besides the oily fats and red meat content, the flavour is likely in the spicing of the sausage. I would try to figure out what spices and herbs are in your favourite sausage, and add them to your recipe. Sometimes a subtle savoury (as opposed to sweet) flavour comes from unexpected sources; cinnamon, nutmeg, anise, chocolate are good examples.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 26 Mar 07 - 11:42 PM

Jerry,

many of those sausages added to dishes often have various types (sweet, heat) of chili spicings in them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: mrdux
Date: 27 Mar 07 - 01:43 AM

Jerry --

For some friends who eat poultry but no meat-of-the-hoof, I tweaked my usual recipe with a garlic chicken sausage made by my local butcher shop and poultry parts instead of pork sausage and parts. Not quite the same -- and, being less fatty, poultry sausage doesn't take as well to long cooking as pork sausage -- but not bad at all. I haven't tried it but my guess is that turkey sausage will do better than chicken. I'll get you my main recipe -- the all-poultry version I still have to write down.

michael


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Barry Finn
Date: 27 Mar 07 - 02:57 AM

Oh, I have some fresh trout in the fridge that I was gonna cook up for supper tomorrow night. But I think I may cook it as a late night snack, now, after reading through this thread. Yum!

Barry


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Wordsmith
Date: 27 Mar 07 - 03:44 AM

I came quite late to cooking, since my mother never liked cooking, although she was decent at it. She never shared her recipes, either. I started out baking, and little by little, picked up things on my own. Better Homes and Gardens, Good Housekeeping, McCall's...these were where my first recipes originated. My tastes expanded, more than my waistline, over the years...as did my fear of cooking diminish. But I have loads of horror stories as well. College roommates. Wrong ingredients. Oven not quite right. And so on.

I now feel quite secure in my ability...but am always open to new ideas, recipes, tastes. I will credit Julia...I adored her, though I thought her heyday recipes were too elaborate...I'm not that interested in eight-hour prep time, either, any more. I refer to my falling apart, Joy of Cooking, frequently still, as much for the recipes tucked inside as well as the great advice within. I haven't seen or bought the newest edition, yet. Don't have a Cuisinart...actually want a Kitchaid.

I watch PBS for their frequent cooking shows. I especially like a short program, called Posh Nosh, that is charmingly citric. I also have the complete DVD collection of the former BBC show: Chef! And, after reading through this thread, I, too, am hungry, and would've loved to have been at the English dinner described in luscious details.

BTW, Scoville, I'm not sure if this was intentional or not, but your link to Texas Cooking took me to Amazon.com and a group called Luscious Jackson. It provided me with a little after-dinner music from their album: "Fever In Fever Out." I prefer Peggy Lee for my "Fever," although this group was interesting. Do you get a commission? ;D


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,Cats
Date: 27 Mar 07 - 04:08 AM

I have to thank MMario for putting me on to The Accomplisht Cooke. I bought it and have worked out what some of the recipes are and have made loads from it. Thanks MMario.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: autolycus
Date: 27 Mar 07 - 11:02 AM

I went to a de-cluttering workshop,where the thingy doing it asked if we had lots of Cookbooks. She said we could chuck them because all recipes are on the net.


Sorry - on the Net (Web?)





    I.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Bee
Date: 27 Mar 07 - 11:19 AM

Autolycus - she's nuts. There are lots of recipes on the internet, but you won't find the one you're looking for!


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: MMario
Date: 27 Mar 07 - 11:23 AM

Not to mention - you never, ever, ever throw out a book. Not while it's still has legible print.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 27 Mar 07 - 11:36 AM

Jerry, I think if you put paprika in your cassoulet, especially smoked paprika, you'd get some of that lovely savoury flavour that comes from the inclusion of nice French saudsages (I always put chorizo in mine). And don't underestimate the power of a really good stock!


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 27 Mar 07 - 10:35 PM

... especialy among Bulls and Bears...


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Scoville
Date: 28 Mar 07 - 10:45 AM

Yeah, my mom was going to quit writing out recipes because they "Were all on the Web", but of course we don't have a computer in the kitchen and print-outs smear if you spill ingredients on them.

I'll keep my cookbooks, and I write out my own recipes in Sharpie so they don't smudge.

* * * * *

Ah, crap--blew the link. I was trying to explain to a friend how bad my ex-boyfriends taste was in music. Try this:

Texas Cooking.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,maire-aine
Date: 28 Mar 07 - 12:39 PM

I don't know about in cassoulet, but I have a sauerkraut dish that works well with Butterball turkey kielbasa.

m


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 28 Mar 07 - 12:44 PM

Heyyyyy forget cooking...just take me to my favourite 'Sushi' restaurant in Montmartre, Paris....mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 28 Mar 07 - 04:09 PM

Thanks for the suggestions on the Cassoulet. The Turkey Kilbasa is an especially good idea. Thanks for the ideas about spices, too... I'll see what I can whip up, based on mrdux's recipe.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Mrrzy
Date: 29 Mar 07 - 01:06 PM

OK - do you get hungry going to the Aquarium because of all the great seafood? How about the zoo - I remember going through an Endangered Species wing with one of my sibs who'd lived in Africa as an adult - and kept hearing Oh, I've eaten that - really upset some of the mommies and daddies around!
I am a great top-of-stove cook. I am a lousy baker unless it's a very good recipe. I am learning to grill and barbecue. But baking is science and stovetop cooking is art, I think!


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: RangerSteve
Date: 29 Mar 07 - 06:53 PM

My mom grew up with the idea that vegetables should be cooked until they a minute away from turning into mush. As a result, I hated most cooked veggies. Corn and beets were an exception. It seems you can't ruin them. Otherwise she was a good cook. A friend of mine introduced me to steamed veggies, and now I can eat things that I couldn't stand as a kid. Most of my recipes come from fund-raising cookbooks, the kind put out by fire departments, schools, churches, etc. No nouvelle cuisine, exotic ingredients, just good home cooking.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 29 Mar 07 - 06:59 PM

For baking you need to measure carefully - other types of cooking can work fine with 'a pinch of this, a dab of that'.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: mrdux
Date: 30 Mar 07 - 12:58 AM

At the beginning of this thread (cool thread, by the way), Chanteyranger mentioned favorite food writers. I also like Claudia Roden and Paula Wolfert (especially her Cooking of South-West France).

At least at this moment, my two favorite food writers are Elizabeth David and M.F.K. Fisher. Both were impeccable and elegant writers, both were insightful essayists, both lived into their eighties, both passed away in 1992. Elizabeth David was more the scholar, the ethnographer, the collector of what and how people eat. Her Cooking of Provincial France and Italian Food are superb, as are any of her collections of essays.

M.F.K. Fisher believed that "eating well was one of the arts of life," and her writing centers on food as a part of living, with fascinating forays into natural history, culture, and philosophy. But it's her ability to express the sensual nature of food and eating that's the most striking to me. Here's an excerpt (and sorry for the long-ish cut-n-paste, but I could resist)("Al" is her first husband)


"...It was then that I discovered little dried sections of tangerine. My pleasure in them is subtle and voluptuous and quite inexplicable. I can only write how they are prepared.

"In the morning, in the soft sultry chamber, sit in the window peeling tangerines, three or four. Peel them gently; do not bruise them, as you watch soldiers pour past and past the corner and over the canal towards the watched Rhine. Separate each plump little pregnant crescent. If you find the Kiss, the secret section, save it for Al.

"Listen to the chambermaid thumping up the pillows, and murmur encouragement to her thick Alsatian tales of l'intérieure. That is Paris, the interior, Paris or anywhere west of Strasbourg or maybe the Vosges. While she mutters of seduction and French bicyclists who ride more than wheels, tear delicately from the soft pile of sections each velvet string. You know those white pulpy strings that hold tangerines into their skins? Tear them off. Be careful. Take yesterday's paper (when we were in Strasbourg L'Ami du Peuple was best, because when it got hot the ink stayed on it) and spread it on top of the radiator. The maid has gone, of course - it might be hard to ignore her belligerent Alsatian glare of astonishment.

"After you have put the pieces of tangerine on the paper on the hot radiator, it is best to forget about them. Al comes home, you go to a long noon dinner in the brown dining-room, afterwards maybe you have a little nip of quetsch from the bottle on the armoire. Finally he goes. You are sorry, but -

"On the radiator the sections of tangerines have grown even plumper, hot and full. You carry them to the window, pull it open, and leave them for a few minutes on the packed snow of the sill. They are ready.

"All afternoon you can sit, then, looking down on the corner. Afternoon papers are delivered to the kiosk. Children come home from school just as three lovely whores mince smartly into the pension's chic tearoom. A basketful of Dutch tulips stations itself by the tram-stop, ready to tempt tired clerks at six o'clock. Finally the soldiers stump back from the Rhine. It is dark.

"The sections of the tangerine are gone, and I cannot tell you why they are so magical. Perhaps it is that little shell, thin as one layer of enamel on a Chinese bowl, that crackles so tinily, so ultimately under your teeth. Or the rush of cold pulp just after it. Or the perfume. I cannot tell.

"There must be someone, though, who understands what I mean. Probably everyone does, because of his own secret eatings."

"Borderlands," Serve It Forth (1937)


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Wordsmith
Date: 30 Mar 07 - 02:00 AM

Wow, I really liked that, mrdux. I had a roommate from college who I later lived with in a house with her and her husband, also a college mate, and two other men. No, it was not a commune...my friends rented out the rooms to pay for overhead, etc. It's a long story. The reason I brought it up was because she was always waxing poetic about M.F.K. Fisher, and I was too busy to borrow any of her books to check Fisher out. Now, eons later, I regret that, especially since my local library has none of her books. I now know what the fuss was all about.

Thanks, Scoville, that new link works perfectly. I was just salivating over the pictures alone.

I'm with RangerSteve, I steam almost all of my veggies now, and what a difference! I even steam my ears of corn. I grew up mostly on canned with an occasional frozen. I prefer the latter in a pinch, but I tend to have mostly fresh, now.

I now make my own soup from scratch, and here's a hint for those who do. Caramelize...an overused verb these days on cooking shows, but absolutely correct...your vegetables, I usually do them separately and put them in a bowl, while I do the rest, before you put them back in the pot and add your stock. I can't tell you what a difference that makes. Yes, it's more work, but if you look at it as a bonus for yourself and all who eat your finished product, you will be well-rewarded and willing to do it. It keeps the veggies from getting soggy, too. I was surprised to read where most chefs, in the city, don't use celery much. When you caramelize it, it loses its concentrated essence that tends to overwhelm the other vegetables. Anyway, hope that helps.

I also agree that baking is more of a precision making event, but I really do believe that stovetop cooking is too to some extent, hence the caramelization aspect I spoke of. It does change the end result.

I also switched to kosher (more coarse) salt once I read that major restaurant chefs switched to keep the line cooks from oversalting. It helps if you salt each vegetable when you're working on a soup, e.g., to help sweat the produce. But just a pinch or two. It takes more coarse salt than regular to spoil a dish...that's why the switch. You can rarely miss if you undersalt. My roommate I spoke of once ruined a dish that took all day to make by oversalting, and it was for a dinner party. When we all sat down that night, and went to take the first bite, the faces we made...while trying not to hurt her feelings. Trooper that she was, she immediately forbade us from eating further and whipped an alternative meal up while we sipped on the wine. We offered our help, but she declined. Good meal, good friends.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Wordsmith
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 04:17 AM

I apologize for the impromptu cooking lesson...I forgot I was on a site with grownups. I'm usually the elder stateswoman who get to explain things in detail.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Scoville
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 12:41 PM

Cayman Net News: Johnnycake, rescued from the ashes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,maire-aine
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 01:23 PM

I read this about over-salting:

If you accidentally over-salt a dish while it's still cooking, drop
in a peeled potato and it will absorb the excess salt for an instant
"fix-me-up."

Has anybody ever tried this? did it work?

Maryanne


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Bee
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 01:29 PM

I have a better solution: in most cases, don't add salt until after the dish is cooked. Stews and soups don't need the salt cooked in, neither do roast, grilled, or fried meats. Any commercial sauces you add already have salt in (and often sugar as well). In fact, some raw 'fresh' meats and chicken already have salt added - read packaging carefully.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: bobad
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 01:32 PM

There's a discussion on this topic here, it seems there are varying opinions on that question. My own thinking is that the potato will absorb as much salt as is in the water it absorbs, which is not too much.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Scoville
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 01:57 PM

I've heard the potato thing doesn't really work. Logically, it doesn't make sense to me, but I agree with Bee that it's probably more sensible to simply not salt food until it's done. We don't salt anything and let the person eating it salt to his/her taste.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Dave'sWife
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 04:30 PM

I am an unabashed foodie as well.   Cooking for the family largely fell to me as a teen when my Mum went back to work and my father who was retired disabled from law enforcement also went back to work in a new field. It amazed me how I could make things my mother said my Dad would never eat and he would eat them because I made them. he he- Daddy's little girl.

It was good experience and I picked up a lot both from women in the family and from cookbooks. When I went to college, I took a job as an apprentice cook to the head cook of a leading caterer in Albany NY. I still make some of his signature dishes such as Sesame fried (I do oven baked) chicken, Asian Cole Slaw, Onion tart, Crab and Cavier spread and others.

My husband is very good at making Japanese homestyle cooked meals. In adition, he's an adventurous eater so I can get away wit thrying just about anything and he'll eat it. I metnioned in another thread that sunday I made Peruvian chicken with plums. I had a box of plums (fruit of the month club from his boss) going to waste and figured I could peel them up and make dinner with them. What I have leftover I used to make a plum vinegarette which came out nicely. I had soooo much Chicken with plums that I brought some of the leftovers to my doctors office today for their lunch. My nurse there has been bugging me to bring in a dish from a recipe I had featured on AOL but I brought her this instead!

So, three cheers to this thread. Food is wonderful and good food is even better


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Scoville
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 04:50 PM

My mother got an Eritrean cookbook somewhere and made up her own berbere. We've tried it with beef, pork, and chicken (pork and chicken are great, beef is sort of too strong) but discovered that it goes best with cubes of Indian paneer. (We don't make it as hot as a real Eritrean would, either, but oh, well. A little goes a long way.) You make a stew of tomatoes, onions, berbere, and protein of choice. It would probably be great with shrimp or something, too.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Bee
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 05:04 PM

I gotta share this remembered recipe, from an old but adventurous cookbook , because it tastes really good.

Pollo Pina (I think)

One cut up chicken: brown both sides in big cast iron skillet (or whatever pot you got, eh?). Add one fresh skinned and seeded crushed tomato, one quarter cup finely grated onion, juice of two small fresh limes, one half cup crushed fine pineapple, one tablespoon brown sugar (demerara is nicest), one teaspoon current jelly (trust me:leaving this out changes the flavour), one quarter cup dark rum. Simmer til chicken is very tender, serve with rice drizzled with pan juices.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 06:35 PM

In South America, Coca Cola is sometimes added to stewed chicken dishes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,HiLo
Date: 05 Apr 07 - 10:06 AM

I just a hirshmy called a racelette, looks interesting but I've no idea what to do with it. Anyone have any suggestions.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Scoville
Date: 05 Apr 07 - 10:20 AM

In the Southern U.S., Dr. Pepper is sometimes added to barbecue, and chickens are cooked on the grill with cans of beer shoved into their body cavities, which steams them from the inside out and makes them super-tender. They also taste vaguely of beer, but not in a bad way.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,Hi Lo
Date: 05 Apr 07 - 12:18 PM

I do the chicken beer can thing quite often but I drink thwe beer and half fill the can with red wine and garlic..very good indeed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Scoville
Date: 05 Apr 07 - 12:58 PM

Mmmm, that does sound good.

I saw some sort of fancy cone thing at one of those overpriced kitchen place at the mall that was supposed to do exactly the same thing as the beer can. Ha ha!


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Dave'sWife
Date: 05 Apr 07 - 03:57 PM

Seeing as Easter is coming up, I'm gonna post a favorite easter recipe I posted 2 years ago in another thread. Enjoy:


>>>This is one of my favorite recipes even though it's not from my own family. I got it from a next-door neighbor when I was growing up. This is a very traditional Italian-American easter Treat!

Nana's Italian Easter Rice-Ricotta Pie

INGREDIENTS for Filling:

1/2 c. dry rice (short grain, Arborio works best)
1 c. water
1/2 qt. milk or heavy cream
3/4 c. super fine sugar (or castor sugar for us Irish people)
1/2 lb. ricotta cheese (not low fat, low fat won't taste proper)
3 egg yolks, lightly beaten
1 tsp. cinnamon
Pinch Nutmeg
1 Tsp of Sambuca Liqueor..or more..depending on taste (can be omitted and replaced with Vanilla Extract)
1/4 c. candied Citron (can be found in most stores) (can be omitted and replaced with chopped cherries)
Grated orange Zest to taste..probably a teaspoon or..half tsp Orange zest, half tsp Lemon Zest. Bergomot zest ok too
(some people put mini choloclate chips in as well)

CRUST: (or use your fave cold pastry recipe)
3 1/2 c. flour
1/2 c. vegetable shortening or lard
3/4 c. sugar
1/4 c. water

Boil rice and 1 cup water for 10 minutes; drain, then add hot milk/cream. Cook 15 minutes and cool. Stir in 3/4 cup sugar, ricotta cheese, egg yolks, cinnamon, nutmeg, sambuca, citron fruit and citrus rinds; mix together.

Crust: Cut shortening into flour; add sugar, 1/4 cup water to form stiff dough. Roll dough (thinly) and line one 9 inch pie pan (you will have enough dough for 2).

Pour rice mixture into dough. Roll out remaining dough (thick), cut into 1 inch strips and place on top of pie. Brown at 450 degrees, then reduce heat to 350 degrees for 40 minutes to cook until pie filling is firm and jiggles a bit. Cool at least 40 minutes. Can be served warm or cold. Top with Vanilla Iceream if desired.

Me..I prefer no Pastry strips on top of my Easter Pie. Also..I like mine backed in a Square Pie Dish for easy cutting of servings.

Here in the States, Ricotta cheese often comes in 15 ounce containers for some reason. I have been known to dump the whole 15 ounces in this recipe, but if you do that, you must add at least one more egg yolk to make it come out properly. Another option is to simply double the recipe and use the 15 ounce container all up. Why make one when you can make 2? Works for me.

Try this one this year instead of Hot Cross Buns or..make 'em both!<<<<

Another way to make this is tostart with a good ricotta cheesecake recipe and then just add some cooked arborio rice and the flavorings. If you have a good recipe for ricotta cheesecake that never fails, you might prefer this method. Another change is to crush cannoli shells for the crust, mix with melted butter and a few tablespoons of flour and then bake that for 10 minutes before pouring filling in. That comes out REALLY yummy!


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: mrdux
Date: 06 Apr 07 - 02:06 AM

I just a hirshmy called a racelette, looks interesting but I've no idea what to do with it. Anyone have any suggestions.

HiLo --

Do you mean raclette? If so, it's a cheese from the Swiss and French Alps. It comes as a largish -- maybe 15 pounds? -- round wheel and traditionally it's put in front of an open fire where it slowly melts; the melted parts are scraped off ("raclette" comes from the French word for scrape) and served with boiled potatoes, onions, pickles, etc. Very tasty. And very popular in Switzerland and alpine France. There's a table-top device -- i've seen it called a raclette machine or raclette grill -- that's designed for melting individual servings of cheese in little trays or pans that get put under a heating element. There's even a Swiss Raclette Association if you're interested.

On the other hand, if you don't mean raclette, well, then, uh... i dunno.

michael


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Dave'sWife
Date: 06 Apr 07 - 02:56 AM

That Raclette association is wanting to sell you their raclette cooking set!


Raclette Association product

BTW _ Emeril lagasse made easter pie tonight and made it different than my recipe. instead of water for the crust, he used 2 eggs and some vanilla and substited some lard for part of the butter. For the filling, he skipped the rice, used plenty of ricotta, added shaved choclate and left out the liquor and citreon. He DID make a double crust though. I think I'll have to try his recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Wordsmith
Date: 06 Apr 07 - 03:40 AM

Thanks for all the tips and yummy recipes. I've been wanting to make a ricotta pie for some time, but totally forgot about it. I'll have to try your recipe, Dave's Wife.

As for the potato to desalinate? Never tried it. but I did hear that vinegar might work...however, I never had to nerve to try, either...all I could picture was an oversalted dish that now tasted sour, too. I now use salt sparingly, with the same idea of letting people spice to taste. Someone, I think it was Lydia Bastianich, said to check what your recipe calls for and then put it in a separate little dish and when it's gone, that's it...e.g., a tsp. Makes sense.

I've also heard about Cola, but not Dr. Pepper. On the beer thing, though, do you actually insert the can itself inside the chicken? Obviously with the top popped. I have used beer to make Flemish Pot Roast...makes a nice gravy. Thanks for the links, too. Happy Easter and Bon Appetit!


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,HiLo
Date: 06 Apr 07 - 08:10 AM

Thanks, I do know about the cheese, but I think the thing I have is for cooking it in. I only assume that because it has the same name as the cheese. It has three wee pans that go under a broiler, but surely it must have uses other than cooking cheese! Does it ?


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: mrdux
Date: 06 Apr 07 - 02:28 PM

re: raclette

From what I've read, machines like that were devised for the one narrow purpose. For other uses, I'd think it would depend on how wee the trays are and how hot the heating element gets. My first thought is that if the thing gets hot enough, maybe you could use it to heat up or brown -- or melt cheese on top of -- individual tapas or other appetizers, maybe? something like a thin slice of toasted baguette, topped with a thin slice of tomato, a basil leaf and a thin slice of romano cheese (small enough to fit, of course) and run it through the machine. Or, brush the tray with olive oil, preheat it and pour in a little beaten egg, pop the tray in until the egg is set and then top the egg with some kind of filling, fold it or roll it and you have some very small omelets. . .

michael


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Scoville
Date: 06 Apr 07 - 02:35 PM

You open a can of beer, drink about half, and shove the can into the chicken. Then you sit the chicken upright on a covered grill and cook until done. It steams from the inside out.

Looks kind of uncomfortable, really.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,Dani
Date: 06 Apr 07 - 05:41 PM

Potato trick definitely works. I've used it many times over the years. Whole or half, peeled, has to cook in the soup/stew for a while.

Glad to know who all you other foodies are ; ) I don't like to muck up the music here with food, but I'll take advantage now that you've started the thread.

Dani


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Wordsmith
Date: 07 Apr 07 - 03:28 AM

Thanks, Scoville, that picture says oodles...ouch! I gather you have to buy the rack, too, then? I put the site in my favorites file for when I get time to research it. Looks like a launching pad: Caution: Chicken Launching at 6! Great thread! Happy Easter to one and all, before I leave. ;D


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,Bardan
Date: 10 Apr 07 - 04:46 PM

HiLo

Yeah, raclette machines are kind of fiddly but good fun for a dinner party kind of thing if you've got time. You stick a load of ingredients out. (I remember pre-cooked potatoes, ham, pickled onions, pretty much what someone else mentioned earlier as traditional acompaniments.) Everyone gets a tray, loads it up with ingredients, sticks some raclette cheese on top and browns it in the machine. Repeat till satisfied. I'm sure you could vary the ingredients and the cheese if you wanted to. It does take quite a while to really eat your fill though. Those trays aren't huge. You *could* have two on the go at once I spose, but then you'd need a great big machine with lots of trays, and you could probably do something similar in big batches under a normal grill.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 10 Apr 07 - 07:32 PM

I had promised to post the Cowboy Cake recipe in appreciation for all the suggestions and the cassoulet recipe. The trick was finding it. It was in a cookbook of my favorite recipes of my Mom's, and when we remodeled the basement, everything got moved around. Now that I've found it, here it is.

COWBOY CAKE

3/4 cup white sugar
1/3 cup dark brown sugar
1/2 cup light brown sugar
3 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup (2 sticks) butter or margerine
1 egg, large (beaten)
1 1/2 cups buttermilk
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon cinammon

Mix together sugars, flour, baking powder and baking soda. Cut in butter as with pie crust. Save out 1 cup of this mixture. To remaining mixture add egg, buttermilk and vanilla, mixing until ingredients are moist. Pour mixture into greased 9 x 13 pan.

Mix cinnamon with reserved flour mixture. Sprinkle over batter. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes, or until done.

As I may have mentioned, I swapped a perfectly good, unopened cassette of Handful Of Songs for this recipe. A woman brought a plate of cake to be sold during intermission at the Sounding Board in Hartford, CT. where I was doing a concert. I bought half the plate, I think.

Don't ask me why it's called Cowboy Cake, because I don't know. I find it hard to believe that the average cowpoke carried all this stuff in his saddle bag..

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,Scoville at dad's
Date: 10 Apr 07 - 08:07 PM

Or you prop it up with empty beer cans. It doesn't really matter as long as the beer doesn't spill out.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: mrdux
Date: 11 Apr 07 - 01:26 AM

Jerry --

Thanks. I've been curious since you mentioned it.

So here's a question: both my wife and mother-in-law are gluten intolerant. . . anyone have any thoughts on how this might work with a gluten-free flour? For that matter, any suggestions on gluten-free flours, since there seem to be a raft of them out there?

Thanks.

michael (of the cassoulet recipe)


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: MMario
Date: 11 Apr 07 - 08:15 AM

with a gluten free flour it would be much heavier. Possibly could be done if you cut down on the buttermilk by 1/2 cup, add two eggs (for a total of three) and whip the whites of the eggs, folding them into the batter.


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Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat foodies thread
From: GUEST,maire-aine
Date: 11 Apr 07 - 10:30 AM

My mother was gluten-intolerant too. I usually used rice flour, altho only for thickening gravy/soups and to make the struesel topping for apple crisp. I've never tried real baking (like muffins or such) with it. I have some recipes at home-- I'll look for them.

Maryanne


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